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F OX T H E AT R E

NATIONAL BALLET THEATRE OF ODESSA PRESENTS

ROMEO & JULIET


2 | encore Classical Arts Entertainment, Inc. PRESENTS

NATIONAL BALLET THEATER OF ODESSA, Ukraine

S. Prokofiev

ROMEO AND JULIET A BALLET IN TWO ACTS BASED ON THE TRAGEDY BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Choregraphy by Michael Lavrovsky Production by Garri Sevoian

NADEZHDA BABICH, General Director of the Theatre ELENA BARANOVSKAYA, Artistic Director of the Ballet

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Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge brook to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes. A pair of star-crossed lovers takes their life...

Romeo and Juliet A Ballet in Two Acts Music by Sergei Prokofiev Based on the tragedy by William Shakespeare Choregraphy by Michael Lavrovsky Production by Garri Sevoian

CAST

Juliet Capulet . . . . . Olena Dobrianska, Oleksandra Vorobiova, Olha Vorobiova Romeo Montague . . . . . . Serhii Dotsenko, Stanislav Skrynnik Tybalt (Juliet’s Brother) . . . . . . . . . . . . Bohdan Chabaniuk Mercutio (Romeo’s Friend) . . . . . . . . . . . Mykola Vorivodin Father (Capulets) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rostyslav Rostyslav Father (Montague) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vitalii Rozdaibida Paris (Juliet’s Groom) . . . . Serhii Dotsenko, Stanislav Skrynnik Juliet’s Friend . . . . . Olena Dobrianska, Oleksandra Vorobiova, Olha Vorobiova, Olha Pylypeiko, Ganna Tyutyunnyk, Valeriia Mala, Mariia Riazantseva Padre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yurii Karlin Mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olena Lavrinenko Juliet’s Nurse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yelyzaveta Malina NADEZHDA BABICH, General Director of the Theatre ELENA BARANOVSKAYA, Artistic Director of the Ballet


4 | programnotes SYNOPSIS PROLOGUE

Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life; Whose misadventure piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents’ strife. —W. Shakespeare

ACT I

SCENE ONE Morning in Verona. Servants of the noble Capulet family are preparing for a big annual celebration. Tybalt brings a guest - a young nobleman, Paris, dreaming to marry his cousin, Juliet. Tybalt orders the servants to receive the guest and put all other matters aside. Awakened by the neighbors’ bustle, the Montague servants are waking up little by little. The feud between these families has been going on for centuries. Taken with the morning dance, they meet the son of the master of the house, the young Romeo, who is hoping against all odds to win the heart of the beautiful Rosalina. Twirling in a cheerful dance, Montague’s servants collide with Capulet’s servants. There is a quarrel, which escalates to a brawl. Now the nephew of Lady Capulet, the young bully, Tybalt, crosses swords with a relative of the prince, a friend of Romeo, Mercutio. Even the elderly heads of the households grab the ancient swords their ancestors went to battle with and join the fight. Only the appearance of the Duke of Verona stops the fighting - no one, under penalty of death, dares to unsheathe swords in the streets of the city.

SCENE TWO Juliet’s room. Only yesterday she was still a child, Juliet turned into a real beauty. The girl pokes fun at her Nurse, runs around and frolics when her mother enters the room. Lady Capulet tells her daughter about the upcoming engagement to the handsome Paris and asks her to be kind to her future husband. Meanwhile, Capulet guests gather for the ball. Mercutio, trying to distract Romeo from daydreaming about Rosalyn, suggests that they sneak into the Capulet ball and, wearing masks, have the times of their lives. In the midst of the prim dance of the knights, Romeo and Juliet see each other and fall in love at first sight.

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Tybalt recognized the son of the sworn enemy under the mask and hinders their conversation. Mercutio distracts Tybalt with a mad dance. Nevertheless, Tybalt is still incensed at the presence of an outsider at the ball and looks for a fight, however, the head of the Capulet family forbids Tybalt to attack Romeo, who gained respect in Verona as a noble and upstanding man. Taking advantage of the turmoil, Mercutio leads besotted Romeo away from the Capulet house.

SCENE THREE Juliet’s balcony. The girl cannot sleep; all her thoughts are about Romeo. She realizes that she fell in love with a young man, whose family has been feuding with hers since the dawn of time, but the feelings are stronger, and she is ready to renounce the family for her love. “Romeo, I love you,” she whispers. Romeo, who has climbed into Capulet garden hoping to see his beloved again, hears the confession that escaped the girl’s lips. Reciprocating her feelings, the young man confides in his beloved one, and they decide to ask Friar Laurence to marry them secretly.

