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APRIL 12-18, 2019

LOCAL

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 15

SPORTS

ENTERTAINMENT

‘Listen to the Music’ Saturday in Slamanca with the Doobie Brothers ....see page 2

Getting technical at SGI: Part 2 ....see page 8

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LUX’s no-hitter leads SGI to season-opening win over JFK. ....see page 3

Springville Chamber awards 2019 honorees at annual gala

By Elyana Schosek

For those who have given so much of themselves to the community, the Springville Area Chamber of Commerce took a night to give some recognition in return. The Chamber’s annual Awards Gala was held Saturday, April 6, honoring some of the influential community members in the Springville area with some good food and good company. The event began at 5 p.m. with a social hour until 6, at which time there was a dinner catered by Julie’s Pizzeria & Restaurant. The awards ceremony began at 7 p.m. with opening remarks from Joseph Pillittere, chamber president. Following opening remarks was a special guest, Harry Scull Jr., a Springville resident. Harry is a 1984 graduate of SpringvilleGriffith Institute. During his time at SGI, he participated in football, basketball and baseball. After high school, Harry attended Buffalo State College majoring in criminal justice with a minor in photography. Beginning in 1985, he started his career in photojournalism at the college newspaper. In 1996, he joined the staff at the Buffalo News.

Photos by Elyana Schosek Non-Profit of the Year: Club of Springville

In 2016, he moved back to Springville and has continued to contribute within his community. The first awards to be presented were the 40-Under-40 Awards. Recipients of this award were Evan Emerling, Jeremy Pyszczynski, Ashley Lowry and Joe Lowry. Evan Emerling became the

Activists mark anniversary of DEC denial of Northern Access permit

By Rick Miller

A group of activists opposed to the Northern Access Pipeline gathered for a walk Monday to mark the twoyear anniversary of the state’s denial of a Clean Water Act permit for the pipeline’s route through Western New York. That denial by the state Department of Environmental Conservation on April 7, 2017, was overturned by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) last October. The DEC had denied a Clean Waters Act certification to cross 180 streams, 27 wetlands and 17 ponds along the pipeline route in New York. The FERC ruling said the DEC took longer than the one-year period allotted for review of the proposed $500 million pipeline. DEC officials pointed out that National Fuel Gas had agreed to the extensions. “That didn’t matter,” said Lia Oprea of Sardinia, See DEC Denial page 6

ck

a B k o o L A

general manager of Emerling Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in October 2018. Jeremy Pyszczynski opened his Edward Jones office at 43 East Main St. in Springville in late November and has successfully filled a Main Street storefront with an active and promising business.

Ashley Lowry is an SGI graduate who attended the University at Buffalo where she earned both her undergraduate and law school degrees. She is also a founding member and the current vice president of Green Springville, the local sustainability nonprofit, aspiring to become an

influential, regionally recognized organization, with an engaged local membership and capability to undertake major community projects. Joe Lowry is president and CEO of Encorus Group, the Springville based company formerly known as RJR Engineering. The next award was the Community Service Award presented to the Lions Club of Springville. The Club’s mission statement is “To create and foster a spirit of understanding among all people for humanitarian needs by providing voluntary services through community involvement and international cooperation.” The Club of Springville was the recipient of the Non-Profit of the Year Award. The mission of The Club of Springville is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring and responsible citizens in our community. The recipient of the Small Business of the Year Award was the 49 Coffee House and Eatery. It opened on West Main Street in March 2018 and doesn’t show any signs of slowing down after

See Gala page 5

Lawrence’s Tavern celebrates 80th anniversary this month

This month, Lawrence’s Tavern at 10 North Buffalo St. in Springville is celebrating its 80th anniversary. Lawrence’s is not only the longest-running business in the village of Springville, but it also holds the oldest liquor license in Erie County. Lawrence’s continues operating today as a neighborhood bar — a business which Larry Zielinski’s parents began in 1939. Zielinski and his son, Mike, have operated the tavern since 1996, and Larry attributes Lawrence’s’ business longevity to the plan his father and mother had: provide a place for local residents to come in for a drink, a bite to eat and some friendly conversation.

Photo submitted Pictured (from left): Paul Geiger, Tony Frelash and Fido Burns with the beer delivery 1949.

In 1939, Lawrence Zielinski bought the business for $800 from the McAllister brothers, who operated the Concord House across the street. Zielinski was motivated by the hard times of the Great

Depression, and he rented the building on North Buffalo Street from Blanch Stady for $40 per month. After returning from a tour of duty in France during World War II, Zielinski purchased the

building for $8,000 in 1946. He and his wife, Ann, managed the business while they raised their family upstairs. Zielinski’s beer sales See Lawrence’s page 5

A Look Back: The first railroad through Springville

BY JOLENE HAWKINS

Looking back to the early 1800s, the way our forefathers got around Springville and Concord was by horse-drawn wagons, riding horses or by

controlled. On June 13, 1878, the Napier Brothers, of Machias, were awarded the contract for $1,830 per mile to be completed by Oct. 20, 1878. Ground was broken on July 28 with foot. Chafee at the shovel. If you wanted to visit a nearby town, you could hop upon Sardinia was to prosper as groups of Irish a stagecoach on a daily basis. The Springville Boston Road had and Swedes took up rooms as they labored gone into service by 1851 and planks were placed on the road to on the line. A locomotive was ordered from ease the passage of vehicles over wet or soft ground. Brooks Locomotive works in Dunkirk. An On Nov. 8, 1870, there was a slate of directors that were elected extra Stagecoach was added to the line to take for the Buffalo and Springville Railroad. Included on this slate folks over to Sardinia to see for themselves of directors was Bertrand Chafee, who would later become the the progress being made on the railroad. President of the Springville and Sardinia Railroad. On Oct. 31, 1878, at 5:13 p.m., the This new route connects Springville and Hamburg with a train entered Springville for the first time. standard gauge rail bed. That idea was soon supplanted by the Chafee returned again, but this time with introduction of the narrow gauge. the Springville and Sardinia railroad’s own By 1877, Springville was only second best to its railroad locomotive, named Little Darling. neighbors, the Arcade and Gowanda. It was pointed out how it Trestles — 12 in all — were built of fresh would be an advantage to have the narrow gauge connect with cut, untreated hemlock, some to the height the Buffalo, New York and Philadelphia railroad at what is now of 61 feet. Bert Chafee, who weighed 250 Chafee railroad. pounds, walked out to the center of the Burt Chafee, a mill owner and farmer, Charles J. Shuttleworth, span, announcing how safe they were, to the a foundry owner, and S.R. Smith, the “Springville’s Cheese traveling public. King,” were selected to consider the line. Rather than affiliate See A Look Back page 5 with the B.N.Y & P., they suggested that the line be locally


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April 12-18, 2019

LOCAL

‘Listen to the Music’ Saturday in Salamanca with the Doobie Brothers

By Kellen M. Quigley

Get the spring started off right this Saturday with an unforgettable night of all-American classic rock at the Seneca Allegany Resorts and Casino in Salamanca. The record-setting, award-winning band the Doobie Brothers will perform for an audience ready to “listen to the music” filled with incredible harmonies and stunning guitar work April 13 at 7 p.m. in the Seneca Allegany Events Center. For over five decades, the Doobies have been delivering hit after hit to fans around the world. With over 48 million albums sold and four Grammy Awards, the Doobies continue to perform and record. Today, the core of the band consists of Patrick Simmons, a founding member of the band, on guitars and vocals; Tom Johnston, another founding member, also on guitars and vocals; and John McFee, who joined the band in 1979, on guitars, pedal steel, dobro, fiddle and vocals. In the course of the

band’s lifetime, they’ve amassed 10 platinum albums, 14 gold and even a very rare diamond album for their “Best of the Doobies” compilation, which sold more than 12 million copies. Coming out of San Jose, Cali., the late 1960s with an authentic rock and roll sound built on sweet threepart harmonies and rootsbased, acoustic flavors, the Doobies finally hit it big in 1971 with their self-titled album and never looked back. “We’re basically an American band — we cover a lot of areas,” Johnston said in a statement on the band’s website. “We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, and rock ‘n’ roll. It’s based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking and harmonies. That’s been the signature of the band.” The band's history can be roughly divided into three eras. From 1970 to 1975 it featured lead vocalist Tom Johnston and a mainstream rock and roll sound with elements of folk, country and R&B. Johnston quit the group in 1975, and was replaced by Michael McDonald,

whose interest in soul music changed the band's sound until it broke up in 1982. The Doobie Brothers reformed in 1987 with Johnston back in the fold and are still active, with occasional contributions from McDonald. Every incarnation of the group emphasized vocal harmonies. “We all have the same work ethic,” said McFee, the multi-instrument virtuoso self-described as the “new guy.” “Tom, Pat and I are still surging ahead. We’ve stayed together as friends as well as musicians.” With huge songs like “Listen to the Music,” “Long Train Runnin’,” “Black Water,” “What a Fool Believes” and “Real Love,” the Doobies have cemented their status as arena-rock kings. The Doobie Brothers were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. As of 2018, the band continues to tour regularly, performing an average of 70 to 80 shows a year. The Doobies will even begin touring with Santana as part of their 2019 summer

Photo courtesy of the Doobie Brothers A longtime staple in essential American rock ‘n’ roll, the Doobie Brothers are set to perform at the Seneca Allegany Events Center in Salamanca on Saturday, April 13

tour. Still getting incredible airplay even today, the Doobie Brothers continue to be the inspiration for countless bands and musicians. And their tuneful, melodic songs have stood the test of time, connecting to generation after generation of fans. “We didn’t really sit around and think, ‘Oh, we need this element or that element,’” Simmons

SCA’s Songwriter Showcase to feature locals beginning April 13

Nick Kody hosts Springville Center for the Arts’ Songwriter Showcase highlighting original music from the Western New York area on Saturday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Songwriter Showcase features musicians performing “in the round,” each will share the inspiration behind the writing process and then perform their song. This year’s show will feature songwriting duos. Lydia Herren rounds out Kody’s duo joined by Porcelain Train (Ralph & Tamala Fonda), meet the Bacons (Joe & Robin Bacon) and the Panfil Brothers (Chris & Mark Panfil) throughout the season.

