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AUGUST 2016 www.esemag.com

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CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

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CONTENTS

AUGUST 2016 • Vol. 29 No. 4 • ISSN-0835-605X

18

DEPARTMENTS 66 69 69 73

Environmental News Professional Cards Ad Index

COMING IN OUR

FEATURES 6 8 12 14 16 18 22 28 33

Product Showcase

OCTOBER 2016 ISSUE SPECIAL CONFERENCE EDITION

Adversity brings out the best in infrastructure design and management What to do when your drinking water reservoir springs a leak Water reuse essential for new multi-use development projects Properly running HVAC system helps protect Jewish Museum artifacts Redesigned grinder solves London’s wet wipe problem Massive sewer bypass project completed under Canada’s busiest airport How do aggregate operations affect groundwater levels and wetlands?

This issue will offer our 47,000 readers across Canada a strong and diverse range of articles, plus a special section on:

Need for plastics removal forces WWTP to upgrade its bar screens

EDITORIAL FOCUS:

Remediating chlorinated solvents at a former dry cleaning facility

48

WATER AND WASTEWATER PLANT EFFICIENCY

50

FEATURED TOPICS:

• • • •

SPECIAL SECTION

BONUS CIRCULATION AT:

CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

• • • • • • • •

Helping local governments prepare financially for climate change Aquifer storage and recovery more important to stabilize water supplies Increased frequency of algal blooms challenges drinking water systems Biological hydrolysis can help achieve energy neutral wastewater treatment Keeping industry competitive is a vital part of any carbon cap-and-trade program Developing new stormwater infrastructure funding and optimization plans Complete stormwater system modelling assesses rainfall event risks

Ad Booking Deadline: September 5, 2016

Contact us to reserve your ad space.

ES&E’S ANNUAL GUIDE

4 | August 2016

IN PRINT

ONLINE

TO GOVERNMENT, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS 56 Associations 60 Government Agencies 65 Colleges and Universities

STAY CONNECTED

Water Environment Federation (WEFTEC) Eastern Ontario Water Works Association Canadian Waste & Recycling Expo National Drinking Water Conference South Central Ontario Waterworks Western Canada Water Northern Territories Water and Waste Association World Water–Tech North America – Toronto

MOBILE

T: 905-727-4666 TF: 1-888-254-8769

esemag.com ▼

34 38 40 44 48 50 52

Wastewater treatment and collection systems Stormwater management Drinking water supply, treatment and distribution systems Disinfection and filtration

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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EDITORIAL COMMENT BY STEVE DAVEY

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER STEVE DAVEY steve@esemag.com MANAGING EDITOR PETER DAVEY peter@esemag.com SALES DIRECTOR PENNY DAVEY penny@esemag.com SALES REPRESENTATIVE

DENISE SIMPSON denise@esemag.com

ACCOUNTING SANDRA DAVEY sandra@esemag.com CIRCULATION MANAGER DARLANN PASSFIELD darlann@esemag.com DESIGN & PRODUCTION MARK TZERELSHTEIN markintoshdesign.com

TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD Archis Ambulkar, Jones and Henry Engineers, Ltd. Gary Burrows, City of London Jim Bishop, Consulting Chemist, Ontario Patrick Coleman, Black & Veatch Bill De Angelis, City of Toronto Mohammed Elenany, Urban Systems William Fernandes, City of Toronto Marie Meunier, John Meunier Inc., Québec Tony Petrucci, Stantec, Markham

Environmental Science & Engineering is a bi-monthly business publication of Environmental Science & Engineering Publications Inc. An all Canadian publication, ES&E provides authoritative editorial coverage of Canada’s municipal and industrial environmental control systems and drinking water treatment and distribution. Readers include consulting engineers, industrial plant managers and engineers, key municipal, provincial and federal environmental officials, water and wastewater plant operators and contractors. Information contained in ES&E has been compiled from sources believed to be correct. ES&E cannot be responsible for the accuracy of articles or other editorial matter. Articles in this magazine are intended to provide information rather than give legal or other professional advice. Articles being submitted for review should be emailed to steve@esemag.com. Canadian Publications Mail Sales Second Class Mail Product Agreement No. 40065446 Registration No. 7750 Undeliverable copies, advertising space orders, copy, artwork, proofs, etc., should be sent to: Environmental Science & Engineering, 220 Industrial Pkwy. S., Unit 30, Aurora, Ontario, Canada, L4G 3V6, Tel: (905)727-4666, Fax: (905) 841-7271, Web site: www.esemag.com

A Supporting Publication of

Adversity will bring out the best in infrastructure design and management

S

ir Isaac Newton first presented his three laws of motion in the “Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis” in 1686. His first law states that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force. Publishers are no exception to this law in that we often resist change for change sake. However, you will notice that after many years, we have at last changed the look of our articles. We hope you like it. Action or in-action on climate change is a social, political and economic situation that Newton’s first law might also describe. Some feel inaction is the appropriate response. Increasingly though many are taking action. For example, the government of Canada is taking action on climate change at home and abroad. Environment and Climate Change Minister, Catherine McKenna, recently wrapped up a series of UN meetings in Vienna, where Canada pushed for international action to phase down climate-warming hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as quickly as possible. Canada is also actively addressing HFCs internally. So far in 2016, the government has finalized measures to increase recovery, recycling and destruction of them from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. It established a regulatory permitting and reporting process for HFCs and is developing measures to phase them out and ban a variety of products that contain them. This issue features a special section on climate change and resilient infrastructure design. In one article, author Eric Dunford highlights a recent report that says the economic impact of climate change in Canada could reach between $21- $43 billion per year by 2050. His article “Helping Local Governments Prepare Financially for Climate Change” presents options that communities of all sizes can consider to cope with this tremendous challenge. In another article, author Stanley States writes that the increasing frequency and intensity of hazardous algal blooms in drinking water sources may be related to global warming. This is of great concern for water providers as such blooms negatively affect the health of people and animals that consume or have other exposure to these waters. While monitoring methods and drinking water treatment approaches have been established, the ultimate solution for dealing with the problem rests with control of their formation in the first place. From carbon trading regimes to extreme weather events, such as floods, fires and droughts, the impact of climate change is being felt everywhere. Doing nothing is no longer an option. But there is no question in my mind that the water, wastewater and environmental protection sectors will rise up to meet the challenge of these adversities. Steve Davey is editor and publisher of ES&E Magazine. Email: steve@esemag.com

6 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


DRINKING WATER

What to do when your drinking water reservoir springs a leak By Rika Law and Wayne Stiver

P

eterborough Utilities Commission (PUC) owns and operates the Peterborough Water Treatment Plant (WTP), which consists of a conventional filtration system, a chlorine contact tank and clearwell. Given that the chlorine contact tank and the clearwell were constructed in the 1920s, and that there was no operational redundancy for the chlorine contact tank, a new chlorine contact tank and clearwell had to be added. The PUC was also aware that the existing reservoir was leaking. However, they couldn’t quantify or determine the location and extent of the leak. Once the new reservoir was constructed, the existing reservoir could be taken out of service for permanent repairs of the leaks. The project was designed so that, when both the new and existing reservoirs are constructed or repaired, they can operate in parallel, providing supply security, flexibility in operation, and additional storage.

EXISTING RESERVOIR LEAK AND SHUTDOWN

Critical piping connection between the new chlorine contact tank and clearwell system and the existing distribution network. 8 | August 2016

Excavation was underway for the new chlorine contact tank and clearwell, some distance from the existing chlorine contact tank and clearwell. Slope protection was in place and all seemed well on October 3, 2014. But, by October 6, the excavation site turned into a lake, as the existing reservoir developed a sizeable leak and flooded the site. The PUC quickly switched the Peterborough WTP to bypass mode. This involved prechlorination at the beginning of the WTP to achieve the required disinfection. Treated water then went through a bypass pipe in the chlorine contact tank into the distribution system. This allowed PUC to drain down the existing chlorine contact tank and clearwell. Once this was done, assessment of the leak and repair plans could start. continued overleaf...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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DRINKING WATER R.V. Anderson Associates Limited (RVA) structural staff observed that numerous cracks along the floor of the reservoir in both cells allowed water to leak. The cracks were not new, but the water had found a new path of least resistance when the adjacent site was excavated. It was suspected that the water made channels/voids underneath the floor slab and that these would also need to be addressed. Based on the structural investigation, the following emergency repairs were recommended by RVA: • Polyurethane injection (with NSF-61 approved material for potable water application) for all observed floor cracks; • Pressure grouting of the voids underneath the floor slab; • Potable water dive into the operational inlet and effluent chambers of the existing reservoir to try to patch up cracks at the floor/wall interface. This plan would allow the existing chlorine contact tank and clearwell to be put back into service as soon as possible. However, several issues complicated and hindered the emergency repairs, including: frigid winter temperatures; leaks from the operating inlet and effluent chambers (which were in use for the bypass operations); and, leaks from the isolating sluice gates and valves.

CHALLENGES, STRATEGY AND LESSONS LEARNED

There were several things that were done to prepare for this possible leak. PUC had the foresight to implement construction of the new reservoir, and to undertake permanent repairs to the existing one, prior to the major leak event. They knew that the reservoir was leaking, but were not able to quantify it because they could not stop the use of the existing chlorine contact tank and clearwell without going on emergency bypass operations. PUC had budgeted for the two projects in order to address the leaking existing reservoir issue and the lack of redundancy in their chlorine contact tank. During the unexpected, emergency shutdown of the existing chlorine contact tank, PUC’s operations staff was also able to maintain the supply of potable water. PUC operated the WTP with prechlorination at the beginning of the conventional filtration system, and emergency bypass of the chlorine contact tank and clearwell 10 | August 2016

LESSONS LEARNED • Cultivate a cooperative environment between parties • Update and inform key stakeholders • Know your water system’s limits, capabilities and redundancies.

BEFORE LEAK

AFTER LEAK

for five months. Monitoring for water quality, including trihalomethanes, was done frequently. PUC was proactive and informed the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change of the emergency situation and maintained good relations with them. Lessons learned from this unexpected turn of events included: • Cultivation of a cooperative environment amongst all parties (client, consultant, contractor, approval agencies, etc.) is important throughout the project, but especially when trouble arises; • Updating and informing key stakeholders of the issue throughout the process helps to keep the cooperative spirit; • Knowledge of the water system, its limits, capabilities, and redundancies/ contingencies, is necessary for troubleshooting under extreme circumstances.

CONNECTING THE NEW SYSTEM

Plant operators planned for a 36-hour

window to perform a critical piping connection between the new chlorine contact tank and clearwell system and the existing distribution network. The situation was complicated due to: space constraints; night-time work; installation of new tee between two existing fixed points; installation of several large 1,200 mm valves and pipe pieces; and, “live” water system at both ends of the connection. During the shutdown, PUC and RVA had several tools to continue distribution of potable water: • Keep the water levels in the City reservoirs high; • Overland bypass pumping between the existing clearwell (which had been repaired and put back into service) to another one for the high lift pumps to feed Zone 2 water reservoirs in the City; • Back feed Zone 1 via Zone 2; • Closely monitor the water levels and water demand; • Review and revise the shutdown plan, complete with contingency plans, with the contractor three times; • Conduct shutdown planning meetings to coordinate details of who, what, when, where and how. Despite planning efforts by PUC, RVA and the contractor, accidents and unexpected events still occurred. These included warping of the stainless steel pipe during installation and the breaking of a specially measured and fabricated gasket on an important coupling. In the end the shutdown lasted 21 days! During that time, all parties worked together to try to find alternative solutions, including calling different suppliers, contractors and municipalities for replacement parts.

LESSONS LEARNED

A shutdown can never have too many contingency plans, as redundant and pessimistic as it may sound. Also, reliable “as-built” information can save a lot of headaches. Due to the quick thinking, cooperative spirit and collective experience of Peterborough Utilities Commission, operations staff, contractors, and the consultant, both incidents at the plant had a positive ending. Rika Law, P.Eng., PMP, is with R.V. Anderson Associates. Email: rlaw@rvanderson.com. Wayne Stiver, P.Eng., is with Peterborough Utilities Group.

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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WATER REUSE

Water reuse essential for new multi-use development projects By Irene Hassas

W

ith population growth and urbanization, there is increased market pressure for the development of residential houses on private property and existing recreational facilities beyond city boundaries. Development of these lands has created the need for new sustainable water management approaches. In some instances, they are located close to environmentally sensitive natural features, making growth and resource management a larger challenge.

WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

One particular challenge involves water management on multi-use properties where golf and residential developments are combined. In many of these instances, the physical distance to the municipal servicing area makes connection via piping financially unfeasible. This type of growth and multi-use development has become increasingly common and popular in the suburban and rural areas surrounding larger cities. Land value appreciation has created a financial incentive for the development. It is therefore imperative to look at ways to develop on-site and distributed neighborhood-scale approaches to water management, including drinking water supply, irrigation and wastewater treatment.

INTEGRATED WATER SYSTEMS

Utilizing a complete design approach, developments are able to integrate proper planning and implementation to build sustainable water and wastewater systems. These communities are able to take advantage of complete potable water treatment, pumping, piping, wastewater and irrigation systems to meet their needs. Recently, Aslan Technologies has been engaged in multiple development projects to provide integrated water treatment solutions. The Lebovic Golf Club, located south of Aurora, Ontario, is a sustainable 12 | August 2016

Wyndance’s SBR plant under construction.

development that includes a golf course, clubhouse and maintenance facility. Also, there are 75 homes surrounding the course, requiring drinking water and subsequent wastewater treatment. Utilizing a packaged water treatment and sequestering batch reactor, the golf course and development has a capacity of 170 m3 a day for drinking water and wastewater treatment. As part of the development’s water management program, a water reuse strategy has been implemented. Treated effluent from the wastewater system is discharged to the golf course irrigation and aesthetic ponds. Another example of progressive water reuse is at the Whitevale Golf Club, located north of Pickering, Ontario, where a larger clubhouse and corresponding wastewater treatment system were built. The new high efficiency sequencing batch reactor has a treatment capacity of 30 m3 per day. It meets surface water discharge criteria, enabling the club to recycle treated wastewater to the pond for irrigation use. For the Wyndance Golf Club development, located South of Uxbridge, Ontario, a completely integrated approach to water

and wastewater management was required to meet very stringent environmental constraints. A communal water and wastewater plant with a capacity of 245 m3 per day was constructed to service the clubhouse, maintenance buildings and 125 homes. The wastewater treatment system utilizes a modified sequencing batch reactor, meeting surface water discharge criteria. All surface water is collected and stored in a series of aesthetic ponds and reservoirs for irrigation of the golf course and common areas. These types of communities, which are managed on a development level, rather than supplied by municipal servicing, must utilize and integrate technology solutions into their master servicing plan. “We are integrating technologies and systems that are proven to minimize any environmental impacts, in order to preserve both the natural functioning of the Oak Ridges Moraine and its beauty,” says Daniel Guizzetti, President of Empire Communities, developer of the Wyndance Golf Club community. Irene Hassas is with Aslan Technologies Inc. Email: ihassas@aslantech.ca

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


FILTRATION

TOP: The Jewish Museum at 1109 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan, New York City. Photo: Rolf Müller/Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 3.0. OPPOSITE: ORIVAL ORG-020-LE automatic filter at the Jewish Museum.

Properly running HVAC system helps protect artifacts at the Jewish Museum By Dr. Marcus Allhands

T

housands of people visit the Jewish Museum in Manhattan each year. For over 100 years it has displayed past and present Jewish culture, both secular and religious, to the world. Special care must be taken in protecting over 26,000 paintings, sculptures, works on paper, photographs, ethnographic material, archaeological artifacts, numismatics, ceremonial objects and broadcast media materials. This care begins with proper environmental conditions that rely on a dependable HVAC system. A reliable and economical means of removing suspended solids from the twin cooling towers was sought to protect heat exchangers in the 150 ton chiller system.

14 | August 2016

This maintains the museum’s temperature and humidity at precise set-points. The selected equipment was an ORG-020-LE automatic self-cleaning screen filter from ORIVAL, Inc. The filter was set up as a side-stream system with about 20% of the full flow passing through it. This reduces total suspended solids to a level that protects the heat exchangers from experiencing deposit buildup that would impact the efficiency of the HVAC system. As solids encounter the stainless steel weave-wire screen element inside the filter, all particles larger than the 100 micron openings are immediately blocked from passing. As these particles accumu-

late, a filter cake develops. The pore spaces between these 100+ micron particles are smaller than 100 microns so this filter cake becomes a screening element of its own. It can capture smaller and smaller particles, possibly as low as 10 microns. As the filter cake thickens, a pressure drop develops across the screen element until a 7 psi threshold is met. At this point, a differential pressure switch makes contact and sends a signal to the filter controller to initiate a rinse cycle to automatically clean the filter cake off the screen. Nozzles open to atmospheric pressure move across the screen surface, vacuuming solids off the screen and discharging them to a drain. The entire

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


cleaning process takes only 8-10 seconds. A timer built into the controller can also be used to initiate rinse cycles at pre-set times. Nick Silenko is an engineer for the Jewish Museum and project leader for the filter installation. He states that, “prior to the installation of the filtration system, the cooling tower basins had to be manually cleaned at least every six months. Inspection of the cooling tower basins after three months of filtration showed a noticeable improvement in tower cleanliness.” At its installation, the filter experienced rinse cycles every three to four hours. The rate of solids accumulation on the screen began to decrease over time as the filter removed more and more solids from the system. Rinse cycles are now every 24 to 36 hours. Heat exchangers are maintained at high efficiency levels, providing a reliable HVAC system to precisely control environmental conditions in the museum. Dr. Marcus Allhands, PhD, PE, is with ORIVAL. For more information, email: filters@orival.com

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August 2016 | 15


WASTEWATER OPERATIONS

Redesigned grinder solveS London’s wet wipe problem

The Wonderland pumping station (left) struggled with pump clogging “ragballs, ropes and water bears”, (right) before upgrading its grinder.

By Kevin Bates, JWC Environmental

D

ealing with tough debris and clogged pumps and pipes are significant and costly issues for many municipal public works departments. These problems are escalating due to the growing popularity of flushable wipes, as well as aging facilities and a lack of funding for sewer and utility systems. These issues can cause extensive amounts of downtime due to frequent maintenance, equipment repairs and unscheduled shutdowns. Home to more than 380,000 people, the City of London, Ontario, operates six wastewater treatment plants along the Thames River and 35 pumping stations. It recently faced these problems at one of its pump stations. Its operations and maintenance department staff wanted a solution that was reliable, effective and easy to maintain The Wonderland pumping station, constructed in 2010, is one of the largest stations by volume in the City, with a rated capacity of 45,500 m3/day. It includes two grinders for influent

16 | August 2016

sewage, and four 160 kW, 320 litre per second submersible pumps installed in separate wet wells. Each pump discharges through a 400 mm pipe to a common 750 mm header. All pumps are controlled by variable frequency drives. The header is connected to a 750 mm PVC force main that discharges approximately four kilometres northeast of the station.

FREQUENT CLOGGING

When the Wonderland pumping station was originally built in 2010, the operations and maintenance department worked with Envirocan, a local manufacturer’s representative for JWC Environmental, on a preventive solution to protect the pumps. The company suggested two Channel Monster® grinders. For the first three years of operation, the grinders provided adequate pump protection against tough debris. Starting in 2013, however, the make-up of the sewage at the station started to change. There was an ever-increasing amount of

wipes and rags in the wastewater stream which began to prove to be a challenge for the grinders to handle effectively. While the Channel Monster grinders easily process normal waste, the configuration of the cutters turned the newly introduced wipes into long, stringy bits of debris that would twine together and build up in the wet well. “The grinders were doing their job, but this material just doesn’t dissolve,” said Gary Burrows, operations supervisor for the City of London. “We were having an insurmountable amount of rags weaving in our wet wells.” The staff often had to spend time unclogging the pumps and clearing the wet well to keep the pump station operational. This “weaving” of long, stringy pieces of materials in the wet well often wrapped around the cables and the pumps. The occurrence of severe weather also seemed to intensify the issue, causing surges in the City’s collection system that would scour the sewer mains and push debris into the pump well.

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GRINDERS BUILT FOR WIPES

JWC Environmental discovered that this same problem was occurring at other pump stations, and saw an opportunity to develop a new cutting-edge methodology for their products. The company began focusing on the stringy bits of wipes and hair that were combining into “ropes” and large rag balls, or “water bears.” These rag balls would then slow or completely clog sewer pumps. JWC’s research team found strips of wipes would rope together in the swirling action of a sewer system. To prevent this, they designed Wipes Ready™ Channel Monster and Muffin Monster® models with new cutters, screening drums and operating technologies. These changes improve the debris capture rate and cut wipes into smaller pieces. Testing showed that these enhancements eliminated the formation of long strips and rag balls in test environments.

A TESTED SOLUTION

Looking for solutions and new technologies to improve the situation, City staff

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discussed their maintenance and clogging issues with JWC Environmental and Envirocan. Both companies saw this as a perfect opportunity to put the new technologies to the test. In mid-2015, JWC outfitted one of the new Wipes Ready Channel Monsters at the Wonderland Pumping Station. This new model incorporated full Wipes Ready features, including 17-tooth serrated cutters and knurled spacers, and optimum cut-control gearing. The grinder already had perforated screening drums, which remained in place. The dual-shafted design of the Channel Monster grinder easily shreds through rags, clothing, wood and rocks, turning them into tiny, manageable particles that pass through pipes and pumps without clogging the equipment or compromising flow. The in-line units also quickly adapt into existing pipelines, saving on installation time. In the months since the grinder at the Wonderland pumping station was outfitted with the enhancements, there have been almost no issues related to clogging or debris at the station. In addition, the

cutters on the grinder are holding up well, with few signs of wear. Using knowledge gained in helping other customers with similar issues, JWC also recommended that the City begin pumping down its wet well system on a daily basis. This helps prevent material and debris weaving that the City had been seeing in wet wells and on the pumps and suspension cables. “It dramatically increased our operation and the cleanliness of the wet well,” Burrows added. “That shared information was very valuable to us.” Upgrading to a grinder designed for the wipes problems at the Wonderland Pump Station allowed the City to greatly reduce maintenance time and costs. The cost saving and eliminating the need for operators to manually de-rag the pumps on a nearly daily basis, made this project a success. For more information, email: mike@acgtechnology.com or visit www.acgtechnology.com

August 2016 | 17


WASTEWATER COLLECTION

Massive sanitary sewer bypass project completed under Toronto’s Pearson Airport By Eric Benoit

T

he Region of Peel in southern Ontario is home to over one million people and maintains and operates three wastewater treatment facilities, over 30 pumping stations, and 3,500 kilometres of sanitary sewers. A critical part of this vast network is the Etobicoke Creek Trunk Sanitary Sewer line, which runs under the runways and along the border of Toronto Pearson Airport. To allow ongoing reconstruction and development of its sanitary sewer system, the Region needed to finish a large connection under the runway and implement twinning of the Etobicoke Creek Trunk line for system redundancy. It was a complicated construction project that needed an equally complicated bypass of the existing network. Adding to the complexity, the entire project had to be done without interruption to airport operations. With over 400,000 flights a year, or roughly one per minute during hours of operation,

18 | August 2016

Toronto Pearson is the busiest and largest airport in Canada. For this project, the Region contracted Hatch Mott MacDonald, CRS Tunneling, Inc. and Dibco Underground, Ltd. Atlas Dewatering Corporation was brought in to spearhead the complex bypass effort, using Xylem’s Godwin and Flygt pumps.

