RTN20 eBook - Buyer's Guide+RFP

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Buyer’s Guide & RFP Best Practices: POINT OF SALE

• Processes Driving Procurement • Integrations Considerations • Evaluation Criteria • Checklists & Tips • Labs, Pilots & Final Awards

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


www.restauranttechnologynetwork.com

Introduction

Staff

Current Request for Proposal (RFP) processes are cumbersome, time-consuming, and complex, even for the most sophisticated buyers & suppliers. It is common for this process, or parts of this process, to be outsourced due to the time commitment and risk associated with strategic decision-making. The RFP process should be simple and streamlined for non-mission critical applications. While individual organizations prioritize certain systems, most companies would benefit from a normalized, clearly defined plan, adaptable to specific needs.

VP and Brand Director, HT Co-Founder, RTN 973.607.1358 alorden@ensembleiq.com

ABBY LORDEN

ANGELA DIFFLY Co-Founder, RTN 404.550.7789 angela@restauranttechnologynetwork.com

PATRICK DUNPHY CIO, HTNG & RTN 312.690.5039 patrick@restauranttechnologynetwork.com

ROBERT FIRPO-CAPPIELLO

The RTN Buyer’s Guide and RFP Best Practices will help buyers and sellers accelerate the procurement process by:

Editor in Chief, HT 917.208.7393 rfirpo-cappiello@ensembleiq.com

ANNA WOLFE Senior Editor, HT 207.773.1154 awolfe@ensembleiq.com

Identifying what constitutes a quick decision vs. full-fledged RFP process

MICHAL CHRISTINE ESCOBAR Senior Editor, HT 224.632.8204 mescobar@ensembleiq.com

Ensuring clear objectives for buyers and suppliers Creating a framework to prioritize requirements

KATHERINE WARE Senior Account Executive, HT & RTN 785.424.7392 kware@ensembleiq.com

Increasing buy-in from stakeholders and executive teams

NOELL DIMMIG

Defining clear communications with vendors

Account Executive, HT & RTN 973.607.1370 ndimmig@ensembleiq.com

Simplifying the selection and proof of concept test process

LEAH SEGARRA

Reducing complexity wherever possible RESTAURANT TECHNOLOGY NETWORK

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Senior Account Executive, HT & RTN 973.610.8391 lsegarra@ensembleiq.com


Table of Contents Introduction........................................................................................................................................2 Do You Really Need an RFP?.................................................................................................... 4 Internal Stakeholder Management.......................................................................................... 6 Needs vs. Wants vs. Wish List................................................................................................... 8 Identifying Vendor Candidates................................................................................................. 9 Communicating with Vendors................................................................................................. 10 Evaluation Criteria........................................................................................................................ 12 Lab & Pilot Programs................................................................................................................... 13 Appendix A: Sections of the RFP........................................................................................... 16 Appendix B: Stakeholder Questionnaire............................................................................. 20

Key Contributors

CHRIS HEARD

NIKO PAPADEMETRIOU

JOE TENCZAR

CEO & Co-founder

Vice President, Major Accounts & Business Development

Co-Founder

Our Mission

The Restaurant Technology Network (RTN) is a membership community solely dedicated to the restaurant technology industry. Through access to valuable benefits and powerful connections, our members shape industry standards and share technical guidance to help restaurateurs run successful businesses and better serve their customers.

Copyright 2020 Restaurant Technology Network (RTN). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or information storage and retrieval systems, without express written permission from the publisher. RTN is a wholly owned subsidiary of EnsembleIQ, with principal headquarters at 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60631.

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Do You Really Need an RFP? IS THIS A STRATEGIC SYSTEM? HOW MANY BUSINESS UNITS MAY BE BY A CHANGE?

AFFECTED

TS BE ABLE WILL EACH OF THOSE BUSINESS UNI ECTION AND TO DEDICATE RESOURCES TO THE SEL R/SOLUTION? IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NEW VENDO t’]

[See ‘Internal Stakeholder Managemen

IS THERE A HIGH RISK IF YOU CHOOSE THE WRONG SOLUTION?

• Is the current cost of not having this new system higher than the cost of having to make a second decision?