Influenced by a wide range of rock, blues, country and traditional folk music, Kody and Herren offer a unique and diverse interpretation of the Americana genre through both their recorded work and live performances. Both musicians are multi-instrumentalists, performing on guitar, violin, harmonica, piano and more. Porcelain Train is an acoustic Americana music duo featuring Tamala Fonda on acoustic guitar and vocals and Ralph Fonda on drums/percussion and vocals. Their homegrown interpretation of the Americana genre provides a unique blend of rhythm and harmony

combined with thoughtful lyrics. Meet the Bacons are from Buffalo and draw influences from many great vocal duos, like Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, Simon and Garfunkel, Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris and Shovels and Rope, with music styles that cross classic country, rock, bluegrass, blues and folk. The Panfil Brothers play an eclectic mix of bluegrass, rock and “you name it” in the Buffalo and surrounding areas. Both multi-instrumentalists and experienced songwriters, the Panfil Brothers have been a staple feature in the Western New York Americana scene

throughout their careers. Springville Center for the Arts’ concert programs are housed in an 1869 former Baptist Church located at 37 North Buffalo St., Springville. Call 592-9038 or visit SpringvilleArts.org for

said. “The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time.”

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LOCAL

Springville Art Crawl less than one month away

By Kellen M. Quigley

For one night out of the year, Main Street in Springville becomes an art gallery, with artwork in every business, music in surprising corners and interactive art activities sprinkled throughout. The annual Downtown Springville Art Crawl is set for Saturday, May 4 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. with free activity for all ages throughout the National Register Historic District. The deadline to submit artwork to be judged is this Saturday, April 13. “It’s going to very similar to past years,” said Seth Wochensky, director of the Springville Center for the Arts, which sponsors the crawl. “We help coordinate it, but so much of it happens outside of our control. … The formula is pretty simple: we put artwork in the businesses, get the music

going and people seem to enjoy the night walking around Main Street.” To “crawl,” your first stop should be at the corner of Main and Mechanic Streets to pick up a ballot and a map of the participating locations. After that, the night is what you make of it, wandering in and out of storefronts from the Pop Warner Museum and Mercantile down to North Buffalo Street and the Arts Center. Artwork of various kinds, from watercolor to photography and acrylic to collage, is exhibited in businesses in Springville’s historic downtown. The artwork, submitted from across Western New York, will be juried into the show. Some of the work on display is even for sale.

participate,” Wochensky said. Wochensky said the plan to continue having outdoor musicians, the arts underground and the kids' space. “One thing we’re exploring adding this year is the addition of arts demonstrations and miniworkshops in the afternoon leading up to the crawl,” he said. Wochensky said in recent years, people have started showing up to the crawl earlier and earlier and there has been an increase of people coming from out of town, so having demonstrations in the afternoon before the crawl begins would give them all more to see. “We are encouraging community organizations and causes to set up,” he added. “We started that last year and it was

“Every year we add more businesses, and my dream is to have light-to-light every business

very successful.” Wochensky said any local organization that is interested

SPORTS

in having a space to set up and engage the public can contact the Center for the Arts. Once 8:30 p.m. hits, businesses close and the after-party begins at Springville Center for the Arts, located at 37 North Buffalo St. Refreshments will be provided in the Olmsted Gallery which features the Spring Community Exhibit. “Crawlers” can vote on their favorite artist by ballot and the award is presented. Wochensky said events like the Art Crawl provide a “third space” outside the home and work or school where people can gather and mingle. “People who we don’t see all the time can see each other and main streets in America used to fill that role to a large degree,” he said. “With the changing nature of communities, we don’t have a lot of events that quite do that.” What’s beautiful about the Art

Crawl, Wochensky said, is you can come and go as you please. Each person can experience the event in different ways and there’s something for the whole family, regardless of age. “Creating a space on Main Street where people can interact is so important, and I wish we could do it more often and in more ways,” he added. Even if you aren’t an artist, musician or business owner, Wochensky said any can still get involved and volunteer during the event. Just call the arts center at 592-9038 or email scaseth@ gmail.com. Parking is available in the large municipal parking lot south of Main Street or off Franklin Street. This pedestrian-friendly, free, walking event is held rain or shine. The crawl is sponsored by Springville Center for the Arts, a charitable nonprofit organization.

Lux’s no-hitter leads SGI to SGI softball tops SGI season-opening win over JFK JFK, Mount Mercy Sports to start season 2-1 Schedule

BUFFALO — Four hits from Meghan Rehrauer paved the way to victory for Springville-Griffith Institute Griffins varsity softball team over JFK, 336, on Monday. Rehrauer singled in the first, doubled in the fourth, singled in the fifth, and singled in the sixth. An early lead helped propel the Griffins. SGI scored on a walk by Kaitlyn Wolf, a walk by Meadow Wittman, a walk by Olivia Fisher, a passed ball during Katelyn Mesch's at bat, a passed Jaime Dickinson photo ball during Ella Wittman's Jarrett Wolf gets ready for the pitch behind the plate for Springville during a at bat, an error, a single baseball scrimmage against Pioneer on Wednesday, April 3. by Rehrauer, an passed ball during Lilia Dinse's at SPRINGVILLE — Austin Lux started In addition to the complete game nobat, a double by Mesch, a the Springville-Griffith Institute varsity hitter, SGI also didn’t let JFK back in the single by Bella Oakley and baseball season with a no-hitter on game with defense, committing just one a groundout by Wolf in the Tuesday, striking out 10 JFK batters in a error. first inning. 7-1 victory for the Griffins. “As far as one error, I thought that was JFK scored three runs in Springville scored its seven runs on just really good,” Lux added. “We played good three hits, led by Mike Sobota’s two. defense and whenever guys got in scoring the fifth inning. Wolf led things off in “I think obviously the beginning position, whether wes sacrificed or we of the year the bats are always a little stole a lot of bases, we scored some runs.” the pitcher's circle for SGI. She lasted two innings, tough,” Springville coach Joel Lux said. Later this week, SGI was set to play “Whenever it’s cold, the ball, it just Wednesday at Eden, and visit Tonawanda allowing one hit and two an runs while striking out two doesn’t fly.” on Friday. and walking none. SGI totaled 21 hits in the game. Rehrauer, Mesch, Mikaila Place, Emily Ehlers, Wittman, Marin Lehr and Oakley each had Prescription and multiple hits. Rehrauer Non-Prescription Sunglasses went 4-for-6. Lehr had We offer a large selection of Designer Eyewear a team-high three stolen bases. including Vera Bradley, BCBG Izod,

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GOWANDA — Springville collected 13 hits in a high-scoring affair on Thursday, but Gowanda had 15 hits on the way to victory Thursday, April 4. Gowanda scored on a singles by Gao:wisa:s Stevens and Paige Gabel and a triple by Hailey Fort in the first inning. Zoey Kota tripled in the second inning. Springville notched four runs in the seventh inning as Ella Wittman, Marin Lehr and Kaitlyn Wolf all contributed with RBIs. Wolf toed the rubber for Springville, allowing striking out eight and with no walks. Wolf (4-for-5), Meadow Wittman, Katelyn Mesch, Lehr, and Bella Oakley had multiple hits. For Gowanda, Kota, Olivia Pawlak, Maddie Clark and Stevens each racked up multiple hits.

Springville 25, Mount Mercy 2 SPRINGVILLE — Kaitlyn Wolf drove in five runs on three hits to lead Springville past Mount Mercy Academy on Wednesday, April 3. Wolf drove in runs on a triple in the first, a walk in the first, a single in the third and a single in the fourth. As a pitcher, Wolf allowed just two runs on three hits over five innings, striking out eight with no walks as SGI played errorfree defense. SGI had 13 hits on the day. Meadow Wittman, Wolf, Olivia Fisher and Lilia Dinse each had multiple hits. Wolf and Wittman each collected three hits. Ella Wittman had two stolen bases.