NEVER TOO SAFE

The Etobicoke Creek Trunk Sanitary Sewer line handles flow from the City of Mississauga, the City of Brampton, and Toronto Pearson Airport. With wastewater influx from over a million people, flow rates in the line average 190-285 million litres per day (MLD). To ensure bypass capabilities that could handle a severe wet weather event, Atlas designed a bypass with 400 MLD capacity.

LET IT FLOW

The primary 1,800 mm sanitary sewer line at Etobicoke Creek feeds into a

1,200 mm and a 1,650 mm line, via a splitting chamber. As part of the reconstruction effort, each of these lines had to be diverted and accessed, to be able to upgrade the valves, do some manhole work, and tie them in to the new twinned sewer line and chambers. Phase I of the bypass project began on March 15, 2016, and involved plugging the 1,200 mm line, to provide access for work crews. The Atlas team, using an inflatable, mechanical dome style sewer plug, air hose and air regulator, diverted flow from the 1,200 mm line to the 1,650 mm line. The plug was in place for approximately 30 days, and the bypass was completely manual and gravity fed, with no pumps or piping necessary. As the 1,650 mm line was large enough to handle the temporary increased flow, Phase I went off without issue. Phase II of the bypass project was to block off and bypass the 300 metres of the 1,650 mm line, so the team could have continued overleaf...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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WASTEWATER COLLECTION

mum of three pumps were running during the bypass. As many as eight pumps would run during higher, peak-flow activity, with pumps nine and ten in place to handle any extreme weather event flow. For each phase of the bypass, all discharge lines were pressure-tested and a leakage test using clean water was performed prior to start up, to ensure the system was watertight. Phase III ran non-stop for six days. For additional security, a full time pump watch duty was put in place, to address any issues with the systems in place, and to ensure immediate resolution of any problems.

AT THE AIRPORT, AND ON TIME

BELOW: HDPE pipes running from the Godwin Dri-Prime pumps to the splitting chamber for Phase III of the bypass. FIRST PAGE: A short distance from the taxiway, pumps and piping were placed by crane at the job site.

access for reconstruction efforts. Similar to the Phase I bypass, the Atlas team installed an inflatable, mechanical plug, which diverted flow from the 1,650 mm line back to the 1,200 mm line. As with Phase I, this was also a completely manual, gravity-fed bypass. However, since there was potential for the increased flow from the larger line to overwhelm the smaller 1,200 mm line (given a severe weather event), Atlas incorporated a back-up scenario into the bypass plan. If necessary, they could bring in upwards of four Godwin diesel-driven critically silenced CD400M pumps to handle the extra flow. On April 12, immediately after Phase I was completed, the plug was inserted into the 1,650 mm line and Phase II of the bypass was underway. It too ran for approximately 30 days without a hitch, or any severe weather event. The back-up plan never needed to be implemented, saving Peel a significant amount of money.

ONE PUMP AND ONE PIPE AT A TIME

To handle the 323 MLD of flow in the 20 | August 2016

primary 1,800 mm trunk line during the final phase of the bypass, Atlas brought in 11 Godwin diesel-drive critically silenced CD400M pumps with 450 mm capacity, to be rented by Peel during the bypass operation. Ten of them would be utilized as the primary pumping mechanism, with the eleventh as a back-up. To save energy and diesel fuel costs, each pump was set up with a Godwin level transducer, with floats in place that would trigger the diesel pumps on and off, depending on predetermined flow levels. The bypass design was set up so that the pumps would start sequentially, only turning on as increased system flows called for additional pumping. With the length of the bypass at around 85 metres, approximately 1,000 metres of 450 mm HDPE pipe was rented. Each pump had a dedicated suction line and dip tube, as well as a discharge line, and could handle flow of approximately 38 MLD. On May 24, after two weeks of round-the-clock work on installation, the gates at MH1 were closed off and the flow was diverted to the upgraded lines downstream, thus beginning Phase III. During lower flow, a mini-

The comprehensive bypass effort for the Etobicoke Creek Trunk Sanitary Sewer Line took place on airport property, only metres away from runways, taxiways and access roads. This made it that much more complex for the work crews. Over the course of the project, workers from all teams had to obtain daily clearance with airport security, before being allowed onto the premises. Once at the job site, all equipment and construction crews had to maintain strict distance requirements to adhere to airport protocol. An eight-metre runway object-free area had to be maintained at all times, to ensure the safety of the teams on the ground. They were also in constant communication with airport personnel, as the airport couldn’t shut down at any time during the construction and bypass project. Adhering to a tight schedule, the Atlas and Xylem teams were able to set up and break down the bypass operation in less time than was spelled out in the original plan. All in all, each phase of the bypass ran without a problem over the course of 11 weeks. It was a turn-key solution that helped the Region of Peel integrate the upgrades that needed to be made, in a timely and efficient manner. What initially just looked like a very complex project, ended up being the largest sanitary sewer bypass project in Canada, all within the confines of its largest airport. Eric Benoit, P. Eng., is with Xylem (Ottawa). Email: eric.benoit@xyleminc.com

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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SITE REMEDIATION

Multi-stage remediation removes chlorinated solvents from former dry cleaning facility By Grant Walsom and Michael Schriver

X

CG Consulting Limited was retained by the owners of a commercial real estate property to remediate impacts in soil and groundwater related to the property’s former use as a dry cleaning facility. The client chose active remediation to meet provincial Generic Site Condition Standards. Historical dry cleaning operations resulted in sub-surface releases of chlorinated solvents, including perchloroethylene (PCE), and its breakdown products, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis&trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis1,2-DCE, trans-1,2DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The bulk of the impacted area was beneath the footprint of the slab-on-grade building, as well as outside the footprint under and adjacent to the foundation footings. The initial contaminant concentrations in groundwater were in the order of five to 10 times higher than the standards for the given land use. (See Table 1) Chlorinated solvents are extremely persistent in the natural environment, making remediation costly and often time-consuming. Remediation of this property presented several significant challenges, including: • High concentrations of contaminant species having relatively low remedial target concentrations; • Continued commercial use of the building space overlying the impacted area during remedial activities, which precluded source removal through large-scale excavation of impacted soil;

Direct injection of solutions of ISCO reagents to the subsurface using drilling equipment and low pressure pumping system.

• Subsurface utilities in close proximity to the impacted areas; • Potential air quality issues in the active building space as a result of the contaminants in the subsurface; • Shallow water table approximately one metre below the floor slab of the commercial space, with a stagnated or mounded groundwater flow pattern resulting from a combination of low hydraulic conductivity

in the saturated soil, groundwater flow interference from foundation wall footings, and suspected poorly functioning roof drain and foundations drainage systems; • Fine-grained soil conditions, resulting in low hydraulic conductivity, a tendency for contaminants to be retained in the soil matrix, and limited remedial access to contaminated zones due to preferential groundwater flow patterns.

TABLE 1: Pre-remediation contaminant concentrations in groundwater.

Highest Concentration (µg/L)

PCE

TCE

Cis-1,2-DCE

Trans-1,2-DCE

VC

260

57

220

40

1.2 continued overleaf...

22 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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SITE REMEDIATION

SOURCE REMOVAL

As stated previously, large-scale excavation of impacted soil for contaminant source removal was precluded by the continued occupancy of the building space, and the proximity of underground utilities and the foundation footings of the building. As an alternative means of source removal, XCG designed and oversaw the construction of a buried groundwater collection trench. This consisted of a horizontal perforated pipe, approximately eight metres long, set in a bed of crushed stone at approximately three metres below ground surface. A section of vertical riser pipe was connected to the horizontal pipe to allow for periodic extraction of impacted groundwater from the collection trench, using a vacuum truck and wastewater disposal service. Dewatering the groundwater collection trench resulted in a drawdown of the water table. This increased the groundwater flow gradient to draw the stagnated (mounded) groundwater from impacted areas beneath the building space to the exterior areas (i.e., the collection trench).

There, the contaminants were accessible for removal through dewatering. The slow groundwater recharge rate and the dimensions of the groundwater collection trench resulted in the groundwater being drawn down for several weeks following each extraction event, creating an effective groundwater flow gradient from the impacted areas. Groundwater flow maps were prepared from water level measurements collected from the on-site network of monitoring wells.

IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION THROUGH DIRECT INJECTION

Following the initiation of groundwater extraction events, XCG implemented a program of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) through the advancement of temporary subsurface injection points at interior locations through the concrete floor slab of the building, and at exterior locations through the asphalt surface. Solutions of oxidizing compounds (sodium persulphate and potassium permanganate) were injected at low pressure through the temporary injection

View of the RemOx®SR Plus ISCO reagent cylinders.

points. The depth and location of these were designed by assessing contaminant distribution across the impacted areas and within the various soil types. As part of the remedial activities, indoor air quality monitoring was conducted continued overleaf...

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24 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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SITE REMEDIATION

to assess if chlorinated solvent vapours, namely vinyl chloride, were migrating up through the floor and into occupied building space. The air quality samples were collected over a 24-hour period using flow-calibrated vacuum canisters. Analytical results reported no detection of vinyl chloride in the air samples collected from the occupied building space.

SMALL-SCALE REMEDIAL EXCAVATION

At exterior locations immediately adjacent to the building’s foundation footings, direct injection was not successful in fully remediating groundwater impacts detected in the monitoring wells. Groundwater exceedances persisted following remedial injections of the ISCO compounds. This lack of success was attributed to preferential drainage near the footings, causing the ISCO compounds to migrate away from the impacted areas, and the continued release of chlorinated solvent compounds from the footings area and granular backfill. To address these residual exterior groundwater impacts, XCG implemented a small-scale remedial excavation, using a “mini” excavator similar to equipment used in landscaping projects. A narrow (0.6 m x 2.5 m) trench was excavated at the exterior foundation wall to a depth of 1.8 metres. Impacted saturated soil and three decommissioned monitoring wells that had residual groundwater exceedances were removed. At the base of the trench, gravel bedding and dry form potassium permanganate crystals were placed to facilitate oxidation of residual chlorinated solvents present in the soil adjacent to and potentially underlying the foundation footings. Prefabricated monitoring wells were placed in the trench prior to backfilling to

allow for water quality monitoring in the remediated area. Subsequent groundwater sampling of the wells installed in the exterior remediated area reported no detection of chlorinated solvents.

IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION THROUGH SLOW-RELEASE ISCO TECHNOLOGY

These remedial activities were generally successful, with contaminant concentrations in groundwater being reduced by approximately 50% to 100%. However, residual groundwater impact persisted, due mainly to fine-grained soil conditions and unfavourable groundwater flow characteristics. This resulted in contaminant concentrations exceeding the remediation targets. To address this, XCG implemented a program to apply slow-release ISCO technology to the remaining impacted areas. It consisted of the advancement of boreholes through the concrete floor slab of the occupied building space, using smallscale, portable drilling equipment. Within the saturated zone of each borehole, RemOx® SR Plus ISCO reagent cylinders and dispersant were applied to facilitate the slow release of oxidizing compounds (potassium permanganate and sodium persulphate) to the shallow groundwater in the remaining impacted areas. The reagent cylinders consisted of dry crystals of the oxidizing compounds, encased in degradable paraffin wax. As groundwater dissolves the wax, the oxidizing compounds are released and disperse slowly into the groundwater.

MONITORING OF REMEDIAL PROGRESS

The progress of the slow-release ISCO technology is being monitored on an

ongoing basis through periodic collection of water samples and in situ field parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential) at monitoring wells within and near the remaining impacted areas. Measurement of field parameters taken before and after the ISCO treatments indicates the conditions in the areas of the remaining groundwater became much more favourable for the oxidation of chlorinated solvents. Immediate and continuing increases in the electrical conductivity and oxidation-reduction potential in the groundwater of the treated areas have been observed, indicating the continued release of oxidizing compounds from the dissolving reagent cylinders. Since the application of slow-release ISCO technology, groundwater sampling results have shown a gradual but sustained decrease in total mass of chlorinated solvents at the monitoring well locations. Only one monitoring well location continues to exceed the remedial targets, and this is for one VOC parameter (TCE) by a small margin of 2 µg/L (versus a remedial target concentration of 17 µg/L). (See Table 2) Full remediation of remaining groundwater impacts is anticipated within three to six months. Continued extraction of groundwater from the collection trench provides control of groundwater flow and promotes subsurface migration of groundwater flow around the reagent cylinders. This further dissolves the cylinders to provide “contact” with the contaminants and increase the rate of oxidation. Grant Walsom, P. Eng., and Michael Schriver, P. Eng., P. Geo., are with XCG Consulting Limited. Email: grant.walsom@xcg.com; michael.schriver@xcg.com. Website: www.xcg.com

TABLE 2: Near completion concentrations in groundwater.

PCE

TCE

Cis-1,2-DCE

Trans-1,2-DCE

VC

Highest Concentration (µg/L)

3.1

19

17

5.9

Less than 0.20

Remediation Target (µg/L)

17

17

17

17

1.7

26 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


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ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION

How do aggregate operations affect groundwater levels and wetlands? By Kimberly Logan and Erin Donkers

A

s aggregate operations expand to meet increased development demands, extraction of significant volumes of groundwater is commonly required. Due to the intrusive nature of dewatering, direct environmental impacts within the immediate area of influence can be expected. Dewatering creates an excess amount of groundwater at the surface, which requires management either through surface flow and infiltration, or recirculation and pumping back as groundwater. Extraction of groundwater within the vicinity of wetlands may impact the natural system through temperature fluc-

tuations and quantity and source changes. In a system that contains groundwater inputs, the areal extent and influence of the cone of depression needs to be considered in relation to the location of any nearby wetlands. If extracted groundwater is to be altered to surface flow and expected to infiltrate back as groundwater, the location of nearby wetlands needs to be considered based on potential for increased surface water inputs. This alteration of wetland inputs and flow regimes is important in determining any potential for long-term changes to the wetland ecosystem, including a loss of species richness and diversity.

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


Additionally, a loss of groundwater input can contribute to thermal impacts and changes in water quality. Due to the beneficial functions of wetland ecosystems, including flood control, filtration of sediment and toxins, and wildlife habitat, their conservation should be considered when designing aggregate management plans. A proactive approach to ongoing control of activities such as dewatering will minimize overall negative impacts to natural features. In obtaining a permit to take water, a suitable monitoring plan to limit the measures needed for reclamation can allow for time-scale issues and species specific variables. Continual monitoring of potentially affected natural features throughout the dewatering is crucial to allow for the identification of adverse impacts. Parameters that can be used to monitor the impacts of fluctuating water levels in wetlands from extracted water inputs include floristic quality assessment (FQA) and water quality and quantity measures.

www.esemag.com

VEGETATION BASED INDICES FOR LONG-TERM MONITORING

Monitoring of plant communities can assist in the identification of changing ecological conditions and health of a wetland ecosystem. Due to the sedentary nature of vegetation species and their often fairly specific habitat requirements, the classification of plant communities can prove useful in indicating long-term changes in ecosystem health and/or function in response to aggregate dewatering activities. The use of standardized classification systems such as the FQA can support longterm monitoring activities as they allow for the comparison of vegetation communities over time at the same site, between different locales, or between communities of similar types. The FQA system assigns conservation and wetness index values to plant species. The conservation index (C) assigns values, between 0 and 10, to a species to indicate their degree of tolerance to habitat disturbance. The wetness index (W) assigns a continued overleaf...

August 2016 | 29


ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION value between -5 and +5 to a species to indicate the probability that this species will occur in natural wetland conditions. Lower W values indicate higher requirements for wetland conditions. By averaging these FQA values of species across a community (i.e., girds, plots, transects) conclusions can be made regarding the general degree of naturalness and floristic integrity and wetness preferences of an area. A dramatic decrease in W values over time may indicate that the community is becoming much wetter, and is being inhabited by more obligate wetland species. Although this result may be seen as positive from a wetland conservation point of view, it may alternatively suggest the loss of less flood-tolerant species that may provide critical functions for the overall wetland system. Similarly, plant indices have also been developed for use in the general Great Lakes region, using data from coastal wetlands. These were developed through the incorporation of collected baseline abiotic and biotic information, and iden-

tification of main degradation sources in the region. Main stress sources are reported as including alterations to flow regimes and degradation of water quality parameters. The use of wetland plant indices is recognized as being useful in tracking such stressors and their impacts on natural wetland features.

ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS

Alterations in typical levels of salinity, turbidity or sedimentation, nutrients and pesticide and heavy metals contamination may have impacts on the actual composition of plant species associated with an aquatic system. Alterations in such parameters can occur in a wetland as a result of water inputs from adjacent dewatering activities. The use of vascular plants as indicators of changes in various water quality parameters has been documented for habitats such as prairie wetlands. Such changes can be tracked and, in addition to FQA-related information, conclusions regarding the overall ecological condition of a wetland system can be inferred. These parameters can all play a role in the

overall temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen within a system.

SALINITY

The use of road salts is likely the most commonly considered cause of salinity level increases in nearby surface water features. However, within an area of aggregate resources, salinity can increase through natural sources such as the rock-water interaction and background levels. If during aggregate dewatering activities, groundwater from an aquifer is brought to the surface and discharged into a nearby wetland, changes in normal levels of water quality parameters such as salinity within the receiving feature can occur. An increase in salinity within a wetland due to natural source inputs of groundwater can occur if appropriate components such as brine are present. Fish and invertebrates in freshwater systems typically have a narrow range of tolerance to salinity changes, and therefore increases in salinity can be detrimental to their survival. Similarly, plants have varying tolerance levels

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


LEFT: Spring 2015 – view of wetland monitoring station closest to the dewatering activities (dewatering just begun). RIGHT: Fall 2015 – view of wetland monitoring station closest to the dewatering activities (dewatering occuring for less than 6 months with no significant vegetation impacts).

to salt-impacted soils and substrates. Changes in environmental salinity to levels outside of a species’ optimal “salt tolerance” range can result in identifiable changes in the resident plants found in a wetland. For instance, an increase in salinity has been found to reduce new seed germination rates of high salt intolerant plants by altering their osmotic activities and

preventing the transport of water and nutrients into their root systems. As a result, the plant community can experience a decrease in the number of species in it, with an expected decline in salt-intolerant species.

TURBIDITY

Turbidity levels within an aquatic system can also increase as a result of height-

ened flow and sediment input rates, and flooding. This impacts the amount of light which can penetrate a surface water feature. The addition of water inputs may shift the vegetation species composition to a more emergent or floating-leaved based community. Increased turbidity can change the water quality by increasing temperature and reducing dissolved oxygen levels. continued overleaf...

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ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION This can alter the composition of wildlife species. Turbidity can also impact the physiological processes of aquatic organisms through particles lodging in and clogging gills, settling of particles over substrate smothering eggs and larvae, etc.

NUTRIENTS

An increase in nutrient loads in a wetland system as a result of inputs of high-nutrient containing water can cause a decline in submerged plants and an increase in the emergent and floating-leaved species within a community. If enrichment is severe, the overall richness in emergents may actually decline. More aggressive emergent wetland plants (cattails and Phragmites australis) may increase in biomass and areal coverage. There is little risk associated with nutrient loading as a result of aggregate extraction and dewatering. Increased nutrients within a wetland system are more likely to arise from anthropogenic sources, including sewage and agriculture. However, where an aggregate operation is separated from a wetland by anthropogenic influences, increased overland flow from dewatering may flush larger nutrient loads into a receiving wetland.

TEMPERATURE

Changes in typical wetland temperatures can also occur as a result of increased water inputs. An increase in turbidity increases the absorption of heat by the particles within the water column. Increases in temperature may also occur through the addition of water containing inorganic dissolved solids which increase conductivity levels of the water and create warmer temperatures. Such rises in water temperature can be minor or drastic, but both can have detrimental effects on resident plant and wildlife species, depending on their tolerable temperature regime ranges. Temperature increases can also cause declines in levels of dissolved oxygen, which can influence normal rates of photosynthesis in aquatic plants and metabolism in animals.

PH

In aggregate operations there is a risk of changes to pH in a receiving wetland, depending on the bedrock source of the dewatered inputs and how the extracted groundwater is managed. An increase in

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sediment load can also affect the pH. A change outside of the ideal range of pH 6.5 to 8.0 can cause stress on reproductive functions, and lower pH can allow toxins to become more mobile and available for uptake by aquatic organisms.

CONCLUSION

The ability to monitor impacts to the natural environment in response to intrusive anthropogenic activities, such as aggregate extraction, is crucial to effective resource management. The incorporation of standardized methodologies (such as the FQA and water quality measurements) into monitoring plans can not only help to ensure rehabilitation plans and restoration efforts are effective in restoring function to the surrounding landscape, but will allow for replication and comparison between sites. Kimberly Logan and Erin Donkers are with Groundwater Environmental Management Services. For more information, email: kim@gemservicesinc.com. References are available upon request.