ACT II

SCENE ONE PART ONE Verona Square. Among onlookers, merchants and servants, Romeo waits for a note from his beloved. He dreams of an impending meeting with her and their happy future. Mercutio is trying to engage Romeo into a jovial prankish dance to distract him, but in vain. Finally, Juliet’s Nurse appears with the long-awaited note. Happy Romeo rushes to Friar Laurence.

PART TWO Laurence’s cell. The priest tries to dissuade the young lovers to marry secretly but in vain. In the end, seeing the power of their love and determination to be together, in spite of all obstacles, Laurence yields to their entreaties and marries them.

PART THREE Mercutio whirls in a fun dance. Tybalt suddenly appears. He is still haunted by the thought of taking revenge on Romeo. Seeing Mercutio, he is insistently looking for a fight. Romeo is trying to break up the fight between his best friend and Juliet’s brother. He offers Tybalt a hand of friendship and tells him he is not his enemy, but Tybalt, with a haughty sneer, attacks him. Mercutio, interceding for a friend, crosses swords with Tybalt. Romeo, intending to stop the fight, grabs his friend’s hand. Tybalt takes advantage of the situation and inflicts a mortal wound on Mercutio.


6 | encore Devastated by his friend’s death, Romeo takes a sword and slays the enemy in a battle. Coming to his senses, he realizes he killed Juliet’s brother and broke the Duke’s order. Romeo runs away. House of Capulet demands vengeance.

SCENE TWO Juliet’s room. Romeo secretly sneaks into his bride’s room hoping to see her before his exile. The girl is desperate: her beloved has her brother’s blood on his hands and is sent to exile, but her love is stronger. The Nurse who notifies them about Juliet’s parents’ arrival interrupts their meeting. Juliet is forced to marry Paris. Left alone, she decides to run away and asks Friar Laurence to help her. Friar Laurence offers her a potion that will put her into a death-like sleep and undertakes to notify Romeo.

SCENE THREE Paris, surrounded by Juliet’s girlfriends and their beaus, is expecting his beloved. However, the girl is taking her time to come out. They send the Nurse for her. The Nurse returns and brings horrible news. The mourning procession takes Juliet to the family crypt. Meanwhile, robbers attack Friar Laurence, rushing with Juliet’s note to Romeo. Romeo receives word about his loved one’s death. Under the cover of darkness, he sneaks into the crypt and encounters grieving Paris. In the duel, he kills his rival. Romeo is inconsolable; life without Juliet has lost its meaning. Kissing her for the last time, he drinks poison and falls next to his beloved. Waking up, Juliet sees a horrible scene. In desperation, she stabs herself with Romeo’s dagger. Morning finds both warring families in grief. The death of the young lovers makes Montague and Capulet to end the age-old feud.

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NATIONAL BALLET THEATER OF ODESSA, UKRAINE The year 1923 was a milestone in the history of the Odessa City Theater when its Ballet Company staged an in-house production of Swan Lake for the very first time ever. The press called it “the first attempt to create a real ballet performance in the history of the City Theater”. The ballet was staged by the ballet master Robert Balanotti. Swan Lake was followed by The Little Humpbacked Horse, Coppelia and Le Corsaire. In 1926, Kasyan Goleizovsky came to Odessa. His groundbreaking approach to choreography had an immense effect on the future of the Odessa ballet troupe. His ballets Joseph the Beautiful, In the Sunlight, but foremost the breathtaking Polovetsian Dances from the A. Borodin opera Prince Igor, which attained international fame, immediately won the hearts and minds of the Odessa audience. The Theater-Club-Movie Magazine referred to Goleizovsky’s productions as “Contemporary ballet factory” and “Odessa, the ballet Hollywood.” By the end of the 20’s and in the 30’s, the repertoire of the Theater grew rapidly and had new ballet productions to show for it: La Carmagnole by the Odessa composer Femilidi, as well as classical ballets Don Quixote and Giselle. At that time, renowned choreographers, such as Pavel Virsky, Aleksander Terekhov, Mikhail Moiseyev, who participated in the Russian Seasons in Paris as part of the Sergey Diaghilev Ballet Company, were working at the Theater. Out of 19 ballets staged by Moiseyev in the Odessa City Theater, 12 were world premieres, including Raymonda and La Fille Mal Gardee. Tatyana Dempel, Klavdia Salnikova, Vladimir Lesnevsky, Yevgeniya Steynberg, and Ivan Balayev graced the stage of the Odessa City Theater with marvelous performances. In 1940, the ballet troupe was headed up by Vronsky-Nadiradze. Just before the war broke out, he staged La Esmeralda and began working on Lileya by K. Dankevich based on the literary works by T.G. Shevchenko. However, this project had to be put on hold for four long years. The Theater would remain open during wartime, though part of the troupe left for Krasnoyarsk, where it continued working in extremely harsh conditions. On April 10, 1944, during the Swan Lake performance in Krasnoyarsk, the conductor stopped the music and addressed the audience “Just now they said on the radio that our troops have freed Odessa”. The very first ballet production in the victorious year of 1945 was Lileya. And right after that — yet another comeback of the undying classic, Swan Lake, the ballet this story began with.