SATURDAY 4/13 JV & V Girls Lacrosse: at Amherst, 10 a.m. V Baseball: at North Collins, 12 p.m. Girls Track & Field: at Franklinville, 1 p.m. MONDAY 4/15 V Boys Tennis: at Eden, 4 p.m. V Softball: at Holland, 4:15 p.m. V Baseball: at Holland, 4:15 p.m. V Girls Lacrosse: vs. Mount Mercy, 4:30 p.m. JV Baseball: at Alden, 4:30 p.m. Mod Girls Lacrosse: vs. Lake Shore, 4:45 p.m. TUESDAY 4/16 V Boys Tennis: at Pioneer, 4 p.m. V Girls Lacrosse: vs. Salamanca, 5 p.m. WEDNESDAY 4/17 V Boys Tennis: vs. Alden, 4 p.m. V Softball: vs. Cleveland Hill, 4:30 p.m. V Baseball: vs. Cleveland Hill, 4:30 p.m.

JV & V Girls Lacrosse: vs. Nardin, 4:30 p.m. JV Baseball: vs. Lake Shore, 4:45 p.m.

THURSDAY 4/18 Mod Lacrosse: at Lake Shore, 4:30 p.m. V Softball: at Lake Shore, 4:45 p.m.

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April 12-18, 2019

LOCAL

DEC: Wildfire conditions intensify across New York

With early spring sun and gusts of wind in the 30-40 mph range Wednesday, conditions for wildfires have been optimal, leading the state to upgrade the fire danger map. The Department of Environmental Conservation reemphasized the fact that residential brush burning is prohibited through May 14 across New York state. New York prohibits residential burning during the high-risk fire season to reduce wildfires and protect people, property and natural resources. DEC says the ban has been effective in reducing the number of wildfires. Historically, open burning of debris is the largest single cause of spring wildfires. When temperatures are warmer and the past fall's debris, dead grass and leaves dry out, wildfires can start and spread easily and be further fueled by winds and a lack of green vegetation. So far, there have not been widespread reports of grass and brush fires in the area — although a blaze burned 5 to 10 acres south of Bolivar on March 27. The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning Wednesday for the Southern Tier to the Catskills. A red flag warning is a short-term, temporary warning indicating the

presence of a dangerous combination of temperature, wind, relative humidity, fuel or drought conditions which can contribute to new fires or the rapid spread of existing fires. New York first enacted strict restrictions on open burning in 2009 to help prevent wildfires and reduce air pollution. State regulations allow residential brush fires in towns with fewer than 20,000 residents during most of the year, but prohibit such burning in spring when most wildfires in New York occur. Since the ban was established, the eight-year annual average number of spring fires decreased by 42.6 percent, from 2,649 in 2009 to 1,521 in 2018. Campfires using charcoal or untreated wood are allowed, but people should never leave such fires unattended and must extinguish them. Burning garbage or leaves is prohibited year-round. Violators of the state's open burning regulation are subject to both criminal and civil enforcement actions, with a minimum fine of $500 for a first offense. To report environmental law violations, call (800) 847-7332), or report online on DEC's website.

Hazen wins Easterns SG!

By Caitlin Croft

U19 athletes traveled to Gore Mountain from all over the East Coast to compete in the U19 Eastern Finals. The event consisted of a Super G, Giant Slalom and Slalom. Super G Women: Page Hazen of Kissing Bridge took home the gold medal. Giant Slalom Women: Hazen finished

22nd. Men: Aristotle Ninos (KB) placed 45th.

Slalom Women: Hazen took 23rd. Aristotle Ninos: Ninos finished 28th. Three U14 athletes were invited to the Piche Memorial held at Gunstock Resort in New Hampshire. There were a Giant Slalom and Slalom held for this event.

Maundy Thursday service April 18 at Faith United

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special service. Faith Church is located at 8651 Boston State Road, Boston. For more information, call the church office at 941-3529.

Giant Slalom: Emily Kloc (KB) finished 56th and Lillian Rauch (BSC) took 65th. Hannes Aubrecht of Buffalo Ski Club placed 68th for the boys.

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OBITUARIES

Roger J. Smith

Roger J. Smith, of Vaughn Street, East Concord, died Thursday (April 4, 2019) in Bertrand Chaffee Hospital, Springville, at the age of 77. He was born March 21, 1942, in Springville, a son of the late Milford and Irene (Dole) Smith. He was a graduate of Springville-Griffith Institute and held an Associates Degree from Morrisville Ag & Tech. Mr. Smith owned and operated his own farm in East Concord and also had worked at Fisher-Price and Snyder Tank. He was a former member of the East Concord Fire Department and the Railroad Society in Orchard Park. He is survived by his wife Mary (Kowalewski) Smith, whom he married

in 1964; four daughters, Anne Smith of East Concord, Patty Smith of Springville, Kathy (Todd) Degenfelder of Collins and Michelle Smith of Florida; a sister, Joan Krohn of Florida; and several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. There are no calling hours. A Memorial Mass of Christian Burial will be held and announced at a later date. Burial will be in St. Aloysius Cemetery, Springville. Arrangements were completed by Smith-Weismantel Funeral Home, 271 East Main St., Springville. Online condolences may be offered at www. smithweismantelfuneralhome.com.

Dorothy M. Stapleton

Dorothy M. Stapleton, formerly of Springville, died Saturday (April 6, 2019) in the Crystal River Health & Rehab Center, Crystal River, Fla., at the age of 93. She was born Jan. 15, 1926, in East Concord, a daughter of the late Frank A. and Clare (Lige) Griffith. She was a homemaker, member of Faith Baptist Church, Springville and the Springville Moose, liked to play golf and loved her cats. She is survived by her children, Craig Bobseine of Ocala, Fla., Brian (Diane) Bobseine of Springville, Colleen (William) Hassett of Beverly Hills, Fla., Richard, Jr. (Bonnie) Stapleton of Florida, Ray (Karen) Stapleton of Georgia and Barb Bobseine of Springville; 11 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, three great-great-

LOCAL

LAWRENCE’S

GALA

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were very successful, selling ten 30-gallon kegs each week. Eventually, he received a license to sell whiskey. Through these early years, the tavern had an extensive menu of soups, roast beef and roast pork sandwiches. Lawrence’s featured a blue pike fish fry, later changed to yellow pike and eventually to haddock as the Lake Erie fishery declined. Every Friday, they served 100 to 125 dinners. Just as his father did, Larry Zielinski has maintained the building and kept the neighborhood tavern going. He has remodeled the facade of the building and kept up the restaurant and residence. The business has the nostalgia of a Springville neighborhood tavern that one would expect. The “No Cry Babies Allowed” sign in the front window has become a legend in Springville. Larry Zielinski said there was a patron many years ago who liked to complain every time he came into the bar. Some of the other patrons got together and bought the sign and placed it in the window. Unfortunately, but humorously, Larry said that the sign didn’t work, but it has been there ever since. And he says every once in a while, people stop by and take pictures of it. The Mucket Bucket is another unique feature of Lawrence’s. Patrons started

grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, Richard Stapleton, Sr., and a son, Larry Bobseine, a brother, Willard Griffith, and a sister, Marion Chadwick. Friends may call Saturday, April 13, 2019, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the SmithWeismantel Funeral Home, 271 E. Main St., Springville, where funeral services will follow at 1 pm. Burial will be in East Concord Cemetery, East Concord. Memorials may be made to the Ten Lives Club, 3741 Lake Shore Rd., Blasdell, NY 14219. Online condolences may be offered at www.smithweismantelfuneralhome.com.

Continued from front page

40-under-40 Awards: (from left) Evan Emerling, Jeremy Pyszczynski, Ashley Lowry and Joe Lowry. Photo submitted Lawrence Zielinski (far right) and friends circa 1949.

throwing loose change into a bucket, and at the end of the year, the money was donated to the youth groups in the village. The tradition has grown. On Wednesday evenings, Bob Muhlbauer provides the music entertainment for free and thanks patrons for donations to the Mucket Bucket. Over the last several years, the annual donations to youth groups have been averaging $2,200. In addition, at holiday time, Lawrence’s patrons donate money to buy turkeys for the local needy families. Larry Zielinski reminisces about the changes in the tavern business over the years. “Years ago our customers walked to our restaurant. They walked over to have lunch here. They walked to have dinner or a drink in the evening,” he said. “Back then, people didn’t drive everywhere. They came to

the local tavern instead of driving to distant places to have dinner or a drink.” And Larry is quick to point out that he has kept the neighborhood tavern alive. “There are not many taverns like this around anymore,” he added. And so, on April 17 at 6:30 p.m., Lawrence’s will celebrate 80 years in business. The MooCheesy Food Truck will be out front. Bob Muhlbauer will be playing music. Larry Zielinski said he cannot serve beer for 3 cents a glass as his father did 80 years ago, but he and Mike will be there at the bar serving up the beer, wine and whiskey in the Lawrence’s tradition. Everyone is invited to celebrate Lawrence's Tavern, a Zielinski family tradition, the oldest business in Springville and one which continues to give back to the village community.

s ’ e r e h W x?

Ale

Alex Simmons is a junior at Springville-Griffith Institute High School and contributing writer and photographer with the Springville Times. She and her dog, Buster, will travel around the area and take pictures of specific things or places they see.

Fill out the the information box below take your best guess as to where Alex and Buster were this week. Cut out the info box and return it to the Springville Times office, 65 East Main St., Springville, NY 14141.

