Engineering Georgia November/December 2022

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[20] QUESTIONS WITH MARTA’S NEW GENERAL MANAGER & CEO, COLLIE GREENWOOD DOING GOOD DOES YOU GOOD HOW PUBLICPRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS SAVE TAXPAYERS MONEY November | December 2022
TABLE OF CONTENTS
COVER Engineering firms from around Georgia engage in meaningful volunteer work that benefits their communities. 7 THE PULSE News Coverage from In and Around the Engineering Community 16 ELECTION ANALYSIS The president’s party does not undergo significant losses in Congress. 55 ASSOCIATION NEWS Updates from the Associations that Make Up the Georgia Engineering Alliance. 66 A LOOK BACK A Back-Page Throwback Picturing Georgia’s Most Historic Landmarks 20 COVER STORY: Doing Good Does You Good: 2022 GEORGIA’S ENGINEERING FIRMS BUILD BETTER COMMUNITIES, IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE From Bus Driver to MARTA General Manager & CEO 20 QUESTIONS WITH COLLIE GREENWOOD Outsourcing Government Services A WIN-WIN FOR CITIES AND ENGINEERING FIRMS 36 46
ON THE

EDITORIAL

Engineering Georgia 2022 is published bi-monthly by the American Council of Engineering Companies of Georgia (ACEC Georgia) and its partner associations ASCE, ASHE, GEF, GSPE, ITE, ITS, SAME, SEAOG, SMPS and WTS. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

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Atlanta Post
ANITA ATKINSON PE, Patterson & Dewar Engineers / ASCE Georgia / GEF CANDANCE SCALE / SAME CHAD BECKER Kimley-Horn STACEY CHAPMAN CIT, Croft Architecture and Engineering STEPHANIE DAMMEN-MORRELL Hussey Gay Bell MICHELLE ERSTE CPSM, iParametrics / SMPS Atlanta LIGIA FLORIM Cobb County DOT / WTS Atlanta PHILLIP HATCHER PE, SE, Uzun + Case / SEAOG JENNY C. JENKINS PE, VHB / ASHE Georgia CATHERINE JOHNSON AECOM / NSBE BETTY JEAN JORDAN PE, GSPE KELLY PATRICK PE, PTOE, Cobb County DOT / ITE Georgia JOHN PIERSON PE, Georgia Tech Research Institute / ASCE Georgia RANDAL RIEBEL PE, Delta Air Lines / GSPE THOMAS TRUE PE, LS, Maser Consulting SASHA UGI Croy Engineering BILL WELLS ITS Georgia Publisher: Michael “Sully” Sullivan Editor-in-Chief: Brett Hillesheim Creative Director | Designer: Sabrina Tongren www.in8-design.com Contributing Editors: Chandler Baker Jennifer Head Contributing Writers: David Caraviello Christy Tarallo Zawn Villines Accounting Services Manager: Melisa Beauchamp Advertising Sales Manager: Jennifer Head ACEC Georgia 233 Peachtree
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Street Suite 700 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 jennifer.head@acecga.org (404) 665-3539 Send change of address to: ACEC Georgia 233 Peachtree Street, Suite 700, Atlanta, GA 30303 or email info@acecga.org Facebook.com/EngineeringGA @Engineering_GA www.EngineeringGA.com

II first met David Ralston back in 1997 when he was a state senator. Later, I was among his many supporters in his 1998 race for A orney General of Georgia and even hosted an event for him in Athens. Unfortunately, there were not quite enough of us supporters back then to get him to victory.

Fortunately for Georgia, he wasn’t done with public service, and four years later, he was elected to the House of Representatives, eventually becoming Speaker of the House in 2010.

When the news of his passing came on November 16th, it seemed unbelievable, even though his announcement just weeks before that he would not seek another term as Speaker let us all know that the health problems he had been fighting for some time had taken a grave turn for the worst.

It is di cult to put into words what his loss means, not just for the House or even the General Assembly. As Patricia Murphy so eloquently put it in the AJC, “David Ralston felt for many like the architecture of the Georgia State House, the solid structure holding the place up when politics, tempers, or both threatened to tear the chamber down.”

He was always the rock, always willing to bear the brunt of criticism to protect House members who may have had concerns about how a particular issue might play with the folks back home in their district. Always trying to do what he believed was right for Georgia and its citizens.

He championed so many issues that have improved the lives of Georgians, including the Transportation Funding Act of 2015. But the bipartisan 2022 Mental Health Parity Act, which requires health insurers to provide the same coverage for mental health and substance abuse issues as physical issues, is one of the latest and most illustrative examples.

You won’t o en find mental health coverage at the top of any candidate’s website or hear about it in a political debate. But when the Speaker announced that it was going to be his top legislative priority for the 2022 session, it wasn’t about politics; it was about doing the right thing for all Georgians. And there’s no be er testament to that than Republicans and Democrats coming together to pass the bill unanimously in both the House and Senate.

But he also wasn’t afraid to do the right thing even when it was unpopular with some members of his own party. Georgia’s anti-hate crime bill (sponsored by new House Majority Leader Rep. Chuck Efstration) could not have been passed without Democratic votes to overcome the significant opposition within the Republican caucus. Speaker Ralston’s support for Rep. Efstration and his bill never wavered, and three days a er the final vote for passage in the House, Governor Kemp signed it into law.

Rep. Jon Burns, the man who will replace David Ralston as Speaker, said that Ralston was “always willing to place the good of Georgians ahead of his own personal gain.” For that willingness to do what he thought was right, he frequently drew opposition in the Republican

primary from far-right elements of the GOP. Not surprisingly, these candidates were recruited and supported by folks from far outside of Ralston’s House district in the North Georgia mountains.

Also, not surprisingly, Ralston won reelection by overwhelming margins every time. e people in his district knew him. ey knew who he was, what he stood for, and they knew his heart. And that’s why none of those challengers ever got anywhere close to unseating the gentleman from Blue Ridge.

As big as his loss is to politics and to our state, it’s even bigger for those who were blessed to know David Ralston, the man – the husband, father, grandfather, brother, and friend. I’m sure that words cannot express the loss felt by his wife, Sheree, his children, grandchildren, and family members.

Personally, I feel fortunate for the privilege that my wife Rebecca and I have had of knowing David Ralston all these years and am grateful for those memories. I am also thankful that we were able to honor him with ACEC Georgia’s 2019 Engineering Influence Award for his “exceptional leadership and significant contributions to the economic vitality and business climate of the State of Georgia.” Too o en we miss the opportunity to tell people how much we appreciate them and I’m glad we were able to say “thank you” to Speaker Ralston in a small but tangible way for all he has done for our state.

He will be missed, but his impact will be felt for many years to come.

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Michael
SULLY@ACECGA.ORG 770-356-3769 @MICHAELLSULLY MICHAELLSULLY MICHAELLSULLIVAN

EMC ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC. ANNOUNCES NEW MEMBER TO EMC BOARD OF DIRECTORS

EMC Engineering Services, Inc., headquartered in Savannah, Georgia, is excited to announce that Joel D. Womack, PE, has joined the company’s Board of Directors. Womack’s appointment will bring EMC’s total board membership to nine.

A native of Fitzgerald, Georgia, Womack started in the Savannah Headquarters location in 2007 as a Junior Design Engineer. He transitioned to the Columbus branch office in 2009, where he currently serves as the Engineering Department Head.

Established in 1978, EMC Engineering Services, Inc. is a multidisciplined consulting engineering firm providing services throughout the United States. EMC Engineering Services, Inc. is strategically located with ten office locations to provide local planning, surveying, geotechnical, engineering, landscape architecture, and construction phase services.

Engineered Material Arresting System (EMAS). EMAS is a passive safety system that quickly de-accelerates an aircraft and brings it to a safe stop in case of an overrun. When needed, the system reduces the RSA demands and successfully stops an aircraft safely. Additionally, EMAS increases sustainability by reducing the environmental footprint typically needed for airports and by being completely comprised of recycled material.

The installation of the EMAS system made the Cartersville-Bartow County Airport only the second airport in the state of Georgia to receive this cutting-edge technology.

Earlier this year, the Cartersville-Bartow County Airport was recognized with an Engineering Excellence Merit Award at the annual Georgia Engineering Awards, hosted by the American Council of Engineering Companies of Georgia (ACEC Georgia) and Georgia Society of Professional Engineers (GSPE).

PERIMETER COLLEGE PROFESSORS TEACHING TEACHERS ABOUT RADON

A group of DeKalb County educators peered into a roped-off area at Stone Mountain Park. At first, the targets of their interest — several shoebox-sized plastic boxes with small pipes protruding from the ground — didn’t appear remarkable. But the boxes were important. They were measuring radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the soil.

The high school and middle school teachers were participating in a National Science Foundation program that could change how we think about the air around us, according to Georgia State Assistant Professor of Computer Science Ashwin Ashok. He is co-principal investigator on the U.S. Department of Agriculture Signals in the Soil (SitS) radon project, which will develop a real-time radon test with a wireless sensor network deployed in metro Atlanta.

CROY RECEIVES PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM STATEWIDE AVIATION ASSOCIATION

Croy was recently named the Project of the Year award recipient during the Georgia Airports Association (GAA) 2022 Annual Conference in Savannah, Georgia. The Georgia-based firm received the award in partnership with the Cartersville-Bartow County Airport for runway safety improvements to meet FAA Runway Safety Area (RSA) requirements, the project’s second award to date.

The Cartersville-Bartow County Airport runway safety improvements project brought the runway up to the FAA Runway Safety Area (RSA) requirements with the use of an innovative new technology,

Radon has been cited as the second-leading cause of lung cancer, but some aren’t aware of its existence. Although it quickly dissipates into the atmosphere, it can lurk inside homes and sicken the occupants.

The group of teachers were capping off a week-long science outreach program for educators designed by Perimeter College science faculty members Samantha Andrews and Gladys Bolding. The two biology professors joined Ashok, along with Professor of Geosciences Dajun Dai and Perimeter College Professor of Life & Earth Sciences Pamela Gore, to help the group of DeKalb County educators bring “active science” into their classrooms in the form of the radon monitor observation project. N

L-R: Michael Carter (Croy), Sam Malte (Croy), Dan Porta, Rebecca Collins, Patrick Lenton (Croy), photo courtesy of Croy A radon detector is used by Perimeter College Professors during their outreach program
November | December 7 engineering ga [ feature ] the pulse [ news briefs ]
Photo courtesy of EMC Engineering, Inc.