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WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Need for plastics removal forces WWTP to upgrade its bar screens

B

uilt in 1966, Seattle’s West Point Treatment Plant treats up to 342 million litres of wastewater per day during the dry months, and up to 1,673 million litres per day during the rain/storm season. The facility had six climber style bar screens, with ~14 mm bar spacing. Over time, the bars bent, allowing larger material to pass through the bar rack and into the facility. This created excessive maintenance issues and allowed plastics to flow through the plant. As such, the existing screens had to be replaced. ProTechtor™ Multi- Rake Bar Screens by Kusters Water with 6 mm and 10 mm bar spacing were selected. The existing screens had one cleaning rake that typically took up to two minutes to engage and clean the bar rack. The new ProTechtor

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screens include multiple rakes, typically spaced on 1.8 m centres, that clean the bar rack every five seconds at the highest speed setting. This increased cleaning frequency is advantageous, particularly under higher flow conditions. Also, individual “bolt-in” replaceable bars mean that, if there is damage to a bar, it can be quickly and easily replaced by maintenance personnel with simple hand tools. The six new 10 m long screens were placed into service in the summer of 2014. Plant operators have indicated improved screening removal efficiencies, as well as improved performance of downstream processes. For more information, visit: www.kusterswater.com

August 2016 | 33


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

SPECIAL FOCUS

From carbon trading regimes to extreme weather events, the impact of climate change is being felt across Canada. This issue features a special section devoted to climate change and resilient infrastructure design.

Helping local governments prepare financially for climate change By Eric Dunford

I

n order to create a resilient, livable community, all of Canada’s 3,664 municipalities need a prosperous local economy, supported by efficient transportation systems that get products to market, people to work, and children to school. They also need to ensure a clean source of water that reliably flows to homes, business and agriculture, and a sustainable source of energy to power local businesses and critical institutions. But how can they invest in this critical infrastructure, without breaking the bank? Canada’s infrastructure gap is substantial. According to the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card, one-third of municipal infrastructure is in fair, poor, or very poor condition. Local governments all over Canada face growing demands for service delivery, while struggling with a legacy of infrastructure reaching the end

34 | August 2016

of its useful life. This is especially true for smaller municipalities, which typically face the additional challenge of having relatively low tax revenues, limited staff resources, and aging assets that require large investments over a short time.

CLIMATE CHANGE AND AGING INFRASTRUCTURE DON’T MIX

Once heavily debated, climate change is now commonly accepted by all levels of government in Canada, and the focus has shifted from mitigating impacts to adapting to the expected climatic changes. Although more needs to be done to study the impacts of climate change on our infrastructure, a recent report, Paying the Price: the Economic Impacts of Climate Change for Canada, suggests the economic impact on Canada could reach $5 billion per year by 2020, and between $21 and $43 billion per year by 2050.

Climate change represents a serious risk to the continued performance of engineered infrastructure, but it also presents a challenge to how we think about and design infrastructure. It is intended to last, and is likely to experience changing climate conditions over its long lifespan. Using insufficient or inaccurate data to design infrastructure can create vulnerabilities, which can lead to failure. Infrastructure failures create public safety risks and expose local governments to significant financial risk.

IGNORING CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS NOW WILL COST US MORE LATER

Climate change will impact municipal infrastructure in different ways across regions. Some coastal areas will face great costs from the rise in sea levels, while other regions will experience more unpre-

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


dictable weather and more intense storm events. Economic impacts will also be felt. For instance, regions that rely on timber industries will be adversely affected. GDP in British Columbia could fall by 0.2% to 0.4% by the 2050s, due to climate change impacts on timber supply. This compares to average national GDP reductions of 0.1% to 0.3%. In July 2013, a monumental rainstorm dropped 125 mm of rain in just a few hours in southern Ontario. This massive storm caused flooding and property damage estimated at $940 million in Toronto alone. It was the most expensive natural disaster in Ontario history. Regardless of how climate change will affect a geographic region, countless reallife experiences — from roads that buckle in severe heat, to sewers that overflow in intense rain — have taught us that ignoring the effects of climate change will only cost more in the future.

WHAT TO DO?

Communities of all sizes can slow the deterioration of their infrastructure and prepare for climate change by: • Increasing asset management capacity; • Understanding the community’s specific climate risks; • Utilizing asset and climate data to inform resilient planning and infrastructure design.

ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE: PUT YOUR BEST ASSETS FORWARD

Before communities can plan for the future, they need to know: what infrastructure assets they already possess; the level of service that these assets currently provide; the amount of money it will take to replace them at end-of-life; and, gaps in services that need to be addressed to reduce risk to sustainable service delivery. Taking stock of existing assets provides the data needed to begin asking the right questions. Collectively, these efforts are referred to as asset management. Effective asset management can help local governments identify and avert potential issues before they arise. Asset management can also strengthen levels of service for the public at reduced cost, and allow for more accurate planning. www.esemag.com

In recent years, local governments have taken steps to implement asset management plans. Unfortunately, these are simply a snapshot in time. To be effective, asset management must be an ongoing process. Many local governments, however, lack dedicated in-house staff resources. This is one of the primary challenges to maintaining a proactive asset management program. The Canadian Infrastructure Report Card shows that asset management practices vary according to community size. For instance, 62% of large municipalities, 56% of medium-sized municipalities, and 35% of small municipalities reported having a formal asset management plan in place. All communities, especially smaller ones with limited financial resources, would benefit from increasing their asset management capacity. In addition to the variance in program implementation by community size, there is also a lack of consistency in how asset data is collected, maintained, and analyzed. The most immediate opportunity available to advance asset management practices is the introduction of a consistent, standardized model. In an effort to assist local governments, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is currently piloting a peer-learning program to advance asset management best practices in Canada through its Leadership in Asset Management Program. The first cohort includes 12 municipalities of all sizes. They will receive over $1 million in grants to support capacity-building in their programs. Many local governments have also benefited from participation in the Canadian Network of Asset Managers. This is an association that develops tools, policies, training and technologies, dedicated to improving infrastructure asset management across Canada.

UNDERSTANDING LOCAL CLIMATE RISKS

Asset management enables local governments to make better financial decisions around infrastructure planning. But, it cannot address risks posed to infrastructure from climate and extreme weather. Changes in global climate have been well-documented. However, data on the

anticipated impacts of these changes on infrastructure are inconsistently available at the regional and local levels, and asset-specific assessments are rare. The Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) Protocol is a tool created by Engineers Canada to fill this gap. The PIEVC Protocol provides infrastructure designers with a means to assess and address climate and weather-related vulnerabilities more accurately. The tool uses a five-step screening process to estimate the likely severity of projected climate impacts on infrastructure components. Application of the tool provides decision-makers with better climate data. This enables designers to make more informed choices in response to potential vulnerabilities and risks. To date, this tool has been applied in more than 40 risk evaluations for infrastructure across Canada, for communities of all sizes. To assess the engineering vulnerability and potential impacts of the current and future climate, the Union Water Supply System (UWSS), a municipal water supply system jointly owned by the Ontario municipalities of Leamington, Kingsville, Essex and Lakeshore, used the PIEVC Protocol to perform a climate change vulnerability assessment for its infrastructure. The study involved assessing vulnerabilities of facilities to current climate (existing and/or historical conditions), as well as future climate conditions in 2050. Through the study, UWSS was able to identify a range of strategies, in operations, maintenance, and future design work, to bolster resilience. This included accelerating modifications to fuel tanks to ensure adequate capacity during extended power outages, and potential modifications to emergency intake for pump stations in response to anticipated lower water levels. In addition to PIEVC, other resources are also beginning to come online to assist communities with assessing their climate risks and planning for adaptation. Natural Resources Canada has published a guide for land use planning for climate change adaptation, while FCM is a proponent of the development of municipal adaptation planning guides. continued overleaf...

August 2016 | 35


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

SPECIAL FOCUS

The Grand Bend Wastewater Treatment Facility under construction. It is the first project in Canada to receive Envision certification.

BUILD IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME

Once the gaps in community infrastructure are understood and future climate trends are modeled, this information needs to be translated into the planning and design of new assets, as well as the replacement and rehabilitation of existing ones. Having better information on asset inventories and conditions, and anticipated future climate-related threats, provides the opportunity to design infrastructure that does more, and is better able to resist and adapt to changes in operational conditions. In late 2012, the Envision Framework for Sustainable Infrastructure was introduced to the market. Developed in partnership by the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure, Envision provides infrastructure asset owners and designers with a holistic set of performance measures to elevate sustainable performance. Since its introduction, communities and public agencies of all sizes across North America have implemented this tool. To date, more than a dozen projects have achieved Envision certification. Envision offers local governments a necessary mechanism for encouraging more sustainable design. Stantec has used Envision as a design tool for embedding social/environmental sustainability and adaptive capacity into infrastructure 36 | August 2016

assets. This tool offers a unifying and common language to spur innovation in design. It is also a resource for developing contract language that provides assurance that the design intent is achieved in construction. Two Canadian infrastructure assets have received formal Envision awards to date, while many others have benefited from its application. The Envision design framework provides a broad range of criteria that helps municipalities make better decisions at each step of the project. By focusing on climate risk assessment and resiliency, and considering asset management ramifications, it integrates life cycle costing and monitoring and maintenance concerns into the upfront design process. One of the goals of Envision is to support municipalities in making more holistic decisions. These incorporate social, environmental and economic concerns across the full life cycle. Although there is a cost associated with certifying a project under Envision, the framework is freely available and public sector staff can receive professional training at low cost. The Grand Bend Wastewater Treatment Facility was the first project in Canada to receive Envision certification. This reflects the integration of climate and asset management considerations into the design process. Initially anticipated to cost $23.2 million, the municipalities of Lamb-

ton Shores and South Huron collaborated to find a more affordable and effective solution. The final facility design includes a flexible floorplan that can be expanded or retrofitted as the community’s needs evolve, reducing the upfront capital cost and limiting unnecessary energy and water consumption. At the same time, the facility is designed to be consistent with the recommendations of Ontario’s Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan. It also includes features such as a constructed wetland that reduces vulnerabilities from expected climate impacts.

TAKING ACTION, MAKING A DIFFERENCE

With almost 60% of core public infrastructure owned and maintained by municipalities, local governments have the power to build a strong foundation for a healthy and prosperous Canada. By taking action to build asset management capacity, collecting better data about future conditions, and integrating sustainable design principles into infrastructure planning and design, municipalities of all sizes can advance their objectives, while increasing capacity to adapt to climate change. Eric Dunford is with Stantec. Email: eric.dunford@stantec.com

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CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

WATER RESOURCES

Aquifer storage and recovery becoming more important to stabilize water supplies By Ken Hugo

A

recent study conducted by researchers from the University of Victoria, the University of Calgary and other universities has raised the issue of worldwide over-pumping and scarcity of groundwater. “The global volume and distribution of modern groundwater” clarifies earlier rough estimations of the worldwide volume of groundwater and confirms its finite nature. Conversely, much effort is being made in parts of the world, such as southern Alberta, for flood mitigation. Storage dams and diversions are planned for times of too much water. Alternating droughts with occasional floods illustrates one of the problems with water — it is not always available when needed. This is one reason we build dams. A lesser-seen but equally valid procedure is to collect and store water from abundant precipitation into aquifers and then pump it out in times of need. This procedure is called aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), and is common in Africa and becoming established in parts of the U.S. ASR is less common in Canada, but there is certainly

no reason it should not be undertaken here. Historical researchers have pointed out that ASR commonly occurs under natural conditions. Forests, wetlands, beaver dams and even gopher holes allowed for greater natural recharge of groundwater. With agricultural and industrial development, these landscape features were removed, leading to dwindling groundwater recharge and sharper surface water events. The principle of ASR involves collecting water at times of higher precipitation or high river flow into surface water impoundments, and allowing it to percolate into the aquifer. Sometimes, a confining layer such as a clay till is at the surface and water will not percolate at a sufficient rate. Stripping the upper confining layer, if not too thick, is one option. Injecting water into deeper aquifers through wells is another method which provides great flexibility when aquifers are at deeper depths. The use of wells also minimizes site disturbance. An ideal situation is to use the recharge areas for both flood control and aquifer storage, a practice often under-

taken in parts of Africa that experience short rainfall seasons and long hot and dry periods. These regular seasonal events allow for easier planning and rationalization of an ASR project, rather than contingencies for a project to deal with 100-year flood events. An ASR well field has only a moderate surface disturbance. This is highly advantageous when compared to a surface water impoundment which can have significant surface disturbance and environmental disruption. Not being subject to evaporative losses is another advantage of ASR water storage systems. Other advantages include prevention of land settlement due to over pumping, and lessening of salt water intrusion into coastal aquifers. Introducing surface water bacteria into aquifers is a concern often raised with ASR. Some water treatment may be required; however, surface water bacteria are accustomed to light and oxygen and have a hard time surviving in the cool, dark, low oxygen environment of the aquifer. Experience has shown that surface water bacteria are not a significant

Groundwater Recharge Methods. Photo: State of Washington Department of Ecology.

38 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


problem with ASR. They are largely predated on by natural aquifer bacteria. However, injected water does contain oxygen and organic carbon and naturally occurring bacteria may take advantage of these constituents. Some of these bacteria may form encrustations of a polysaccharide film on the well screen, or in the aquifer around the well, which can lead to well bore plugging. Some elements in the aquifer rock, such as arsenic, can become mobile under changing Eh and pH conditions intro-

duced by the injected water. Issues with arsenic mobilization (and other metals) are a concern in ASR schemes. Aquifer storage and recovery systems are highly engineered. Some technical issues to consider are: • Surface water hydrology studies to determine timing and volumes of water available for ASR; • Geological investigations to determine the extent and capability of the aquifers and the presence or absence of upper or

lower permeability confining layers; • Engineering of well, pumping and delivery systems; • Testing of the water quality, on both an initial and ongoing basis; • Treatment of waters prior to injection or upon withdrawal; • Maintenance of conveyance, treatment and well systems; • Monitoring of conditions in the aquifer. Along with these technical issues, both regulatory and community ones should not be overlooked. Although largely out of sight, ASR schemes are not exempt from stakeholder involvement and similar issues arise as those seen in surface water schemes. The National Ground Water Association has a 22-page free download entitled “Best Suggested Practices of Aquifer Storage and Recovery” which covers these issues. As with all water facilities, a team of specialists is required for successful construction and operation.

Ken Hugo is with Groundwater Information Technologies Ltd. Email: khugo@gritltd.com

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August 2016 | 39


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

SOURCE WATER PROTECTION

Increased frequency of algal blooms challenges drinking water systems By Stanley States

R

ecently, there have been warnings posted at a number of fresh and salt water beaches across Canada, advising swimmers to refrain from entering the water due to concerns over health hazards from contact with hazardous algal blooms (HABs). There have also been concerns over people consuming drinking water from sources that have experienced HAB blooms. It is believed that the increasing frequency and intensity of these blooms may be related to global warming. HABs contain bluegreen algae, which are not really algae at all. Rather, they are photosynthesizing bacteria (cyanobacteria). The “blue-green” portion of the common name comes from the blue-green appearance that blooms of these organisms sometimes give the waters. The blue-green hue is produced by the cyanobacterial pigment phycocyanin. Cyanobacteria are an ancient group of aquatic microorganisms that are commonly found in marine and fresh waters. These

40 | August 2016

bacteria can exist in the aquatic environment as single cells, filaments or colonies. While the single cells are only visible under a microscope, the filaments and colonies can be seen with the naked eye. In fact, heavy cyanobacterial blooms are commonly referred to as “pond scum”. Drinking water utilities have experienced problems associated with cyanobacteria for years, as they release non-hazardous, but nuisance byproducts when the blooms break down. In temperate climates, this usually occurs in the late summer and autumn. The nuisance byproducts are geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, which impart an earthymusty taste and odour to drinking water derived from raw waters experiencing cyanobacterial blooms. A more recent concern is that cyanobacteria also naturally produce cyanotoxins that negatively affect the health of people and animals that consume or have other exposure to these waters.

There are thousands of species of marine and freshwater cyanobacteria, and many of them can produce and release biotoxins. Common cyanotoxin producing genera include: Microcystis, Anabaena, and Oscillatoria. Similarly, there are hundreds of biotoxins that are produced. Microcystins, which are hepatotoxins, have been the most widely studied and are believed to be some of the most virulent cyanotoxins. However, a number of others have also been characterized, including cylindrospermopsin (hepatotoxin), anatoxin-a (neurotoxin), and saxitoxins (neurotoxins). The biology of cyanobacteria and their toxin production and release is complicated. Factors that trigger a particular bloom to synthesize and subsequently release toxins are not well understood. When the toxins are initially produced, they are contained within the cyanobacterial cells (intracellular cyanotoxins). However, at some point, especially when the cells rupture, die and decompose, these

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


Sustainable Ecosystems

Soil retaining system helps urban trees reach are released into the aquatic environment was obtained from a reservoir experiencresulted in issuance of a “do not drink”’ maturity Bycyanotoxins. Eric Keshavarzi and become extracellular ing a large cyanobacterial bloom. advisory, affecting 500,000 consumers.

A number of environmental factors • 1996, Brazil — 52 people were killed Approximately 100 people visited emerenhance cyanobacterial bloom formation. in a dialysis clinic due to contaminated gency rooms complaining of symptoms reen infrastructure and susThese include the increased presence of tap water being used for dialysis. allegedly resulting from consumption of tainability goals are of inlimiting nutrients (especially nitrogen • 2014, Toledo, Ohio — Elevated concenthe contaminated water. creasing importance, and and phosphorus), sunlight, warm water, trations of microcystins in drinking water continued overleaf... achieving them requires techorganic matter availability, water stagnical knowledge and training in varied nation, and water column stratification. fields. Integration of soil and trees into Increases in sunlight and water temperaurban areas substantially improves sustures suggest that climate change may be tainability and helps alleviate some of our exacerbating the problem of cyanobactemost pressing ecological challenges. rial bloom formation. These include air and water quality, rising The routes of harmful exposure to the temperatures, flooding and erosion from water-soluble toxins are varied and include daily rainfall events. U.S.F. S.F Fabrication’s Hatch Safety Grate System is available in a variety S.F. ariety of configurations ingestion, dermal and eye contact, inhalation to meet virtually ually anySafety uall application. The System system allows for routine maintenance of pumps The West Don Lands, in Toronto, U.S.F. S.FOnS.F. Fabrication’s Hatch Grate is available in a variety ariety of configuration of aerosols, consumption of fish originating and equipment when closed and may act as an additional barrier er when open. It allows tario, is a community that is people fo- virtually to meet ually uall any a pplication. The system allows for routine maintenance of pump in waters containing cyanobacterial blooms, ngs without exposing themselves to people to move freely lly around the hatch opening cused, family friendly, environmentally and equipment whenfall-through. closed and may act as an additional barrier er when open. It allows dangerous and intravenous exposure (dialysis). Negative sustainable and beautifully designed for Installation ofaSilva Cells in hatch Mill Street. health effects from exposure to cyanotoxins opening without exposing people to move freely ly l round the Allngs Hatch Safety ety Grates feature: themselves to living. It has a Stage 1 LEED ND GOLD • Tamp Tamper-res r istant 316 SS hinges res are also varied and include: gastroenteritis; dangerous fall-through. certification under the pilot program es- development is new. In fact, the West Don and soil. structure has 92% void space nd harTheare hardw eye, ear and skin irritation; allergic reactions; tablished by the U.S. Green Building Lands streets are the first in a Toronto All • Po Powder-coated aluminum grates to and is a stable surface for thefeature: installation Hatch Safety ety Grates liver damage; and kidney damage. resist corrosion Council. subdivision to be designed with this sys- •res of vehicle loaded-pavements. Tamper-res Tamp r istant res 316 SS hinges There have been a number of major old open devices to lock the grates One notable sustainable component, tem installed under parking lay-bys and • Hold When properly installed, they can outbreaks of human and animal illness in theirhardw full upright and open position and nd har are utilized in the design of the area’s streets, sidewalks. achieve an AASHTO H-20 load rating. • Ca Can be ret r rofitted into existing from exposure to cyanobacteria in drinkPowder-coated Po aluminum grates is a soil retaining system called Silva Mill Street was the first subdivision •access Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code to openings ing water including: r res esist corrosion Cells™. Typical urban trees in the city street in Toronto to be designed to include loading can also be achieved through ap• 1878, Lake Alexandria, Australia — core die after approximately seven years. this soil retaining system. As the lead • Hold old open devices theload grates propriate design. This isto thelock required First documented case of toxic impacts Our experienced team provides a quick turnaround onstructures quotes, such as underground However, Silva Cells help extend their engineering consultant, R.V.Anderson rating for in their full upright and open position of HABs on farm animals consuming drawings and deliveries. Call us today 1.800.668.4533 life spans, thus promoting the growth of Associates coordinated all plans and spec- • Ca vaults, and grates in areas of trafCan becovers r rofitted ret into existing or email us at sales@engineeredpump.com contaminated lake water. mature street trees. ifications with the landscape architect. fic including sidewalks and parking lots. • 1931, Charleston, West Virginia —Microaccess openings Although the City of Toronto had preAbout Silva Cells The cell structure transfers the force to a cystis bloom in river sickened 5,000 — viously used Silva Cells as part of a Silva Cells are a plastic/fiberglass base layer below the structure. 8,000 people via the drinking water. 1635 Industrial Ave. • Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 6M9 stormwater management pilot program in structure of columns and beams that supSoil within the cells remains at low Phone: 604.552.7900 • Fax: 604.552.7901 • 1975, Washington, DC — 23 patients The Queensway, their use as part of site port paving above un-compacted planting compaction rates, thereby creating ideal sales@engineeredpump.com • www.engineeredpump.com Our water experienced team provides a quick turnaround on quotes, developed toxic shock after dialysis

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine August 2016 | 41


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

• 2015, Ohio River, U.S. — Cyanobacterial bloom in a 1,000 km long stretch of the Ohio River threatened the drinking water supplies in four states. Detection of cyanobacterial cells and blooms is accomplished by: traditional microscopic analysis of water samples; molecular biology techniques, such as the identification of DNA and RNA by polymerase chain reaction methods; and even surveillance of water bodies by satellite. Detection and quantification of cyanotoxins in water can be accomplished by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, or liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric or tandem mass spectrometric detectors.