This Week’s Photo: Name: Address:

Guess:

Last week, Alex and Buster were in the alley alongside Lulu Belles off East Main Street. Congratulations to Bob Clark, of Springville, who correctly guessed that Alex and Buster were in front of the Hulbert Library on March 29! Keep those guesses coming in!

CHICKEN BBQ Sunday, April 14 11am ‘till gone

$10 Adults $6.50 Children

405 West Main Street, Springville NY

TAKE-OUT ONLY

Small Business of the Year: 49 Coffee House & Eatery

its one-year anniversary last month. Kistner Concrete was awarded the Business of the Year Award. Kistner Concrete Products is committed to innovation in product design while employing the highest level of customer service and support. The Citizen of the Year Award went to Bill Gugino. He has been serving Western New York in the construction/development

Last weeks Location

Can you guess where they are?

Springville Volunteer Fire Department

Community Service Award: Lions Club of Springville

business for 42 years, starting in Gowanda and relocating his business to Springville in 1997. His passion for growing the area has extended to being president of the Springville Boys and Girls Club, which has led to the merger of the Club and SYI. Gugino has served as the president of the chamber for the past six years and still remains on the board of directors. Finally, the President’s Award was presented to

Jeanne Ellis and Dawn Wible. They started the Oktoberfest event in Springville after Jeanne had lived in Germany and attended Oktoberfest in Munich five times. Mayor Bill Krebs announced the winners of the silent auction. He thanked Julie’s Pizzeria & Restaurant for appetizers, dinner and dessert and 49 Coffee House & Eatery for the coffee.

A LOOK BACK Continued from front page

Byron Cochran of Springville Insurance Agency offered a policy to railroad travelers with a $3,000 death benefit or $15. A week for indemnity — this, of course, was to put all the potential travelers at ease. After the Railroad was finished, there was little need for the Albro & Torrey’s stagecoach line to Arcade, and it was discontinued. A mail contract to Arcade added revenue to the line. At its peak, the line had two locomotives, two box cars, six flat cars, baggage and a passenger car. Passengers and goods could make the 11½mile trip in one hour. A snowplow had been built to

LEGION FAMILY

Easter Egg Hunt

Will be held at: Fiddlers Green Park On Saturday April 20th, 2019 At 12PM Come over to the Town Hall for refreshments afterwards!

be added to the locomotive during the snowy months. One of the larger items of freight hauled by the S & S can still be seen in town. The 22-ton General John Wadsworth monument was hauled in, requiring five of the flat six cars to do the job! The monument stands near the green service shed in Maplewood Cemetery. The days of this venture of railroading were numbered as the extension of the standard gauge Rochester and Pittsburg would soon be passing through Springville to Buffalo. The S & S was to make a mighty effort to render great service before it passed into oblivion by way of delivering 3,000 tons of stonework, huge quantities of rails, iron pipe and timber material for the Cascade Bridge, which totaled 3,147 tons. Early in 1884, the S & S was digging out from the winters assault. Approaching her sixth year of operation, it was going slower and slower over the deterioration roadbed,

rotting-splitting ties and damaged worn rails. The sped over the trestle had been reduced to 3 miles per hour. The S & S decided that the snow and repairs were just too much and quit. In 1883 the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg Railroad had decided to build a branch line to connect Ashford with Buffalo and the line passed through Springville. Cascade Park was built in Springville and served as a popular picnicking and recreation center for many years, thus ensuring the railroad travel to our area. Want to learn more about the great places, people and events from this area? Stop by the Lucy Bensley Center at 23 North Buffalo St., Springville, email us at lucybensleycenter@gmail. com or call 592-0094. Want to volunteer a few hours each month with us? Contact us! You can hear some great music at the Concord Mercantile Heritage Building, 17 Franklin St., on Tuesdays and Thursdays 7 to 9 p.m.


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April 12-18, 2019

LOCAL

Upcoming events at ASP

DEC DENIAL Continued from front page

same. They never did an environmental impact statement, just an environmental assessment.” Worse yet, Oprea said, on April 2, FERC denied a DEC request supported by the Sierra Club, for a rehearing. The walk to Cattaraugus Creek from property owned by Oprea and her family was also done in memory of Joe Schueckler, of Cuba, who fought National Fuel Gas’ eminent domain attempt to force the pipeline across his 200-acre property. Schueckler died on Sunday. National Fuel Gas is expected to appeal the state Supreme Court decision that ruled in favor of Schueckler and his wife Theresa, Oprea said. Oprea and four other Erie County property owners along the pipeline route who lost their eminent domain fight are expected to challenge the court ruling Erie County against the eminent domain ruling that favored National Fuel Gas. Oprea said the NoNAPL Coalition has grown to more than a dozen organizations, including Defend Ohi:Yo’, the Seneca Nation group that helped stop a plan to dispose of treated fracking water in the Allegheny River near Coudersport, Pa. last year. Other groups in the NoNAPL coalition include: SANE Energy, Concerned Citizens of Cattaraugus County, Concerned Citizens of Allegany County, the Sierra Club, WECAP and Defend Ohi:Yo’, Indigenous Women’s Initiatives, The Green Party of Pennsylvania, Ohi:Yo’ Men’s Council, Poor People’s Campaign, Western New York Peace Council, The Center for Biological Diversity, Save the Allegheny and Save Our Streams-Pennsylvania. With Cattaraugus Creek flowing through the Seneca’s Cattaraugus Territory, many Senecas are concerned over the impact of the pipeline crossing the creek with the open trench method. The 24-inch pipeline’s crossing of the Allegheny River will be done through a horizontal drilling method with the pipeline several feet under the riverbed. The pipeline would cross under the Allegheny River near Ceres. It would pass through a small portion of the town

By Kellen M. Quigley It’s spring at Allegany State Park, which means an array of outdoor activities. Whether you’re looking for nature education, a way to give back or a trail run, you’ll find it coming up in the next month.

Photo by Rick Miller Lia Oprea (center, in red) of Wyoming Erie Cattaraugus Against the Pipeline (WECAP) speaks with Barry Miller (right) of Concerned Citizens of Cattaraugus County and Diana Strablow of the Sierra Club during a walk Monday to mark the two-year anniversary of the state Department of Conservation ruling against the proposed 97-mile Northern Access Pipeline Project. The group walked to the site where the 24-inch pipe will trench through Cattaraugus Creek in Sardinia.

of Genesee in Allegany County before entering Cattaraugus County in the town of Portville. It would pass through the towns of Hinsdale, Ischua, Franklinville, Machias and Yorkshire before crossing Cattaraugus Creek into Erie County. Defend Ohi:Yo’ member Elisa Parker, a Seneca working with the Environmental Health Unit, who participated in Monday’s NoNAPL walk, spoke of sponsoring a similar walk this summer to highlight the problems associated with the pipeline. She said getting children involved with the large number of opponents to the Coudersport project helped kill the project. A children’s art show to show thankfulness for the environment will be held at the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum May 3–5. Shannon Seneca, who is also a member of Defend Ohi:Yo’ and an environmental engineer for the Seneca Environmental Health Unit, said a Watershed Resources Working Group is working on the Northern Access Pipeline issue as well.

Oprea said the area where National Fuel Gas wants to cross Cattaraugus Creek is in an area with steep slopes prone to slides where the company says it cannot use the horizontal drilling. She pointed out where the creek’s path is constantly changing in the area where the pipeline will cross. When the creek is swollen by snowmelt or heavy rain, big trees are often carried down the rushing water, Oprea said. “There’s the potential for breakage of the pipeline.” National Fuel Gas officials have indicated the pipeline should be in service as early as 2022. If constructed, the pipeline is expected to generate 1,700 jobs during construction and add $11.8 million a year in property taxes for Western New York municipalities. The pipeline, which would bring natural gas along its route up through McKean County from Pennsylvania fracked gas fields, would connect to the Trans Canada Pipeline and the Tennessee Gas Co. Pipeline.

Quaker Easter Egg Hunt — April 13 Quaker’s Easter Egg Hunt is scheduled for Saturday, April 13. There is a rain date of April 20, 2019. Organizers have 5,000 toy and candy-filled eggs for this event. The plan is to have three designated areas for each age group: 1 to 4, 5 to 9, 10 and up. The hunt is set to begin at 11 a.m. J.Con has generously donated refreshments for the event, served around noon. Refreshments include hot dogs, water and coffee. Organizers are asking that anyone interested please contact Quaker Rental Office to register for the event by April 10. This is so that organizers can provide J Con a head count for refreshments. For more information or to register, call 354-2182. I Love My Park Day — May 4 Celebrate Star Wars Day by giving back to the park! I Love My Park Day is a statewide event, organized by Parks & Trails New York (PTNY) in partnership with the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) and local Friends groups, to celebrate and

enhance New York’s parks and historic sites and bring visibility to the entire park system and its needs. Join us to celebrate New York’s park system by cleaning up park lands and beaches, planting trees and gardens, restoring trail and wildlife habitat, removing invasive species, and working on various site improvement projects. Allegany State Park is once again taking part in the event, with the Friends group leading several projects. Past projects have included clearing brush, picking up garbage, painting cabins and trail maintenance. Thanks to one of the Friends’ members, a few sponsors and the Friends of Allegany State Park, a free hot dog lunch will be served after the event at the Quaker picnic shelter. There will also be a few prizes to give away thanks to our sponsors. Registration is now open at www.ptny.org. Allegany Adventure Run —4 Also happening on Saturday, May 4 is the 2019 Allegany Adventure Run, which kicks off the trail running season in the park at 9:30 a.m. that day. The Summit Ski Area in Red House is home base for this annual wild and challenging experience covering one of three course distances: a 5K, 13K and 27K. Pre-register at www. heartrateup.com by April 27 to guarantee a t-shirt. For information, visit heartrateup. com/alleganyadventurerun.