HUSSEY GAY BELL RECEIVES OUTSTANDING PROJECT AWARD FOR HERSCHEL V. JENKINS HIGH SCHOOL

Hussey Gay Bell has received an Outstanding Project Award in Learning by Design Magazine's Fall 2022 Architectural & Interior Design Awards of Excellence. Savannah-Chatham County Public School System’s new Herschel V. Jenkins High School has been acknowledged as an influential facility for incorporating next-generation learning space design and planning methodologies. All awarded facilities met the six judging criteria: Innovation, Sustainability, Interior Design, Next Generation Learning, Planning, and Functional Design, and Community Needs.

The peer-reviewed jury congratulated Hussey Gay Bell on its accomplishment: "The exterior of the building makes it feel like it is a special place for the community and pulled in elements of the old school. The reuse of the existing building signage was nice as a welcoming element. The daylight-filled entry provides a welcoming entrance to the school and the school day.”

The scope consisted of designing and constructing a new high school to replace the existing on-site school located on a 40-acre site off of DeRenne Avenue. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of the design and construction of a new, two-story, 241,651 SF school to accommodate 1,275 FTE students and Phase II consisting of the demolition of the old school and construction of new athletic facilities and ancillary parking. JE Dunn Construction constructed the project with Phase I completed in 2021 and Phase II concluding this year.

Management (CERM), a minority-owned and operated engineering, environmental, and program management firm, was awarded a contract by DeKalb County School District to perform program management services for its Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (E-SPLOST) VI Capital Improvement Program. This marks the third consecutive contract AECOM has held with the District in this capacity, first serving as its program manager in 2012. In addition, AECOM and CERM have partnered on program management assignments for the District since 2012.

The joint venture will be an integral member of the District’s capital improvement team by delivering program management services for modifications, renovations, additions, and new construction projects that address safety and security upgrades, technology enhancements, and vehicle and equipment improvements. The joint venture’s services are expected to include cost management, scheduling, design standards review, quality and risk management, contract administration, technology integration, and project and program controls and reporting.

Serving 93,000 students, DeKalb County School District is the third largest in Georgia. Its Capital Improvement Program prioritizes meeting the teaching and learning needs of its students through safe and healthy learning environments. This includes facility equity, diversity, and inclusion, with a focus on providing sustainable innovations and learning principles to promote academic opportunity.

ATLANTA UNIVERSITY CENTER CONSORTIUM LAUNCHES NEW INSTITUTE TO INCREASE BLACK ENGINEERS

The Institute for Dual Degree Engineering Advancement aims to build the number of Black engineers by creating an institute focused on dual-degree engineering.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities have produced 40 percent of all Black engineers in America. The Atlanta University Center Consortium, with an established Dual Degree Engineering Program, has contributed to this number for over five decades with a mission to increase the number of Black engineers.

Now with a $1.5 million investment from the A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation, the Atlanta University Center Consortium, aims to expand its efforts to increase the number of minority engineers by creating the Institute for Dual Degree Engineering Advancement (IDEA). IDEA will be a national hub for collaboration between 250 DDEP programs nationwide, providing models for best practices for dual degree engineering students.

AECOM-LED JOINT VENTURE AWARDED THE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT CONTRACT FOR DEKALB COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT.

AECOM, the world’s trusted infrastructure consulting firm, announced that its joint venture with Corporate Environmental Risk

IDEA will create the first institute in the nation at a consortium of historically black, private, liberal arts higher education institutions focused on dual-degree engineering. Graduates of dual-degree engineering earn a liberal arts degree at an AUC institution and an engineering degree at one of nine engineering partner schools.

Photo Courtesy of Hussey Gay Bell
the pulse [ news briefs ]
Photo courtesy of AECOM

PORT OF SAVANNAH HANDLES 1.5M TEUs IN FIRST QUARTER

The Georgia Ports Authority handled more than 1.5 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in the first quarter of the Fiscal Year 2023 (July-September), an increase of 135,000 TEUs, or 9.6 percent over the same period last year.

“A high number of ad hoc vessel calls, the addition of three new Mediterranean services, and one new service to Asia contributed to the growth,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Additionally, our regular services have been arriving with significantly more cargo destined for Savannah.”

Lynch said the average vessel exchange grew from 3,500 TEUs per ship last year to 4,500 TEUs over the past three months. The Port of Savannah handled 776,067 TEUs of loaded and empty exports in the first quarter, while import trade totaled 766,525 TEUs. Loaded containers represented 70 percent of the total container trade.

In intermodal rail, GPA grew lifts 6.4 percent in the first quarter. Counting all rail cargo moved through Garden City Terminal, the Appalachian Regional Port, and GPA’s pop-up container yards, rail lifts totaled nearly 146,000 for the three months, an increase of 8,775.

An easing of demand should help U.S. ports address vessel backlogs brought on by unprecedented import volumes, Lynch said. The Port of Savannah expects to clear the need for vessels to wait at anchor by the end of November. Presently, approximately 204,600 containers are on the water headed for Savannah, down from a high of 262,500 in July.

HSA WILL NOW GO BY HSA COLUMBIA

HSA Consulting Group was acquired on October 10, 2022, by Columbia Engineering and Services, Inc., headquartered in Duluth, GA. HSA Consulting Group will now go by HSA Columbia.

Columbia Engineering is a professional services civil engineering firm providing transportation design, transportation planning, traffic engineering and operations, traffic operations design, water resources, landscape architecture, park design, survey, land development, and construction inspection. This acquisition provides additional staff and a depth of resources to HSA Columbia, expanding Columbia’s offerings to Florida clients.

UGA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CELEBRATES

10TH ANNIVERSARY

The UGA College of Engineering was founded on July 1, 2012. One of 17 constituent schools and colleges at the University of Georgia, the college marked this important milestone in September alongside its faculty, staff, advisory, alumni boards, current students and alumni, and many more.

On Friday, Sept. 23, UGA celebrated the momentous anniversary with an afternoon ribbon-cutting ceremony and dedication of the newly renovated Driftmier Engineering Center, followed by an evening anniversary celebration hosted at Athens Country Club. A

Photo courtesy of Georgia Ports Authority
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GRESHAM SMITH is proud to welcome Eric Lusher, AICP, as the Georgia Planning Department Leader based in the metro Atlanta market.

Lusher will focus on growing Georgia’s innovative planning practice and delivering high-quality services for Gresham Smith’s clients.

Lusher brings over twenty years of experience leading transportation and community planning efforts. His award-winning plans come from his commitment to achieving meaningful community engagement with a focus on reaching out to underserved communities and combining that with technical analysis and results to prepare plans that reflect the values and visions of the communities he has served.

POND announces Richard Hayes, Captain, US Navy (Ret.), as Navy Client Manager. Hayes joins Pond following a distinguished 29-year career in the Navy, where he most recently served as Chief of Staff and Director of the Maritime Headquarters for the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in Virginia Beach, VA.

“Pond is very excited to have Rich on our team,” said Chris Farnie, Senior Vice President. “He will help us better serve our Navy clients with his deep knowledge and experience garnered as a career Naval Civil Engineer Corps Officer and two-time Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command commander.”

THOMAS & HUTTON’S

Environmental Department in Savannah welcomes Alaina Hellofs as a Designer. Hellofs recently obtained a Bachelor of Science in environ mental engineering from Clemson University. As a student, she interned in health, safety, and environmental compliance for an automation machinery manufacturing company. She is certified in Hazardous Waste Management and Shipping for Environmental Professionals and Mechanical Design. Hellofs is an active member of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) and the National Ground Water Association (NGWA). As a Designer, she assists in developing plans, designs, and permits for water and wastewater infrastructure projects throughout coastal Georgia.

Corey McCollum joined Thomas & Hutton’s Civil Department in Savannah as a Designer. McCollum obtained a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering technology from Savannah State University and previously worked as an engineering technician in environmental consulting. As a student, he was named Engineering Technology Student of the Year by the Georgia Society of Professional Engineers (GSPE). He is certified in construction materials testing by the American Concrete Institute. As a Designer, McCollum prepares site development construction drawings, engineering design considerations for water, sewer, and storm drainage infrastructure, and permit applications associated with industrial projects in Georgia.

Thomas & Hutton also welcomes Perry Taylor to the firm’s Landscape Architecture Department in Savannah as a Designer. Taylor obtained a Bachelor of Science in landscape architecture from The University of Georgia in 2021 and previously worked for a designbuild firm based in North Carolina. As a Designer, he assists with permitting and conceptual design for institutional, residential, and industrial projects in South Carolina and Georgia.A

Eric Lusher Richard Hayes Alaina Hellofs Corey McCollum
10 Engineering Georgia engineering ga [ feature ] the pulse [ on the move ]
Perry Taylor

OUT & ABOUT the pulse

Jenny Jenkins with VHB and others at the 2022 Transportation Summit Balram Bheodari with Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport speaking at the 2022 Transportation Summit Freight & Logistics and Vehicle Electrification Panel (from the left) Moderator Seth Millican with Georgia Transportation Alliance, Rep. Rick Jasperse, Sen. Steve Gooch, and Jannine Miller with GDOT at the 2022 Transportation Summit Anna Roach, Executive Director of ARC providing a Regional Update at the 2022 Transportation Summit Holly Painter with KCI Technologies at the 2022 Transportation Summit Griff Lynch, Executive Director of the Georgia Ports Authority addressing the attendees of the 2022 Transportation Summit Commissioner Russell McMurry speaking at the 2022 Transportation Summit Matt Frankel speaking to the 2022-23 Future Leaders at Session 2 of the Program Holly Painter with KCI Technologies, Ashley Ann Adams with Volkert, and Jennifer Harper with TTL, Inc. At the Macon Thirsty Third Thursday Members of ACEC Georgia networking at the Macon Thirsty Third Thursday Attendees of the Inaugural Young Professionals Off The Clock networking event Members of the ACEC Georgia Junior Board (from Left) Sydney Thompson with Pond, Melissa Ting with Blue Cypress Consulting, Jennifer Young with RK&K, Leon Hendee with Peoples & Quigley, and Tiffany Wommack with Jacobs ACEC Georgia Young Professionals enjoying networking and a bingo game at the Inaugural Young Professionals Off The Clock networking event Custom candy bars provided to students by HNTB at the 2022 STEM Day on October 1st Employees of RS&H sponsoring an activity booth at the 2022 STEM activity Aulick Engineering sponsoring a Weird and Wonderful Weirs activity at the 2022 STEM Day Booth sponsors at the 2022 STEM Day show children how different modes of transportation can affect road design University of Georgia College of Engineering students came out to support the 2022 STEM Day and provided a great activity to educate attendees about water filtration Tiffany Wommack and co-workers with Jacobs Engineering teaching students about structures at the 2022 STEM Day Young attendees of the 2022 STEM Day enjoying an activity hosted by New South Associates

TOP FIVE 5

Five STEM Activities for Kids That Will Foster Curiosity

Top Five is a new regular feature in THE PULSE! Top Five will explore recommendations for podcasts, books, activities, and more. This issue we’re exploring STEM activities to help inspire the next generation of engineers and STEM professionals.