8 | encore The Theater had survived the tough wartimes; finally, the golden age of the Ballet Company and the entire Theater has begun it hosts the touring ballet star Marina Semenova, whose every performance is a full house. On stage, she was a “queen.” In 1949, the great Galina Ulanova graced the Odessa stage. The legendary Maya Plisetskaya, at the meridian of her glory, mesmerized and conquered the audience in Odessa with her unique manner of “drawing” the dance. In the ’50s, the creative input of the chief choreographer N. Tregubov added many new names to the Theater’s playbill. The most favorite productions of the audiences were Laurencia by A. Crain (1952), Peer Gynt by E. Grieg (1959), Spartacus by A. Khachaturyan (1962), The Great Waltz by J. Strauss (1959). Contemporary trends emerged in the productions of the choreographers A. Tarasov and A. Lapahuri — Csythian Suite (Ala and Lolli) by S. Prokofiev (1967), Your name... by F. Poulenc (1968). In the ’70s, Igor Chernyshev took up the reigns in the Ballet Company. New productions, such as Wedding of the Candle by the Odessa composer Y. Znatokov (1974), combining modern musical material with the Ukrainian plastic expression, turned into positive experiences of the choreographer. In the ’80s, The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa was headed up by the choreographers N. Ryzhenko and V. Smirnov-Golovanov. It was the time of largescale productions, such as Anna Karenina by R. Shchedrin (in collaboration with Maya Plisetskaya) (1976), Masquerade by A. Khachaturyan (1982). Production of one-act ballets, such as Dances for Isadora to the music of F. Chopin (libretto and choreography by Jose Limon, revised by N. Ryzhenko) (1988) was an innovative experiment of the troupe. In the end of the ’90s, V. Troshchenko took charge in the Ballet Company. He restored the classical ballets The Sleeping Beauty by P. Tchaikovsky (1998), Swan Lake by P. Tchaikovsky (1999), Bayadére by L. Minkus (2000), The Nutcracker by P. Tchaikovsky (2008) and many others. From 2009 through 2016, The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa was led by the Honored Artist of Russia, Y. Vasyuchenko, who staged Paquita by L. Minkus, Faust (Walpurgis Night) by Ch. Gunod, The Secret of the Vienna Woods to the music of G. Mahler and J. Strauss, Don Quixote by L. Minkus, Swan Lake by P. Tchaikovsky, Chipollino by A. Khachaturyan, dances in the Gala Nureyev Forever, as well as dances in the opera productions Turandot by J. Verdi, Don Giovanni by W.A. Mozart, Aida by J. Verdi, Prince Igor by A. Borodin and many others. Since 2017, the Artistic Director of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa is the People’s Artist of Ukraine Elena Baranovskaya.