• If the risk is localized to an individual department or does not have potential knock-on effects, a full evaluation may not be necessary.

• Is the new solution potentially complicated

• Term of agreement with solution (month to month has lower risk)

to replace?

TIP: If ramping up and ramping down the system can be done relatively painlessly, there is less long-term risk to mitigate through a more involved evaluation process.

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Processes for Smaller Brands/Chains vs. Larger Brands/Chains DO YOU HAVE THE TIME AND RESOU RCES TO EXECUTE AN RFI/RFP PROCESS? CAN YOU ENGAGE A CONSULTANT TO EXECUTE THE PROCESS?

Opportunity Costs • POTENTIALLY HUNDREDS OF HOURS The RFP process will take a lot of time. Would that time be better spent (weighi ng against a poor decision) elsewhere? • PM SUPPORT Would the cost of a Project Manager/Co nsultant outweigh the cost of a poor decision?

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Internal Stakeholder Management

STEP 2.

Intelligence Gathering

STEP 1.

Internal Notice

Conduct interviews with high-value users across functional departments. Develop a similar interview framework so that expectations and results are easy to categorize and prioritize.

Create an internal memorandum outlining the 30,000-foot breadth of the project and distribute it to all business units, challenging them to be a part of the project, or miss out on the opportunity to meaningfully contribute.

TIP: Ensuring a well-defined story or ‘why’ the requirement has been included is beneficial, both for the team’s understanding as well as the vendor’s.

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TIP: Maximum transparency among internal stakeholders is key (eg. ops, IT, marketing, etc.). Collaborative decision-making throughout the project lifecycle yields more long-term company-wide consensus.

STEP 4.

Requirements & Scope

STEP 3.

Business Unit Buy-In

While defining requirements, ensure stakeholders consider both functional requirements and the outcome they’d like to achieve. Outcomes are open to vendor interpretation, but are more indicative of actual system operation than specific functionality.

Each business unit should conduct an internal session to identify additional areas that may benefit, either in reducing current friction/challenges or by adding features/functions, to existing processes. • Select one or two people from each relevant department as representatives on the selection/evaluation committee. • If you have franchisees, involve them in this process. It’s not necessary to include all, but ideally everyone should have some representation. • Determine how your customers, franchisees, or vendors may use this system. • Conduct your own ROI analysis. Do not depend on a vendor to do this for you.

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Needs vs. Wants vs. Wish List Overall weighting should be determined by the evaluation committee according to how close the stakeholders are to the business problem. For example, if the operations team weights certain requirements higher than other teams, and the solution will most closely affect operations, the requirements of this team should be weighted more heavily. Requirements may also vary by restaurant size, restaurant service type and restaurant function - drive-thru, table seating, etc.

NEEDS

WANTS

Business critical, usually part of your current solution. List everything so there are no holes or grey areas. There’s nothing worse than finding a solution you believe is a “home run” only to find out it’s missing something critical!

Try to think of current wants and future wants. For example, if you want to integrate kiosks down the road, ask about them now.

Examples:

Your wants could also cover the opportunity to eliminate some of your current integrations or partners. For example, moving to a new POS may remove the need for a different loyalty provider or for a delivery integration partner.

• Supports your business model (QSR, full-service, bar, etc) • Handles DT, KDS, OCBs, EFT, Kiosk, etc • Integrates with current partners • Above store reporting • Loyalty & marketing technology • Third-party delivery service providers & marketplaces • Payroll/HR options • Reporting • Accounting package • CC and gift processor • PCI compliance • Hardware & software support

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WISH LIST These are items that you wish to have in a new solution, but may not be common or currently available. Examples: • Integration with an in-house developed accounting or loyalty program • Ability to manage menus and prices across POS and third-party delivery services

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Identifying Vendor Candidates STEP 1. Compile Vendor List You want this list to be as complete as possible so you don’t have to start over with a new vendor while you’re deep into the process with your initial list. • •

• • •

Ask colleagues for additions Review recent sponsor lists at industry events, like MURTEC, NRA and FSTEC and check the RTN Member List. Check online vendor databases such as G2 and Capterra for a wealth of options. Consult your LinkedIn network, ask connections for recommendations. Round-table within your department/company Identify specialties and non-starters

Ask vendors you know and respect for recommendations

TIP: Speak with existing vendors and ask which suppliers’ clients are using for a similar use case. This is a fast way to understand who has a proven relationship with at least one of the systems you are currently using.