OIL SPILL

Why not try an activity that will connect back to real issues? In this activity, you simply mix oil and water in a large container and add a few feathers to the mix. Then pass out materials like sponges, paper towels, or little spoons and instruct the children to try to remove the oil from the water and feathers.

Have the kids try to remove the oil without removing too much water. You can use this activity to show how oil spills can affect the environment, letting them observe how the oil affected the feathers and how difficult it was to remove it from the water. The basic elements of this activity (mixing oil and water) make it easy for the learning level to be scaled up or down depending on the child’s age—oil can obviously be messy, so use your discretion with younger learners.

Learn More: scienceafterschool.blogspot.com/2012/07/oil-spill-connecting-stem-activities-to.html

BUILDING A HAND CRANK WINCH

This STEM project is perfect for those kids who love to get crafty and learn how things work. The concept of the winch is a perfect way to build an early sense of how people can build awesome things with simple machines like pulleys.

Little ones will probably need your help constructing the winch—but with tools like cardboard paper towel rolls and a spool of ribbon, the parts are all kid-friendly (and inexpensive).

Learn More: littlebinsforlittlehands.com/build-a-winch-simple-machine-recycled-stem-activity

JELLYBEAN BUILDING

All you’ll need is a pile of jellybeans (or large marshmallows) and toothpicks for your student or child to start learning about structures. By connecting toothpicks with jellybeans, encourage your child to see which shapes hold together well, which shapes stack well and which shapes are most interesting to look at.

This activity can help them start to understand the thought, design, and technology behind structural engineering. Try challenging them to create a house or a specific structure—it’s a blast to see them considering their options as they build.

Learn More: lemonlimeadventures.com/engineering-for-kids-building-with-jelly-beans

STICKY NOTE NUMBER MATCH

With a sheet of paper taped to the wall, some sticky notes, and a marker, you can set up this movement-oriented math activity to help kids understand the meaning of numeric values. Instead of memorizing lists of numbers, this “game” lets kids hunt for sticky note numbers and stick them on the wall over the grouping of dots (or stars or banana stickers, if you like) that match the number.

The setup for this activity could not be simpler, and anyone with tape and paper can make it happen! If your kids are still working on the concept—numbers 1-5 can be an easy place to start.

Learn More: busytoddler.com/2018/12/post-it-number-match

BUILD A BALANCE SCALE

This activity involves a plastic hanger, some cups and string. Make your young ones a hanging balance they can use to experiment with weights. Or, if you have an older child—enlist their help in building the scale as well!

To encourage their sense of experimentation, Hands On As We Grow suggests asking questions like, “How many LEGOs does this toy car weigh?” With lots of options to add variety (sorting by shapes, by materials, etc.), this homemade scale can be a STEM project you return to again and again.

Learn More: handsonaswegrow.com/balance-scale A

November | December 15

THE POLITICAL PULSE: ELECTION 2022 ANALYSIS

It is a rare midterm election when the president’s party does not undergo signif icant losses in Congress, however this November’s national elections ended with far less damage to Democrats in D.C. than was expected. Blame it on faulty polling, the Trump effect, or just bad candidates, but Democrats largely bucked the trend and fought off the predicted “red wave” that turned out to be barely a ripple.

These results buoyed Democrats in much of the country, but Georgia – which many had predicted would turn blue – remained red. The GOP maintained control of the Governor’s Office, General Assembly, and every statewide constitutional office –dashing progressive hopes for a blue wave in the Peach State following 2020’s strong Democratic showing.

While the United States Congress did not experience the previously predicted dramatic shift in political power, Republicans did recapture control of the U.S. House of Representatives, though by much slimmer margins than projected. Republicans picked up nine seats in the House, while Democrats will retain a razor thin majority in the Senate, regardless of how the Sen. Raphael Warnock/Herschel Walker runoff election concludes. (Editor’s note: at the time of publication, we do not know who has won the U.S. Senate runoff in Georgia)

In contrast to the narrow division of power at the national level, voters in Georgia placed their confidence in the GOP. Over the course of the pandemic, the state has fared better than most thanks to strong leadership on the economy, a booming business environment, and a commitment to balancing lives and livelihoods without the hyper-partisan gamesmanship seen in other states. These ongoing successes ultimately led to November’s GOP victories.

All statewide constitutional offices were defended and maintained by Republicans, with incumbents leading the

way. Those winners include Governor Brian Kemp, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and Attorney General Chris Carr. Further, Georgia’s congressional delegation picked up one new Republican seat with Congressman-elect Rich McCormick’s win in Congressional District 6.

Additionally, the Insurance and Safety Fire Commissioner John King won his bid for the office after being appointed by Gov. Kemp. King replaced former Insurance Commissioner Jim Beck who was suspended following an indictment for fraud. Commissioner Beck was eventually found guilty and formally removed from office in July of 2021. It was this situation that led to constitutional amendment #1 on the November ballot regarding the suspension of certain state officials’ salaries who are facing felony indictments.

Newcomers on the statewide stage beginning in January will include several former Georgia State Senators: Lieutenant Governor-elect Burt Jones, Agriculture Commissioner-elect Tyler Harper, and Labor Commissioner-elect Bruce Thompson.

While there will be many familiar faces in the state’s highest offices, the Georgia General Assembly’s make-up will look quite different when members are sworn in come January. Though Republicans maintained their majorities in both chambers, 54 members of the state’s 236-member General Assembly will be newly elected. The 2023 incoming freshman class, as well as the 42-person freshman class of 2021, represents a total four-year turnover rate of nearly 40% of the state’s lawmaking arm.

The president’s party does not undergo significant losses in Congress.
CHRISTY TARALLO
16 Engineering Georgia engineering ga [ feature ]
President & CEO Michael "Sully" Sullivan and Director of Government Affairs Christy Tarallo with Agriculture Commissioner-Elect Tyler Harper.

And in a seismic leadership change in the legislative branch, longtime Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives, David Ralston, announced the week before the midterm elections that he would not be seeking another term as speaker; however, a few weeks following this announcement, on November 16, 2023, Speaker David Ralston passed away. Ralston’s legacy as speaker has had a massive influence on Georgia’s economy and the state’s perennial standing as the #1 state in the country to do business. His passion for Georgia and his positive impact cannot be overstated, and he will be sorely missed.

Following the speaker’s announcement, but preceding Ralston’s death, the House Republican Caucus nominated Majority Leader Jon Burns to succeed him as speaker. Burns has served in House leadership as majority leader for seven years and is seen as the natural successor to build upon Speaker Ralston’s pro-economic development and business friendly policies. Burns has earned the reputation of a trustworthy negotiator who has many friends on both sides of the political aisle. His personality, background, and experience will give him a strategic advantage and allow him to continue to move Georgia forward.

The Senate has also experienced significant leadership turnover. Lt. Governor-elect Burt Jones will succeed one-term Lt. Governor Geoff Duncan. Sen. John Kennedy was nominated by the Republican caucus to succeed Butch Miller as President Pro Tem, while longtime transportation advocate Sen. Steve Gooch was elected Senate Majority Leader.

We also want to congratulate the three ACEC Georgia members who currently serve in the General Assembly: former State Representative and now State Senator-Elect Ed Setzler (Vice President with Croft Architects & Engineers); State Representative Houston Gaines (Director of Business Development at Carter Engineering Consultants); and State Representative Brad Thomas, P.E. (Co-Founder and Principal Engineer at Capital Projects). Additional congratulations are in order for Rep. Gaines, who was elected to serve in House leadership as Vice-Chairman of the House Majority Caucus.

While

with the exceedingly large

in the General Assembly and its leadership, Georgia continues to be in the capable hands of proven leaders who have been longtime friends of the engineering industry.

uncertainty
A THE 2023 INCOMING FRESHMAN CLASS, AS WELL AS THE 42-PERSON FRESHMAN CLASS OF 2021, REPRESENTS A TOTAL FOUR-YEAR TURNOVER RATE OF NEARLY 40% OF THE STATE’S LAWMAKING ARM.
there is a degree of
turnover
November | December 17 engineering ga [ feature ]
Director of Government Affairs Christy Tarallo and her husband Marc Hyden with Labor Commissioner-Elect Bruce Thompson at Republican election night watch parties on November 6th
18 Engineering Georgia

the pulse

GEORGIA NUMBERS by the

60,000

41%

OF THE 41% OF AMERICANS that make a New Year Resolution, only 9% keep it.

OF AMERICANS make a New Year Resolution annually.

GEORGIA’S

291 11,000,000+ 9%

ECONOMY is the 10th fastest growing state economy in the US and has been named the No. 1 state for business for nine consecutive years by Area Development magazine.

November | December 19

PEOPLE attend the New Year’s Eve Peach Drop in Atlanta, GA, annually. 10
THE POPULATION OF GEORGIA is expected to top 11 million people by the end of 2023.
FOUNDED IN 1732, in 2023, Georgia will celebrate its 291st anniversary.

DOING GOOD DOES YOU

2022

Initially, she set out to play peacemaker and put a stop to the fighting and profanity she was encountering all too often in her neighborhood on the northwest side of Atlanta. But along the way, Eria Barnett found herself taking on a very different and far more important role.

GOOD:
Georgia’s Engineering Firms Build Better Communities, in More Ways Than One I
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What started as an effort to curb fighting and arguing in front of children resulted in Barnett creating a safe space for them—right on her own front porch. Hugs and other signs of support for kids in her neighborhood of Grove Park led to children showing up on her front porch, which led to activities and tea parties, finding bicycles for Christmas presents, and offering help in learning to read. None of it was intentional; by simply trying to make her neighborhood a better place for the kids living in it, Barnett wound up filling a need suited perfectly to what she calls her “Mama Bear” personality.