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bios

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SERGEI PROKOFIEV Composer Sergei Prokofiev was born in the Ukraine in 1891. After private study, he enrolled at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where one of his teachers was Rimsky Korsakov. By the time of his graduation, he had already composed a considerable body of music including his first ballet, The Buffoon. From 1922, Prokofiev lived in Paris, where he was a friend of Perm’s most famous cultural figure, Sergei Diaghilev. In 1933, he returned to Russia and in the following years wrote some of his best works, including the fairy tale set to music, Peter and the Wolf (1936), and two of the greatest ballets of the twentieth century Romeo and Juliet (1935) and Cinderella (1945). During an active professional life, he composed seven symphonies in all, the last finished just months before his death. Prokofiev’s music is characterized by percussiveness, lyricism and neoclassical structure. As one of the principal Russian figures in classical music during the period of the Second World War, his work also reflects the needs of national self-unity and support for the national struggle. Many of these themes can be seen in Romeo and Juliet — in particular the recurrent percussive elements of the score. The ballet Romeo and Juliet first arose from a suggestion from the Kirov who requested Prokofiev to write a new ballet. But his choice of subject matter proved controversial from the start and the project was taken over by the Bolshoi. The problem was the ending of the story — as Prokofiev later put it “Living people can dance, the dying cannot”. It was the longest ballet Prokofiev had ever written, and the most intensely dramatic. Over a number of years and by working with several different companies, the contradictions between the dramatic and choreographic needs of the ballet were resolved and the work took its place as a centerpiece of his oeuvre.


10 | encore Nadezhda Babich General Director of the Theatre Honored Art Worker of Ukraine Nadezhda Babich graduated from the Kyiv State Institute of Culture in 1980, having obtained a qualification of a librarian-bibliographer. 1980–1988 — Worked as chief educational supervisor and then as a Head of Scientific and Educational Section at the Lenin Scientific Library according to the deployment of The Ministry of Culture of the Ukrainian SSR. 1988–1992 — Head of the library at the Odessa Institute for Political Studies and Social Management. Head of the Ethnic Cultures and Ethnic Arts Section of the Department of Culture at the Odessa Regional Administration. 1992-2005— Deputy Head of Department of Culture and Tourism at the Odessa Regional Administration 2006-2010 — Head of the Department of Culture and Tourism at the Odessa Regional Administration. 2010 - Present — General Director of the National Opera and Ballet Theatre of Odessa. OPERAS— J. Puccini, Turandot; Borodin, Prince Igor; Verdi, Aida (open air and in the hall of the theater), and Nabucco; W.A. Mozart, Don Giovanni; P. Tchaikovsky, The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin; J. Pergolesi, La Serva Padrona; Bizet, “Carmen; G. Donizetti , Elixir of Love; Dm. Bortniansky, Alcides; V. Gubarenko, Wiy (opera-ballet), opera for the children Emerald City BALLETS — The Mystery of the Vienna Woods to the music of J. Strauss and G.Mahler; Don Quixote by L. Minkus; The Rite of Spring and The Firebird by Stravinsky; The Yell to music of various composers; Chipollino, K. Khachaturyan; Pearls of world ballet (an evening of one act ballets); Fite by Y. Gomelskaya. And also we have been delivered: scenic cantata Carmina Burana, Orff (open air and in the theater); Requiem by Verdi; the project Genius and villainy to the music of Mozart and Rimsky-Korsakov; oratorio Mendelssohn Elijah; a choral opera, L. Dychko Christmas action, Symphony N29 by L. van Beethoven. On the grand scale she took place in two International Arts Festivals in Odessa: “Opera 2012” and “Opera 2013.” Also, participated in Christmas Festival, which is held every year since 2012. Festival “Velvet Season in Odessa Opera”; which was first held in September 2015.

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Elena Baranovskaya Artistic Director of the Ballet Elena Baranovskaya is the only ballerina who represented Ukraine at the last concert of Rudolf Nureyev in London. She is also the only Ukrainian ballet dancer who was invited to a concert of the 400th anniversary of Warsaw. She carried Ukrainian banner of art in tours in Britain, USA, Canada, Japan, Italy, Spain, France and Germany. Ms. Baranovskaya danced on the pyramids of Egypt and in many other countries. The whole world of fans knows her. Elena Baranovskaya received a personal recognition from Maya Plisetskaya for Carmen in the ballet Carmen Suite. Her creative story began in 1981, when Elena graduated from Perm State Choreographic School (the class of Honored Teacher of Russia N. Silvanovich). From 1981 to 1986, she worked as a ballet soloist at Perm State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre named after P. Tchaikovsky. From 1986 to 2011, she was a soloist of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa as a leading master. Since October 2011, Elena Baranovskaya is a tutor and since July 2017, the head of the art department of ballet of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa. She is a laureate of the Republican Ballet Contest in Donetsk (1987, 1st Prize). She worked with such outstanding ballet masters of our time as People’s Artist of the USSR Yury Grigorovich, People’s Artist of Russia Mikhail Boyarchikov, and Honored Artist of Russia M. Salimbaev. Ms. Baranovskaya performed with the troupes of the Bolshoi, Mariinsky theatres in Russia, as well as the theatres in Donetsk, Kharkov and Dnepropetrovsk. As a member of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa, she toured in Japan, Finland, Hungary, China; she was invited to National Opera of Ukraine to perform the leading parts in the premieres. Elena Baranovskaya performed the roles of Nikiya (La Bayadere), Kitri (Don Quixote) by L. Minkus; Giselle (the Adan’s ballet of the same name), OdetteOdile (Swan Lake), Masha (The Nutcracker), Aurora (Sleeping Beauty) by P. Tchaikovsky, Carmen (Carmen Suite) by G. Bizet - R. Shchedrin and others. Ms. Baranovskaya has taught at Odessa State School of Culture and Arts named after K. Dankevich. Her students have often become the laureates of international competitions and work on the best stages of the world.