TREATMENT

Treating cyanobacterially-contaminated water to produce safe drinking water involves several steps: a) Removing intact cyanobacterial cells — Optimized conventional clarification and filtration is especially effective. It is important to avoid the use of algecides like copper sulfate, oxidants like ozone, chlorine, or potassium permanganate, prior to removing the intact cells in order to prevent additional release of intracellular toxins. b) Oxidation of extracellular cyanotoxins via oxidation — Chlorine and potassium permanganate are commonly used for this treatment

SOURCE WATER PROTECTION

approach. In the case of chlorine oxidation, the required dosages and contact times exceed those needed for inactivation of bacteria and viruses and approximate those used for inactivation of the cyst from the protozoan Giardia. c) Adsorption of extracellular cyanotoxins using GAC and PAC — For granular activated carbon filters, the required empty bed contact time is somewhat higher than that required for many other trace organic compounds. For powdered activated carbon adsorption, the required dosage exceeds 20 mg/L and the required contact time may exceed 45 minutes. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recommends an overall treatment approach that involves initial removal of intact cyanobacterial cells (by conventional clarification and filtration), followed by oxidation and adsorption to remove extracellular cyanotoxins. It is important to utilize oxidation after the removal of intact cyanobacterial cells to reduce the possibility of cell rupture and release of additional intracellular cyanotoxins. The 2014 drinking water cyanobacterial episode in Toledo, Ohio, prompted the USEPA to ramp up its production and release of standards and guidance for HABs. In May 2015, it set drinking water advisory levels for two cyanotoxins. These

non-regulatory levels are recommended safe concentrations limits for ingestion of cyanotoxin contaminated water. For microcystin, the advisory level for children younger than six years old is 0.3 ug/L. For adults and children older than six the limit is 1.6 ug/L. In the case of cylindrospermopsin, the advisory

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


level for children younger than six is 0.7 ug/L and 3.0 ug/L for adults and children older than six. Drinking water containing concentrations of these two cyanotoxins greater than the recommended limits is not considered safe for consumption over a 10 day period. Every five years, the USEPA releases a contaminant candidate List (CCL) of substances that it is considering for future regulation in drinking water. The proposed list of candidate contaminants for the upcoming CCL4 contains ten cyanotoxins including total microcystins, and six specific varieties (congeners) of microcystin, cylindrospermoposin, anatoxin-a, and nodularin. Ohio, having experienced potentially hazardous HABs in Lake Erie in 2014, and some interior lakes in other years, has been the most proactive state with regard to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin regulation. As of June 1, 2016, Ohio drinking water utilities are required to monitor for cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in raw water supplies and finished drinking waters on a regular basis throughout the year.

PREVENTION

While monitoring methods and drinking

water treatment approaches have been established, the ultimate solution for dealing with the problem of HABs and their toxins, in both recreational and drinking waters, rests with control of their formation in the first place. There are several limiting nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, whose increased concentration in lake, reservoir and river waters greatly stimulates algal and cyanobacterial bloom formation. The sources of these limiting nutrients includes municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges and leaking septic systems, as well as agricultural sources, including animal feed lots and the use of natural and artificial fertilizers. In 2016, the Canadian Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change and the USEPA formally agreed to reduce the discharge of phosphorus into Lake Erie by 40% in the future to help control HABs. Being the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes, Erie is the most susceptible to HAB formation. Stanley States, Ph.D., is with the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium. Email: Stanley.States@teex.tamu.edu

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August 2016 | 43


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

WASTEWATER

Biological hydrolysis can help achieve energy neutral Wastewater treatment By Robert Hacking

C

hallenges facing wastewater treatment utilities today often seem greater than ever. On top of traditional expectations, utilities are facing new ones. Communities are increasingly connected to broad themes of sustainability, including resource recovery, reduced carbon emissions and carbon footprint, and lower operating costs. Energy in wastewater treatment is one area where operators can begin to address some of these sustainability expectations, while not risking any economic viability. Energy can account for 30% of a wastewater treatment plant’s total operation and maintenance budget. This percentage will grow as the demand for advanced treatment and its inherent energy consumption increases as well. In an effort to combat this, operators are embracing a shift from wastewater treatment to resource recov-

ery. This involves harnessing the energy content inherent in wastewater, which is two to four times the amount required to treat it. With this mindset, plants can go from energy consumers to energy producers, convert what was once a discharge into a reusable resource, and recover and utilize nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus.

BUILDING BLOCKS

There are four fundamental components that comprise an energy-neutral wastewater treatment plant: enhanced primary treatment, biological treatment, advanced sludge treatment, and energy recovery. Advanced anaerobic digestion is a type of advanced sludge treatment in which bacteria, in the absence of oxygen, break down biosolids created during the biological treatment process. The valuable byproducts,

Biological hydrolysis in real-life applications, including Anglian Water’s Great Billing Water Recycling Centre.

including methane, can be combusted for heating or processed through a Jenbacher gas engine to produce electricity and heat.

BIOLOGICAL HYDROLYSIS

The advanced anaerobic digestion process can be configured in many different ways. One of these is biological hydrolysis, a non-invasive

TABLE 1: The fundamental building blocks that comprise an energy-neutral wastewater treatment plant; the highlighted row indicates where biological hydrolysis is applicable.

Component

Description / Benefit

Example

Enhanced primary treatment

Single step for separation, thickening, and optional dewatering of primary solids; can increase the amount of diversion of digestible solids to anaerobic digestion

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Biological treatment

Removes nutrients and organics from sewage; a low-energy option boasts 4x greater efficiency than conventional fine bubble aeration

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Advanced sludge treatment

Organics shunted from biological treatment are processed through advanced anaerobic digestion, converting sludge into biogas that can then be converted to electricity & biosolids; 20% to 30% higher biogas yield than conventional anaerobic digestion; enables the treatment of sludge in reduced digester retention times, allowing for optimized digester volume to treat more sludge, and/or external wastes

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Energy recovery

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44 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


solution that is installed upfront of existing anaerobic digestion infrastructure to enable maximum digester efficiency. A biological hydrolysis system consists of six serial reactor vessels, whereby sludge is heated to 42°C in the first reactor. Thermal energy is typically drawn from a plant’s hot water loop, with heat provided by a biogas boiler or a combined heat and power engine if available. The reactors operate in a semi-continuous reverse cascade batch system, where sludge is batched once per hour from reactor six (R6) to the digester, then R5 to R6, R4 to R5, and so on to R1 and R2. Following the final transfer, a fresh batch of sludge is transferred to R1. (See Figure 1) Total hydraulic retention time (HRT) is designed to be approximately three days. The ultimate goal is to transfer sludge to the anaerobic digester prior to significant methanogenesis. With each batch, only a portion of the reactor vessel is transferred forward, leaving a concentration of enzymes behind. The sludge is only heated in the initial reactor, but progressively cools to between 35°C and 40°C prior to entering the methanogenic digester. Mixing in the reactors is powered by unconfined gas recirculation. Biogas is drawn from the head space of one reactor, compressed, and injected into the base of the next reactor. Each of the reactors is completely mixed, but short circulating is minimized due to the system’s operation in

Figure 1: Biological hydrolysis schematic.

Figure 2: Conventional anaerobic digestion (top) versus biological hydrolysis to meet Class B standards (middle) and Class A standards (bottom). The heating and holding process increases the organic loading rate of the pre-conditioned sludge and the total suspended solids operating level of the digesters.

continued overleaf...

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CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

WASTEWATER

TABLE 2: In just five short years, a sewage plant is transformed from an energy consumer to an energy producer. Biological hydrolysis was a first and crucial step in this process.

Pre-year 2007

2007

2009

% sludge treated

51%

86%

100%

100%

100% + FW

Digester volume

16,400 m3

16,400 m3

25,200 m3

20,800 m3

25,200 m3

Electricity produced

1.9 MWe

2.9 MWe

4.0 MWe

4.0 MWe

+5.75 MWe

reverse cascading batch flow. This ensures that all sludge entering the R1 vessel spends the majority of the design HRT within the biological hydrolysis system, prior to entering the digester. Batch transfer through six reactor vessels essentially represents a plug flow across the entire process. Biological hydrolysis, combined with the system’s ideal retention time and operational strategy, promotes acidification. Sludge exiting the system is expected to have high volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, which conditions sludge for biogas conversion downstream in the anaerobic digester.

Beginning 2012

In addition to operating at 42°C, biological hydrolysis systems include Monsal 55, an enhanced treatment step that incorporates pasteurization. The technology was developed by Monsal Limited, a company that was acquired by GE Water & Process Technologies in 2014. With Monsal 55, reactors R4 through R6 function at an elevated temperature of 55°C. Operation is a true batch hold process, whereby vessels R5 and R6 operate in parallel and the entire vessel contents are held to be safely pasteurized. Biological hydrolysis systems can accommodate feed sludge with a dry solids concen-

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End 2012

tration of up to 8%. Sludge exiting the system still has a 6% to 8% dry solids concentration. However, since the natural hydrolysis process reduces viscosity drastically, it has characteristics similar to raw sludge at 2% to 3% dry solids concentration. The biological hydrolysis process uses reactor vessels, heat exchangers and gas compressors, for mixing and transfer. The steel tanks used for heating are epoxy or glass lined and insulated and cladded to ensure energy efficiency. The process offers an economical alternative to building more digester volume and can even free up capacity for other organic solids.

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The technology’s footprint is compact, which means it can be retrofitted into existing facilities in a non-invasive way. Plants can continue to utilize existing digester mixing, as biological hydrolysis alters sludge microstructure, not the manner in which it is processed. Biological hydrolysis enables an increase in the digester organic loading rate, thereby enhancing biogas production and reducing biosolids mass. By processing the biogas yield through a combined heat and power gas engine, operators can produce electricity using the biogas byproduct as well as recapture all required heat.

THEORY IN PRACTICE

Since 2002, 12 Monsal biological hydrolysis plants have been commissioned, mainly in the United Kingdom. The plants range in size from 4,500 to 40,000 tonnes of dry solids sludge feed (tds) per year. These installations have allowed plant owners to maximize indigenous sludge digestion as well as import additional sludge volumes

and/or other organic wastes to treat in existing digester infrastructure. Bristol Sewage Treatment Facility is a 300 ML per day wastewater treatment plant. Prior to incorporating biological hydrolysis, the plant had primary clarifiers and sequential batch reactors. The plant only treated 51% of its sludge for digestion, with the remainder being lime stabilized. The plant’s desire to become a regional sludge centre and to move towards energy-neutral operation led them to biological hydrolysis. The addition of this advanced process increased sludge treatment from 51% to 86% of both indigenous and imported sludge. Also, it increased power production from 1.9 MWe to 2.9 MWe. Following biological hydrolysis incorporation, biosolids holding tanks were repurposed to digesters to expand sludge capacity. This enabled 100% of the sludge to be treated. With volume exceeding need, two of the digesters were reallocated for digestion of imported biowaste feed. This ability to digest sludge and food waste at a co-located facility was

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timed perfectly, with a community ban on organics to landfills.

RENEWABLE ENERGY

The advanced anaerobic digestion process holds an abundance of opportunity for those willing to take the proactive step to incorporate the technology. For example, the Great Billing Water Recycling Centre, also in the UK, shows how biological hydrolysis can lead to energy-neutral wastewater operations. Commissioned in 2009, their Monsal 55 system enabled a 300% increase in biogas production and 4.2 MWe of renewable electricity generation. This was achieved through biological hydrolysis, which more than tripled the sludge treated through the digestion portion of the plant. Projects such as these show that biological hydrolysis can transform plants from energy consumers to energy producers. Robert Hacking is with GE Water and Process Technologies (Canada). Email: robert.hacking@ge.com

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August 2016 | 47


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

GREENHOUSE GASES

Keeping industry competitive is a vital part of any carbon cap-and-trade program By Patrick Sackville, Paul Acchione and Michael Monette

A

growing number of national and subnational jurisdictions have taken steps to develop plans to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). While it is clear that consensus regarding climate change and momentum to address its threats are both building, jurisdictions have yet to coalesce around a common strategy. This has created a patchwork of solutions and encouraged “free riders”. The Government of Ontario is finalizing plans to launch a cap-and-trade program that will serve as the central component for their ongoing strategy to combat climate change. The Ontario Society of Professional Engineers (OSPE) realizes how critically important the planning, design and execution of this

48 | August 2016

policy is for the province’s environment and economy, and they have voiced their support and criticisms throughout the public consultation process.

EFFORTS TO CORRAL CARBON IN CANADA

In the Canadian context, provincial governments have largely taken a leadership role in curbing emissions and transitioning toward low-carbon economies. Broadly speaking, current climate initiatives in Canada fall into one of two camps: carbon tax systems or cap-and-trade programs. Launched in 2008, British Columbia’s $30 per tonne carbon tax collects $1-billion annually. This is a revenue-neutral program whereby all funds are redistributed into the economy through a “tax-shift” for

businesses and households. Essentially, program revenues are redistributed to organizations and individuals that show environmental proactivity, improved stewardship, and realize energy efficiencies. This year, Alberta, ahead of environmental conservation, introduced a tax on carbon emissions. Levying an initial rate of $20 per tonne, this price will be raised to $30 after one year. Alberta’s government forecasts the carbon tax will collect $9.6-billion over the next five years, to be reinvested into the provincial economy to realize energy efficiencies. By contrast, in 2013, Quebec formally launched its cap-and-trade system, now linked with California as part of the Western Climate Initiative (WCI). This partnership created the largest carbon market

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


in North America and established the world’s first carbon market to be designed and operated by subnational governments of different countries. In February, Ontario introduced legislation to create a cap-and-trade program as part of the Climate Change and Low-Carbon Economy Act. Unlike carbon tax systems that do not place hard limits on emissions, cap-andtrade programs set a clear limit on GHG emissions. Under cap-and-trade, this limit is translated into tradable emission allowances, each typically equivalent to one metric tonne of carbon dioxide or equivalent. These are auctioned or allocated to regulated emitters on a regular basis. At the end of each compliance period, each emitter surrenders enough allowances to cover its actual emissions. The total number of available allowances decreases over time, to reduce the total amount of GHG emissions. By creating a market and a price for emissions reductions, the cap-and-trade system offers an environmentally effective and economically efficient response to climate change. Ultimately, cap-and-trade programs offer opportunities for the most costeffective emissions reductions. However, many challenging design issues must be addressed before initiating a capand-trade program in Ontario. A welldesigned market can achieve reduction goals in a cost-effective manner, and drive low-GHG innovation.

CREATING CONNECTIONS: ONTARIO’S CAP-AND-TRADE PROGRAM

While the scope and design of Ontario’s cap-and-trade system have yet to be determined, there is already a significant congruence between the California and Quebec regimes. For example, both systems cover the same GHGs and sectors, set the same emissions’ thresholds, and have virtually identical allocation methods. The significant parallels between Quebec and California’s cap-and-trade systems have enabled both markets to integrate quickly and seamlessly. Despite only officially linking carbon markets in 2014, they have already successfully held joint auctions of greenhouse gas allowances. Given Ontario’s desire to link with the cap-and-trade markets in Quebec and California, their systems will likely play a significant role in dictating the approach Ontario takes. The significant similarities between Quebec and California’s systems are largely dictated by detailed policy architecture prepared over a period of several years by the Western Climate Initiative (WCI) and their partner jurisdictions. The WCI, launched in 2007, consists of a voluntary coalition of U.S. states and Canadian provinces, including Ontario. They have developed guidelines to facilitate mutual cooperation in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in particular by developing and implementing a North American system for cap-and-trade.

Ontario has also consistently emphasized the importance of linking cap-andtrade systems with other jurisdictions. In 2008, Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and Quebec Premier Jean Charest signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with respect to a provincial and territorial cap-and-trade initiative. The MOU heavily contemplated and encouraged linkages to other GHG cap-and-trade systems, noting that such linkages could reduce GHGs at lower costs, allow for larger trading volumes, improve liquidity, and speed the pace of innovation, among other benefits. Shortly after entering into the MOU, Ontario demonstrated its further commitment to a cap-and-trade system by introducing enabling legislation with Bill 185, the Environmental Protection Amendment Act, 2009 (Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trade). The Bill provided the government with broad authority to implement emissions trading systems and establish rules relating to the scope, trading, distribution, and administration of such a system. Like the WCI and MOU, Bill 185 explicitly contemplates integration with other regional cap-and-trade systems.

THE NEED FOR A BORDER ADJUSTMENTS FRAMEWORK

A cap-and-trade mechanism functions properly when it is connected with other global entities to facilitate a trading structure and force GHG reductions. This complex arrangement needs to work by continued on page 74

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August 2016 | 49


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

funding through their “Rainwater Rewards Program” for projects that control stormwater run-off and/or minimize release of contaminated stormwater. Funding for this program is limited to an annual maximum rebate of $75,000. If applications are received in excess of this amount, they are considered in the following year. Rebates are granted after an application is approved, construction of the measure is completed and final documentation is submitted and accepted by the City. Other jurisdictions and conservation authorities offer grants and incentives to implement controls. The stormwater credit programs in Kitchener/Waterloo and Mississauga are based on the ongoing performance of a control measure that accomplishes goals in: peak flow reduction, stormwater treatment, reduction of stormwater volume, and pollution prevention.

Developing new stormwater infrastructure funding and optimization plans

PEAK FLOW REDUCTION

By Rosanna DiLabio

I

ncreasingly, we have seen much property damage from storm events. It is believed that the July 2013 flash flood in Toronto was Ontario’s most costly natural disaster at more than $850 million in damages. The 1998 Quebec ice storm cost $1.5 billion. Last August, Calgary experienced toonie-sized hail, flash flooding, power outages and damaging winds, during a thunder storm that ripped the roof off a low rise apartment building. The Calgary Sun estimated that the downtown core received as much as 90 mm of rain within one hour. The historical average August rainfall for the City is 40 to 60 mm in total! This type of weather is no longer a rarity. Climate change is real and Canadian cities are taking action. Last May, Mississauga City Council in Ontario passed a by-law allowing the City to charge for stormwater discharge. This will establish a sustainable source of funding to offset the costs of operating and maintaining stormwater infrastructure. These funds have traditionally come from development fees and property taxes, but, with little undevel-

50 | August 2016

oped land left in Mississauga, an alternative to funding had to be established. Many other cities and municipalities have developed similar programs. The Halifax Regional Municipality in Nova Scotia implemented stormwater fees as early as 1997 which, at the time, were based on water consumption. In line with best industry practice, fees are now based on a property’s impervious area. Interestingly, similar fees have been implemented in the U.S. for many years. According to the USEPA, by April 2009, more than 800 communities and districts had established stormwater utilities to fund the costs of regulatory compliance, planning, maintenance, capital improvements, and repair or replacement of infrastructure.

STORMWATER CREDIT PROGRAMS AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

Some jurisdictions, such as Mississauga and Kitchener/Waterloo in Ontario are offering credits for residential and non-residential properties. Others, such as Victoria, British Columbia, are offering

Reducing the rate at which water is discharged from a property is commonly referred to as peak flow reduction. This involves the use of technologies to temporarily store precipitation on-site and allow for it to slowly drain into the municipal stormwater system. This alleviates bottlenecks in the drainage systems already in place, which would be costly to upgrade. Examples of these devices include roof drainage controls, drainage inlet controls, catch basin orifice plates for parking lots, above- and below-ground cisterns and stormwater ponds. When implementing property drainage controls, care must be taken to prevent water from entering buildings, which can cause structural or building condition problems and lead to property damage insurance claims. Overland water drainage onto adjacent properties must also be avoided. In Mississauga, non-residential property owners can reduce their annual stormwater charges by up to 40% by implementing peak flow reduction technologies. Stormwater drainage controls implemented during property development can qualify for immediate credit. By integrating drainage controls with the capital plan of a property, credits can be maximized. For instance, the incremental cost to install below ground cisterns to control

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


stormwater drainage will be significantly less during a parking lot repaving project compared to a stand-alone project.

STORMWATER TREATMENT

Removing solids and other contaminants from stormwater prior to discharge can also qualify for credits in some jurisdictions. Examples include: stormwater retention ponds, oil and grit separators, infiltration trenches, bio-filters, rain gardens and green roofs. Some properties may already have stormwater interceptors in place and can apply for available credits in their jurisdiction. A stormwater retention pond could also qualify for credits, under both the peak flow reduction and stormwater treatment categories.

REDUCTION OF STORMWATER VOLUME

This technology is ideal for properties that have yet to be developed. Stormwater run-off is reduced by capturing and reusing a portion of the precipitation and reducing loads on the municipal system. The use of permeable pavements for hard surfaces or harvesting rainwater for reuse as irrigation, process water reuse, or for use as grey water, can be implemented to obtain stormwater credits in this category. Implementing these types of measures during property development is more cost-effective than post development. Properties that have incorporated elements of the LEED Standard may be ideal candidates for credits in this area.

POLLUTION PREVENTION

Preventing pollution from entering the stormwater system is important. Unlike the sanitary sewer system, stormwater receives little, if any, treatment prior to discharge to the receiving water body. Credits are available for those properties in Kitchener/Waterloo and Mississauga that have implemented pollution prevention practices. For commercial sites, this could include parking lot sweeping programs and deicing programs that minimize the application of rock salt. For industrial sites, spill prevention and contingency plans and good chemical handling/storage procedures will help minimize chemical discharges from the property. www.esemag.com

RECOMMENDED NEXT STEPS

Property owners should inventory stormwater measures and controls on their properties and submit credit applications where possible to reduce charges. When considering the implementation of stormwater control measures for larger properties, experienced consultants should be engaged to review proposed measures in conjunction with existing building condi-

tions to prevent building water infiltration issues. For those properties that have yet to be developed, it is advantageous to ensure they are developed to maximize stormwater credits. Rosanna DiLabio is with Pinchin Ltd. Email: rdilabio@pinchin.com

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CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Urban flood risk is increasing due to the impacts of climate change.

Complete stormwater system modelling assesses rainfall event risks By Andrew Wiens and John van der Eerden

D

uring small storm events, surface runoff is captured by stormwater collection systems, typically made up of pipes and channels. This conveyance infrastructure is commonly referred to as the minor system, since it is intended to manage minor, or frequently occurring, rainfall events. Ultimately, this system drains to a watercourse, lake or the ocean. During extreme rainfall events, the capacity of the minor system is often exceeded. Excess runoff results in surface ponding and conveyance within public right-of-ways and private property. The surface conveyance system is commonly referred to as the major system because it is intended to manage extreme, or infrequently occurring, rainfall events. Ponding and conveyance may result in property damage, including vehicles, buildings, and contents. It may also cause other economic losses due to road closures, infrastructure damage, and business interruptions. In some cases, surface flooding may also create public safety risks. Most municipalities design the minor system for a rainfall event that occurs on average once every five or ten years. This risk-based approach means that the major

52 | August 2016

system is expected to be active from time to time. The annual probability of surface flooding ranges from 10% to 20%. Events larger than this are intended to be managed by the major system without causing damage to private or public property. Due to climate change, the frequency and severity of major overland flows are increasing. However, detailed evaluation of urban drainage infrastructure during extreme events is computationally demanding. It requires significantly more data and complex analytical techniques than traditional stormwater evaluations.