“Children are born innocent. They’re born beautiful. And I’ve tried to maintain that the best I could, considering the environment that was influencing them,” said Barnett, a Senior Document Control Specialist at the Atlanta office of the architecture, engineering, and design firm Gresham Smith. “The parents know what I stand for, and they’re open to it. That allowed me to bond with their children and become an influence. And it just kind of went from there.”

The members of Georgia’s engineering community are known for building better communities through the design and construction of highways, bridges, libraries, schools, airports, and so many other things that enrich the fiber of everyday life in the Peach State. But those same firms also build better communities in other ways, too—through charitable programs, volunteerism, foundation grants, mentoring programs, fundraisers, and countless other philanthropic ways in which the time, talent, and resources of the engineering community are used to help those in need. N

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And in at least one case, that involves serving as the “block mom” in Grove Park, where neighborhood kids begin showing up on Barnett’s front porch as soon as she arrives home from work. To the adults causing all the trouble, she proved that she wasn’t shy about calling the police. To anyone arguing in the street, she proved she wasn’t afraid to intervene. And to the kids, she offered a sanctuary.

“I try to treat everyone as myself. And if there's a need, and I can do something about it, then I want to do what I can,” said Barnett, who has been with Gresham Smith since 2016 and has nearly 15 years of experience in contract administration and account management.

“I can't do everything. But I can at least try to plant the seed and let someone know that they're not alone.”

EMPLOYEES AS A GOOD WORKS GUIDE

Good works, though, extend far beyond the front porch. Barge Design Solutions can trace its beginnings back to the 1950s when namesake Don Barge Jr. founded the firm in the hopes of landing construction phase services on the redevelopment of Capitol Hill. For nearly as long, the firm known for its infrastructure work has also prided itself on

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giving back to the communities it serves through grassroots giving and volunteerism. And to find the direction for those campaigns, the company looks within.

“As a company, we could set the docket for the causes and organizations we support,” said Sarah Camperlino, strategic communications specialist with Barge. “However, we recognized that it would be more profound to support the initiatives in which our employees are already involved.”

That effort led to the 2014 creation of the Barge Community Fund, which allows employees who contribute to the fund to also submit applications for their favorite nonprofits to be considered for grants. Of the $468,000 in grant funding given to approximately 130 organizations over the past eight years, more than $40,000 has been given to 17 organizations in Georgia. That was followed in 2021 with the debut of Barge Gives Back, a community involvement campaign in which Barge’s Georgia employees have volunteered with Columbus Water Works, the Chattahoochee River Cleanup, and the Atlanta Food Drive, among other projects. N

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Barge is not alone among firms that use their employees to direct their philanthropic efforts. The cornerstone of giving at Prime Engineering is its philanthropy committee, which is an organization created and staffed by Prime employees and funded by the company. Consisting of a cross-section of employees from across all branches of Prime, the philanthropy committee meets regularly to seek out and participate in charitable works.

Prime Engineering’s 2022 philanthropic efforts in Georgia have included a Chattahoochee River cleanup; support of Atlanta’s 5K4Kids race, which helps keeps children connected to incarcerated parents; support of “Cars and Q for the Cause,” a car show in Atlanta that raised $505,065 for the Georgia Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and company-wide animal shelter and Christmas canned food drives.

It’s a similar story at Thomas & Hutton, whose nine service regions throughout the Southeast are connected by the common thread of employee-driven community giving. Launched in 2017, the T&H Helping Hands program is a volunteer effort in which employees donate time to local organizations that directly impact the cities and towns surrounding the firm’s regional offices. The company’s most significant initiative in 2022 has been the “Waiting for Wishes” fundraiser to benefit Make-a-Wish Georgia, spearheaded by Savannah-based chief operating officer and senior Vice President Ben Jones.

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Thomas & Hutton has also held events such as an office Olympics to benefit the Atlanta Angels, which helps the foster care community, and the Food Bank of Northeast Georgia; a car show to benefit Shelter From the Rain, a Savannah nonprofit that helps single mothers; and a mini-golf tournament to benefit CURE Childhood Cancer in memory of Catie Wilkins, an Effingham County child who succumbed to the disease. Thomas & Hutton employees in 2022 also pledged $51,064 to benefit the United Way of the Coastal Empire and added average donations of over $1,000 to causes such as the Georgia chapter of the ALS Association and a fund to assist those impacted by an April tornado in Bryan County.

Employee-driven community giving was also on display on March 12, when 21 employees of the engineering firm HDR gathered in snow flurries and below-freezing temperatures outside Atlanta’s Grace Midtown Church. They were there to plant 35 trees, 20 of which had been purchased with funds from a Young Professional Action Grant, a program at HDR designed to encourage leadership and initiative among younger employees. The $5,000 Trees Atlanta grant was sponsored by HDR’s Brigitte von Oppenfeld, who helped plant the saplings near Rodney Cook Sr. Park, which the firm designed.

In August, 17 HDR volunteers gathered at the Atlanta Food Bank to sort 10,611 pounds of food and 8,842 packaged meals as part of a grant sponsored by employee Diana Gu. And three more $5,000 grants were approved in 2022—one sponsored by Gu to plant 20 new trees in Pinnacle Park in Norcross, another by von Oppenfeld and Jenna Levy to install native plantings and place boulders, rebar, and other locally sourced materials in eroded Crayfish Creek, and one sponsored by Rachel Cohen to purchase raised garden beds, soil, seeds, and gardening supplies for Lindsay Street Park in Atlanta. N

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GIVING BACK THROUGH EDUCATION

Children who are unable to read at grade level by the end of third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school, studies have shown. In Atlanta, the Dresden Elementary School Education Foundation works to help children meet that key threshold by offering individualized tutoring twice a week. And since 2018, Aulick Engineering has built a relationship with the foundation that includes everything from raising money to espousing the values of STEM education and potential engineering careers.

The activity table that Aulick sponsored for ACEC Georgia STEM Day in October will be donated to Dresden Elementary for use in their STEM classroom. Headquartered in nearby Chamblee, Aulick has also helped the foundation build a playground, decorated classrooms for talks about STEM careers, and donated bicycles to students who demonstrated good attendance and learning habits. And it’s hardly the only Georgia engineering firm to use its community outreach efforts as a way to try and cultivate the next generation of engineers in the Peach State.

Several companies including Prime Engineering and Shear Structural participated in “ACEC Georgia’s Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day,” an event held at Kennesaw State University in April. “We had a blast challenging these young female future engineers to build a cantilever as long as possible off the table,” said Malory Atkinson, Managing Partner at Shear Structural. “As Georgia's only women-owned structural engineering firm, it is important for us to cultivate the next generation of diverse engineers in our field.”

Shear Structural employees also volunteered in 2022 with Backpack Bash, an event which provides 100 percent of all school supplies for the entire year to students at a local elementary school with a high-need population. “We raise the funds, then volunteer all day at the school and give out backpacks and let students walk through and pick out all their school supplies,” Atkinson added. “It's a really fun experience to give back to so many students in a high-need community.” N

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Philanthropic or volunteer efforts with an educational focus were not uncommon among Georgia engineering firms in 2022. At Pond, Vice President of Aviation Hugh Weaver gave a guest lecture at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro and led a field day at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport, where students could see various design elements and airport operations up close, get hands-on experience and engage directly with airport crew. And employees at PES Structural Engineers took part in a role model program at Barnwell Elementary in Johns Creek, where they worked with students to explain concepts they used in engineering projects.

Meanwhile, at Carter & Sloope Consulting Engineers, a very different effort was unfolding: employees helping Evan Boyd, son of company President Marty Boyd, with an Eagle Scout project that entailed the beautification of the entrance to the historic Chenocetah Fire Tower, a stone edifice built in 1937. Evan put together a plan for the town of Cornelia to purchase the necessary materials, and in May employees from Carter & Sloope’s Athens office took a day of service to add shrubs and mulch to one of the nation’s largest stands of rhododendron. Evan earned his Eagle Scout rank in July.

For many engineering firms in Georgia, building stronger communities entails battling food insecurity. The Atlanta office of VHB is holding a virtual 5K Turkey Trot to raise money for the Atlanta Community Food Bank, which distributes over 65 million meals annually across north Georgia. The Atlanta office of Stantec volunteered in June at the food bank, sorting and packing 1,020 pounds of squash, 980 pounds of Cheez-Its snack mix, and 4,546 nonperishable items and canned goods. And Aulick distributed over 5,000 pounds of food that fed 1,500 people in a food drive with We Love BuHi, a nonprofit working to preserve the multicultural identity of Buford Highway in Atlanta. N

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FROM ATLANTA MISSION TO ALS WALK

There is no playbook to giving back; it can be done in a number of ways and for a number of reasons, and there are countless organizations that can benefit. Some causes are deeply personal—as is the case with Eberly & Associates, which for 12 years now has participated in the Walk to Defeat ALS to raise funds for research and to help the families of those living with the disease. It’s all done in the memory of Ki Song, one of Eberly’s founding partners, who passed away from ALS in 2009.

Other efforts stem from personal connections, as is the case with an Aulick fundraiser for Church of the Common Ground. The organization provides support to the unhoused, the urban poor, and other underserved people in the Atlanta metro area, and Aulick engineer Alex Mooney serves on its board. Still more arise simply from a desire to help, such as WTS Atlanta donating supplies to the Atlanta Mission, or a Croy team participating in a fundraiser to benefit LiveSafe Resources, an organization which provides safety and healing to those impacted by domestic violence, sexual assault, or elder abuse. N

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November | December 31
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Some efforts have their roots in a love of the outdoors, such as PES Structural Engineers’ participation in the Chattahoochee River Clean-Up, and KCI Technologies’ involvement in the Adopt-a-Road Program with Gwinnett Clean and Beautiful. Others have been furthered by technology, such as the “VBay” auction held by VHB. “With the creation of an online bidding tool by our IT Team, VBay became not only our biggest single fundraising event, but also a chance for spirited camaraderie and connections across our footprint,” said Jenny Jenkins, Co-Chair of VHB Cares, the company’s employee-led charitable efforts group.