12 | encore Elena Dobryanskaya Prima Ballerina Honored Artist of Ukraine Elena Dobryanskaya is the bronze medalist and a laureate of the Ill Yuri Grigorovich International Competition Young Ballet of the World (Sochi, 2010), and the winner of the Liya Bugovaya Youth Award established by the Odessa Regional Department of the National Sports Council for her outstanding performance as Odette-Odile in Swan Lake (Odessa, 2009). In addition, she was awarded the Certificate of Merit by the Chairman of the Odessa Regional State Administration. Elena is a graduate of the Odessa School of Ballet and the Odessa College of Arts and Culture named after K. Dankevich (class of Elena Baranovskaya, the People’s Artist of Ukraine). She performs impressive parts, such as Odette-Odile, Masha and Aurora (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and The Sleeping Beauty by Pyotr Tchaikovsky), Kitri (Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus), and solos in La Bayadére and Paquita by Ludwig Minkus, Les Sylphides and the gala-ballet Nureyev Forever. Ms. Dobryanskaya has toured in the US, Canada, Germany, France, Russia, and Kazakhstan. In 2010, she performed in children’s ballets Alice in Wonderland and Little Red Riding Hood in Taiwan. In September 2014 Elena Dobryanskaya became Prima Ballerina of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa. On March 26, 2018, Elena was awarded the honorary title “Honored Artist of Ukraine”.

Aleksandra Vorabyeva Principal Dancer Aleksandra Vorobyeva graduated from the Odessa College of Arts and Culture named after K. Dankevich majoring in Classical Choreography in 2001, as well as from the Odessa National Polytechnic University majoring in Business Economy in 2004. Since 2012, she is a student at the City of Kherson State University with the major in Classical Choreography. Aleksandra has been performing with the ballet company of The Atlanta’s Historic Fox Theatre | foxtheatre.com


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National Ballet Theatre of Odessa since 2001. Her repertoire includes diverse parts, such as Fate and Tobacco worker in the ballet Carmen Suite by Georges Bizet - Rodion Shchedrin, Waltzes N27 and I in the choreographic suite Les Sylphides to the music of Frederic Chopin, the title role in the ballet Giselle by Adolphe Adam, Princess Aurora and the Diamond Fairy in The Sleeping Beauty by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Masha in The Nutcracker by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Maid of Honor and Swan in Swan Lake by Pyotr Tchaikovsky; Margot in the gala-ballet Nureyev Forever, solo in the ballet Paquita, Girlfriend and extra variations in the ballet Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus; Maria in the ballet The Secret of the Vienna Woods to the music of Gustav Mahler and Strauss and many other parts. Aleksandra Vorobyeva toured with The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa, as well as the troupe of the National Opera and Ballet Theatre of Ukraine, named after Taras Shevchenko, the Moscow Ballet Company New Classical Ballet and the troupe of Ballet Classique de Paris in Spain, Switzerland, Greece, the USA, Canada, Portugal, China, Portugal, Belgium, France and Germany.