SGI

By Elyana Schosek Student Reporter Last week was an introduction to some of the students in this year’s Tech I class at Springville High School and a few of the projects they’ve done, as well as why they chose to take the class and their favorite projects. Those students also talked about the best part of the class, what makes it unique from other classes and what they’re currently working on. The structure of the class is unique in that, “Every project we work with partners which gives us more and better ideas while working on the projects,” said Eric Copeland. Jared Hecht added that the best part was “to be able to work as a team with people and turn the ideas into finished projects with them.” “Most of the students who take this class enjoy hands on problem solving and a bit of competition,” said Mr. Shelley, who teaches the class. When asked to pick their favorite project, it took some time to make a decision because of the sheer number of projects they have done up to this point. Ben Sullivan and Will

Getting technical at SGI: Part 2 Guilmain both said that their favorite project would have to be the “marble mover.” Ben said he chose this one because “there were a lot of details and thought that had to be put into it. We also had to make a lot of adjustments so that everything worked properly together.” He continued in saying, “We had to make several moving parts that linked back to one manual moving part, such as a hand crank and so we had to create it in such a way that all the moving parts worked together.” Will’s reasoning was that, “Everyone in the group has a job to do, and when you piece everything together it's super satisfying to see it work.” Ethan Fisher said that the best part of the class is every time they finish a project and get to test it out. Similarly, Ben mentioned the best thing to be “problem solving and seeing the final outcome.” “Learning new skills and working with different kinds of people,” Will added. Daniel Gernatt said, “Getting to use different programs and stuff like the laser and the 3D printer” was the best part. Josh Beres said, “Taking your ideas and designs and making

them a reality along with getting the knowledge and learning how to accomplish your goals”. Currently, the class is working on various projects for Tech Wars, a competition where middle and high school students in the area can come together to compete. “We're doing our Tech Wars project. Most are building a mousetrap car, some are doing catapults or robots. I'm building a bridge,” Will explained. Jared, Eric, Ethan, Daniel and Josh are all “currently building a mousetrap car and designing it to travel the furthest distance possible,” as Josh explained. Eric added that they intend to take it to Tech Wars to see how it does in a competition against kids from other schools. Other projects being prepared for Tech Wars are a remote control car by Ben and a catapult by Daniel. There are many reasons why this is a unique class but here are just a few according to the kids taking it. “The hands on learning aspect of it and the freedom you have to pick the way you want your projects,” said Jared. “Instead of doing work and writing papers all the time, it

Photos by Elyana Schosek Students in the Tech I class at Springville High School test out one of their recent projects, mousetrap cars, in the halls at school.

teaches you problem solving skills, and how to work with a group,” added Will. Ben said, “The teacher is just there to guide and help out when needed but you decide what you're doing on your own for the most part.” Similarly, Daniel referenced “the freedom of getting to choose

how you do your project.” Ethan noted that “on every project, the teacher will let you fail as a learning experience for why you failed.” Josh described the class as a “great learning experience for students willing to learn about technology and have a great teacher to teach you.”

St. Aloysius students compete in regional science fair

On March 23, 10 students from St. Aloysius Regional School (STARS) competed at the WNY Science and Engineering Fair held at D’Youville College. Students in grades 5-8 were selected based on science projects presented and judged during the school’s annual science fair held in February. Mrs. Bridget Tartick, grades 6-8 Science Teacher, coordinated the school’s science fair and coached the students for their Photo Submitted participation in the fair. Several students from St. Aloysius Regional School (STARS) recently competed at The Western New the WNY Science and Engineering Fair held at D’Youville College. York Regional Science public, private and home- Genesee and Wyoming Students at the and Engineering Fair WNYRSEF present schooled students in county. WNYRSEF (WNYRSEF), sponsored grades 5 through 12 from hosted 208 students from a project using the by WNY Science 25 different schools. scientific method to Congress, Inc., is open to Erie, Niagara, Orleans,

judges composed of WNY teachers, scientists and engineers. The students compete for medals, monetary awards, and advancement to state and international fairs. This event-filled day included a keynote address from renowned Buffalo architect, Robert Traynham Coles, the selected Distinguished Scientist/Engineer of the event as well as mini-workshops, public viewing of projects and the awards ceremony. The five STARS students who earned medals and cash awards are: Grade 5-6 award: Olivia West Gold Medallion and

$20 Science Experiment Title: Diaper Dilemma Grade 7-8 awards: Elizabeth Stahl Gold Medallion and $100 Science Experiment Title: Filter Me Soft Joshua Tartick Silver Medallion and $75 Science Experiment Title: An Internal Explanation Thomas Tartick Bronze Medallion and $50 Science Experiment Title: What's In Your Penny? Jocelyn Mesch Honorable Mention Medallion Science Experiment Title: Chew On This


April 12-18, 2019

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

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COMMUNITY

Concord Senior Center news and updates AARP Income tax is over. We had a great turn out. AARP Defensive Driving Class is Tuesday, April 23. Call 592-4946 to sign up. Call 592-2741 to sign up for a great lunch for only a $3 donation. Paint with Carolyn is Friday, April 26 at 9:30 a.m. University Express starts May 3 at 12:30 p.m. Questions or ideas, call 592-2764 or email concord2017sc@gmail.com.

•10 a.m. — Knit & Crochet •11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises •Noon — Stay Fit Lunch Wednesday, April 17 •WOW Craft Group •1 p.m. — Red Cross Blood Drive

Monday, April 15 •11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises •Noon — Stay Fit Lunch •7 p.m. — Springville Jazz Band concert

Thursday, April 18 •9:30 a.m. — Stitches Quilt Group •11 a.m. — Stay Fit Exercises •Noon — Stay Fit Lunch •12:30 p.m. — Euchre Card Group •1 p.m. — Univera Insurance Rep here

Tuesday, April 16 •9:15 a.m. — Yoga

Friday, April 19 CLOSED — Good Friday

MOVIE REVIEW New success through fun continues for DC in ‘Shazam!’

Collins Public Library Events

Lap Sit with Miss Abbie, April 15, 10:30 a.m. — Join us for this fun program for children ages 6 months to 2 years with a caregiver. A great introduction to early literacy skills with rhymes, finger plays, music, stories and more. Sign up required. Savvy Caregivers Series, April 15, 6 p.m. — A four-session training series designed to teach how to care for someone who has Alzheimer’s disease or another related dementia. Presented by Chautauqua Opportunities. For more info or to register, call 366-3335 ext. 1236. Morning Book Club, April 15, 11 a.m. — We will be discussing “Beartown” by Fredrik Backman. You can request a copy online or at the library desk. LEGO Club, April 16, 6:30 p.m. — Play with LEGOs in the library. We will put your creation on display in the library. Ages 4 to 12. Registration required. Call or stop in. Easter Fun Story Hour, April

18, 6 p.m. — Join us for catapulting peeps, rabbit “mini golf,” Pete the Cat’s big Easter Adventure, make your own bunny trail mix and more. Open to children ages 3 to 10. Registration required and limited. Closed, April 19 — Please use our book drop or renew online at www.buffalolib.org. Tinkering in the Library, April 20, noon — With different rotating activities each month, there will be new things to explore. Fun for the whole family. Stop by or call to sign up. Book A Tech Trainer, April 23, 1 p.m. — There are a variety of subjects we can help you with. From eBooks to phones, we are here to help. Call to set up a free hands on appointment. Make A Seed Bomb, April 23, 2 p.m. — Fun for all ages. Plant a pop of spring flowers. First come first served. Buffalo Zoo presents ‘A Touch of Class,’ April 23, 6 p.m. — Join us as the staff from the Buffalo Zoo

help us investigate and learn about birds, mammals, reptiles, arthropods and amphibians. Open to all ages. Sign up is required. Spring Slime, April 25, 6 p.m. — Ages 3 to 12. Come make some slime. First come,first served. Supplies are limited. Young Adult Book Club, April 25, 6:30 p.m. — We will be discussing “Echo” by Pam Munoz Ryan. You can request a copy online or at the library desk. Did you know? Erie County Library cards are available to all Erie County residents, all individuals who work in Erie County, and all those who live in the Gowanda School tax district. Stay up-todate with events at the library by ‘liking’ our Facebook page, Collins Public Library. New Library Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Closed Sundays. Telephone: 532-5129.

Warner Bros. Pictures In this image from Warner Bros. Pictures, Jack Dylan Grazer (left) and Zachary Levi appear in a scene from “Shazam!”