There’s also the occasional effort inspired by a past story on good works by Georgia engineering firms—such as a Shear Structural initiative which gave each employee $100 in cash with instructions to pay it forward in a meaningful manner, just as WK Dickson detailed in the 2021 edition of this magazine. And then there’s Eria Barnett, and the kids that show up on her porch every evening in Grove Park, and a neighborhood that’s changing for the better thanks to one person’s vigilance and love. N

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“We did change a lot of the culture,” said Barnett. “Parents know they can come to me for support— there was a family whose lights were not on, so I told them to come to my house to get whatever they needed. But the violence and the arguing and the bickering has gone down substantially. It's rare that it happens anymore. If you come here today, it's very quiet and peaceful.” A

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GENERAL MANAGER & CEO 20 Questions with Collie Greenwood
FROM BUS DRIVER TO MARTA
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BRETT HILLESHEIM

CCollie Greenwood is no stranger to mass transit in a large, urban city. The new MARTA General Manager and CEO began his career 35 years ago as a bus driver with the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), North America’s third-largest transit system. Greenwood rose through the ranks of the TTC over the next three decades to eventually serve as Chief Service Officer. In 2019, after 30 years with TTC, he and his family moved to Atlanta, where he joined MARTA as Chief of Bus Operations and Urban Planning. Less than two years later, Greenwood was named Deputy General Manager of Operations. And in January 2022, the MARTA Board of Directors named him Interim General Manager and CEO following the death of then-CEO and General Manager Jeffrey Parker. N

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This past October, the MARTA Board of Directors made it official and named Greenwood MARTA General Manager and CEO.

“I am honored and humbled by this opportunity,” Greenwood said. “I love transit and have known since my days of driving a bus how vital it is to people and their communities. I am eager to get to work enhancing and expanding service in the metro Atlanta region.”

As General Manager and CEO, Greenwood will lead MARTA’s largest and most ambitious expansion and modernization program since its founding over 40 years ago. He will work closely with his senior leadership team to develop and deliver major capital projects to enhance the customer experience, including adding new railcars and electric buses to the MARTA fleet.

Already off to a running start, Greenwood announced the Georgia Partnership for Transit Excellence (GPTE) with ACEC Georgia during the 2022 Georgia Transportation Summit.

“MARTA is pleased to solidify our commitment to partnering with our community,” Greenwood said at the Summit. “We have been the beneficiary of many years of consultant commitment to provide professional services to support our existing transit systems. As we embark on this unprecedented investment in expansion and growth, it is important for us to have a venue to share best practices, provide feedback, and solve challenges together. MARTA is confident that partnering with ACEC Georgia will provide better education, advocacy, and focus on the role that transit plays in the overall transportation network in the state of Georgia.”

Engineering Georgia was able to catch up with Greenwood following the Georgia Transportation Summit to get to know the new MARTA leader better. N

I LOVE TRANSIT AND HAVE KNOWN SINCE MY DAYS OF DRIVING A BUS HOW VITAL IT IS TO PEOPLE AND THEIR COMMUNITIES.
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I AM EAGER TO GET TO WORK ENHANCING AND EXPANDING SERVICE IN THE METRO ATLANTA REGION.

QUESTIONS WITH COLLIE GREENWOOD

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YOU WORKED FOR OVER 30 YEARS IN TORONTO, CANADA; WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO ATLANTA?

I retired from the TTC, and my wife and I decided that Atlanta posed an incredible opportunity, and we were ready for our next adventure. MARTA’s transit philosophy was consistent with my own, and there was a lot of support for progressive transit initiatives in a city that deserves excellent service.

WHAT APPEALED TO YOU MOST ABOUT RELOCATING TO ATLANTA?

I was excited to move to a world-class city with an established transit system ripe for expansion. I’d heard of southern hospitality before we moved, and to experience the warmth and kindness from people all over the region has made my wife, and I feel so welcome and grateful that we chose to come to Atlanta.

WHAT ACCOMPLISHMENT HIGHLIGHTS YOUR TIME AT THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION (TTC)?

Developing a workforce of talented, profes sional people who have gone on to make significant contributions in transit at the TTC and elsewhere. Initiating a station management program that signaled a quali tative change in how service was delivered.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE IN THE INDUSTRY BETWEEN THE TIME YOU JOINED IT AND TODAY?

A broader sense of civic awareness and integration, best practices adoption, and adherence to expectations that traditionally were outside of the considerations of a transit provider.

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WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF SO FAR DURING YOUR TIME AT MARTA?

The relationships I’ve built with the employees during a difficult, unprecedented couple of years. MARTA is its PEOPLE, and I am so proud of the dedication of everyone here. It is a privilege to lead such a sincere and loyal group of people.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS YOUR MISSION AT MARTA?

To advocate for and provide safe, multimodal transit services that advance prosperity, connectivity, and equity for a more livable region.

WHAT IS MARTA’S MOST SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGE AT THIS MOMENT IN TIME?

Consistency of service excellence. We know how to do it well, but we MUST do it well all day, every day, as a service to our existing customers and as a compelling case for our future customers.

HOW HAS MARTA NAVIGATED THROUGH THE PANDEMIC?

MARTA did an excellent job through the pandemic by remaining abreast of rapidly changing data and directives, adapting our service for the most effective use of limited resources, focusing on customer and employee safety, and remaining open throughout the pandemic. Our MARTA Heroes employee showcase series received critical acclaim from the rest of the transit industry. N

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HOW DO YOU THINK YOUR PREVIOUS EXPERIENCES WILL HELP YOU IN YOUR ROLE AT MARTA?

Decades of exposure and engagement at a large, multi-modal transit agency with similar issues means that my experience is relevant on a consistent basis.

WHAT MOST EXCITES YOU ABOUT THE FUTURE OF MARTA?

A robust Capital expansion program designed to elevate the transit experience and MOVE PEOPLE in our region for generations to come.

WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR FREE TIME?

Friends, family, fitness, and food – still working on the right balance.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE PLACES IN ATL?

Chattahoochee greenspace, Beltline, amazing restaurants, midtown

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE BOOK OR PODCAST ON LEADERSHIP?

In Search of Excellence – Tom Peters

WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE OF YOUR CAREER?

The biggest challenge in this line of work is always the next one. We often say, "you’re only as good as your last rush-hour service.” That said, I anticipate challenges with the responsibility to deliver so many capital projects in a landscape fraught with inflation, resource shortfalls, and unyielding expectations. As always, we welcome the challenge and the chance to build ourselves ready for the “next one.”

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR MANAGEMENT STYLE, AND HOW WAS IT FORMED?

Transitional – a different approach for different circumstances. Formed via years of working at varying levels of an organization with access to many different leaders – and the ability to observe the impact (or lack thereof) of their styles.

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN A POTENTIAL NEW HIRE?

Engagement. The energy and intelligence to make a compelling case for their own candidacy and the ability to help me envision the difference they will make. N

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YOU STARTED YOUR CAREER IN TRANSPORTATION AS A BUS DRIVER. WHAT DID MOVING UP THROUGH THE RANKS TEACH YOU ABOUT LEADERSHIP?

The best Leaders are NOT those who cling to “NO.” The best leaders create a responsible and repeatable way to get to “YES.” They maintain an immovable set of values and adapt to the scenarios and the people in front of them. They inspire and build respectful, capable teams in their wake.

WHO DO YOU LOOK UP TO FOR INSPIRATION OR MENTORSHIP?

It truly takes a village. I’ve always sought those gifts from a very large cohort of people. Different bosses, peers, and subordinates depending on the challenge at hand.

WHAT’S THE MOST SIGNIFICANT FACTOR THAT’S HELPED YOU SUCCEED IN YOUR CAREER?

Connecting with good and authentic people and forging mutually beneficial successes.

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF LEADERSHIP ADVICE YOU’D GIVE TO OTHERS LOOKING TO ADVANCE IN THEIR CAREER?

Take care of your people – they are all you have. Take advantage of the opportunities for broad exposure when you can. Your NEXT job will depend on your level of comfort with challenges outside of your core duties. A

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OUTSOURCING GOVERNMENT SERVICES

It had been more than 50 years since a new city had been created in Georgia when the City of Sandy Springs came into being in 2005. There were no models for how to get one up and running that could be applied. Fortunately, Oliver Porter had an idea.

Oliver Porter is an engineer, artist and somewhat of a visionary. Porter believes that smaller governments that are closer to the people offer citizens more opportunities for engagement and input and greater government accountability. Porter had a vision for the City of Sandy Springs designed to minimize the sort of bureaucracy that would create barriers to direct citizen engagement. Critical to this vision was the idea of privatizing government services.

Partnership: A Win-Win for Cities and Engineering Firms I
Public-Private
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It wasn’t an entirely new idea, but it’s an idea that caught on here in Georgia and across the globe. Almost every new city created in Georgia since 2005 has followed the Sandy Springs model by outsourcing some or all of their government services. Even long-established cities and counties have incorporated outsourcing into their service delivery models. And engineering firms have been central to this process.

THE CITYHOOD MOVEMENT AND OUTSOURCED GOVERNMENT SERVICES: CLOSE ALLIES

If you were to ask almost anyone to share their complaints about government, you’d probably hear a litany of gripes about bureaucracy and slow services. Prior to 2005, the community of Sandy Springs was no different. Back then, Sandy Springs was an unincorporated area in the northern part of Fulton County. Residents complained about slow and inefficient services, and about their high tax burden that was not justified by the poor-quality of services they were receiving. N

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Jacobs and the City of Johns Creek are in a public-private-partnership, with Jacobs providing a range of municipal services, including public works and community development.

Dissatisfaction with the government services they were receiving from Fulton County was a key reason for many residents who were in favor of incorporation and the intent to outsource many of those services was part of the cityhood campaign.

In 2005, residents of Sandy Springs voted 94% in favor of incorporating their new city, which became the third largest area in the country ever to do so. The City’s leaders, Oliver Porter included, immediately announced their plan to run their city differently. Rather than a large, impressive city hall complex and staff to go with it, the City of Sandy Springs would run a slimmed-down operation that placed a premium on efficiency. The key ingredient in the recipe? Outsourcing.

CH2M (now Jacobs) was the engineering firm tasked with providing all city services. Ashley Jenkins was elected to serve on the first Sandy Springs City Council, and she described the challenge the city faced, stating that they “could not have stood up the city without the expert advice and leadership from our partners at CH2M. From process management to traffic engineering to building permits, they were on top of it all. We were successful because of their hard work behind the scenes.”

But beyond merely providing the services, CH2M/Jacobs also provided data on how well those services were being provided, and at what cost. As Jenkins put it, “they provided dashboards and metrics so we could properly budget and track where we were year over year to make progress in the areas that needed it most.”

This now-familiar model of public-private partnerships quickly gained national attention. Proponents of cityhood generally, and privatization specifically, hoped that Sandy Springs would provide a compelling case for a shift away from large full-time staffs and top-heavy city government infrastructures.