ADVANCEMENTS IN STORMWATER MODELLING

Minor system modelling often involves a dynamic one-dimensional representation of the enclosed drainage system. Analysis and design typically strive to prevent surface flooding during a minor system rainfall event. Although this approach can identify locations where the minor system surcharges to the ground surface, it is not able to effectively quantify surface flows, ponding depths, or flood extents. Furthermore, it cannot effectively differentiate between flooding that is merely a

nuisance, and flooding that causes property damage and/or a risk to public safety. The major system includes aboveground stormwater conveyance systems such as roads, creeks and rivers. Major system modelling considers ground surface ponding and surface flow routing. These surface flow paths can be represented as either one- or two-dimensional flow. Traditional modelling approaches for evaluating urban drainage systems treat the minor and major systems independently. This approach allows effective analysis of the minor system and identifies the release of flows to the major system. However, it omits the dynamic exchange of flows between the two systems, and in particular the re-introduction of flows into the minor system when capacity allows. An important consideration that is often overlooked with traditional modelling approaches is that surface water collection capacity is not unlimited. This assumption of unlimited inlet capacity is often inherent to model development as a result of catchment hydrographs being deposited directly into the minor system via manholes. This common approach ignores the potential limiting inflow

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


capacity of catch basins, catch basin leads, and surcharged pipes. As a result, traditional modelling approaches are unable to identify surface flooding as a result of inadequate surface collection capacity during extreme rainfall events. This may become an important consideration, particularly where water bypasses surcharged catch basins and flows overland to downstream locations.

EVALUATING THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS

Quantifying flood damage from extreme rainfall events using traditional approaches is not reliable. The primary challenge in urban flood risk assessments is to develop realistic surface flood extents and depths. This can be achieved by developing a dual-drainage model that includes dynamically coupled minor and major systems. The most robust type of dual-drainage model utilizes a two-dimensional hydraulic model to analyze overland flow paths and surface flooding areas. Output data from this type of model identifies surface flooding areas as well as

surface flow paths across the landscape. Dual-drainage models with a two-dimensional surface model are an excellent tool for identifying areas that are vulnerable to flooding during extreme rainfall events. The model results are able to identify the onset of flooding relative to storm return period. They can also pinpoint vulnerable structures and infrastructure and clearly identify where flood mitigation improvements are beneficial. For example, flooding within a roadway during an extreme rainfall event, while problematic, does not always translate into an economic loss. Conversely, shallow surface flows that enter low-lying private property may have serious consequences. This distinction highlights the inability of traditional modelling approaches to reliably identify economic losses. It stems from the realization that stormwater surcharging to the ground surface cannot be used as a proxy to identify infrastructure at risk and the corresponding economic losses. Following the development of reliable surface flood extent and depth data, we can quantify economic losses within the study

area. For example, to quantify building damage we can combine a spatial database of relevant building attribute data with depth-damage curves. Repeating this analysis allows the quantification of economic losses for various return periods. Furthermore, the comparison of damages under existing and improved conditions allows us to quantify the expected reduction in economic damages resulting from alternative improvement scenarios. By comparing the estimated reduction in economic losses against the capital cost estimate for the proposed improvement, we can develop a credible, transparent and defensible cost-benefit ratio and/or marginal cost estimate. Detailed dual drainage modeling can clearly distinguish the full spectrum of surface flows. These range from areas of nuisance surface flooding to severe flooding resulting in property damage and threats to public safety. This allows appropriate decisions to be made relative to the value of losses and the cost to mitigate them. Municipalities can then consider continued overleaf...

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August 2016 | 53


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

and quantify the benefits of structural as well as non-structural flood mitigation works. Given that coupled two-dimensional surface flow models can directly identify surface flood extents and depths at a fine resolution, it is possible to make detailed comparisons of alternatives. Finding the optimum balance between various stormwater management techniques can be challenging. Coupled dynamic two-dimensional modelling facilitates comparison of these approaches. For example, implementing source controls, best management practices and conveyance upgrades can be compared against the potential to protect properties via introduction of grading or minimum building elevation (MBE) by-laws. The latter approaches can result in significant savings by taking a long-term view of flood protection. For example, the long implementation time associated with an MBE by-law might dovetail with the anticipated impacts of climate change. Associated Engineering has completed many detailed dual-drainage modelling

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Identifying the optimal benefit-cost ratio to guide stormwater infrastructure improvements.

assignments across western Canada. Initially, some of these assignments were reactive, due to extreme rainfall events which typically exceeded the 100-year

return period and caused significant property damage. More recently, some clients are pursuing this form of analysis on a proactive basis in order to identify

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Environmental Science Engineering 3.375” x 4.875” Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine March 2016


areas currently at risk and those where the risk is increasing due to the impacts of climate change. The results of these analyses allow them to quantify the reduction in economic losses realized by constructing more resilient systems. As well, these improvements can be prioritized based on the level of risk and magnitude of economic benefits. This type of analysis requires specialized hydraulic software which can complete two-dimensional overland flooding analysis

coupled with the minor system. Associated Engineering has successfully utilized commercial software packages to complete this type of hydraulic analysis and on some projects the model can work down to the catch basin level. Based on experience, this form of analysis can cover urban areas over 10,000 ha in size and servicing over 100,000 structures. However, such large scale projects result in a new form of challenge: data management. Each coupled 1D-2D model simulation may take several days to run and produce

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over 100 gigabytes of data. By evaluating multiple rainfall periods and several different improvement scenarios, it is quite easy to produce terabytes of output data. Sifting through this information to review results and compute economic damages can be an overwhelming experience. In order to efficiently evaluate big data projects, Associated Engineering developed proprietary software for calculating economic losses as a result of rainfall and river-based flooding. While this form of urban drainage analysis is not yet mainstream, current computing power has made it feasible. By combining available GIS data and specialized software, municipalities can begin the process of proactively assessing the risk of extreme rainfall events and planning for the future, knowing they are receiving high returns on their investment. Andrew Wiens, P.Eng. and John van der Eerden, M.Eng., P.Eng. are with Associated Engineering. Email: wiensa@ae.ca, or vandereerdenj@ae.ca

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ES &E’S ANNUAL GUIDE TO Government Agencies, Associations and Academic Institutions Associations............................. 56 Government Agencies............. 60 Colleges and Universities........ 65

ES&E’S GUIDE TO ASSOCIATIONS ABORIGINAL WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO

PO Box 340, 41C Duke St, Dryden ON P8N 2Z1 Sara Campbell saracampbell@knet.ca T: 807-387-3740 F: 807-223-2572 www.awwao.org

AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 420 Fort Duquesne Blvd, One Gateway Ctr, 3rd Fl Pittsburgh PA 15222-1435 Stephanie Glyptis sglyptis@awma.org T: 412-232-3444 F: 412-232-3450 www.awma.org

ALBERTA ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

18303-60 Ave, Edmonton AB T6M 1T7 Chic Shaw dhshaw@aowma.com T: 877-489-7471 F: 780-486-7414 www.aowma.com

ALBERTA WATER & WASTEWATER OPERATORS ASSOCIATION

10806 - 119 St., Edmonton AB T5H 3P2 Dan Rites drites@awwoa.ca T: 780-454-7745 F: 780-454-7748 www.awwoa.ab.ca

AMERICAN CONCRETE PIPE ASSOCIATION 350-8445 Freeport Parkway, Irving TX 75063-2595 Matt Childs mchilds@concrete-pipe.org T: 972-506-7216 F: 972-506-7682 www.concrete-pipe.org

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS Fl23 - 120 Wall St, New York NY 10005-4020 June Wispelwey junew@aiche.org T: 203-702-7660 F: 203-755-5177 www.aiche.org

AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 1400-1200 Main St, Kansas City MO 64105-2100 Scott Grayson sgrayson@apwa.net T: 816-472-6100 F: 816-472-1610 www.apwa.net

AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION

BLOOM CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABILITY

6666 W Quincy Ave, Denver CO 80235-3098 David LaFrance dlafrance@awwa.org T: 303-794-7711 www.awwa.org

213-1540 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 7W5 Jeannie Freeborn jfreeborn@bloomcentre.com T: 905-842-1115 F: 905-842-1119 www.bloomcentre.com

ASSOCIATED ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSORS OF CANADA INC.

BRITISH COLUMBIA GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION

PO Box 490, Fenelon Falls ON K0M 1N0 Erik Luzak erik@aesac.ca T: 877-512-3722 www.aesac.ca

ASSOCIATION OF CONSULTING ENGINEERING COMPANIES CANADA

420-130 Albert St., Ottawa ON K1P 5G4 Randi Goddard rgoddard@acec.ca T: 613-236-0569 F: 613-236-6193 www.acec.ca

ASSOCIATION OF MUNICIPALITIES OF ONTARIO 801-200 University Ave, Toronto ON M5H 3C6 Pat Vanini pvanini@amo.on.ca T: 416-971-9856 F: 416-971-6191 www.amo.on.ca

BRITISH COLUMBIA WATER & WASTE ASSOCIATION 620-1090 West Pender St. Vancouver BC V6E 2N7 Tanya McQueen tmcqueen@bcwwa.org T: 604-433-7824 F: 604-433-9859 www.bcwwa.org

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ACCREDITATION INC.

102-2934 Baseline Rd, Ottawa ON K2H 1B2 Charles Brimley cbrimley@cala.ca T: 613-233-5300 F: 613-233-5501 www.cala.ca

ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO LAND SURVEYORS

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PETROLEUM PRODUCERS

1043 McNicoll Ave, Toronto ON M1W 3W6 Blain Martin blain@aols.org T: 416-491-9020 F: 416-491-2576 www.aols.org

2100-350 - 7 Ave SW, Calgary AB T2P 3N9 Jeff Gaulin jeff.gaulin@capp.ca T: 403-267-1100 F: 403-261-4622 www.capp.ca

ASSOCIATION OF POWER PRODUCERS OF ONTARIO

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF RECYCLING INDUSTRIES

1602-25 Adelaide St. E, Toronto ON M5C 3A1 David Butters david.butters@appro.org T: 416-322-6549 F: 416-481-5785 www.appro.org

1906-130 Albert St., Ottawa ON K1P 5G4 Tracy Shaw tracy@cari-acir.org T: 613-728-6946 F: 705-835-6196 www.cari-acir.org

ATLANTIC CANADA WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

PO Box 5050 Stn LCD 1, 867 Lakeshore Rd Burlington ON L7R 4A6 Dr Chris Marvin chris.marvin@ec.gc.ca T: 289-780-0378 www.cawq.ca

PO Box 28141, Dartmouth NS B2W 6E2 Clara Shea contact@acwwa.ca T: 902-434-6002 F: 902-435-7796 www.acwwa.ca

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS

AUDITING ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

1801 Alexander Bell Dr., Reston VA 20191 Thomas W. Smith board@asce.org T: 703-295-6300 www.asce.org

9 Forest Rd, Whitby ON L1N 3J6 Todd Hall admin@auditingcanada.com T: 905-404-9511 www.auditingcanada.com

56 | August 2016

1334 Riverside Rd, Abbotsford BC V2S 8J2 Debbie Lamont secretary@bcgwa.org T: 604-530-8934 F: 604-630-8846 www.bcgwa.org

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION ON WATER QUALITY

CANADIAN BROWNFIELDS NETWORK 2800-14th Ave Suite 210, Markham ON L3R 0E4 Diane Gaunt info@canadianbrownfieldsnetwork.ca T: 416-491-2886 F: 416-491-1670 www.canadianbrownfieldsnetwork.ca

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS CANADIAN CENTRE FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY

135 Hunter St East, Hamilton ON L8N 1M5 Eleanor Westwood clientservices@ccohs.ca T: 905-572-2981 F: 905-572-4500 www.ccohs.ca

CANADIAN CONCRETE PIPE & PRECAST ASSOCIATION

200-447 Frederick St., Kitchener ON N2H 2P4 Gerry Mulhern gerry.mulhern@ccppa.ca T: 519-489-4488 F: 519-578-6060 www.ccppa.ca

CANADIAN COPPER & BRASS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

210-65 Overlea Blvd, Toronto ON M4H 1P1 Stephen Knapp aknapp@coppercanada.ca T: 416-391-5599 F: 416-391-3823 www.coppercanada.ca

CANADIAN COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT LABORATORIES (CCIL)

PO Box 41027, Ottawa ON K1G 5K9 Francine Fortier-ThéBerge ccil@magma.ca T: 613-746-3919 F: 613-746-4324 www.ccil.com

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION APPROVALS BOARD

200-308 11th Ave SE., Calgary AB T2G 0Y2 Victor Nowicki geobacnb@nbnet.nb.ca T: 403-233-7484 F: 403-264-6240 www.cecab.org

CANADIAN GENERAL STANDARDS BOARD 6B1-11 Laurier St., Place Du Portage III Gatineau QC K1A 1G6 Begonia Lojk begonia.lojk@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca T: 819-956-0383 F: 819-956-5740 www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

CANADIAN NETWORK OF ASSET MANAGERS

Bay 3, 4905 – 102 Avenue SE, Calgary, AB T2C 2X7 T: 403-244-7821 www.cnam.ca

CANADIAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 1150-45 O’Connor St, Ottawa ON K1P 1A4 Larry Frevert lfrevert@apwa.net T: 202-408-9541 F: 202-408-9542 www.cpwa.net

CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING

CANADIAN WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

CORRUGATED STEEL PIPE INSTITUTE

11-1010 Polytek St., Ottawa ON K1J 9H9 Robert Haller rhaller@cwwa.ca T: 613-747-0524 F: 613-747-0523 www.cwwa.ca

2A-652 Bishop St N, Cambridge ON N3H 4V6 Ray Wilcock rjwilcock@cspi.ca T: 519-650-8080 F: 519-650-8081 www.cspi.ca

CANADIAN WATER NETWORK (UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO)

CSA GROUP

200 University Ave W, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1 Dr Simon Courtenay scourtenay@cwn-rce.ca T: 519-888-4567 www.cwn-rce.ca

178 Rexdale Blvd, Toronto ON M9W 1R3 Gianluca Arcari gianluca.arcari@csagroup.org T: 416-747-4000 www.csagroup.org

CANADIAN WATER QUALITY ASSOCIATION

PO Box 19206, Golden CO 80402 Jon R Runge info@dipra.org T: 205-718-4218 www.dipra.org

504-295 The West Mall, Toronto ON M9C 4Z4 Kevin Wong k.wong@cwqa.com T: 416-695-3068 F: 416-695-2945 www.cwqa.com

CANADIAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION 320-176 Gloucester St., Ottawa ON K2P 0A6 Rick Ross executivedirector@cwra.org T: 613-237-9363 F: 613-594-5190 www.cwra.org

CANADIAN WIND ENERGY ASSOCIATION 710-1600 Carling Ave, Ottawa ON K1Z 1G3 Lejla Latifovic lejlalatifovic@canwea.ca T: 613-234-8716 F: 613-234-5642 www.canwea.ca

CENTRE FOR ADVANCEMENT OF TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGIES University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1 T: 519-888-4770 www.cattevents.ca

CHEMISTRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 805-350 Sparks St, Ottawa ON K1R 7S8 Nancy Marchi nmarchi@canadianchemistry.ca T: 613-237-6215 F: 613-237-4061 www.canadianchemistry.ca

COMPOST COUNCIL OF CANADA

16 Northumberland St, Toronto ON M6H 1P7 Susan Antler santler@compost.org T: 416-535-0240 F: 416-536-9892 www.compost.org

CONSERVATION COUNCIL OF ONTARIO

521-300 rue St-Sacrement, Montreal QC H2Y 1X4 Doug Salloum doug.salloum@csce.ca T: 514-933-2634 F: 514-933-3504 www.csce.ca

129-215 Spadina Ave, Toronto ON M5T 2C7 Marcus Paul info@weconserve.ca T: 416-533-1635 www.weconserve.ca

CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION

CONSULTING ENGINEERS OF ONTARIO

178 Rexdale Blvd, Toronto ON M9W 1R3 Gianluca Arcari gianluca.arcari@csagroup.org T: 416-747-4000 www.csa.ca

405-10 Four Seasons Pl, Toronto ON M9B 6H7 Barry Steinberg bsteinberg@ceo.on.ca T: 416-620-1400 F: 416-620-5803 www.ceo.on.ca

www.esemag.com

ASSOCIATIONS

DUCTILE IRON PIPE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION

EARTH ENERGY SOCIETY OF CANADA 7885 Jocktrail Rd, RR1, Richmond ON K0A 2Z0 Bill Eggertson eggertson@earthenergy.ca T: 613-222-6920 F: 613-822-4987 www.earthenergy.ca

ECO CANADA

200-308 - 11th Ave SE, Calgary AB T2G 0Y2 Michael Kerford info@eco.ca T: 403-233-0748 F: 403-269-9544 www.eco.ca

GEORGIAN BAY ASSOCIATION

18 Fenwick Ave, Toronto ON M4V 2J8 Bob Duncanson rduncanson@georgianbay.ca T: 416-219-4248 www.georgianbay.ca

INTERNATIONAL OZONE ASSOCIATION PO Box 97075 c/o Southern Nevada Water Authority Las Vegas NV 89193 info3zone@ioa-pag.org T: 480-529-3787 F: 480-533-3080 www.ioa-pag.org

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SCIENCES 413-4246 Albert St., Regina SK S4S 3R9 Gordon Huang gordon.huang@uregina.ca T: 306-337-2306 F: 306-337-2305 www.iseis.org

INTERNATIONAL ULTRAVIOLET ASSOCIATION 208-7720 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda MD 20814 Deborah Martinez deb.martinez@iuva.org T: 240-437-4615 F: 240-209-2340 www.iuva.org

MANITOBA ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

100-62 Albert St, Winnipeg MB R3B 1E9 Margo Shaw mshaw@meia.mb.ca T: 204-783-7090 F: 204-783-6501 www.meia.mb.ca

August 2016 | 57


ASSOCIATIONS

GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS

MANITOBA WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 1600, 215-9 Saskatchewan Ave W Portage La Prairie MB R1N 3P1 Iva Last mwwa@mymts.net T: 204-239-6868 F: 204-239-6872 www.mwwa.net

NORTHERN TERRITORIES WATER & WASTE ASSOCIATION 201-4817 49th St, Yellowknife NT X1A 3S7 Jennifer Spencer info@ntwwa.com T: 867-873-4325 F: 867-669-2167 www.ntwwa.com

MARITIME PROVINCES WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION

PO Box 28142, Dartmouth NS B2W 6E2 Clara Shea contact@mpwwa.ca T: 902-434-8874 F: 902-434-8859 www.mpwwa.ca

PO Box 10308, Thunder Bay ON P7B 6T8 Kristen Oliver admin@noma.on.ca T: 807-683-6662 www.noma.on.ca

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS & TECHNOLOGISTS

22-1525 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 0B2 Alan Korell alan.korell@municipalengineers.on.ca T: 289-291-6472 F: 289-291-6477 www.municipalengineers.on.ca

MUNICIPAL WASTE ASSOCIATION

PO Box 1894, 11B Suffolk St E, Guelph ON N1H 7A1 Ben Bennett ben@municipalwaste.ca T: 519-823-1990 F: 519-823-0084 www.municipalwaste.ca

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CLEAN WATER AGENCIES 1816 Jefferson Place NW, Washington DC 20036-2505 Ken Kirk kkirk@nacwa.org T: 202-833-2672 F: 888-267-9505 www.nacwa.org

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL BALANCING BUREAU 8575 Grovemont Circle, Gaithersburg MD 20877 Glenn Fellman glenn@nebb.org T: 301-977-3698 F: 301-977-9589 www.nebb.org

NATIONAL GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION 601 Dempsey Rd, Westerville OH 43081 Kevin McCray kmccray@ngwa.org T: 614-898-7791 F: 614-898-7786 www.ngwa.org

NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION 207-90 O’Leary Ave, St. John’s NL A1B 2C7 Ted Lomond ted@neia.org T: 709-237-8390 www.neia.org

NORTH AMERICAN HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 700-12011 Tejon St., Westminster CO 80234 Dave Waddell dave.waddell@kingcounty.gov T: 877-292-1403 F: 303-458-0002 www.nahmma.org

58 | August 2016

404-10 Four Seasons Place, Etobicoke ON M9B 6H7 David Thomson dthomson@oacett.org T: 416-621-9621 F: 416-621-8694 www.oacett.org

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF SEWAGE INDUSTRY SERVICES PO Box 184, Bethany ON L0A 1A0 Mark Brosowski vicepresident@oasisontario.on.ca T: 877-202-0082 www.oasisontario.on.ca

ONTARIO BACKFLOW PREVENTION ASSOCIATION PO Box 265, Campbellville ON L0P 1B0 Cameron Gray cgray@proactivewatersolutions.com T: 416-708-1263 www.obpaonline.com

ONTARIO COALITION FOR SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE Darla Campbell executivedirector@on-csi.ca T: 416-562-9082 www.on-csi.ca

ONTARIO CONCRETE PIPE ASSOCIATION Fl2-447 Frederick St, Kitchener ON N2H 2P4 Gerrard Mulhern gerry.mulhern@ocpa.com T: 519-489-4488 F: 519-578-6060 www.ocpa.com

ONTARIO ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION 410-215 Spadina Ave, Toronto ON M5T 2C7 Alex Gill agill@oneia.ca T: 416-531-7884 F: 416-665-2032 www.oneia.ca

ONTARIO ENVIRONMENT NETWORK PO Box 192, Georgetown ON L7G 4T1 oen@oen.ca T: 905-925-9217 www.oen.ca

ONTARIO GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION 48 Front Street E, Strathroy ON N7G 1Y6 KC Craig Stainton executivedirector@ogwa.ca T: 519-245-7194 F: 519-245-7196 www.ogwa.ca

ONTARIO MUNICIPAL WATER ASSOCIATION 2593 Tenth Concession, Collingwood ON L9Y 3Y9 Ed Houghton ehoughton@omwa.org T: 705-443-8472 F: 705-443-4263 www.omwa.org

ONTARIO ONSITE WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 2336, 198 Sophia St, Peterborough ON K9J 7Y8 Denis Orendt info@oowa.org T: 855-905-6692 F: 705-742-7907 www.oowa.org

ONTARIO POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATION (OPCEA) PO Box 28009, Barrie ON L4N 7W1 Kelly Madden opcea@opcea.com T: 705-725-0917 F: 705-725-1068 www.opcea.com Our association is a non-profit organization dedicated to assisting member companies in the promotion of their equipment and services to the pollution control market sector of Ontario. Originally founded in 1970, the OPCEA has since grown to over 180 member companies whose fields encompass a broad spectrum of equipment and services for the air and water pollution control marketplace.