Olga Vorobyeva Principal Dancer Olga Vorobyeva graduated from the Odessa College of Arts and Culture, named after K. Dankevich, majoring in Classical Choreography in 2001, as well as from the Odessa National Polytechnic University majoring in Business Economy in 2004. Since 2012, she is a student at the City of Kherson State University with the major in Classical Choreography. She became part of the Ballet Company of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa in 2001, while still studying at the Odessa College of Arts and Culture. She performs a variety of parts, such as: • Fate and Tobacco worker (Carmen Suite by Georges Bizet - Rodion Shchedrin) • Waltz and Mazurka N27 (Les Sylphides to the music of Frederic Chopin) • Giselle (Giselle by Adolphe Adam) • French and Spanish dances (The Nutcracker by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) • Maid of Honor, Swan and Fiancée (Swan Lake by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) • Tender Fairy, Princess Florine and the adagio with the courtiers (The Sleeping Beauty by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) •Variations (Paquita by Ludwig Minkus) • Nikia and the Trio of Shades (La Bayadere by Ludwig Minkus) • Kitri’s friend, the Queen of the Dryads and variations (Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus)


14 | encore • Water Fairy (The Secret of the Vienna Woods to the music of Gustav Mahler and Strauss) • Solo in the ballet Women in D Minor (choreography by Radu Poklitaru) and other parts. Ms. Vorobyeva toured with The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa, as well as the troupe of the National Opera and Ballet Theatre of Ukraine named after Taras Shevchenko, the Moscow ballet company New Classical Ballet and the troupe of Ballet Classique de Paris in Italy, Spain, France, Canada, the USA, Greece, Portugal, Holland, Switzerland, Austria, Belgium.

Sergey Dotsenko Principal Dancer Honored Artist of Ukraine Sergey Dotsenko graduated from the Kiev State School of Ballet, majoring in Choreography in 1996, and the Kiev National University of Culture and Arts, majoring in Modern Choreography in 2001. In 1997, Sergey accepted the offer to join the Ballet Company of The National Ballet Theatre of Odessa. His repertoire includes a vast array of parts, such as: • Prince Siegfried and Rothbart (Swan Lake by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) • Prince Desire (The Sleeping Beauty by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) • Nutcracker-Prince (The Nutcracker by Pyotr Tchaikovsky) • Albrecht (Giselle by Adolphe Adam) • Jose and the Bullfighter (Carmen Suite by Georges Bizet - Rodion Shchedrin) • Rudy (Gala Ballet Nureyev Forever) • Stepan (Lileya by Constantin Dankevich) • Young man (Les Sylphides) • Solor (La Bayadere by Ludwig Minkus) • Lucien (Paquita by Ludwig Minkus) • Espada (Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus) • Crown Prince (The Secret of the Vienna Woods to the music of Gustav Mahler and Strauss) • Ivan Tsarevich (Firebird by Igor Stravinsky) • Antipodes (Yell to the music of various composers) and other parts. As a choreographer, Sergey Dotsenko staged the children’s ballet Little Red Riding Hood.

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Mr. Dotsenko has toured France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Switzerland, Germany, USA, Canada and many other countries.

Stanislav Skrynnik Principal Dancer Participant of the IV International Competition of Yuri Grigorovich “Young Ballet of the World” (Sochi, 2012). In 2009 he graduated from the Moscow State Academy of Choreography in the class of honored Russian artist Yuri Vasyuchenko. In 2011, he was hired at the Odessa National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater. Performing parts: • Siegfried (Swan Lake by Pyotr Tchaikovsky); • The Crown Prince (“The Secret of the Vienna Woods” to the music of Gustav Mahler and Johann Strauss); • Boys (“Chopeniana” to the music of Frederic Chopin); • Basil, Espada (Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus); • Lucien (“Paquita” by Ludwig Minkus); •Laptev (“Scream” to the music of various composers); • Ivan Tsarevich (“The Firebird” by Igor Stravinsky); • Pas de deux classique to the music of Daniel Aubert; • Pas d’esclave and Pas de deux (Adolphe Adam’s Corsair); • Choreographic sketch “Escape” (ballet-gala Nuriev forever) • Prince Zvezdich (Masquerade by Aram Khachaturian)


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ENCORE ATLANTA :: National Ballet Theatre of Odessa presents Romeo & Juliet at the Fox Theatre  

In this issue, the National Ballet Theatre of Odessa brings the classic Romeo and Juliet to the Fox Theatre.

ENCORE ATLANTA :: National Ballet Theatre of Odessa presents Romeo & Juliet at the Fox Theatre  

In this issue, the National Ballet Theatre of Odessa brings the classic Romeo and Juliet to the Fox Theatre.