STEP 2. Understand Your Core Needs At some stage, you will need to perform detailed analysis if the system warrants a full RFP. This is often done with the help of a select vendor; however, to avoid bias early in the process it is important to understand the core needs prior to your vendor-assistance discussions. Consider creating an RFI (prior to the larger-requirements) to capture mission-critical strategic requirements. This provides vendors an opportunity to submit messaging around their product/service, which can narrow down vendor scope.

TIP: With a good preliminary analysis, ‘letting the vendor select you’ in this way can take a pool of options from a few dozen to a handful very quickly.

The following questions should be asked without the help of a vendor: • • • •

Which systems are currently in place that will require integration? (See ‘General Business Integrations’) What are the current pain points in the organization driving the initiative? What current workflows must be addressed by the new solution? What requirements absolutely must be met for the initiative to be a success? (Eg. If you use a particular accounting system, any new BOH or order management system must integrate with that system.)

STEP 3. Share Internally Once the core needs analysis is done, circulate it to a large selection of potential options through a simple email outreach with the expectation and clear communication that if there are misalignments at this early stage, you will disengage.

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TIP: While the process requires more work up-front by the evaluating team, it enables vendors to bow out early without any further discovery and wasted time.

BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Communicating with Vendors Timeline Provide a realistic timeline for the entire RFP process to all vendors. • • • •

TIP: If vendors approach other members inside your

Stage Description Completion date Standard operating procedure guidelines

organization, ask that the inquiry be redirected to the named buyer in the solicitation. This is critical to ensure vendors

Segment RFI/RFP by Category • • • • •

Requirements Infrastructure Security Dependencies Risks

• • • • •

are not given an advantage (or disadvantage) by information

Financials Accounting Service level Functionality Viability

provided to one potential bidder, but not all. Additionally, only the written text in a solicitation document is binding; nonbinding verbal statements have

NDAs

the potential to create problems.

• All vendors responding to the RFP must sign the NDA provided. • Provide a specific date and time for execution.

RFP Launch • Send RFP documentation to the designated vendor contact. • Once a solicitation has been released by Contracts and Procurement, communication with vendors should be directed to the buyer named in the solicitation.

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Clear Communication Guidelines • Confirm all vendor contact information & designate one contact per vendor for all communications. • Provide specifications for written questions and completion dates. • Aggregate vendor submissions into one master side-by-side analysis format for easy, at-a-glance comparison of all answers.

TIP: Taking both a primary and secondary vendor through contract review and lab stages is advantageous; in the event the primary candidate fails critical use cases in the lab, you have a contingency candidate.

• Set one date and time for an open, verbal communication for all written questions to be answered. This minimizes the chance that a vendor may have undue influence on the solicitation. • After verbal meetings, conduct no further communication with vendors. • Make choices and communicate them clearly, especially with disqualifications.

Contract Award • After proposals have been submitted to Contracts and Procurement and an award recommendation has been made, agencies may choose to give the name and date of the awarded vendor to vendors when requested. • Any other requests, such as copies of written documentation, should be directed to the buyer at Contracts and Procurement.

Contract Negotiation • No further communications shall be conducted with disqualified vendors until contract negotiations have been completed with the awarded vendor. • If a contract cannot be reached with the awarded vendor, written documentation should be provided to the awarded vendor to communicate that contract negotiations have been terminated. The buyer should move onto the vendor with the second best score in the evaluation criteria.

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Evaluation Criteria Things to Consider During Vendor Demos • Total Price/Investment • Technical Requirements • Installation/Onboarding Plan • Service Capabilities • Reference Checks (find users, ask for users from vendor) • Scoring System • A scoring system should be established to be as objective as possible. • A minimum of three people in the organization should act as the evaluation committee to review and score each response. • Example: For each evaluation criteria, score on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being highest/best, and 1 being lowest/ worst. Add the total scores and determine your winner. You can also rate each vendor from top to bottom in each category. If you have four vendors, score each on a scale of 1-4 with 4 being highest/best and 1 being lowest/worst. Add the total scores and determine your winner. • The Decision Makers • The evaluation committee may be assigned as final decision makers based on the evaluation process and scoring system. • The evaluation committee may also provide a recommendation to the CEO/executive team to make the final decision. • All vendors should have access to meet/obtain input from the final decision makers.