Every year when contracts were rebid, the City of Sandy Springs would ask a crucial question: do public or private contracts offer the greatest value for the lowest cost?

Along with the legislation creating Sandy Springs, a number of legislative changes were made to make it easier to incorporate new cities, and Sandy Springs’ success unleashed a torrent of new cityhood ballot measures. Cities such as Dunwoody, Milton, Johns Creek, Brookhaven and Peachtree Corners promised residents better services and better stewardship of taxpayer dollars via incorporation. For many resident, outsourcing some government services to private contractors was a key selling point.

For example, Johns Creek has maintained streamlined operations by outsourcing public works to Jacobs Engineering. Outsourced contracts also operate its right-of-way and stormwater systems, parks, and traffic operations. N

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Photo Credit: North Fulton Chamber of Commerce

Dunwoody outsources various contracts too, including to The Collaborative, an urban planning and design firm that supports the City’s planning, zoning, and code enforcement.

Milton outsources a variety of city planning services on an as-needed basis, sending contractors to building inspections, to oversee zoning issues, and to review building and other development plans.

Brookhaven allows contractors to directly bid on a variety of contracts on its website. It lists the details of each awarded contract directly on the website, so the public can easily view project costs and progress.

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WHY OUTSOURCE

PUBLIC SERVICES?

The outsourcing model allows cities to cast a wide net, seeking national or even international talent to solve familiar challenges.

“This model provides lower costs, higher performance and greater accountability by outsourcing most departments to the private-sector service providers,” said City Manager Eric Linton in his September 2021 newsletter.

For some advocates of small government, outsourcing public services is all about saving money. Outsourcing, though, has also drawn the support of those who believe it creates greater accountability, improved services, and a more manageable city staff.

City leaders cannot be experts in all things. Outsourcing allows them to find and hire the real experts, and renew their contract only if the contractor delivers in full on the promised services.

A competitive bidding process with local accountability incentivizes good work from contractors. When city employees do the work, addressing performance issues may expend significant HR resources as managers implement performance improvement plans or seek to overhaul entire departments. Without a competitive process in place, transparency into the actual cost of a service as compared against the value it delivers is challenging.

Public-private partnerships prioritize results, and can drive innovation that may ultimately spread to other cities. Once a firm wins a contract, it has freedom to implement the contract based on its own expertise, rather than on political considerations. There is no bloat, no department heads to consult, and no need to waste time on bureaucratic red tape or resistance to change.

Defining success for these contracts is crucial to realizing their promised benefits. Each city has devised its own solution for keeping the process competitive and accountable.

The Sandy Springs model awards contracts to multiple firms, using a “ranked runner-up” system. If the first contract recipient does not meet standards, the City can transition to a different contractor without going through the rebidding process.

In Dunwoody, the City can begin the search for a new contractor even while under an existing contract with a different firm.

Opponents of cities have expressed concern about keeping outsourced work transparent. The leaders of the cityhood movement insist that outsourcing is actually more transparent, because cities have a strong interest in clear oversight. The relatively small size of most of the newer cities may also mean more engaged citizens who put pressure on contractors (and the elected officials who award the contracts) to deliver what they promise.

Those citizens have the right to access most contracting documents and budgets. Even when a government hires a private firm to do a job, the records associated with that job are covered under Georgia’s Open Records Act, which requires that governments allow members of the public to view almost all government documents. These open records generally include budgets, contracts, emails and other communications about outsourcing projects, meeting minutes, and more.

Georgia’s Open Meetings Act lends an additional layer of transparency. Most government meetings, including those about outsourced contracts, must be open to the public, and advertised in compliance with state law.

Georgia law prohibits outsourcing certain services, including police and fire. So even in the most pared down cities, these operations remain consistently under the control of local leadership.

THE BENEFITS TO ENGINEERING FIRMS OF OUTSOURCING

Engineering firms can offer a wide range of outsourced services. Jacobs, a leader in global engineering, has contributed to many local projects. Jacobs acquired CH2M Hill, which oversaw many of the earliest city engineering contracts, in 2017.

Following the incorporation of Johns Creek in 2006, surveys showed that residents’ biggest concern was traffic. Jacobs developed a traffic control system linking 72 traffic signals to a single control center.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, badly timed traffic signals are a major contributor to road congestion. Reconfiguring these signals is one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce traffic slowdowns.

Jacobs reports that many cities across the nation have installed such traffic systems, but these systems often fail to realize their promised benefits because the right people do not oversee them. The timing of the signals remains outdated or inefficient, potentially exacerbating rather than improving traffic frustrations.

Things work differently in Johns Creek. Jacobs engineers actively oversee the traffic signals, making continuous improvements based on actual traffic patterns. As a result, traffic congestion has steadily improved in this highly populated region. N

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Due in part to these traffic improvements, The Georgia Section of the Institute of Transportation named the Johns Creek Public Works Department Agency of the Year in 2018.

Cities face complex challenges, especially as they recover from the pandemic. Traffic, crime, climate concerns, and public health all figure prominently in the minds of city leaders and citizens. Engineering firms can innovate creative solutions to these challenges.

Small cities offer fertile soil in which to plant and test out new solutions. When they succeed, other cities may adopt these innovations, improving quality of life in an entire region. When projects fail, the mandate to perform to the standards of the contract incentivizes engineers to keep trying until they find something that works. The failure itself can be beneficial, offering guidance to other cities, and for future projects.

IS THE OUTSOURCING TREND WANING?

Outsourcing can save taxpayer dollars—a strong selling point, especially as a recession looms. Outsourcing, though, doesn’t always lower costs in absolute terms. Even Sandy Springs has elected to bring some services in-house since 2019.

“In this [reassessment of contracts], the gap between private sector prices and in-house costs for these services was such we cannot justify the difference,” Mayor Rusty Paul said in a press release at the time. “We frequently compare the private sector offerings we receive with the in-house cost of delivering services and have elected in the past to rely on the private sector due to cost, flexibility and innovation.”

Nevertheless, Sandy Springs continued to keep several contracts privatized. Public works field services, the city attorney’s office, the municipal court and solicitor’s offices, and 911 services all remain outsourced.

A 2017 Library Systems and Services survey found that 53% of citizens believe that outsourcing some government services is “mainly a good thing.” And while respondents reported generally favorable opinions of local government services, favorability rates were generally lower for those services that governments are most likely to outsource. Respondents also expressed skepticism about government’s ability to report on and constrain administrative costs for services such as libraries.

Engineering firms can continue to adapt to new trends, keeping costs under control and demonstrate their ability to be responsive to the needs and concerns of citizens and government officials. As Deyanna Respress, Manager of Projects, Municipal Services at Jacobs puts it “engineers are trained problem solvers and working with local governments requires quick problem-solving skills and innovative solutions.”

The opportunity to innovate remains and local governments can be the beneficiaries of those creative solutions. As the leaders of Georgia’s recent cityhood movements continue to learn, adaptation to changing needs is the key to success. A

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JULIE SECRIST, PE, M. ASCE

Meritage Land Development President, 2021-2022 ASCE Georgia www.ascega.org

ASCE GEORGIA HIGHLIGHT: COLLEGE OUTREACH

The Georgia Section of ASCE puts great emphasis on student outreach to encourage future leaders to join the engineering industry and support engineering students in their path toward the profession. This month we’re highlighting our College Outreach efforts and a couple of Student Chapters to give our members insight to ASCE Georgia activities.

ASCE GEORGIA – COLLEGE OUTREACH Mission

To provide support, guidance, and resources to ASCE Student Chapters in Georgia.

What we do

The Section works with Faculty and Practitioner Advisors to protect the interests of the various ASCE Student Chapters across the 6 primary Georgia Universities with established engineering programs: University of Georgia, Kennesaw State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Mercer University, Georgia Southern University and Savannah State University. We provide recommendations and support to the Chapters on developing a budgets and goal setting; we facilitate communication and collaboration between the Chapters; we provide financial assistance, mentorship, presentations at Chapter meetings and career fair support; and we help plan and

facilitate the annual Student Chapter Summit between all Georgia student chapters which occurs in October.

Leadership

ASCE Georgia’s College Outreach effort is currently led by Keith Cole, PE, CHMM, F. ASCE with support from many other volunteers. Keith is the Georgia Section Director of Student Chapters and is a Principal with Ramboll Group.

ASCE GEORGIA – STUDENT CHAPTER HIGHLIGHT: MERCER UNIVERSITY

Mercer University’s ASCE student chapter aims to provide its students with a supportive network of peers and professionals to help them thrive. As a young chapter, their goals include increasing society membership among our growing student population, building relationships with local engineering professionals, and encouraging campus involvement.

In 2022, the chapter attended the Southeast Student Symposium for the first time. In 2023, the chapter will compete in the Concrete Canoe competition for the first

time, receiving support from Moore Bass Consulting Inc., Heath & Lineback Engineers Inc., Terracon Consultants Inc., ASCE Georgia, and Mercer University School of Engineering. In addition to preparing for the symposium, the chapter hosts various presentations and workshops from various professionals, such as this year’s resume preparation workshop and presentation on P.E. licensure. Students also get the opportunity to socialize and have fun in events that are hosted in collaboration with other campus organizations. From movie parties to visits from engineering professionals, Mercer ASCE stives to keep its students engaged, well-rounded, and eager for the next opportunity. Upcoming events include a presentation featuring Heath & Lineback Engineers from Marietta, Georgia and volunteering at Mercer University’s annual holiday celebration.

Mercer’s ASCE student chapter is so grateful for the support it has received from ASCE, professionals across Georgia, and the other ASCE student chapters. Moving forward, we are so excited for what the future has in store for us. We will continue striving to advance the civil engineering profession and to become the best civil engineers of the future!

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MUSEUM VISIT IN TALLAHASSEE, FL STUDENTS AT OUR FIRST STUDENT SYMPOSIUM STUDENTS AT OUR “ENGINEERING OLYMPICS” SOCIAL EVENT
56 Engineering Georgia

SHAWN FLEET

ASHE NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Planning is well underway for the 2023 ASHE National Conference, which will be held in Atlanta in June! We’ve secured great seats for a Braves game (with gifts!), have a beautiful course booked for the golf tournament, and are planning for an engaging and fun overall conference experience. Of course, we can’t do this without sponsors and volunteers! Please visit 2023conference.ashe.pro for more info and to be a part of it all!