By Kellen M. Quigley

How did we get here? I just saw a movie where a superhero — who gets his powers by yelling the name “Shazam!” — is fighting with a bad guy in a toy store, takes a real-life Batman action figure off the shelf, throws the figure at the bad guy and yells, “Get him, Batman,” and it wasn’t totally lame. What makes it even stranger is this is a Detective Comics (DC) movie, the same company that produced the ridiculous gritty and serious “Batman v Superman” only three years ago to near universal panning. In a Hollywood era where films made from Marvel Comics have regularly outdone DC year after year, “Shazam!” is already proving to be another solid success for DC just four months after another success for the company with “Aquaman,” both of which were fun and funny. Since the return of Superman in “Man of Steel” came just a year after Marvel’s “The Avengers,” most would say DC is too dark compared to Marvel and that’s why they haven’t been as successful. Become a library trustee! representative available to help you own pom-pom creations with items But recently, I’d say the tides have turned, and comic The Concord Public Library is with food, heating bills, SNAP, WIC, you can find around your house. book movies are all the better for it, and all the recent looking for library trustees. Library and other social services programs. Registration is required. Call 592success for DC I’m hoping to see continue owes a lot of trustees are powerful advocates •Drop-in Family Storytime (ages 7742 or stop by to reserve your spot. credit to “Shazam!” for libraries in our community. If 2-5 years) 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Jumping from foster home to foster home, 14-year-old interested, contact library director •SPCA Paws for Love - Read to a April 24, 1 p.m., Computer Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel) is searching for his Jennifer Morris at 592-7742. Dog! 3 to 4 p.m. Class: Microsoft PowerPoint real mom but finds comfort in his newest foster family. Come practice reading aloud to — An introduction to Microsoft's While escaping a couple of bullies, Billy is suddenly Mondays Gracie, a SPCA therapy dog. For ages presentation software. Requires transported to another dimension and finds himself in the •Builder's Bonanza! 3:30 to 5 p.m. 4 and up. No registration is required. basic mouse and keyboard skills. presence of an ancient wizard (Djimon Hounsou). •Drop in for an afternoon of •Teen Game Lab 4 to 6 p.m. Drop Registration is required. Call 592With the threat of the Seven Deadly Sins about to hit building with LEGO's, Magformers by for board games, robotics and 7742 or stop by to reserve your spot. America, the wizard transfers all his power to Billy, and and Keva Planks! more! For ages 8 and up. all he needs to do is shout out one word to transform into (ages 6 and up) Buffalo & Erie County public the adult superhero, Shazam (Zachary Levi). Special Events libraries have more than 3.2 million Still a kid inside, Shazam revels in the new version of Tuesdays April 13, 11 a.m., Wheatgrass & materials such as books, eBooks, himself by doing what any other teen would do: have fun •Drop-in Computer Help. Stop Microgreens — Christine Henderson DVDs, music and more. Free library while testing out his newfound powers. But he'll need to in with your questions about email, will be here to show how easy and cards, traditional and eLibrary, are master them quickly before the evil Dr. Thaddeus Sivana ebooks, using the internet and more. 4 inexpensive vegetable greens are to available to Erie County residents (Mark Strong) can get his hands on Shazam's magical to 5:30 p.m. grow. Registration is required. Call and to those who work and/or attend abilities. 592-7742 or stop by to reserve your school in Erie County. Follow What immediately stands out about “Shazam!” that sets Thursdays spot. the library on Facebook, Twitter, it apart from most comic book movies is it is a comedy •Erie County Department of Social Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and on first and an action film second. Nearly every scene is Services 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 23, 2 p.m., Make Your our podcast All Booked Up! Call 858about the comedy — whether over-the-top ridiculous or The Erie County Department Own Pom Pom Pals — In this kids 8900 or visit www.buffalolib.org. just awkward and heartwarming — that is in everyday of Social Services will have a activity, learn how to make your life, and adding superpowers into the mix just makes it funnier. Given the premise, this story has a lot more in common with the Tom Hanks movie “Big” than with any Superman origin story. Under that lense, this movie subverts the usual expectations and is more of a dissection of the April 13 April 14 superhero myth rather than just a satire of it. Easter Egg Hunt Springville Volunteer Fire Company Chicken BBQ For example, when Billy first becomes Shazam, he at Gowanda Moose Lodge, Aldrich Street in Gowanda. at Springville Volunteer Fire Company, 405 West Main St. doesn’t immediately go fighting crime. He and his foster Hosted by Women of the Moose and Ladies Auxiliary. $10 adults, $6.50 children. brother Freddy Freeman, played hilariously by Jack Dylan Hunt for eggs, play games, enjoy refreshments, meet the 11 a.m. until sold out Grazer, instead start testing his powers, recording them Easter Bunny. Don’t forget a pantry item to donate. and posting them on YouTube. They go to the store and 1 p.m. April 14 buy beer. They take pictures with fans in the park for tips. Palm Sunday and Easter Egg Hunt All things a 14-year-old would do if he suddenly looked April 13 at Salem Lutheran Church & Preschool, 91 West Main like he was in his mid-30s. Songwriters Showcase St., Springville. Palm Sunday Worship Service lead by Speaking of which, Zachary Levi has all the charm at Springville Center for the Arts. Area musicians perform our Junior/Youth Praise Band. Easter Egg Hunt, Hot dog and charisma you’d expect to keep Shazam so likable. acoustically and share stories in a casual setting. Call 592lunch, Petting zoo, coloring, crafts, movies and more. In addition to the great chemistry with Grazer and the 9038. Tickets $12 pre-sale, $15 at door. 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. superhero “act” he puts on, I believe that Levi is playing a 7 p.m. 14-year-old suddenly finding himself in a grownup body. April 16 Unfortunately, this movie isn’t without faults, and Mark April 13 & 14 SLAM Auditions – Urinetown Lunch with the Easter Bunny at Springville Center for the Arts. Open to anyone entering Strong’s villain is both weak and boring. You could argue at The Legacy restaurant, Springville. Take pictures with high school through college this fall. Bring music to sing that the character is purposefully written as a big cliche, Easter Bunny and enjoy kid-approved buffet. Coloring 16 bars of a musical theater piece that will show your but things that are meant to be lame can still be fun and contest still ongoing. Call 592-3300. talent. entertaining, and he mostly just grounds the momentum 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 5 p.m. to a halt. Luckily, every scene with Strong was canceled out by the doubly great scenes with the foster family. Billy’s new parents and siblings are all great. Again subverting expectations, the parents are loveable and supportive and the siblings feel like real kids. They’re the real heart of the story, keeping that theme of unique family situations going in the DC films. Unlike most DC movies, what helps “Shazam!” succeed along with “Aquaman” is how it embraces what it is. There are magical and mystical elements at play, and SUBSCRIBE OUTSIDE THE rather than go super realistic and serious, this film is all SPRINGVILLE AREA BY fun and games, as it should be. CALLING (716) 372-3121 X. 266

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Notice of Public

www.SpringvilleTimes.com Hearing for

Employment / Help Wanted ********* GENERAL COUNSEL President's Office Salamanca, NY Proposed compensation Deadline: April 19, 2019 For more info log onto www.sni.org ********* EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY The Town of Concord is accepting resumes for a Multitask Worker. The position would include hours for the Concord Nutrition Site, office work on a computer and a person that enjoys working with the older generation. The position is 19 hours per week. Please send resumes to the Town Supervisor's office, P.O. Box 368, Springville, New York 14141. Resumes must be received by April 22, 2019. If you have any questions, please call Eleanor at 592-2764.

Commercial / Rental Property ****** Store For Rent 18 Washington St Call Greg 716-490-1621

***** TOWN OF MANSFIELD REQUEST FOR LAWN MOWNING BID PROPOSALS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN the Town of Mansfield is requesting Bids for the lawn mowing of the Town of Mansfieldʼs four cemeteries the lawns around the Highway Garage, Historical Building and the Town Hall. Bids are to be one Legals price for the entire mowing season. Bid proposals may be mailed to the Town Clerk in a sealed envelope clearly marked “Lawn Mowing Bid” or presented at the next Town Board Meeting by 7:00 p.m. at which time bids will be publicly opened and read. Said Town Board Meeting to be held April 15, 2019 at the Mansfield Town Hall in Eddyville, 7691 Toad Hollow Road, Little Valley New York 14755. Before submitting bid proposals please contact Town Supervisor Robert Keis for details, he may be reached by calling (716) 4745730. The Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. By Order of the Town Board Betty Jane Horning, Town Clerk

Special Use Town of Otto, Cattaraugus County, New York NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Article 7 of Town law Section 7.3 of the Otto Zoning Ordinance ,a public hearing will be held by the Otto Zoning and Planning Board on Tuesday April 30, 2019 at 7:00pm at the Otto Town Hall, 8842 OttoEast Otto Road, Otto, NY for the Legals purpose of considering a Special Use Permit application by Matthew and Kimberly Walker relating to the property located at 9080 Otto-E. Otto Road and legally described as a single family residence, parcel number 046800 36.009-212 with property dimensions of 140 x 115. This application is filed for the purpose of obtaining a Special Use Permit which will allow the subject property to be used as a multi family residence. At the above time and place, the Zoning and Planning Board of the Town of Otto will meet and review the special use application. All interested parties will be given an opportunity to be heard. Trisha Priest, Otto Town Clerk ***** THE MAPLES CEMETERY will hold its annual meeting on April 29, 2019, 7PM in the Mansfield Town Hall, 7961 Toad Hollow Road, Eddyville, NY. All deed holders are encouraged to attend.