Contingent Award Once you’ve completed demos and the committee has regrouped to evaluate the options, move forward with primary and secondary vendor selections. Ensure roles are communicated clearly, and perform due diligence on total pricing, legal agreements, references, etc. RESTAURANT TECHNOLOGY NETWORK

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Lab & Pilot Programs Lab Program The Lab evaluation is critical to the overall success of the project. As such, it represents the greatest single opportunity to create friction or overall failure. The entire process up until this point is designed to provide the committee sufficient information, from initial interviews of the functional business units, through the actual RFP submission and subsequent product demonstrations, all the way to the selection of the final vendor, to create the “success criteria.” These criteria should be prioritized and transparently evaluated through the Lab phase of the project.

SUCCESS CRITERIA

UNIFORMITY

Mutually agree with selected vendor(s) on the success criteria and sign off. Success criteria should be weighed/prioritized, since no single system/solution will ever accomplish everything for everyone.

Arrange a heavily scripted, uniform process for internal demos to judge success against prioritized requirements.

SCORING LAB ACCURACY Lab should fully represent the most common environment/ecosystem, representative of the actual live Pilot to follow. This includes an accurate number of POS terminals, printers, KDS, OCBs, payment terminals, etc., all connected to the same network (and appliances) as the Pilot location, with functional integration partners integrated and sharing data.

After evaluating, apply predetermined weighting to criteria in order to create a scorecard for stakeholders to validate/ choose a final solution to enter Pilot.

NOTE: There is always some portion of the Lab that cannot fully replicate the solution, until the ecosystem is recreated in a full production environment; however, as much testing as possible should be done in this demo/test environment.

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Lab & Pilot Programs Pilot Program Both the Lab and the Pilot phases will be somewhat fluid, as inevitably some thing(s) will be unearthed that may present as gaps critical to the next stage. These will need to be triaged, scoped, prioritized, and potentially delivered before the next stage of the process can be met. Being a partner to one another is extremely important. The give and take nature of this stage is extremely critical for the long-term relationship and success of the project.

LOCATION

TIMELINE

• The best practice is to use the exact same physical ecosystem evaluated during the Lab in the Pilot location (whenever possible).

Typically 4-8 weeks • Consider your business cycles, e.g. payroll (weekly, biweekly, monthly) and accounting/ financial periods (monthly, 4-4-5).

• Immediately replace the Lab, as one should always have a fully functioning and storerepresentative Lab of whatever technology being evaluating or used in the field.

• You may want to include multiple payroll cycles and/or period ends in the process, just so all manager and related business unit processes can be completed more than once.

• Choosing the proper Pilot location(s) is extremely important, as there will inevitably be some growing pains, or outright frustration, experienced with entirely new system implementations.

MANAGING COSTS • Lab and pilot costs should be accounted for, as once the system goes “live” the all-in costs associated with getting the first store live will be a multiple of the next, etc.

• The Pilot location should be relatively easy for stakeholders to visit.

HARDWARE

STAFF

• Develop a sample restaurant configuration for your concept and have the vendor price it out, or pick a specific location.

• The Pilot should have a very strong, yet malleable, operational staff, and should neither be the busiest, nor least busy location across the chain.

• Make sure to include everything required to run the POS system (terminals, printers, PCs, networking equipment, KDS, scanners, etc). The vendor can be of significant help here.

• All users at the Pilot location should be made aware of the project and the reasons for the project, success criteria, & process for validation of the Lab.

• If you’re replacing piece-for-piece, costs can be straightforward; if you’re changing the configuration or adding/deleting technologies, it can become significantly more complex.

• Whenever possible, train Pilot location staff on the Lab system prior to implementation.

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• Does your vendor provide all the required equipment or will there be some third-party components? If so, make sure those costs are considered and factored in.