ONTARIO PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 22-1525 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 0B2 Terry Hardy info@opwa.ca T: 647-726-0167 F: 289-291-6477 www.opwa.ca

ONTARIO RURAL WASTEWATER CENTRE University Of Guelph, School Of Engineering Guelph ON N1G 2W1 Katherine Rentsch krentsch@uoguelph.ca T: 519-8242-4120 F: 519-836-0227 www.orwc.uoguelph.ca

ONTARIO SEWER & WATERMAIN CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION 300-5045 Orbitor Dr Unit 12 Mississauga ON L4W 4Y4 Giovanni Cautillo giovanni.cautillo@oswca.org T: 905-629-7766 F: 905-629-0587 www.oswca.org

ONTARIO SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 502-4950 Yonge St, Toronto ON M2N 6K1 Sandro Perruzza sperruzza@ospe.on.ca T: 416-223-9961 F: 416-223-9963 www.ospe.on.ca

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS

ASSOCIATIONS

ONTARIO WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

RESEAU ENVIRONNEMENT

3-2005 Clark Blvd, Brampton ON L6T 5P8 Rob Cook rcook@owma.org T: 905-791-9500 F: 905-791-9514 www.owma.org

750-255 Boul. Cremazie Est, Montreal QC H2M 1L5 Maelle Beurier eau@reseau-environnement.com T: 514-270-7110 F: 514-874-1272 www.reseau-environnement.com

6517 Mississauga Rd Unit C, Mississauga ON L5N 1A6 Heather Tyrrell heather@weao.org T: 416-410-6933 F: 416-410-1626 www.weao.org

ONTARIO WATERPOWER ASSOCIATION

SASKATCHEWAN ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY & MANAGERS ASSOCIATION

601 Wythe St, Alexandria VA 22314-1994 Eileen O’Neill eoneill@wef.org T: 800-666-0206 F: 703-684-2492 www.wef.org

264-380 Armour Rd, Peterborough ON K9H 7L7 Melanie Boyd mboyd@owa.ca T: 866-743-1500 www.owa.ca

ONTARIO WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION 100-922 The East Mall Dr., Toronto ON M9B 6K1 Laura Libralesso llibralesso@owwa.ca T: 416-231-1555 F: 416-231-1556 www.owwa.ca

PO Box 22009 RPO Wildwood, Saskatoon SK S7H 5P1 Al Shpyth ashpyth@ecometrix.ca T: 844-801-6233 www.seima.sk.ca

www.owwea.ca The Ontario Water Works Equipment Association (OWWEA) is an organization that represents its membership within the waterworks industry of Ontario. Membership consists of manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, agents and contractors dedicated to serving the Ontario municipal market.

PLASTICS PIPE INSTITUTE

825-105 Decker Court, Irving TX 75062 Tony Radoszewski tonyr@plasticpipe.org T: 469-499-1044 F: 469-499-1063 www.plasticpipe.org

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS ONTARIO 101-40 Sheppard Ave W., Toronto ON M2N 6K9 Gerard McDonald gmcdonald@peo.on.ca T: 416-224-1100 www.peo.on.ca

PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 102-211 Columbia St, Vancouver BC V6A 2R5 Jeannette Austin info@pwabc.ca T: 877-356-0699 www.pwabc.ca

PULP & PAPER TECHNICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 1070-740 Notre-Dame St W, Montreal QC H3C 3X6 Greg Hay ghay@paptac.ca T: 514-392-0265 F: 514-392-0369 www.paptac.ca

www.esemag.com

WATER ENVIRONMENT ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO

WATER ENVIRONMENT FEDERATION

SASKATCHEWAN ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 449 Haviland Crescent, Saskatoon SK S7L 5B3 Travis Wolfe twolfe@sowma.ca T: 306-988-2102 F: 855-420-6336 www.sowma.ca

SASKATCHEWAN WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

ONTARIO WATERWORKS EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATION

PO Box 7831 Stn Main, Saskatoon SK S7K 4R5 Kelly Kish glokel@sasktel.net T: 306-668-1278 www.swwa.ca

SOLAR & SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOCIETY OF CANADA INC.

WATER FOR PEOPLE - CANADA

400-245 Consumers Rd, Toronto ON M2J 1R3 Joan Conyers jconyers@waterforpeople.org T: 416-499-4042 F: 416-499-4687 www.waterforpeople.org Water For People-Canada is a charitable nonprofit international humanitarian organization dedicated to the development and delivery of clean, safe water and sanitation solutions in developing nations.

WATER SUPPLY ASSOCIATION OF B.C.

1700 Des Broussailles Terrace, Ottawa ON K1C 5S9 Bill To president@sesci.org T: 613-824-1710 www.sesci.org

PO Box 22022, Penticton BC V2A 8L1 Toby Pike pike@sekid.ca T: 250-497-5407 www.wsabc.ca

SOLID WASTE ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA

WESTERN CANADA ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF B.C.

650-1100 Wayne Ave, Silver Spring MD 20910 Sara Bixby sbixby@swana.org T: 800-467-9262 F: 301-589-7068 www.swana.org

STEEL TANK INSTITUTE /STEEL PLATE FABRICATORS ASSOCIATION 944 Donata Ct., Lake Zurich IL 60047 Noel Zak nzak@steeltank.com T: 847-438-8265 F: 847-438-8766 www.steeltank.com

THE GREEN BUILDING INITIATIVE

PO Box 342, 110-174 Wilson St Victoria BC V9A 7N7 Garth Millan gmillan@wcowma-bc.com T: 250-218-8045 F: 250-381-6667 www.wcowma-bc.com

WESTERN CANADA WATER PO Box 1708, 240 River Ave Cochrane AB T4C 1B6 Audrey Arisman aarisman@wcwwa.ca T: 877-283-2003 F: 877-283-2007 www.wcwwa.ca

PO Box 80010, Portland OR 97280 Vicki Worden info@thegbi.org T: 503-274-0448 www.thegbi.org

WATER & WASTEWATER EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION, INC.

304-540 Fort Evans Rd, Leesburg VA 20176-3379 Vanessa Leiby vanessa@wwema.org T: 703-444-1777 www.wwema.org

August 2016 | 59


ES&E’S GUIDE TO PROVINCIAL AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ENVIROMENTAL AGENCIES Alberta

Ministry of Environment & Parks Main Floor, Great West Life Bldg, 9920–108 St, Edmonton, AB T5K 2M4 Tel: 1-877-944-0313 Information Centre Main Floor, Great West Life Bldg, 9920-108 St, Edmonton, AB T5K 2M4 Tel: 1-877-310-3773 24-hour Environmental Emergencies Hotline Tel: 1-800-222-6514

Regional Offices: Peace Region Floor 3-Provincial Bldg,9261-96 Ave, Peace River, AB T8S 1T4 Tel: 780-624-7133 Lower Athabasca Region Floor 2-Provincial Bldg, 9303 Beaverhill Rd, Lac La Biche, AB T0A 2C0 Tel: 780-623-5240 Red Deer/North Saskatchewan Region Twin Atria Bldg, 4999-98 Ave, Suite 111, Edmonton, AB T6B 2X3 Tel: 780-427-7617 South Saskatchewan Region 303 Deerfoot Square Bldg, 2938-11 St NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7L7 Tel: 403-297-7602 Upper Athabaska Region Floor 1-Provincial Bldg, 5020-52 Ave, Whitecourt, AB T7S 1N2 Tel: 780-778-7165

Local Offices: Camrose Tel: 780-679-1274 Edson Tel: 780-723-8363 Fort McMurray Tel: 780-743-7472 Grand Prairie Tel: 780-538-5260 High Level Tel: 780-926-5263 Lac La Biche Tel: 780-623-5394 Lethbridge Tel: 403-381-5322 Medicine Hat Tel: 403-529-3151 Red Deer Tel: 403-340-7052 Rocky Mountain House Tel: 403-845-8272 Sherwood Park Tel: 780-464-7955 Slave Lake Tel: 780-849-7282 Spruce Grove Tel: 780-960-8600

British Columbia

Ministry of Environment Head Office 1150 McKenzie Ave, Victoria, BC V8W 9V7 Tel: 250-952-5102

60 | August 2016

Environmental Emergencies (Toll Free) 1-800-663-3456 Report Pollution 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP) Environmental Appeal Board PO Box 9425, Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9V1 Tel: 250-387-3464 Environmental Assessment Office PO Box 9426, Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V9W 9V1 Tel: 250-387-9408 Parks & Conservation Service Division PO Box 9339 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 Environmental Protection Division PO Box 9339 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 Tel: 250-356-0121 Environmental Stewardship Division Floor 2-10470 - 152nd St, Surrey, BC V3R 0Y3 Tel: 604-582-5200 Strategic Policy Division PO Box 9335 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 Tel: 250-387-9666 Environmental Emergencies & Land Remediation Branch PO Box 9342 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 Tel: 250-387-9971 Environmental Standards Branch PO Box 9341 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 Tel: 250-387-9933 Water Strategies & Conservation PO Box 9362 Stn. Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M2 Tel: 250-356-2791

Manitoba

Regional Offices:

Eastern Region 284 Reimer Ave Unit B, Steinbach, MB R5G 0R5 Tel: 204-346-6346 Northwest Region 22-2nd Ave, Dauphin, MB R7N 3E5 Tel: 204-622-2153 Northern Region PO Box 28, 59 Elizabeth Dr, Thompson, MB R8N 1X4 Tel: 204-677-6704 Interlake Region 75-7th Ave, Gimli, MB R0C 1B0 Tel: 204-642-6134 Central Region 25 Tupper St N, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3K1 Tel: 204-239-3186 South Western Region 1129 Queen’s Ave, Brandon, MB R7A 1L9 Tel: 204-726-6563

Vancouver Island Region 2080 Labieux Rd, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6J9 Tel: 250-751-3100 Lower Mainland Region Floor2,10470-152nd St, Surrey, BC V3R 0Y3 Tel: 604-582-5200 Thompson Region 1259 Dalhouse Dr, Kamloops, BC V2C 5Z5 Tel: 250-371-6200 Kootenay Region 205 Industrial Rd G, Cranbrook, BC V1C 7G5 401-333 Victoria St, Nelson, BC V1L 4K3 Tel: 250-354-6333 Cariboo Region 400-640 Borland St, Williams Lake, BC V2G 4T1 Tel: 250-398-4530 Skeena Region 3726 Alfred Ave, PO Box 5000, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0 Tel: 250-847-7260 Omineca Region Parks & Protected Areas Div/Environmental Stewardship Div. 4051-18th Ave, Prince George,BC V2N 1B3 Tel: 250-565-6135 Environmental Protection Div/Conservation Officer Service/Water Stewardship Division 325-1011 - 4th Ave, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9 Tel: 250-565-6135 Okanagan Region 102 Industrial Pl, Penticton, BC V2A 7C8 Tel: 250-490-8200 Peace Region 400-10003-110 Ave, Fort St.John, BC V1J 6M2 Tel: 250-787-3411

Ministry of Environment Conservation, Strategic Policy & Coordination Branch Public Information & Inquiries 200 Saulteaux Cres, PO Box 38, Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3 Tel: 1-800-214-6497 Clean Environment Commission 305-155 Carlton St, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3H8 Tel: 204-945-0594 Conservation Agreements Board c/o Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corp 200-1555 St.James St, Winnipeg, MB R3H 1B5 Tel: 204-784-4350 Office of Drinking Water Branch 1007 Century St, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0W4 Tel: 204-945-7084 Water Services Board 2010 Currie Blvd Unit 1A, PO Box 22080, Brandon, MB R7A 6Y9 Tel: 204-726-6076 Round Table for Sustainable Development (MRT) 160-123 Main St, Winnipeg, MB R3C 1A5 Tel: 204-945-1869 Manitoba Water Council 200 Saulteaux Cres/PO Box 38, Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3 Environmental Emergency 24 hour Service Tel: 204-945-4888

Regional Offices:

New Brunswick

Ministry of Environment Head Office Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-444-5119 Environmental Emergency 24 Hour Service Tel: 1-800-565-1633 Air Quality Section Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-457-4844 Assessment & Planning Appeal Board City Centre, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-453-2126 Climate Change Secretariat Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-457-4844

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Drinking Water Source Protection Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-457-4846 Policy & Planning Divison Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 Tel: 506-453-3700

Regional Offices: Region 1 – Bathurst 159 Main St, Room 202, PO Box 5001, Bathurst, NB E2A 3Z9 Tel: 506-547-2092 Region 2 – Miramichi 316 Dalton Ave, Miramichi, NB E1V 3N9 Tel: 506-778-6032 Region 3 – Moncton 355 Dieppe Blvd, PO Box 5001, Moncton, NB E1C 8R3 Tel: 506-856-2374 Region 4 – Saint John 8 Castle St, PO Box 5001, Saint John, NB E2L 4Y9 Tel: 506-658-2558 Region 5 – Fredericton Analytical Services Lab, 12 McGloin St, Fredericton, NB E3A 5T8 Tel: 506-444-5149 Region 6 – Grand Falls 65 Broadway Blvd, PO Box 5001, Grand Falls, NB E3Z 1G1 Tel: 506-473-7744

Newfoundland/ Labrador Ministry of Environment Environment & Conservation Head Office: Floor 4, West Block, Confederation Bldg, PO Box 8700, St.John’s, NL A1B 4J6 Tel: 709-729-2563 Environment & Conservation Branch: Floor 3-Noton Bldg, PO Box 2006, Corner Brook, NL A2H 6J8 Tel: 709-637-2375 Drinking Water & Wastewater Section: Tel: 709-729-4048 Environmental Spill Emergencies (24 hr service) Tel: 709-772-2083

Regional Offices: Corner Brook Floor 9, Sir Richard Squires Bldg, 84 Mount Bernard Ave, PO Box 2006, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G2 Tel: 709-637-2035 Grand Falls-Windsor Provincial Bldg, 3 Cromer Ave, Grand Falls-Windsor, NL A2A 1W9 Tel: 709-292-4997 Happy Valley-Goose Bay 2 Tenth St, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, NL A0P 1E0 Tel: 709-896-7981

Northwest Territories & Nunavut Government of the Northwest Territories Ministry of Environment 600-5102 - 50th Ave, PO Box 1320, Yellowknife, NT X1A 3S8 Tel: 867-767-9231 24-Hour Spill Report Line Tel: 867-920-8130

www.esemag.com

Regional Offices: DEHCHO REGION Floor 2, Milton Bldg, PO Box 240, Fort Simpson, NT X0E 0N0 Tel: 867-695-7450

Local Office: Fort Laird Tel: 867-770-4300

Inuvik Region PO Box 2749, Shell Lake, NT X0E 0T0 Tel: 867-678-6650

Local Offices: Aklavik Tel: 867-978-2248 Fort McPherson Tel: 867-952-2200 Paulatuk Tel: 867-580-3021 Tsiigehtchic Tel: 867-953-3605 Tuktoyaktuk Tel: 867-977-2350 Ulukhaktok Tel: 867-396-4505

North Slave Region 3083 Bretzlaff Dr, PO Box 2668, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P9 Tel: 867-873-7181

Local Office: Tlicho Tel: 867-392-6511

Sahtu Region PO Box 130, Norman Wells, NT X0E 0V0 Tel: 867-587-3500 Local Offices: Deline Tel: 867-589-3421 Fort Good Hope Tel: 867-598-2271 Tulita Tel: 867-588-3441

South Slave Region Sweetgrass Bldg, PO Box 900, Fort Smith, NT X0E 0P0 Tel: 867-872-6400

Local Offices: Fort Providence Tel: 867-699-3002 Fort Resolution Tel: 867-394-4596 Hay River Tel: 867-875-5550 Lutsel K’e Tel: 867-370-3141 Government of Nunavut Ministry of Environment Inuksugait Plaza/ PO Box 1000 Station 1320, Iqaluit, NU X0A 0H0 Tel: 867-975-7700 24-Hour Spill Response Line: 867-920-8130

GOVERNMENT

Conservation offices: BAFFIN REGION: Arctic Bay Tel: 867-439-9945 Cape Dorset Tel: 867-897-8932 Clyde River Tel: 867-924-6235 Grise Fiord Tel: 867-980-4164 Hall Beach Tel: 867-928-8507 Igloolik Tel: 867-934-8999 Iqaluit Tel: 867-979-7800 Kimmirut Tel: 867-939-2004 Pangnirtung Tel: 867-473-8937 Pond Inlet Tel: 867-899-8819 Qikqtarjuaq Tel: 867-927-8966 Resolute Tel: 867-252-3879 Sanikiluaq Tel: 867-266-8098 KIVALLIQ REGION: Arviat Tel: 867-857-2976 Baker Lake Tel: 867-793-2944 Chesterfield Inlet Tel: 867-898-9130 Coral Harbour Tel: 867-925-8823 Rankin Inlet Tel: 867-645-8084 Repulse Bay Tel: 867-462-4002 Whale Cove Tel: 867-896-9187 KITIKMEOT REGION: Cambridge Bay Tel: 867-983-4164 Gjoa Haven Tel: 867-360-7605 Kugluktuk Tel: 867-982-7450

Nova Scotia

Ministry of the Environment 1903 Barrington St, Suite 2085, PO Box 442, Halifax NS B3J 2P8 1894 Barrington St, Suite 1800, PO Box 442, Halifax, NS B3J 2P8 Tel: 902-424-3600 Emergency After Hours Tel: 800-565-1633 Environmental Monitoring & Compliance Tel: 877-936-8476 or 902-424-2547

Regional Offices: Central HRM, East Hants, West Hants Suite 115-30 Damascus Rd, Bedford Commons, Bedford, NS B4A 0C1 Tel: 902-424-7773

Eastern CBRM, Victoria County, Northern Inverness Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 Tel: 902-563-2100 Port Hawkesbury & Sydney Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 Tel: 902-563-2100

August 2016 | 61


GOVERNMENT

GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS

Richmond County, Southern Inverness, Mulgrave, Auld’s Cove Suite 12-218 MacSween St, Port Hawkesbury, NS B9A 2J9 Tel: 902-625-0791 Sydney Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 Tel: 902-563-2100

Northern Amherst, Antigonish, Truro, Pictou 36 Inglis Pl, PO Box 824, Truro, NS B2N 4B4 Tel: 902-893-5880 Antigonish & Guyborough Counties 205-155 Main St, Antigonish, NS B2G 2B6 Tel: 902-863-7389 Colchester County 36 Inglis Pl, PO Box 824, Truro, NS B2N 4B4 Tel: 902-893-5880 Cumberland County 71 E Victoria St, Amherst, NS B4H 1X7 Tel: 902-667-6205 Pictou County 20 Pumphouse Rd, RR 3, New Glasgow, NS B2H 5C6 Tel: 902-396-4194

Western Bridgewater, Kentville, King, Annapolis & Yarmouth 136 Exhibition St, Kentville, NS B4N 4E5 Tel: 902-679-6086 Digby, Yarmouth & Shelbourne Counties 55 Starrs Rd, Unit 9, Yarmouth, NS B5A 2T2 Tel: 902-742-8985 Lunenburg & Queens Counties 81 Logan Rd, Bridgewater, NS B4V 3J8 Tel: 902-543-4685

Ontario

Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Floor 11-Ferguson Block, 77 Wellesley St W, Toronto, ON M7A 2T5 Tel: 416-325-4000 Public Information Centre Floor 2-Macdonald Block, 900 Bay St, Toronto, ON M7A 1N3 Tel: 416-325-4000, 800-565-4923 Corporate Management Division Floor 14-135 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 Tel: 416-314-6426 Advisory Council on Drinking Water Quality & Testing Standards Floor 3-40 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 Tel: 416-212-7779 Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA) Floor 17-1 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 Tel: 416-775-0500, 800-667-6292 Pesticides Advisory Committee Floor 7-Foster Bldg, 40 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 Tel: 416-314-9230 Walkerton Clean Water Centre 20 Ontario Rd, PO Box 160, Walkerton, ON N0G 2V0 Tel: 519-881-2003, 866-515-0550 Drinking Water Management Division Floor 14-135 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 Tel: 416-314-4475 Environmental Programs Division Floor 14-135 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 Tel: 416-326-7203 Environmental Sciences & Standards Division Floor 14-135 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 Tel: 416-314-6358

62 | August 2016

Environmental Monitoring & Reporting Branch West Wing, Floor 1-125 Resources Rd, Toronto, ON M9P 3V6 Tel: 416-235-6300 Laboratory Services Branch 125 Resources Rd, Toronto, ON M9P 3V6 Tel: 416-235-5743 Standards Development Branch Floor 7-Foster Bldg, 40 St.Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 Tel: 416-327-5519 Climate Change & Environmental Policy Division Floor 11-77 Wellesley St W, Toronto, ON M7A 2T5 Tel: 416-314-6338 Operations Division Floor 8-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 Tel: 416-314-6378 Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) 605-1075 Bay St, Toronto, ON M5S 2B1 Tel: 416-325-3377, 800-701-6454