KP RUN/WALK/ROLL

In September, ASHE Georgia members participated in the KP Run/Walk/Roll 5K – we were thrilled to be back in person for this fun event! Huge thanks to our sponsors of the tent, including CHA, Gresham Smith, Heath & Lineback, HNTB, and VHB.

association [ news ] November | December 57

On September 30th, Georgia ITE held its first-ever annual Marr Traffic Grand Prix. The event sold out and was a big success. Sixty participants enjoyed a rotation of live on-thetrack racing, operational training, and safety training. The fastest participants from each group competed in one final race to determine the first-ever Grand Prix Champion. First place went to Jaap Tigelaar, 2nd to Chris Moultrie, and 3rd to Raul Viera.

In October, GAITE held a joint meeting with ITS Georgia at Monday Night Garage to hear from Kathy Zahul, GDOT's Assistant Director of Strategic and Systems Planning. Our November meeting featured our annual young member spotlights, which are short presentations from several new members centering around things they’ve learned and projects they’ve worked on since graduating. Our November monthly meeting also featured our Traffic Bowl Competition. Georgia Southern, Georgia Tech, and Kennesaw State competed for the honor of representing the Georgia Section at next year’s Southern District ITE Meeting. Congratulations to the Georgia Tech Team on their win!

Looking to the future, GAITE will host our annual meeting in December. In 2023 the Southern District ITE Meeting returns to Georgia and will be hosted in Savannah. GAITE is also hard at work planning the 2023 Winter Workshop in coordination with ASHE Georgia. That conference will return to Augusta in 2023.

If you would like to be a part of Georgia ITE, please see our website at: gaite.org/join.php for information on how to join. When you join ITE international, you are automatically added as a member of your local section. Members receive discounts on our monthly meetings and events and have the opportunity to serve on our various committees.

ANNUAL MARR TRAFFIC GRAND PRIX YOUNG MEMBER SPOTLIGHT PRESENTERS YOUNG MEMBER SPOTLIGHTS PRESENTATION NOVEMBER MONTHLY MEETING YOUNG MEMBER SPOTLIGHTS PRESENTATION TRAFFIC BOWL
58 Engineering Georgia

CAPT JOHN PRIEN, CEC, USN (RET)

The Clorox Company GEF President john.prien@clorox.com www.gefinc.org

REMEMBERING OUTSTANDING GEF FOUNDERS

Gordon Dalrymple, PE (left), joined with leaders of other engineering organizations in recognizing the “need for a singular organization to undertake philanthropic and educational efforts on behalf of the engineering profession in Georgia.” Dalrymple, GSPE’s Executive Director John Prien, PE (right), and the presidents of 15 state engineering societies agreed to establish such an organization to be called the Georgia Engineering Foundation (GEF).

Dalrymple, Prien, and CECG President Bob Przybylowski, PE undertook to create bylaws for GEF and acted as incorporating officers and founding directors. Their efforts led to the incorporation of GEF in 1971 and eventually to the foundation's involvement in philanthropic programs. To further the mission of GEF we are pleased to announce that we will be receiving $40,000 in new 2022 donations to increase funding of existing endowments in memory of three outstanding GEF members. They are:

Gordon B. Dalrymple PE

Gordon Dalrymple was born in Williamsburg, KY, in 1924. When he was just two years old, his father died, leaving his widow with ten children to feed and little income. From those humble beginnings, Dalrymple became a successful, highly respected Atlanta businessman, engineer, philanthropist, and community leader. Gordon proudly served in the Navy in WWII. After graduating from the University of Illinois with a Civil Engineering degree, he moved to Atlanta, where he obtained a Master's degree from Georgia Tech. He joined Law Engineering in 1952, later becoming president and CEO and serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors from 1975 to 1984. Dalrymple served as GEF’s first President from 1972-1973.

Julian “Rod” Ralston Lee, J.D. Rod Lee was reared by his father. He was a member of the original 10th Special Forces during the Vietnam War. He was a graduate of Armstrong State, UGA, and Georgia Tech. He obtained degrees in Agricultural Engineering, Physics, a Master of Nuclear Engineering, and a Juris Doctorate. He was a farmer, logger, salesman, an Electrical Engineer in Industry, a Professor of Physics and Mechanical Engineering, and a consultant to many different firms. He was a Life member of GSPE and NSPE, holding many offices and receiving many honors, such as President of the Year and Engineer of the Year in 1980 and 1990. He was also one of the leaders of GEF, serving as President from 1987-1988. For many years, he and his wife published the Georgia Professional Engineer Magazine under the company name Drexel-Lee Associates. He retired in 1992 as Professor Emeritus of the University System of Georgia.

Kenneth G. Taylor PE

Ken Taylor graduated from Rhode Island State College in 1943 with a degree in Civil Engineering. Ken ran cross country and track was a member of the URI national champion cross country team in 1942, and was inducted into the URI Sports Hall of Fame in 1984. During WWII, he served across the Pacific Theatre, constructing airfields for B-29s. After the war, Ken worked in construction management. In 1958 he helped establish Eastern Engineering and served as Executive Vice President. In 1971, Eastern became Simons-Eastern and later Simons. Ken was President of Simons from 1982 – 1986. He also served and chaired the Georgia Tech Foundation and the Georgia Tech Research Corporation Board of Directors. He was President of GEF from 1976-1977, and in 1988, he received the GEF Medal of Honor for Exemplary Service.

Now more than ever, investing in our nation's future leaders and the greater engineering community is critical. You can know that GEF will ensure that each scholarship is awarded on benefactor goals, student merit, and with a strong consideration of each scholar’s financial need. Your generosity is needed now more than ever as financial assistance continues to grow. If you are interested in setting up a scholarship, endowment, or volunteering to serve, please reach out to GEF at President@gefinc.org or john.prien@clorox.com.

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November | December 59

GRAHAM S. SIZEMORE, E.I.T.

Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood GSPE President graham.sizemore@gmcnetwork.com www.gspe.org

GROW WITH OTHER PEs IN YOUR COMMUNITY AND CELEBRATE EWEEK

You have established your career as a PE, but what is next? What are the areas where you need to enhance your professional toolkit? Maybe you want to strengthen your skill set to move up.

You have a unique professional opportunity to connect with engineers representing the full range of PE disciplines through membership in GSPE and NSPE. You can participate in thoughtful, multi-faceted conversations online and in person.

GSPE plans to participate with NSPE and other national societies to celebrate EWeek for 2023. Founded by NSPE in 1951, EWeek is dedicated to ensuring a diverse and well-educated future engineering workforce by increasing understanding of and interest in engineering and technology careers.

Today, EWeek is a formal coalition of more than 70 engineering, education, and cultural societies and more than 50 corporations and government agencies. Dedicated to raising public awareness of engineers' positive contributions to quality of life, EWeek promotes recognition among parents, teachers, and students of the importance of a technical education and a high level of math, science, and technology literacy and motivates youth to pursue engineering careers to provide a diverse and vigorous engineering workforce. Each year, EWeek reaches thousands of schools, businesses, and community groups across the U.S. This week is just around the corner and will be held February 19-25.

Take a look at the many faces of NSPE and the exclusive Georgia Society of Professional Engineers Member Benefits nspe.org/membership/memberbenefits and Join nspe.org/membership/join-now Today! #IAmGSPE #IAmNSPE

MATHCOUNTS BRAIN TEASER

Each year, GSPE and NSPE participate through volunteer opportunities and sponsorship of MATHCOUNTS. MATHCOUNTS provides engaging math programs to US middle school students of all ability levels to build confidence and improve attitudes about math and problem solving. GSPE is proud to support MATHCOUNTS and thankful for all of the volunteers who dedicate their time to this great cause!

2023 GEORGIA ENGINEERING AWARDS

GSPE is excited to once again participate in the Georgia Engineering Awards for the 2023 year with the event to be held on March 25, 2023 at the Cobb Galleria.

GSPE will recognize engineers, honoring those who have made outstanding contributions to the engineering profession, the public welfare, and/or humankind, at the banquet. GSPE presents awards in the categories of:

• GSPE Lifetime Achievement in Engineering

• GSPE Engineer of the Year in Construction

• GSPE Engineer of the Year in Education

• GSPE Engineer of the Year in Government

• GSPE Engineer of the Year in Industry

• GSPE Engineer of the Year in Private Practice

• GSPE Young Engineer of the Year

• GSPE Engineering Student of the Year

• GSPE Engineering Technology Student of the Year

• GSPE Engineering Employer of the Year

• Engineering Organization Volunteer of the Year

Facebook.com/gspeorg Linkedin.com/company/Georgia-society-of-professional-engineers www.youtube.com/GSPEng

VISIT GSPE.ORG
TO JOIN VISIT
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NSPE.ORG/MEMBERSHIP/JOIN-NOW CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!
60 Engineering Georgia

THOMAS GLUECKERT, PE, PTOE

Kimley-Horn ITS Georgia President itsgachapter@gmail.com www.itsga.org

ITS GEORGIA ELECTS NEW BOARD MEMBERS

On October 19th, at our Annual Banquet, ITS Georgia announced our six incoming directors who will serve a two-year term, effective January 1, 2023 through December 31, 2024. Elected to the Board were:

They join current board members Holly Painter – KCI, Matt Glasser – Arcadis, Ken Keena – Gwinnett County Department of Transportation, and Greg Ramsey – Peachtree Corners Department of Transportation.

Thomas Glueckert of Kimley-Horn remains Chapter President; Rachel Cohen of 360 Network Solutions as Vice President; Secretary, Steven Foy of Paulding County DOT as Secretary; and, Mahesh Atluri of HNTB as Treasurer, Winter Horbal of Kimley-Horn. is the Immediate Past President. The term of officer positions is for the 2022-2023 years.

Congratulations to our newly elected board members, all of whom are well qualified to provide leadership as we move the organization forward over the next two years of their term. Thanks to retiring board members Natalie Smusz-Mengelkoch, Keith Rohling, and Dino Pampolina for their leadership and hard work over the past two years and we welcome their continued participation and guidance in the future.

ITS GEORGIA ANNOUNCES 2022 BEST OF ITS GEORGIA AWARDS

Every year, ITS Georgia takes pride in recognizing the outstanding people, projects and organizations that make our state a leader in the development, deployment, and operation of intelligent transportation systems. This year, we are honored to be able to recognize the people and agencies who have contributed so much to our industry these past years. We are also pleased to introduce a new award this year, which recognizes new and exciting uses for existing ITS technologies. Congratulations to all our winners!