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SOFTWARE

INTEGRATION

• Obtain a price from the vendor for your sample restaurant configuration and/or specifics using an existing location.

• Often overlooked is what it costs for your existing integrations to work with your new POS. What additional costs are required to reconfigure your credit cards, gift cards, loyalty, online ordering, above-store reporting systems, etc.?

• Will software be a one-time purchase or a recurring cost?

• Obtain costs (if any) from all your existing or new vendor partners, and ask yourself if there may be any miscellaneous costs involved.

SUPPORT • Are you supporting the product in-house, outsourcing or some mix? • Get costs for support that fit your concept style. (Example: If you’re open 24/7 you may need support that is always available.) • Consider third-party support options. • Consider companies that support specific POS brands very well, and ask if they provide varying options outside of what the POS vendor offers.

TRAINING AND/OR GO-LIVE SUPPORT • Think about the implementation/conversion process, and plan for training restaurant staff, managers and above-store support personnel. • Consider a “Training the Trainer” model as a significant cost-saver. If you have someone inside your organization who can learn the process from the vendor, then train your staff.

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Appendix A

Sections of the RFP Restaurant Profile Completing this section accurately is extremely important for ensuring only those suppliers well-suited to your operational model, size, and technology ecosystem enter the RFP process. • Number of Store Units (Involved In the RFP) • Breakdown of Corporate to Franchised Stores • Location/Coverage/Regions/International Needs • Segment/Restaurant Type(s) • Store Layout & Operational Style • POS User Story, e.g. Customer orders in front of POS terminal/ cashier and pays for food all at once, then waits for food.

Existing Store Technologies & Key Integration Requirements Identify all physical HW/SW used today and expectations of uses in future state. Examples: Drive-Thru, Kitchen Display System (KDS), Order Status Boards, Digital Display Menu Boards, POS-connected Order Confirmation Displays, Drive-Thru Timers CURRENT OR EXPECTED INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS

EXISTING 3x POS terminals on Counter, 2x POS terminals in drive-thru (one in each window - dual window drive-thru model), 6x KDS screens w/4 controllers (2 screens are mirrored off of others), 4x EMV PEDs (payment encryption devices), 4x dual-drawer setup cash drawers, 5x thermal receipt printers, 3x IP/network connected impact line/station printers.

Detail which suppliers you use for which technologies, and integration requirements for each. (See ‘General Business Integrations’)

PRIMARY SYSTEM USERS Workflows that are expected to be met by the new system, eg. the employee or manager actions that are currently not being addressed.

FUTURE Same as above with the addition of 3x standalone kiosk stations, each with a thermal receipt printer and EMV-capable PED (actual kiosk device size, etc. tbd).

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General Business Integrations CONSIDERATIONS • Identify how systems integrate. • Determine if it is appropriate to include individual company names. • Define what data (record types) is housed in each business system. • Identify API type for each system. • Define what information each business system will need to receive from other systems to achieve business objectives. • Create a system matrix of how each system needs to communicate with each of the others. • Identify which record types will move between systems. • Pinpoint API method to move data between each system. (What hurdles exist? If hurdles, how important is this system, or should we look at alternates with easier API?) • Is critical data missing? If so, how do we overcome?

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Appendix A

Sections of the RFP List of Applications & Integration Use Cases POS Systems Monitor Trends of Key KPIs: Sales, Avg. Check Size, Transaction/Guest Count (Amount And % Growth) Sales by Channel (Eat In, Drive-Thru, Third-Party, Mobile, Kiosk, Etc.) Sales by Payment Type (Cash, Credit, Debit, Bitcoin) Product Mix Analysis

Off-Prem Systems (THIRD-PARTY DELIVERY/ CURBSIDE SOLUTIONS)

Sales Analysis by Channel Profitability Analysis by Channel Product Mix Analysis by Channel

Human Resource Information Systems Productivity Actual vs. Scheduled, Actual vs. Budget Margin Analysis Employee Scorecard

Speed Of Service Analysis

Overtime Analysis

Customer Reviews

Attrition Analysis

Supply Chain

Social Media Accounts

Margin Analysis - Theoretical Food Cost, Waste, Variance

Understanding Menu Preferences

Geographic Information Systems

Marketing: Pricing, Coupons, Limited Time Offers, Bucket Analysis Forecasting Budgeting