District Offices: CENTRAL REGION: Toronto District Office Floor 9-5775 Yonge St, Place Nouveau, Toronto, ON M2M 4J1 Tel: 416-326-6700 Halton-Peel District Office 300-4145 North Service Rd, Burlington, ON L7L 6A3 Tel: 905-319-3847, 800-335-5906 York-Durham District Office Floor 5-230 Westney Rd S, Ajax, ON L1S 7J5 Tel: 905-427-5600, 800-376-4547 Barrie District Office 1201-54 Cedar Pointe Dr, Barrie, ON L4N 5R7 Tel: 705-739-6441, 800-890-8511 WEST CENTRAL REGION: Hamilton Regional & District Office Floor 12-119 King St W, Hamilton, ON L8P 4Y7 Tel: 905-521-7640, 800-668-4557 Guelph District Office Floor 4-1 Stone Rd W, Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2 Tel: 519-826-4255, 800-265-8658 Niagara District Office Floor 9, Garden City Tower, 301 St.Paul St E, Ste 15, St Catharines, ON L2R 7R4 Tel: 905-704-3900, 800-263-1035 EASTERN REGION: Kingston Regional & District Office Unit 3-1259 Gardiners Rd, PO Box 22032, Kingston, ON K7M 8S5 Tel: 613-549-4000, 800-267-0974 Belleville Area Office 345 College St E, Belleville, ON K8N 5S7 Tel: 613-962-9208, 800-860-2763 Cornwall Area Office Floor 1-113 Amelia St, Cornwall, ON K6H 3P1 Tel: 613-933-7402, 800-860-2760 Ottawa District Office 103-2430 Don Reid Dr, Ottawa, ON K1H 1E1 Tel: 613-521-3450, 800-860-2195 Peterborough District Office Floor 2-300 Water St, Robinson Pl., South Tower, Peterborough, ON K9J 8M5 Tel: 705-755-4300, 800-558-0595 (within 705, 613 & 905) NORTHERN REGION: Thunder Bay Regional & District Office 331-435 James St S, Thunder Bay, ON P7E 6S7 Tel: 807-475-1205, 800-875-7772 (within 807 & 705)

Kenora Area Office 808 Robertson St, Kenora, ON P9N 1X9 Tel: 807-468-2718, 888-367-7622 (within area) North Bay Area Office 16&17-191 Booth Rd, North Bay, ON P1A 4K3 Tel: 705-497-6865, 800-609-5553 (within area) Sault Ste. Marie Area Office 110-70 Foster Dr, Sault Ste Marie, ON P6A 6V4 Tel: 705-942-6354 Sudbury District Office 1201-199 Larch St, Sudbury, ON P3E 5P9 Tel: 705-564-3237, 800-890-8516 (within 705) Timmins District Office Government Complex, 5520 - Hwy #101 E, Bag 3080, South Porcupine, ON P0N 1H0 Tel: 705-235-1500, 800-380-6615 SOUTHWESTERN REGION: London & District Office 733 Exeter Rd, London, ON N6E 1L3 Tel: 519-873-5000, 800-265-7672 Owen Sound District Office Floor 3, 101-17th St E, Owen Sound, ON N4K 0A5 Tel: 519-371-2901, 800-265-3783 Sarnia District Office 1094 London Rd, Sarnia, ON N7S 1P1 Tel: 519-336-4030, 800-387-7784 Windsor Area Office 620-4510 Rhodes Dr, Windsor, ON N8W 5K5 Tel: 519-948-1464, 800-387-8826

Prince Edward Island

Ministry of the Environment Floor 4, Jones Bldg 11 Kent St, PO Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8 Tel: 902-368-5028, 866-368-5044 Ministry of the Environment Floor 4, Shaw Building South, 95 Rochford St, PO Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8 Tel: 902-368-5024 Environmental Emergencies Tel: 1-800-565-1633

Quebec

Ministere du Developpement durable, de l’Environnement, et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques Èdifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul Rene-Levesque Est, 30e etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3911 Ministere du Developpement durable, de l’Environnement, et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques 141, avenue du President-Kennedy, 8e etage, Montreal, QC H2X 1Y4 Tel: 514-864-8500 Riding of Viau 3750, boul Cremazie Est, bureau 402, Montreal, QC H2A 1B6 Tel: 514-728-2474 Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE)/ Environmental Public Hearing Board Edifice Lomer-Gouin, 575 rue Saint-Amable, bureau 2.10, Quebec, QC G1R 6A6 Tel: 418-643-7447 Kativik Environmental Quality Commission (KEQC) & Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) Edifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul. Rene-Levesque Est, 6 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3950 ext.4810

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Societe des etablissements en plein air du Quebec (SEPAQ) Place de la Cite, Tour Cominar, 2640, boul Laurier, 13 etage Quebec, QC G1V 5C2 Tel: 418-890-6527 Societe quebecoise de recuperation et de recyclage (RECYC-QUEBEC) - Head Office 300, rue Saint-Paul, bureau 411, Quebec, QC G1K 7R1 Tel: 418-643-0394 (RECYC-QUEBEC) - Monteal Office 141 President-Kennedy Ave, Floor 8, Montreal, QC H2X 1Y4 Tel: 514-352-5002 Analyse et expertise regionales et du centre de controle environnemental du Quebec/ Regional Analysis & Expertise Edifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul Rene-Levesque est, 30e etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3861 Bureau des changements climatiques/ Climate Change 675, boul Rene-Levesque est, 6e etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3868 Direction generale des changements climatiques, de l’air et des relations intergouvernementales 675, boul Rene-Levesque est, 30e etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3861 Centre de controle environnemental du Quebec Ediface Marie-Guyart, 675 boul Rene-Levesque est, 30e etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 Tel: 418-521-3861 De l’ecologie et du developpement durable Tel: 418-521-3861 Services a la gestion & au milieu terrestre/ Administrative Services & Earth Environment Tel: 418-521-3861 Centre d’expertise en analyse environnemental du Quebec (CEAEQ) #E-2-220, 2700, rue Einstein, Sainte-Foy, QC G1P 3W8 Tel: 418-643-1301 Centre d’expertise hydrique du Quebec Tel: 418-521-3866

Mauricie & Centre-du-Quebec: Trois-Rivieres 100, rue Laviolette, bureau 102, Trois-Rivieres, QC G9A 5S9 Tel: 819-371-6581 Nicolet 1579, boul Louis-Frechette, Nicolet, QC J3T 2A5 Tel: 819-293-4122 Victoriaville 62, rue St-Jean-Baptiste, S-02, Victoriaville, QC G6P 4E3 Tel: 819-752-4530

ADDRESSES DU MINISTERE EN REGION: Bas-Saint-Laurent & Gaspesie-Iles-de-la-Madeleine: Rimouski 212, ave Belzile, Rimouski, QC G5L 3C3 Tel: 418-727-3511 Sainte-Anne-des-Monts 124, 1re rue O, Sainte-Anne-des-Monts, QC G4V 1C5 Tel: 418-763-3301 Iles-de-la-Madeleine 125 chemin du Park, Suite #104, Cap-aux-Meules, QC G4T 1B3 Tel: 418-986-6116 Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean: Saguenay 3950, boul Harvey, 4e etage, Saguenay, QC G7X 8L6 Tel: 418-695-7883

Outaouais: Gatineau 170, rue de l’Hotel-de-Ville, bureau 7.340, Gatineau, QC J8X 4C2 Tel: 819-772-3434

Capitale-Nationale & Chaudiere-Appalaches: Quebec 1175, boul Lebourgneuf, bureau 100, Quebec, QC G2K 0B7 Tel: 418-644-8844 Sainte-Marie 675, route Cameron, bureau 200, Sainte-Marie, QC G6E 3V7 Tel: 418-386-8000 Montmagny 116, rue Saint-Jean-Baptiste O, bureau C, Montmagny, QC G5V 3B9 Tel: 418-248-0984

www.esemag.com

Estrie & Monteregie: Sherbrooke 770, rue Goretti, Sherbrooke, QC J1E 3H4 Tel: 819-820-3882 Longueuil 201, Place Charles-Le Moyne, 2e etage, Longueuil, QC J4K 2T5 Tel: 450-928-7607 Bromont 101, rue du Ciel, bureau 1.08, Bromont, QC J2L 2X4 Tel: 450-534-5424 Salaberry-de-Valleyfield 900, rue Leger, Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, QC J6S 5A3 Tel: 450-370-3085 Montreal, Laval, Lanaudiere & Laurentides: Montreal 5199, rue Sherbrooke E, bureau 3860, Montreal, QC H1T 3X9 Tel: 514-873-3636 Laval 850, boul Vanier, Laval, QC H7C 2M7 Tel: 450-661-2008 Repentigny 100, boul Industriel, Repentigny, QC J6A 4X6 Tel: 450-654-4355 Sainte-Therese 300, rue Sicard, bureau 80, Sainte-Therese, QC J7E 3X5 Tel: 450-433-2220 Joliette 1160, rue Notre Dame, Joliette, QC J6E 3K4 Tel: 450-752-6860

Abitibi-Temiscamingue & Nord-du-Quebec: Rouyn-Noranda 180, boul Rideau, 1er etage, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 1N9 Tel: 819-763-3333 Cote-Nord: Sept-Iles 818, boul Laure, Sept-Iles, QC G4R 1Y8 Tel: 418-964-8888 Baie-Comeau 20, boul Comeau, Baie-Comeau, QC G4Z 3A8 Tel: 418-294-8888

Saskatchewan

Ministry of the Environment 3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 Tel-800-567-4224, 306-787-2584 Environmental Emergency 24 hour Service 1-800-667-5799 Environmental Assessment Floor 4-3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 Tel: 306-787-7603

GOVERNMENT

Environmental Protection 112 Research Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7K 2H6 Tel: 306-933-6542 Environmental Support Division Floor 5-3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 Tel: 306-787-5737 SaskWater - Head Office 200-111 Fairford St E, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 1C8 Tel: 888-230-1111 SaskWater - Saskatoon 103-2103 Airport Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7L 6W2 Tel: 306-933-1118 SaskWater - Prince Albert 800 Central Ave (McIntosh Mall), Prince Albert, SK S6V 6G1 Tel: 306-953-2250

Field Offices:

Assiniboia Tel: 306-642-7242 Beauval Tel: 306-288-4710 Big River Tel: 306-469-2520 Buffalo Narrows Tel: 306-235-1740 Candle Lake Tel: 306-929-8400 Creighton Tel: 306-688-8812 Christopher Lake Tel: 306-982-6250 Dorintosh Tel: 306-236-7680 Estevan Tel: 306-637-4600 Fort Qu’Appelle Tel: 306-332-3215 Hudson Bay Tel: 306-865-4400 Humboldt Tel: 306-682-6726 Kindersley Tel: 306-463-5458 La Ronge Tel: 306-425-4234 Leader Tel: 306-628-3100 Lloydminster Tel: 306-825-6430 Loon Lake Tel: 306-837-2410 Maple Creek Tel: 306-662-5434 Meadow Lake Tel: 306-236-7557 Melfort Tel: 306-752-6214 Melville Tel: 306-728-7480 Moose Jaw Tel: 306-694-3659 Nipawin Tel: 306-862-1790 North Battleford Tel: 306-446-7416 Outlook Tel: 306-867-5560 Pierceland Tel: 306-839-6250 Pinehouse Lake Tel: 306-884-2060 Preeceville Tel: 306-547-5660 Prince Albert Tel: 306-953-2322 Regina Tel: 306-787-2080 Saskatoon Tel: 306-933-6240

August 2016 | 63


GOVERNMENT

GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS

Shaunavon Tel: 306-297-5433 Southend Tel: 306-758-6255 Spiritwood Tel: 306-883-8501 Stony Rapids Tel: 306-439-2062 Swift Current Tel: 306-778-8205 Wadena Tel: 306-338-6254 Weyburn Tel: 306-848-2344 Yorkton Tel: 306-786-1463

Yukon Territories

Environment Yukon 10 Burns Rd, PO Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 Tel: 800-661-0408 ext. 5652

24 Hour Yukon Spill Report Centre Tel: 867-667-7244 - Collect calls accepted Tel: 867-667-5683 - Regular Business Hours Climate Change Secretariat Tel: 867-456-5544, 800-661-0408 Ext 5544 Environmental Programs Branch 10 Burns Rd/PO Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 Tel: 867-667-5683, 800-661-0408 Ext 5683 Water Resources Branch 10 Burns Rd, PO Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 Tel: 800-661-0408 ext. 3171 Yukon Fish & Wildlife Management Board PO Box 31104, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5P7 Tel: 867-667-5715, 800-661-0408 Ext 5715 Conservation Services Branch 10 Burns Rd, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4Y9 Tel: 867-667-8005 Yukon Parks Branch Bldg 1271, 9029 Quartz Rd, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4P9 Tel: 867-667-5648 or 800-661-0408 Ext 5648 Yukon Environmental & Socio-Economic

Assessment Board (YESAB) 200-309 Strickland St, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2J9 Tel: 866-322-4040

Regional Offices:

Dawson City Bag 6050, Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0 Tel: 867-993-4040 Haines Junction PO Box 2126, Haines Junction, YT Y0B 1L0 Tel: 867-634-4040 Mayo PO Box 297, Mayo, YT Y0B 1M0 Tel: 867-996-4040 Teslin PO Box 137, Teslin, YT Y0A 1B0 Tel: 867-390-4040 Watson Lake PO Box 294, Watson Lake, YT Y0A 1C0 Tel: 867-536-4040 Whitehorse 203-309 Strickland St, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2J9 Tel: 867-456-3200

KEY GOVERNMENT WEB SITES: Government of Canada www.canada.ca Environment Canada www.ec.gc.ca Health Canada www.hc-sc.gc.ca Natural Resources Canada www.nrcan.gc.ca

National Research Council of Canada www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca Alberta www.alberta.ca British Columbia www.gov.bc.ca Manitoba www.gov.mb.ca

New Brunswick www.gnb.ca Newfound & Labrador www.gov.nl.ca Northwest Territories www.gov.nt.ca Nova Scotia www.novascotia.ca

Nunavut www.gov.nu.ca Ontario www.ontario.ca Prince Edward Island www.gov.pe.ca Quebec www.gouv.qc.ca

Saskatchewan www.gov.sk.ca Yukon Territory www.gov.yk.ca

You are invited to attend the

68th Annual Western Canada Water Conference & Exhibition October 4-7, 2016 Calgary Telus Convention Centre

For more information on registration, technical sessions, workshops, tours and networking opportunities visit wcw16.wcwwa.ca

64 | August 2016

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E’S AT A GLANCE GUIDE TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The following institutions offer diploma and degree programs in these areas: Environmental Biology, Environmental Control, Environmental Technician, Environmental Engineering/Technology, Environmental Health and Science, Environmental Studies, Environmental Toxicology, Environmental Health Engineering.

Alberta

Concordia University College of Alberta.................................................... Edmonton Grande Prairie Regional College..................................................................... Grande Prairie Keyano College....................................................................................................... Fort McMurray King’s University College................................................................................... Edmonton Lakeland College.................................................................................................... Vermillion, Lloydminster Lethbridge College................................................................................................ Lethbridge Medicine Hat College.......................................................................................... Medicine Hat Mount Royal University..................................................................................... Calgary Northern Alberta Institute of Technology................................................. Edmonton Olds College............................................................................................................. Olds SAIT Polytechnic.................................................................................................... Calgary Southern Alberta Institute of Technology................................................. Calgary University of Alberta........................................................................................... Edmonton University of Calgary........................................................................................... Calgary University of Lethbridge.................................................................................... Lethbridge

British Columbia

British Columbia Institute of Technology.................................................. Burnaby Camosun College................................................................................................... Victoria College of New Caledonia ................................................................................ Prince George Douglas College...................................................................................................... New Westminster Kwantlen Polytechnic University................................................................... Surrey Okanagan College.................................................................................................. Kelowna Royal Roads University....................................................................................... Victoria Simon Fraser University..................................................................................... Vancouver Thompson Rivers University............................................................................ Kamloops Trinity Western University................................................................................ Langley Vancouver Community College....................................................................... Vancouver University of British Columbia........................................................................ Vancouver, Okanagan University of Northern British Columbia................................................... Prince George University of Victoria.......................................................................................... Victoria

Manitoba

Assiniboine College.............................................................................................. Brandon Brandon University............................................................................................... Brandon Red River College.................................................................................................. Winnipeg University of Manitoba....................................................................................... Winnipeg University of Winnipeg....................................................................................... Winnipeg

New Brunswick

Mount Allison University................................................................................... Sackville New Brunswick Community College............................................................ Various St. Thomas University......................................................................................... Fredericton Université de Moncton....................................................................................... Moncton University of New Brunswick.......................................................................... Fredericton

Newfoundland

College of the North Atlantic........................................................................... Various Memorial University of Newfoundland...................................................... St. John’s

Cambrian College................................................................................................... Sudbury Canadore College................................................................................................... North Bay Carleton University............................................................................................... Ottawa Centennial College................................................................................................ Toronto Collège Boreal......................................................................................................... Sudbury Conestoga College................................................................................................. Kitchener Confederation College......................................................................................... Thunder Bay Durham College...................................................................................................... Oshawa Fleming College...................................................................................................... Lindsay Georgian College.................................................................................................... Barrie Humber College...................................................................................................... Toronto La Cite Collegiate................................................................................................... Ottawa Lakehead University............................................................................................ Thunder Bay Laurentian University.......................................................................................... Sudbury Loyalist College...................................................................................................... Belleville McMaster University........................................................................................... Hamilton Mohawk College..................................................................................................... Hamilton Niagara College Canada (Niagara-on-the-Lake)...................................... Niagara Nipissing University............................................................................................. North Bay Northern College................................................................................................... Various Queen’s University................................................................................................ Kingston Redeemer University College.......................................................................... Ancaster Royal Military College......................................................................................... Kingston Ryerson University............................................................................................... Toronto Sault College............................................................................................................ Sault Ste. Marie Seneca College........................................................................................................ Toronto Sheridan College.................................................................................................... Brampton St. Lawrence College............................................................................................ Cornwall Trent University..................................................................................................... Peterborough University of Guelph............................................................................................ Guelph University of Ontario Institute of Technology......................................... Oshawa University of Ottawa........................................................................................... Ottawa University of Toronto.......................................................................................... Toronto University of Waterloo........................................................................................ Waterloo University of Windsor......................................................................................... Windsor Western University (University of Western Ontario)........................... London Wilfrid Laurier University.................................................................................. Waterloo York University....................................................................................................... Toronto

Prince Edward Island

Holland College...................................................................................................... Charlottetown University of Prince Edward Island............................................................... Charlottetown

Québec

Bishop’s University............................................................................................... Sherbrooke Concordia University........................................................................................... Montréal École Polytechnique de Montréal.................................................................. Montréal McGill University................................................................................................... Montréal Université de Montréal....................................................................................... Montréal Université de Sherbrooke.................................................................................. Sherbrooke Université du Québec.......................................................................................... Various Université Laval...................................................................................................... Québec City

Nova Scotia

Saskatchewan

Nunavut

United States

Ontario

Yukon

Acadia University.................................................................................................. Wolfville Cape Breton University....................................................................................... Sydney Dalhousie University............................................................................................ Halifax Nova Scotia Community College.................................................................... Various Saint Mary’s University...................................................................................... Halifax St. Francis Xavier University............................................................................ Antigonish University of King’s College............................................................................. Halifax

Nunavut Arctic College................................................................................. Various

Algonquin College................................................................................................. Ottawa Brock University..................................................................................................... St. Catharines

www.esemag.com

First Nations University of Canada............................................................... Regina Luther College......................................................................................................... Regina University of Regina............................................................................................ Regina University of Saskatchewan............................................................................. Saskatoon Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology............ Various Saskatchewan Polytechnic ............................................................................... Various Northlands College............................................................................................... La Ronge

American Public University System.............................................................. Charles Town

Yukon College.......................................................................................................... Whitehorse

August 2016 | 65


PRODUCT & SERVICE SHOWCASE Granular Media Filtration AWI’s innovative filter optimization products include the Phoenix Underdrain and Panel Systems. These custom-engineered solutions guarantee uniform backwash water flow distribution, ensuring sustainable filter performance and long-service life of your media bed. With AWI’s site-specific approach to filter optimization, you can expect improved filter performance and the training and technical support to maintain your filters in optimum condition. T: 403-255-7377 E: info@awifilter.com W: www.awifilter.com

AWI

New Hybrid Chemical Metering Pump

Blue-White®’s new Proseries-M® MD-3 chemical metering pump provides precision chemical metering for the treatment of municipal water and wastewater. This hybrid pump has 2000:1 turndown, and provides smooth chemical dosing with no pulsation dampener required. With 380 strokes per minute, it provides a remarkably steady flow. The patent pending design is 50% more energy efficient than similar units now on the market. T: 714-893-8529 F: 714-894-9492 W: www.blue-white.com, www.proseries-m.com

Blue-White® Industries

Protect roads Summer is paving season and time to consider where new asphalt installations are most vulnerable. Denso’s modified polymer bitumen DensoBand and Reinstatement Tape protect roads by keeping water and ice out. Applied to the vertical face of the cold joint prior to the top lift, Denso roads tapes provide a 66 | August 2016

flexible, watertight seal, extending road life and protecting your investment. T: 416-559-7459 E: stuart@densona-ca.com W: www.densona.com

TILT Bioreactors TILT provides wastewater treatment for communities and industries. Based on liquid shipping containers, TILT is a very low cost, extremely compact, reliable, and robust package.  Easily transportable anywhere — ships by rail, truck and cargo ship. Can be placed outdoors. New units ready in stock and we have rental and temporary units available for BOD removal and nitrification. Available in MBBR, SBR and aeration tank versions. T: 888-575-8642 W: www.h2flowTILT.com

Denso

Fish protection Evoqua Water Technologies has innovated fish protection for intake systems for over 60 years. Our latest fine mesh overlay using Smoothtex® is so fine it captures larvae, and has a patent pending. This is great news for industries using intake systems who want to maintain a positive impact on the environment. T: 877-477-2787 E: screening@evoqua.com W: evoqua.com/intake

H2Flow Equipment   

Remote Monitoring Station Data Logger

Evoqua Water Technologies

The HOBO RX3000 is Onset’s next-generation remote data logging station that provides instant access to site-specific environmental data anywhere, anytime via the Internet. Onset’s web-based data logging systems enable real-time, remote access to your data via cellular, Wi-Fi, or Ethernet communications. They can be configured with a wide range of external sensors for measuring weather conditions outdoors, and energy, power and environmental conditions indoors. E: salesb@hoskin.ca, Burlington, ON E: salesv@hoskin.ca, Burnaby, BC E: salesm@hoskin.ca, Montreal, QC W: www.hoskin.ca

Intake equipment inspection To c o n t i n u e providing convenience to the customers who use large water intake systems, Evoqua Water Technologies now provides a free checklist for intake equipment inspection. When is the last time you checked your chain, water screens, or other equipment? Would you know what to look for? Find it and subscribe to our blog at www.evoqua.com/checklist. T: 877-477-2787 E: screening@evoqua.com