2022 ITS Small Project of Significance Award

PAULDING COUNTY

Project: Paulding County Traffic Control Center

2022 ITS Large Project of Significance Award

APPLIED INFORMATION

Project: School Bus Priority Using Connected (CV) Technology

2022 Innovation: Outside the Box Award

GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Project: High-Risk Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Notification Program

2022 Innovation: Best Use of Existing ITS Technologies Award

GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Technology: ITS Asset Management System (IAMS) Software Solution

2022 Outstanding Agency Contribution Award

GWINNETT COUNTY AND GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Contributions: For their innovation in deploying full connected vehicle technologies county-wide in order to advance CAV applications Statewide.

2022 Outstanding Individua Contribution Award

WHITNEY NOTTAGE, P.E., PTOE OF Q-FREE

Contributions: For being instrumental in ITSGA’s transition over the past year and working tirelessly to promote ITSGA, support her fellow board members, and provide best service to our members through her leadership on the Communications Committee.

2022 President’s Award

HOLLY PAINTER, P.E., OF KCI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

Contributions: For exemplifying the attributes of a dedicated board member, always providing her honest opinion, helping promote ITSGA through membership outreach and engagement, and supporting her fellow board members when they most needed it.

2022 Larry R. Dreihaup Award

ALAN DAVIS, P.E., PTOE OF GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Contributions: For exemplifying leadership and dedication in promoting the deployment of ITS technologies throughout the state of Georgia while pushing the industry forward and advancing Georgia to be a national leader.

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EMILY DWYER Georgia Department of Transportation WHITNEY NOTTAGE Q Free FARRAH GLASGOW Utilicom STEVEN SHEFFIELD Seoul Robotics TROY GALLOWAY Arcadis MARY THUMATY
November | December 61
Southeastern Engineering

CANDICE SCALE

DOD, CHA Consulting, Inc

SAME Atlanta Post President Candice.scale@gmail.com www.sameatlantapost.org

MOVING FORWARD, TOGETHER

It’s hard to believe we are nearing the end of 2022. It has been an honor to have served as the President of SAME Atlanta Post this year. Together, we have achieved so much! We started the year strong by being recognized as a Distinguished Post for our 2022 Streamers submission, led by David Nelson (ATI). We donated a total of $24,000 to college students pursuing careers in engineering through our Post Awards Program, led by Felita Bunn (Brown and Caldwell) and Beth Harris (Prime AE Group), and our contribution to the Georgia Engineering Foundation (GEF). In May, Georgia Tech Student Chapter Member Edward Jennings was the recipient of the Student Leadership Medal at the SAME Joint Engineer Training Conference in Colorado. In June, we kicked off our Leader Development Program with a call to action from COL Patrick Hogeboom, USA (Retired) (Michael Baker International) and LTC Craig Bryant (USACE Tulsa District), two SAME National Elected Directors who currently support the national Leader Development Program. In August, we had a sold-out Small Business Panel Discussion led by Afsaneh Abree (ZAPATA), where we heard from several federal agency small business representatives. We celebrated our 50th Annual Shrimp Boil in September, led by Young Professionals Committee Chair Christian Ward (Osprey Management). More than 300 members gathered for the SAME Southeast Tri-Regional Joint Engineer

Training Symposium (JETS) at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center in October, led by Kellie Sak (Black and Veatch) and Gwen Parker (The Parker Connection). And in November, Atlanta Post Sustaining Member Firm Raymond Engineering – Georgia was named Small Business of the Year. These are just a few of the many accomplishments of the Atlanta Post in 2022. I can’t wait to celebrate all we achieved together at the Annual Post Awards, Installation Ceremony, and Holiday Party in December.

On that note, I am excited to introduce you to our incoming Post President, Mike Ramos, Executive Vice President at Raymond Engineering – Georgia, who will be installed at the December meeting. Mike will join the legacy of his father, Ray Ramos, PE, F.SAME, who has been a long-standing member of the Society and is also a past President of SAME Atlanta Post. When we began searching for our next year's leader, Mike’s name was at the top of the list. His leadership style, can-do attitude, and willingness to serve are just a few of the strengths he’ll leverage in this role. I cannot wait for you all to meet him and hear his ideas for what the Atlanta Post will achieve together in 2023.

I’m incredibly grateful for our time together in 2022 and look forward to continuing to serve the Atlanta Post in a new role supporting leader development.

After all, the mission of SAME is to “build leaders and lead collaboration among government and industry to develop multidisciplined solutions to national security infrastructure challenges.”

2025 SAME STRATEGIC PLAN

Learn more about the Society, our mission, vision, and goals in the SAME’s 2025 Strategic Plan at online.fliphtml5.com/fedq/eltf/#p=1.

RAYMOND ENGINEERING NAMED SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

SAME Atlanta Post Sustaining Member Firm Raymond Engineering – Georgia was named the Small Business of the Year at the 2022 Society of American Military Engineers Federal Small Business Conference in Nashville, TN, in November 2022. Raymond, a service-disabled veteranowned small business (SDVOSB) and 8(a) firm based in Conyers, GA, was recognized for its contributions to the small business community and its commitments to federal and defense clients and the engineering industry. Raymond currently has 12 Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts to provide engineering and construction support to federal and defense clients all over the globe. Raymond has been a sustaining member firm of the Atlanta Post for more than 15 years. Please join all of us at SAME in congratulating our friends at Raymond for this prestigious national award!

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LEARN MORE ABOUT SAME & CONNECT WITH US! sameatlantapost.org linkedin.com/company/same-atlanta-post DECEMBER 15: Annual Post Awards, Installation Ceremony & Holiday Party JANUARY: Joint Meeting with ASCE GA and ACEC GA
Visit our website for more information about our upcoming events and to register.
Atlanta Post
UPCOMING EVENTS
62 Engineering Georgia

SE3 COMMITTEE UPDATE

Please complete this brief survey regarding future SE3 programming. Your input is greatly appreciated.

SOLICITING PROJECT SPOTLIGHT SUBMISSIONS

As discussed in SEAOG’s October meeting, SEAOG would like to highlight some of the interesting work our members are doing.

Currently, we are soliciting project spotlight submissions. This will be a great opportunity for members to showcase the existing work being done in our area. Ideally, we would like to spotlight three projects for an upcoming meeting. For each project, the format would include a 15-minute presentation followed by a 5-minute Q&A session.

If interested in presenting a project, please submit your proposal with a brief description, including its interesting design aspects to programs@seaog.org. We look forward to hearing from you!

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November | December 63
association [ news ] MICHELE REDMOND HOLCOMBE SMPS President Michele@foundationtechnologies.com www.smpsatl.org THERE IS SO MUCH TO LOOK FORWARD TO AT SMPS ATLANTA! BE SURE YOU’RE ON OUR MAILING LIST OR FOLLOWING US ON SOCIAL MEDIA TO STAY UP TO DATE ON EVENTS. ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR AND PHOTOSHOP WORKSHOPS December 1, 2022 MARKET EXCHANGE December 8, 2022 ROCK THE BLOCK NETWORKING monthly EDUCATIONAL BOOT CAMP January 26, 2023 LEVERAGE YOUR BEVERAGE January 2023 ELECTRIC VEHICLES INFRASTRUCTURE LUNCHEON February 7, 2023 NEW MEMBER MEETUP February 2023 EDUCATIONAL BOOT CAMP March 2023 SPEED MENTORING March 2, 2023 (members only) FILM & TV LUNCHEON April 18, 2023 EDUCATIONAL BOOT CAMP April 2023 EDUCATIONAL BOOT CAMP May 2023 HEALTHCARE SYMPOSIUM BREAKFAST June 13, 2023 TBD VIRTUAL PROGRAM July 2023 MEGA MEETING September 12, 2023 UPCOMING EVENTS Annual and event sponsorships are needed! Please contact us if you’re interested in supporting SMPS Atlanta. 64 Engineering Georgia

KRISTIN ROME WINZELER

WTS Atlanta President kwinzeler@northfultoncid.com www.wtsinternational.org/atlanta

MENTOR-PROTÉGÉ GRADUATION

Congratulations to the Graduates of the WTS Atlanta 2022 Mentor Protégé program! The program provided opportunities for 11 pairs of mentors and their protégés to grow professionally through panels, workshops, and professional development activities. The Mentor Protégé Committee would like to thank the speakers who graciously shared their words of wisdom, including Kristin Winzeler, Tracy Styf, Stefanie Taylor, Emmanuella Myrthil, Rukiya Thomas, Sally Riker, Jill Goldberg, Beth Ann Schwartz, Iris Ortiz, Cara Vojdani, Audra Rojek, Charlotte Webber, and Tonya Saxon. Thanks also to ATL/SRTA/GRTA, HNTB, Lowe Engineers, and North Fulton CID for hosting the in-person sessions.

WTS ATLANTA 40TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

Cheers to a fabulous 40th Anniversary Gala celebration for WTS Atlanta! Our industry partners and members showed up in style, making this an extraordinary evening for WTS. Thank you to our inspirational speakers, FTA Administrator Nuria I. Fernandez, WTS International Board Chair Jannet Walker-Ford, WTS International President and CEO Sara Stickler, and WSB Traffic Reporter Ashley Frasca, our amazing Gala host. Congratulations to all our scholarship and award winners! Special thanks to our 2022 sponsors, especially our Presenting Partner HNTB, and to all our member volunteers who worked all year diligently to put on this beautiful anniversary celebration for the Atlanta Chapter.

We look forward to seeing everyone again at the WTS International Conference in Atlanta in May!

TO BECOME A 2022 CORPORATE SPONSOR, CONTACT KRISTIN WINZELER AT KWINZELER@NORTHFULTONCID.COM OR (678) 397-0570.
MENTOR PROTÉGÉ PROGRAM GRADUATION
November | December 65 association [ news ]

A LOOK BACK

Atlanta, Georgia – Rich’s Department Store Christmas Tree – Rich’s first placed a Christmas tree on the roof of its downtown location in 1948. The tree stood seventy-five feet tall on the store’s crystal bridge over Forsyth Street. The lighting of Rich’s Great Tree on Thanksgiving night became a celebrated (and later televised) event in the decades that followed. The downtown Rich’s store closed in the early 1990s and the tree was temporarily relocated. Since 1999, Macy’s has held the Great Tree lighting ceremony on Thanksgiving night each year at their Lenox Square location in Buckhead.
66 Engineering Georgia
PHOTO CREDIT: R&R News Co., 1948
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