********** Notice of Public Hearing for Special Use Town of Otto, ***** Cattaraugus TOWN OF County, New York MANSFIELD NOTICE IS REQUEST FOR LAWN MOWNING HEREBY GIVEN BID PROPOSALS that, pursuant to Article 7 of Town NOTICE IS law Section 7.3 of HEREBY GIVEN the Otto Zoning the Town of MansELLICOTTVILLE Ordinance ,a public field is requesting CENTRAL hearing will be held Bids for the lawn SCHOOL by the Otto Zoning mowing of the DISTRICT Town of Mansfieldʼs and Planning Board NOTICE OF four cemeteries the on Tuesday April ANNUAL SCHOOL 30, 2019 at 7:00pm lawns around the DISTRICT at the Otto Town Highway Garage, PUBLIC HEARING Hall, 8842 OttoHistorical Building AND VOTE: East Otto Road, and the Town Hall. NOTICE IS Otto, NY for the Bids are to be one HEREBY GIVEN, purpose of considprice for the entire that a public ering a Special Use hearing for the mowing season. Permit application Bid proposals may voters of the by Matthew and be mailed to the Ellicottville Central Kimberly Walker Town Clerk in a School District on relating to the prop- the 2019-2020 sealed envelope erty located at 9080 budget and clearly marked Otto-E. Otto Road “Lawn Mowing expenditure of Bid” or presented at and legally defunds will be held scribed as a single the next Town on Tuesday, family residence, Board Meeting by May 14, 2019 parcel number 7:00 p.m. at which commencing Tuesdays from 10 a.m.atto Bybids Alex 046800 36.009-2time willSimmons be 7:00 pm in the High noon. publicly opened and 12 with property School Cafeteria of dimensions of “GettingEllicottville read. Town Center your hands dirty TheSaid Springville Central 140 x 115. is a given, School, Board to has getting 5873 covered for theMeeting Arts always Route be held April 15, on, This application Ellicottville, headisto toe219, in paint is a good programs going filed for the pur2019 at the MansNew York. possibility.” and pose of obtaining a AND FURTHER field from TownApril Hall into June, The class began March programs will begin toSpecial Use Permit Eddyville, 7691 NOTICE IS 26 but throughGIVEN June pile in preparation for will allow thegoesHEREBY Toadup Hollow Road, which subject property to there Little Valley New 18. Note, willAnnual be no summer! that the be used as classes a multi April York Be- is always 23 orDistrict May 7. The14755. art gallery School vote fore submitting bidThisfamily residence. of 11 thesessions Ellicottville Take part in for open for visitors. At the above time proposals please Central School $77. spring, arts centerand is place, the contact the Town SuDistrict (“District”), The Songwriters including “The Collection Zoningofand Planpervisor Robert Cattaraugus is a nightNew of York Bruce datesBoard Showcase ning of the Keis forBlair.” details,Exhibit he County, Town of Otto mayfrom be reached bythrough will songwriters originals. are April 17 will be held on calling1.(716) 474meet and review This yearTuesday, featuresMay Lydia June 21, the special Herren use 5730. The Town 2019, from 1:00 pm and Nick Kody, Whether you have Board reserves the application. All into 8:00 pm in the Tamala (Porcelain little artistic or have terested parties will Fonda right to reject skill any or Elementary School and Robin Bacon no artistic skill at all, be given anTrain), oppor- JoeFoyer, all bids. as follows and the of printmaking could betunity a funto be (Meet heard. the Bacons) By Order of the for the purposes Trisha Priest, Town for Board Panfil Brothers (Mark and class you! electing two (2) Betty Jane Horning, Chris PanfiMembers l). of the Printmaking uses Otto Town Clerk Town Clerk Board The concert is of onEducation, April 13 linoleum block printing voting on at 7 p.m. Tickets arethe $15 at techniques. budget for the presale. You can work at your own the door, $12 2019-2020 fiscal “The Music pace to create one to two year,Man,” and directed bytransacting Don Wesley and color prints. If you already such other business music direction by Doris as is have experience, you can authorized by law: to the Arts use other techniques such as Jones, comes Polling 16 toPlace 19 and 24 reduction printing or pattern Center May Ellicottville Central to 26. printing. School – This is the “same Foyer The class is with Mary Elementary directing team ‘Annie,’ Anderson and limited to (5873asRoute 219, New and it was Ellicottville, a huge success,” eight people, 16 and older. Seth14731). Wochensky, All materials provided at the mentionedYork FURTHER Executive TAKE Director of the cost of $60/$52 member. NOTICE, that the Springvilleelection Center offormemthe The center always has Arts. “Thebers Music Man” tellsof things going on for the of the Board the story ofEducation Harold Hill, young ones. Spark! Is a shall“a be held to fillas two traveling salesman he(2) creativity program for positions on the cons the people of River kids aged 2 to 5 that meets Board. An election will be held on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 to fill the seats currently held by board members Mrs. Nicole Klein and Mr. Robert Van ASHFORD — A oneM. Pleace,Wicklin. 21, bothThe of two candidates vehicle accident was Delevan, were charged receiving the at reported at 8:06 p.m. April 11 p.m. April 6 with two of highest number votes will each 2 on Thornwood Drive. counts each of unlawful a five-year Michelle Y. Coombs, 58, of possessionserve of marijuana, term, beginning on West Valley, was identified violations.July Sullivan wasand 1, 2019 as the driver. No injuries also charged with operating expiring on June 30, 2024. were reported. an unregistered vehicle, an YORKSHIRE — Gerald infraction.Nominating They werepetieach tions are available R. Sullivan, 24, and Austin issued an appearance ticket. in the District Office, between the hours of 7:30 am - 4:00 pm (Monday-Friday) when school is in Published every Thursday by Bradford Publishing session. Co. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE, that all candidates for the office of Member of the Board of Education shall be nominated by petition. Each petition shall be directed to the Clerk of the District, shall