Inventory Controls

Staff Reviews

Traceability, Quality Control,

Correlation Between Sales And Customer Feedback

Supplier Analysis

Marketing Effectiveness

Environmental Systems (Weather)

Loss Prevention Systems

Correlation Analysis Between KPIs And External Factors

Theft Analysis

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Impact on Sales Marketing Analysis New Store Development

Marketing Technologies, Loyalty Systems/CRM


Mobile Apps

Customer Feedback

Loyalty Sales by this Channel

Understanding Menu Preferences

Personalization

Staff Reviews

Speed Of Service Systems Drive-Thru Time Management Meet Targets

Correlation Between Sales and Customer Feedback

Delivery Times - Meet Targets

Enterprise Resource Planning

Online Reservation Systems

Business Intelligence (BI) Systems

Automate Feeding Info to Accounting System

Customer Analysis eg. Repeats, Customer Loyalty

Measure Other Operational Info Including Rent, Supplies, Electricity, Water, Etc.

Labor Management Based On Reservations

Cook Time Analysis

Labor Information: Scheduling, Labor Hours, Margin, Efficiency, Social Channels

Kitchen Display Systems

Inventory Management

Digital Signage / Digital Menu Boards

Email

Food Traceability

Labor Management

Accounting Software

Third-Party System Dependencies

Voice Systems

Catering Systems

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Cloud Kitchen

BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


Appendix B

Stakeholder Questionnaire This list is a starting point for questions you should ask as part of the process.

General

• Is your solution cloud or server based? • What OS do your POS terminals run? • Do you have mobile/tablet options? If yes, detail. • Do your terminals have customer-facing displays? If so, besides showing the details of their check, what other features does the customer-facing display have? (customer signature for cc’s, loyalty, ads, etc.)

Support

• Is install, go live, and all future support with your company, or is it handled by a third-party? • Is your Help Desk 24x7? If not, detail. • Can your Help Desk act as a single point of contact for our other providers? If yes, detail.

Menus

• Describe your Enterprise Management solution or approach. How would we manage all our menus? • Can menu and/or price changes be scheduled to go live at a certain time/date? What other administrative changes can be made in advance of effectivity? • We have menu items that change price throughout the day, does your system support this? If yes, please detail. • Does your system support multiple menus/pricing for the same location (i.e. higher delivery menu pricing w/ limited menu)? If yes, please detail.

KDS (Kitchen Display Systems)

• Do you offer KDS? • Do you have both touch-screen and bump bar solutions for KDS? • Does your KDS have running totals and can the categories differ on multiple displays (different product totals on different screens)? • Does your KDS support multiple “make” or “prep” screens/stations?

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Payments

• Can payments be processed? If yes, what types (MSR, EMV, NFC) and on what devices? Is it server or guest facing? • Do you support contactless payments? • What payments acquirers do you support? • How does your solution support NFC payment at the terminal? • Do you have a kiosk solution to allow guests to pay on their own? • Do you support (CC processor) CC’s? • Do you support (GC processor) gift cards? • Can your system support barcode scanning for e-gift cards with various denominations? (so that we can use imbedded barcodes instead of gift card numbers) • Can your system support split checks & multiple payment types for the same order? • CC electronic signature capture capable? • Can you support tipping through digital and in-store payment types?

Staffing

Third-Party Delivery

Other

• How can employees verify their time, without having to sign printed paper?

• Insert specific integration questions for your Loyalty, Accounting, Inventory, etc. • Which third-party delivery companies do you integrate with?

• Please provide three references currently using your solutions (include contact name & title, email and phone number). • Give us three reasons why you’re the best partner for us. • Are there any other questions you feel we should be asking?

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BUYER’S GUIDE & RFP BEST PRACTICES: POINT OF SALE


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If you have a vested interest in the restaurant technology industry, join us. Collectively, our members shape the industry by creating and disseminating technology standards and technical guidance to benefit members. Through our cornerstone virtual think-tank workgroup meetings, our members solve industry challenges and prosper inside a unique, collaborative environment. + VIEW OUR MEMBERS

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