Evoqua Water Technologies

Hexa-Cover

Hoskin Scientific

The patented Hexa-Cover® system can be used on all kinds of liquids. It is the ideal solution for eliminating: • Evaporation • Organic growth • Emission • Odour. The unique design makes the elements interlock by wind pressure and ensures that the Hexa-Cover tiles mechanically constitute a coherent cover.  T: 519-469-8169 F: 519-469-8157 E: sales@greatario.com W: www.greatario.com

Greatario Engineered Storage Systems

Wading Discharge Measurement FlowTracker2 Wading Discharge Measurement Instrument is a modern approach for triedand-true ADV technology. It is intuitive, graphical and easy to use, and provides proven SonTek ADV accuracy, and new features requested by water professionals like you! E: salesb@hoskin.ca, Burlington, ON E: salesv@hoskin.ca, Burnaby, BC E: salesm@hoskin.ca, Montreal, QC W: www.hoskin.ca

Hoskin Scientific Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


Inline Pressure-Boost Pumps The Movitec 125 pump from KSB extends the company’s family of inline pressure boosting pumps with a new high-capacity model that can deliver up to 192 cubic metres/hour, at heads as high as 125 metres. These efficient, low-maintenance pumps are ideal for chemical plants, manufacturing industries, building services, irrigation systems and food and beverage processing. T: 905-568-9200 E: info@ksbcanada.com W: www.ksb.ca

KSB Pumps

Coatings and paints MSU Mississauga Ltd. offers a variety of coatings and paints for access hatches, including NSF/ANSI 61 Drinking Water Systems Compliant coatings. For more information, call Paul at 1-800-268-5336 x 28 or email paul@msumississauga.com T: 800-268-5336 F:  888-220-2213 E: paul@msumississauga.com W: www.msumississauga.com

MSU Mississauga

Fire hydrants

Metering Pump The gamma/ X Metering Pump introduces new technology for continuous and ver y low f low dosing situations. Intuitive features and programming help ensure ease-of-use and optimal chemical metering results. Discover more at gammax.prominent.ca T: 888-709-9933 F: 519-836-5226 E: sales@prominent.ca      W: www.prominent.ca      

Canada Valve™ Century, B-50-B18, B-50-B24, and Monitor style fire hydrants from Mueller Canada f e atu re t h e Mu e l l e r ® “E/M” Operating System. Designed to minimize the amount of required maintenance for optimal operation, the “E/M” system utilizes less lubricant and contains fewer moving parts than other fire hydrants. This results in years of trouble-free service under even the most extreme conditions. T: 705-719-9965 E: more-info@muellercanada.com W: www.muellercanada.com

ProMinent Fluid Controls

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Engineered metal doors

Protect underground structures from the effects of sub-zero temperatures. MSU Mississauga manufactures frost covers for maintenance holes and vaults which conform to a variety of regional standards such as Peel and York Regions. Call Paul at MSU Mississauga today to learn more at 1-800-268-5336 x 28. T: 800-268-5336 F: 888-220-2213 E: paul@msumississauga.com W: www.msumississauga.com

No limit switches, no reversing motor, no springs — these set the ORIVAL ORE/A electric automatic selfcleaning water filter ahead of competitors. ORE/A filters come with connections from 2” to 24”, having single unit capacities up to 12,000 USgpm. Units in parallel handle unlimited flow rates. Multi-layer 316L stainless steel screen elements are interchangeable, with filtration degrees from 3000 microns down to 5 microns.  T:  201-568-3311                     F:  201-568-1916 E: filters@orival.com          W: www.orival.com

USF Fabrication, Inc. manufacture a complete line of engineered metal doors for underground utility access. They have been fabricating solutions since 1916 with over 160,000 sq ft of manufacturing space. This allows them to offer the best lead times in the industry. Their friendly and knowledgeable staff is committed to providing customers with the right product for their application and shipping it when they need it. T: 604-552-7900 F: 604-552-7901 E: epsl@telus.net

MSU Mississauga

Orival

USF Fabrication

Oxidation Ditch Aerators

Fuchs Oxystar® aerators from Kusters Water are ideally suited for installation in oxidation ditches. The aerators are offered as self-aspirating or blower assisted, and can be easily installed into new or existing oxidation ditches. The Oxystar units are low maintenance and highly efficient and eliminate surface spray. Replacement of existing brushes or vertical style aerators is simple and cost-effective. Visit our website for additional product information, www.kusterwater.com or contact Jim Weidler at 205-987-8976, ext 1101. T: 800-264-7005 E: jim.weidler@kusterszima.com W: www.kusterswater.com

Kusters Water

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T: 905-578-9666               F: 905-578-6644 E: contact@spillmanaagement.ca             W: www.spillmanagement.ca

August 2016 | 67


PRODUCT & SERVICE SHOWCASE

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Power & Portability The Waterra PowerPack PP1 inertial pump actuator is powerful enough to lift water from over 60 m depth, using the Standard Flow System. Fully portable and weighing only 13 kg, the PowerPack is so compact that it fits onto a backpack frame, yet also provides outstanding pumping performance. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

Inertial Pumps 5 dustless and safe

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5 minimize polymer usage The Optimo dry polymer activation system is completely enclosed preventing polymer dust from escaping the wetting zone. The initial wetting stage is designed to reduce the maturation time of the polymer resulting in smaller maturation and storage tanks.

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1-888-709-9933 sales@prominent.ca www.prominent.ca 68 | August 2016

The Waterra inertial pump is an efficient, reliable and inexpensive pump suitable for purging and sampling groundwater monitoring wells. Its simplicity has allowed it to be adapted to a wide variety of sizes, making it suitable for numerous applications. It performs well in harsh environments that would ruin other more expensive pumps. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

Disposable groundwater filter

High Performance Automation Waterra’s portable, electrically operated Hydrolift-2 inertial pump actuator will eliminate the fatigue that can be experienced on large monitoring programs and will result in a big boost to your field sampling program. The Hydrolift-2 gives you the power and endurance you need — without breaking a sweat. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

Low-Speed Mixers Xylem’s Flygt 4400 low-speed mixers are ideal for gentle mixing of large volumes or when horizontal f low is essential. The mixing solution for activated sludge treatment including aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic zones, oxidation ditches, sludge treatment, ice prevention and oxygenation in lakes and harbors, the Flygt 4400 low-speed mixers provide the most efficient, clog-free solution for continuous duty, large scale applications. T: 855-XYL-H2O1 (855-995-4261) W: www.xylem.com/treatment

Xylem

The unique, open pleat geometry and 600 cm2 surface area of Waterra’s High Turbidity FHT-45 offers the most surface area available in a capsule-type filter today. High quality polyethersulphone 0.45 micron filter media provides maximum exposure and excellent particle retention above the target micron size range, while ensuring that you will not lose filtration media to blinding. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E NEWS ES&E NEWS BC TO ADDRESS AQUIFER WATER QUALITY

Five decades of excellence in infrastructure planning & engineering

The British Columbia government will take a series of immediate steps toward ensuring safe drinking water for approximately 200 residents near Spallumcheen, in the north Okanagan region. Residents within the Steele Springs Water District have been under a water-quality advisory since 2014, because of elevated nitrate levels in their local drinking water source, Hullcar aquifer 103. The region has seen intensive agriculture activity for the past century. Previous analysis suggests a combination of factors is likely affecting the Hullcar aquifer and it will take multiple Consulting • Engineering • Construction • Operation actions by provincial and local government, agriculture industry and the community to improve water quality. The aquifer is unconfined and it is difficult to Black&Veatch_ND.14_ProCard_TP.indd 1 ascertain if nitrates are coming from any one source.

Markham, ON 905-747-8506 Vancouver, BC 604-251-5722 Edmonton, AB 780-455-4300 WeKnowWater@BV.com www.bv.com

2014-11-12 10:29 AM

CORAL REEFS CONTINUE TO DECLINE

Researchers have concluded that coral reefs are declining around the world because a combination of factors — overfishing, nutrient pollution, and pathogenic disease — ultimately become deadly in the face of higher ocean temperatures, A study published in Nature Communications, based on one of the largest and longest field experiments done on this topic, suggests that the widespread coral deaths observed in recent decades are being caused by this combination of multiple local stressors and global warming.

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Divers studying coral experimental plots

The findings were made by researchers from six institutions following a threeyear experiment that simulated both overfishing and nutrient pollution on a coral www.esemag.com

August 2016 | 69


ES&E NEWS

Engineers and Environmental Consultants 1-800-265-9662 www.rjburnside.com

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years

reef in the Florida Keys. The large body of field data collected over an extended period of time helped resolve some of the fundamental questions about the cause of coral reef declines, scientists said. About 25% to 35% of the corals on the Great Barrier Reef are dying right now. During 2014-2016, large portions of tropical reef across the planet experienced bleaching, and this past April, 90% of the Great Barrier Reef bleached as part of a massive El Nino event. 12:10 PM In addition to helping to sort out the effects of known stressors like overfishing and nutrient pollution, the researchers made one bizarre and totally unexpected finding. In normal conditions, parrotfish, like many other species, are essential to the health of coral reefs, nibbling at them to remove algae and causing no permanent damage. But, in one part of the experiment, corals were so weakened by nitrogen and phosphorus pollution that when parrot fish would bite them, 62% of the corals would die. A normally healthy fish-coral interaction had been turned into a deadly one.

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Ontario’s Environmental Commissioner, Dianne Saxe, has released a series of report cards rating how well ministries within the provincial government are upholding the public’s environmental rights. Fourteen provincial ministries currently have varying responsibilities under the Environmental Bill of Rights. These ministries must provide prompt and meaningful information to enable public participation through the Environmental Registry. “Whether it is introducing a sweeping new law that will have impacts for the whole province, or issuing a permit that may affect a local stream, the government needs to let the public know about the proposal, and give the public an opportunity to provide input on it,” said Commissioner Saxe. “Good environmen9:42 AM tal outcomes go hand-in-hand with effectively engaging the public.” The report cards say several ministries, most notably the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, are often woefully late in informing the public when they have reached a decision about issuing Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E NEWS ES&E NEWS a permit or approval. This matters because the public is left in the dark about whether a company got the proper approval to operate. Also, it could potentially delay by years the opportunity for the public to appeal the permit. Аll the while the company has been operating. Further, in some cases, provincial ministries meet the letter of the law, but they don’t enable the public to meaningfully participate because of scant details about what they are proposing. For example, several types of notices are chronically deficient, providing few details on what is being proposed. This effectively bars the public from being able to provide informed comment on approvals.

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AIR RELEASE/VACUUM BREAK VALVES FOR SEWAGE & WATER

ALBERTA STARTS FIRST ROUND OF WATER AND WASTEWATER INVESTMENTS

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The Alberta government has set aside $595 10-YEAR WARRANTY • ALL STAINLESS RGX RBX million over the next five years to help Acoustic Wave fund water and wastewater infrastructure Management Experts improvement projects in small towns and Since 1922 rural Alberta. This round of more than Tier 1 Hydro-Pneumatic Surge and Pressure Control $117 million in funding will improve access Systems in both Bladder and Air over Water Solutions to safe, reliable water supplies and enhance Reliant WQA WATER QUALITY AERATOR forlagoons Lagoons Aquaculture water quality aerator for and& aquaculture environmentally-sustainable wastewater treatment, while creating hundreds of jobs, water quality aerator foraster lagoons and ™ aquaculture agoon according to the Alberta government. ✓ Coarse & fine bubble aeration • Course & fine bubble aeration • Only 4 hp moves ✓9 Tames MGDsludge buildup To date, the Alberta government has ✓ Eliminates thermal stratification • Tames sludge buildup • Handles up to 5 acres per seasonal unit turnover ✓ Eliminates committed more than $99 million in Alberta ✓ Only moves 9 MGD • Eliminates thermal stratification • Efficient - Up to 15 lbs4Ohp2 /hr ✓ Handles up to 5 acres per unit • Low maintenance✓ & Simple! • Eliminates seasonal turnover Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership Efficient: Up to 15 lbs O /hr ✓ Low maintenance & Simple! (AMWWP) funding that will support 44 HYDRO-LOGIC ENVIRONMENTAL INC. 762 Upper St. James St., Suite 250, Hamilton, ON L9C 3A2 • Ph: 905-777-9494 • Fax: 905-777-8678 water and wastewater improvement projects info@hydrologic.ca www.hydrologic.ca ✓ Coarse & fine bubble aeration T: 905-777-9494 • F: 905-777-8678 • info@hydrologic.ca • www.hydrologic.ca around the province. In addition, than ✓ more Tames sludge buildup 762stratification Upper St. James Street, Suite 250, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L9C 3A2 $18.6 million will go to support ✓ 16Eliminates Water for thermal ✓ Eliminates Life (W4L) projects province-wide, includ- seasonal turnover ✓ Only 4 hp moves 9 MGD ing projects just getting underway and final ✓ Handles up to 5 acres per unit payments to municipalities ✓ forEfficient: projectsUp to 15 lbs O /hr 2 recently completed. ✓ Low maintenance & Simple! — www.alberta.ca

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ALBERTA COMPANY FINED FOR HYDROGEN SULFIDE RELEASES

info@hydrologic.ca www.hydrologic.ca

Canadian Natural Resources Limited has been penalized $500,000 for incidents at its Horizon facility, which occurred in 2010 and 2012, according to Alberta Environment and Parks. The first incident occurred on May 28, 2010. The plant’s sulfur recovery unit failed and some hydrogen sulfide escaped at both ground level and through a flare stack. The company reported the incident to Environwww.esemag.com

August 2016 | 71


ES&E NEWS

Continuous Clean Energy Power Plant We retrofit Transfer Stations by providing Baling & Bagging Greey EnWaste™ Equipment to Guarantee unit of Greey CTS Inc. Diversion of all Organic Waste from Landfill. email: greey.enwaste@rogers.com www.greeyenwaste.ca

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72 | August 2016

ment and Parks on June 3, 2010, contravening a requirement under Section 227 (j) of the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act to immediately report a release to the director. For this violation, the company was penalized $350,000. The second unrelated incident occurred on August 2, 2012. The plant’s sulfur recovery unit failed. An unknown quantity of hydrogen sulfide gas escaped through a flare stack as it failed to fully combust the hydrogen sulfide gas, which was a contravention of the plant’s approval. The company admitted to breaching Section 227 (e) of the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act and was penalized $150,000. Of the total penalty, $425,000 will be directed to researchers from the University of Calgary who will use the funds to research the toxicological effects of chemicals measured in the air in and around Fort MacKay, according to Alberta Environment and Parks. — www.alberta.ca

SCIENTISTS DEVELOP ENERGY SAVING NANOFILTER FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new type of nanofilter that could reduce the energy needed to treat wastewater by up to five times. Typically, for the last steps of water purification in a wastewater treatment process, an ultrafiltration membrane filters out small particles before a reverse osmosis membrane is used. In reverse osmosis, water is pushed through an extremely fine membrane at high pressure to separate water molecules from any remaining contaminants which are tiny – about a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair, such as salt, heavy metals and toxic chemicals like benzene. This high water pressure, typically 10 bars and above, means that the water pumps need a lot of energy. However, NTU’s proprietary nanofiltration hollow fibre membrane does away with both ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, combining the two processes. It also requires only two bars of water pressure, similar to the pressure found in a typical home pressure cooker, to filter out the same type of contaminants. Yet, it Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


produces water that is almost as pure as through reverse osmosis. This breakthrough technology took NTU’s Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute (NEWRI) about two years to develop and is now being commercialised by an NTU spin-off company De.Mem. — www.ntu.edu.sg

FLOOD AND DROUGHT PROTECTION FUNDING FOR VULNERABLE ALBERTA COMMUNITIES

The government of Alberta announced on July 21, 2106, that it is investing in flood and drought resiliency projects to protect communities against the effects of severe weather. Twelve organizations in southern Alberta and other vulnerable communities across the province will share a total of almost $1 million through the Water-

shed Resiliency and Restoration Program. Over three years, $18.5 million has been granted to 30 organizations to pay for this important work. This is the third and final round of that funding. The grants will go towards such projects as the restoration of riparian areas, creation of wetlands, installation of rain gardens in urban locations, soil bioengineering, implementation of agricultural best management practices, and the increased use of beaver structures. If appropriately managed, Alberta’s natural watershed systems will help mitigate severe natural events and will provide many other ecological benefits. The Program’s grants will fund the restoration of more than 40 km of riparian areas and the creation or enhancement of more than 600 hectares of wetlands. The grants will also support projects focused on education, outreach and the implementation of best management practices. — www.alberta.ca

ACG Technology................................... 75 Associated Engineering......................42 Atlas Dewatering.................................76 AWI......................................................... 11 Blue-White............................................21 Canadian Safety...................................43 Can-Am Instruments............................. 2 Denso ................................................... 41 Endress + Hauser................................... 5 Engineered Pump................................ 41 Envirocan ............................................ 75

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Evoqua...................................................13 Flottweg............................................... 19 Greatario .............................................45 Groundwater Environmental Management Services......................... 37 H2Flow .................................................30 Hoskin Scientific............................. 17, 33 Huber Technology...............................47

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Hydro International............................. 55 Kemira...................................................31 KG Services........................................... 25 Kusters Water.......................................29 Mantech ..............................................43 Master Meter ........................................ 3 Monitario.............................................. 32 MSU Mississauga................................. 27 Mueller.................................................30 Newmarket Precast.............................54 Parsons................................................ 49 Pinchin.................................................. 32 Pro Aqua.................................................9 ProMinent............................................68 RV Anderson........................................54 SPD Sales............................................. 46 Spill Management............................... 23 Stantec................................................. 46 USF Fabrication.................................... 41

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August August 2016 2016| 73 | 73


CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

GREENHOUSE GASES

continued from page 49

design, operate based on objective scientific findings, and be outcomes-focused. It should be calibrated to ensure that reduction targets are being achieved. In the event that connections are not made, are not equitable, or fail to expand, Ontario’s diverse mix of economic sectors could face significant competitive disadvantages, or these pressures could undermine Ontario’s emissions targets. Ensuring that the cap-and-trade program does not disadvantage Ontario producers is key to sustaining public support for the program. Based on Ontario’s transformation costs to achieve an 80% reduction in emissions from 1990 levels in the electrical sector, OSPE estimates that, to achieve the same goal across all other sectors of the economy, will require substantially higher carbon prices than the $30 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent that is currently anticipated. The public is unlikely to tolerate high carbon prices if they create economic hardship in Ontario due to unfair trade. As an action to mitigate these risks, Ontario could introduce a border adjustments framework. Border adjustments are trade measures that aim to level the playing field between domestic producers facing costly climate change measures and foreign producers facing very few. In the context of cap-and-trade, border adjustments are meant to reduce leakage and competition exposure - a forward-looking design that would serve to fill a critical gap in the program Ontario has proposed. As it stands, Ontario’s program fails to account for the foreign purchase of allowance credits. Because foreign company emissions are not part of the process for determining allowances, forcing these firms to buy credits in the Ontario market will affect allowance prices in ways that were not anticipated when quantities were established. To prevent these ill-effects, border adjustments act as a carbon tax payment for imports into Ontario or as a carbon tax refund for exports going out. This applies to jurisdictions that do not have an equivalent program. In context, the market would determine a carbon tax value that would be applied on imports from and exports to key jurisdictions like Michigan, Ohio and New York that do not have a cap-and-trade program recognized by Ontario or its likely program 74 | August 2016

Ontario has already reduced emissions in its electrical sector by 80% from 1990 levels, putting it about 35 years ahead of the rest of the world. partners (such as California or Quebec). A border adjustments framework would provide a more precise mechanism for fair trade between jurisdictions with differences in their carbon reduction programs. Border adjustments would also put additional pressure on foreign jurisdictions to introduce their own carbon-pricing programs to avoid the carbon price penalties on their exported products.

TIME IS TICKING

For Ontario, the window of opportunity to take the lead in developing a border adjustments framework is quickly closing. California is currently in the middle of their second compliance period and will review the implementation of a border adjustments framework ahead of their third period (2018-2020). This would impose similar compliance costs on imports from jurisdictions without cap-and-trade program linkages equitable to California’s. If California proceeds with such a framework, it will take Ontario some time to modify its own program, and it will need to accommodate California-focused regulations that are not in Ontario’s interests. Border adjustments make sound policy sense. Ontario has one of the cleanest mixed generation electrical grids in the world and should receive credit from its trading partners for this value-added feature. Ontario has already reduced emissions in its electrical sector by 80% from 1990 levels, putting it about 35 years ahead of the rest of the world. Allowing products made with high-emissions, low-cost electricity to enter Ontario without a carbon price adjustment would be unfair to Ontario companies. Border adjustments would accelerate carbon reduction in trade-exposed sectors, while maintaining economic priorities

and protecting against job losses. Through border adjustments, Ontario businesses would be protected from unfair competition from high-emission jurisdictions. Looking at the current situation from a global perspective, the proliferation of Chinese solar panels serves as a clear example of how a border adjustments framework would assist Ontario’s environment and economy. Solar panels manufactured in China are made with one of the highest GHG-emitting electrical systems in the world and are undercutting low-emission solar panel production in Ontario. This is a “lose-lose” arrangement for the province both environmentally and economically. Border adjustments would serve to address this and other gaps between policy objectives and outcomes, while also leveling the playing field for Ontario’s domestic and export industries.

BIG CHALLENGES REQUIRE BRIGHT MINDS

During public consultations with the Ontario government on Bill 172, the Climate Change Mitigation and Low-Carbon Economy Act, the argument for border adjustments was presented by OSPE as the voice of the province’s engineering community. It is OSPE’s belief that by setting a price on carbon and permitting the purchase and sale of emission allowances, cap-andtrade systems have the potential to become the cornerstone of an integrated environmental approach aimed at encouraging the most cost-effective GHG reductions. Ontario wants to establish the foundation for an economic strategy focused on developing a green economy. With this objective in mind, the Ontario Society of Professional Engineers has urged the government to establish a border adjustments framework that will defend the integrity of our environmental commitments, encourage our trading partners to adopt carbon pricing programs, and support Ontario’s economic interests. Patrick Sackville, MA, Paul Acchione, M. Eng., P. Eng., FCAE, and Michael Monette, P.Eng., MBA, are with the Ontario Society of Professional Engineers. For more information, email: patrick@ospe.on.ca

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine (ESEMAG) August 2016  

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine's August 2016 issue. Featuring a special section on climate change and resilient infrastructure...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine (ESEMAG) August 2016  

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine's August 2016 issue. Featuring a special section on climate change and resilient infrastructure...