Legals

on the propositions, completed a Office of the Clerk adopted, to wit: year, and and on12-18, the election of the District transacting such RESOLVED: This April 2019 detailed statement in writing of the of Members of the other business as is between the hours proposition will of 7:30 am authorized by law: authorize the Board Board of Education. amount of money which Legals will be TAKE FURTHER Prevailing Time and of Education of the Polling Place required during the NOTICE that the 4:00 pm Prevailing Ellicottville Central Ellicottville Central Board of Education ensuing 2019-2020 Time and not later School – School District in fiscal year for of this District has than 5:00 pm on Elementary Foyer the County of school purposes, adopted Rules for Monday, April 22, (5873 Route 219, Cattaraugus, State specifying the the Use of Voting 2019. Ellicottville, New of New York, to several purposes Machines and the TAKE FURTHER levy an additional York 14731). and the amount for Submission of NOTICE, that (not to exceed) TAKE FURTHER ELLICOTTVILLE each. The amount Questions or voting on the $21,000 to lease 2 NOTICE, that the CENTRAL of each purpose budget and (two) 30 passenger Propositions to be election of memSCHOOL estimated necesPlaced Thereon. Trans Tech school bers of the Board of propositions shall DISTRICT sary for payments consist of voting on buses and $19,500 Printed copies for Education shall be NOTICE OF to boards of general distribution the following to lease 1 (one) IC ANNUAL SCHOOL held to fill two (2) cooperative in the District are propositions, and CE 66 passenger positions on the DISTRICT education services available at the ofon each of the oth2020 International PUBLIC HEARING Board. An election shall be set forth in fice of the District er propositions as School Bus for will be held on AND VOTE: full with no deducClerk. are authorized by each of the next Tuesday, May 21, NOTICE IS tion of estimated TAKE Legals FURTHER law and the rules of five years (five an2019 to fill the HEREBY GIVEN, Legals Legals Legals Legals state aid. Said NOTICE, that apnual payments) seats currently held this Board to be that a public statement will be plications for abvoted on at said commencing with by board members hearing for the available, upon sentee ballots for time: the 2019/2020 Mrs. Nicole Klein voters of the request, to taxpaythe Annual District PROPOSITION and Mr. Robert Van school year. Ellicottville Central ers within this Vote may be apNO. 1 - Basic Wicklin. The two PROPOSITION School District on District during the plied for during Budget candidates NO. 3 – Ellicotthe 2019-2020 hours of 7:30 am school business Shall the following receiving the tville Memorial budget and Prevailing Time to hours (7:30 am – resolution be adophighest number of Library Tax expenditure of 4:00 pm Prevailing 4:00 pm) at the ted, to wit: votes will each Shall the following funds will be held Time from Office of the Clerk RESOLVED that serve a five-year resolution be on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, to of the District the basic budget for adopted, to wit: term, beginning on May 14, 2019 May 14, 2019 the Ellicottville July 1, 2019 and Resolved: Shall the beginning April 23, commencing at exclusive of Sat2019. Complete Central School proposition be ap7:00 pm in the High expiring on June urdays, Sundays applications must District (the “Disproved authorizing School Cafeteria of 30, 2024. and holidays, in the be received by the trict”) for the fiscal Nominating petithe Board of Ellicottville Central Business Office of District Clerk at year commencing Education of the School, 5873 Route tions are available Ellicottville Central least seven (7) July 1, 2019, and in the District OfEllicottville Central 219, Ellicottville, School. days before the ending June 30, fice, between the School District to New York. election if the ballot By Order of the 2020, as presented levy taxes annually hours of AND FURTHER Board of Education is to be mailed to by the Board of 7:30 am - 4:00 pm in the amount of NOTICE IS Ellicottville Central Education, is (Monday-Friday) $32,042 and to pay the voter, or the HEREBY GIVEN day before the elec- School District that hereby approved when school is in over such monies that the Annual the District Clerk is tion, if the ballot is and adopted and to the trustees of School District vote session. hereby directed to to be delivered the required funds TAKE FURTHER the Ellicottville of the Ellicottville arrange for the use personally to the therefore are NOTICE, that all Memorial Library. Central School of voting machines voter. A list of all hereby candidates for the TAKE FURTHER District (“District”), for said Annual office of Member of appropriated and NOTICE, that a vot- persons to whom Cattaraugus School District absentee ballots the necessary real the Board of ing machine will be County, New York Vote. have been issued property taxes Education shall be used to record the will be held on BY ORDER OF required shall be nominated by vote on the budget, will be available in Tuesday, May 21, THE BOARD OF raised by a tax on on the propositions, the Office of the 2019, from 1:00 pm petition. Each EDUCATION District Clerk on the taxable petition shall be to 8:00 pm in the and on the election MELISSA each of the five of Members of the Elementary School directed to the Clerk property in the SAWICKI, Board of Education. business days of the District, shall District to be levied Foyer, as follows DISTRICT CLERK prior to the Annual and collected as TAKE FURTHER be signed by at for the purposes of District Vote, and required by law. NOTICE that the least 25 qualified electing two (2) PROPOSITION Board of Education such list will also be voters of the Members of the posted at the NO. 2 - School of this District has Board of Education, District, shall state Call polling places for Bus Lease adopted Rules for the residence of voting on the 372-3121 the Annual District Shall the following the Use of Voting each signer, and budget for the Vote. resolution be Machines and the shall be filed in the 2019-2020 fiscal adopted, to wit: Submission of Office of the Clerk year, and TAKE FURTHER RESOLVED: This Questions or of the District transacting such NOTICE, that the proposition will Propositions to be other business as is between the hours Board of Education authorize the Board Placed Thereon. of 7:30 am authorized by law: of this District will Printed copies for Prevailing Time and of Education of the Polling Place have prepared and Ellicottville Central general distribution 4:00 pm Prevailing Ellicottville Central to plaCe completed a School District in in the District are Time and not later School – detailed statement the County of available at the ofthan 5:00 pm on Elementary Foyer your in writing of the Cattaraugus, State fice of the District Monday, April 22, (5873 Route 219, amount of money of New York, to Clerk. 2019. Ellicottville, New Classified which will be levy an additional TAKE FURTHER TAKE FURTHER York 14731). required during the (not to exceed) NOTICE, that apNOTICE, that TAKE FURTHER ad ensuing 2019-2020 $21,000 to lease 2 voting on the NOTICE, that the plications for abfiscal year for (two) 30 passenger sentee ballots for budget and election of memschool purposes, Trans Tech school bers of the Board of propositions shall the Annual District specifying the consist of voting on buses and $19,500 Vote may be apEducation shall be several purposes to lease 1 (one) IC the following held to fill two (2) plied for during and the amount for CE 66 passenger propositions, and positions on the school business each. The amount 2020 International on each of the othBoard. An election hours (7:30 am – of each purpose School Bus for er propositions as will be held on 4:00 pm) at the estimated neceseach of the next are authorized by Office of the Clerk Tuesday, May 21, sary for payments of the District law and the rules of five years (five an2019 to fill the to boards of nual payments) beginning April 23, seats currently held this Board to be cooperative commencing with 2019. Complete voted on at said by board members education services the 2019/2020 applications must time: Mrs. Nicole Klein shall be set forth in school year. be received by the PROPOSITION and Mr. Robert Van full with no deducPROPOSITION District Clerk at NO. 1 - Basic Wicklin. The two tion of estimated NO. 3 – Ellicotleast seven (7) Budget candidates state aid. Said tville Memorial days before the Shall the following receiving the Library Tax election if the ballot statement will be resolution be adophighest number of available, upon Shall the following is to be mailed to ted, to wit: votes will each TheorTown accepting resumes request, to is taxpayresolution be the voter, the of Concord RESOLVED that serve a five-year within this Worker. day before the electhe basic budget for adopted, to wit: term, beginning on for aers Multitask District the hours for the Resolved: is the Ellicottville July 2019 and City,1,Iowa.” Arts will be hosting Shall their the tion, if the Theballot position wouldduring include hours of 7:30 am proposition be apto be delivered Central School expiring on June Wochensky exclaims annual Gala. The Gala Concord Site, office work on a Prevailing Time to proved authorizing personally to the Nutrition District (the “Dis30, 2024. that, “It's gonna music, 4:00 pmthat Prevailing Boardmini of golf, voter. A list ofand all a person trict”) for theconsists fiscal ofthe Nominating peti- be really computer enjoys working with successful, so we encourage basket rafflEducation e and, ofofcourse, Time from the persons to whom year commencing tions are available the older generation. position is 19 hours April 30,The 2019, to Ellicottville Central absentee ballots July 1, 2019,food! and in the District people to getOftickets in May 14, 2019 School District to have been issued ending June 30, fice, between the advance.” It is a nice evening under exclusive Sat- Supervisor’s office, taxes annually 2020, hours will be available Please send in resumes to theofTown Mayof 16 is Pay What Youas presented the stars tolevy listen to music Sundays in the amount of by the Board of 7:30 am - 4:00 pm the Office of the P.O. Box 368,urdays, Springville, New York 14141. Can with a Can. and enjoy the company of and holidays, in the $32,042 and to pay District Clerk on Education, is (Monday-Friday) Resumes must be received by April 22, 2019. Shows are May 16 to 18, friends. Business Office of over such monies hereby approved when school is in each of the five 24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m. and “Gala tickets on sale Ellicottville Central to the are trustees of and adopted and session. business days School. the Ellicottville If you have any questions, please the requirednow,” funds Wochensky TAKE FURTHER prior to the Annual May 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. said. By Order at of the Memorial Library. therefore are A $30 ticket NOTICE, that$15 all general, District Vote, andCall Eleanor Tickets are includes 592-2764. FURTHER hereby candidates thesenior, such list will also be Board of Education $12 studentforand $10 mini-golf,TAKE food and drink. Ellicottville Central NOTICE, that a vot- posted at the office of Member of appropriated and group of 15-plus. Kids 21machine are free.will Call School District that be the necessary realundering the Board of polling places for Comingshall soon SCA taxes 592-9038 used for tickets. the District Clerk is to record the Education beto theproperty the Annual District is Opera Lytes. The center “now hereby directed to voteison the budget, Vote. required shall be nominated by arrange for the use on thethe propositions, raised by a tax on petition. Eachlike regular It is “not partnering with Village of voting machines and on the taxable of Springville petition be opera,”shall Wochensky said. andthe theelection Town TAKE FURTHER for said Annual of Members of the the NOTICE, that the property in the directed to thestages Clerk the Opera Lytes of Concord” to provide Board of Education. Board of Education School District of the District, shall District to be levied works of Gilbert and free Summer Concert series. Vote. TAKE FURTHER of this District will and collected as be signed by at Sullivan. They bring required light by law.There will be different NOTICE that the have prepared and BY ORDER OF least 25 qualified opera of andthemusical theater to styles of music possibly completed a THE BOARD OF Boardand of Education PROPOSITION voters EDUCATION of this detailed statement NO. 2 - School District, shall state stages across Western New some of our localDistrict food has MELISSA adopted Rules in writing of the the residence York. Detailsofwill follow.Bus Lease trucks, Wochensky said. for SAWICKI, the Use to of “expand Voting amount of money Shall the following each signer, and theater The Children's They are looking DISTRICT CLERK Machines and the which will be resolution be shall be filed in the interns who are responsible their audience” and are Submission of required during the adopted, to wit: Office of the Clerk forthe running moving or the Questions ensuing 2019-2020 RESOLVED:considering This of Districtthe summer programs, be arriving concerts toPropositions Heritage Park. to be fiscal year for proposition will between thewill hours Thereon. school purposes, authorize the Board of in 7:30 May.am There isPlaced so much Printed copies for specifying the of Educationhappening of the Prevailing Timewe and “This year are hoping at the Springville general distribution several purposes Ellicottville Central 4:00 pma Prevailing to add music education Center for the Arts in the in the District are School District in Time and not later and the amount for intern,” added. next couple months,atso available the ofthe County of than 5:00Wochensky pm on each. The amount The “Signups to get those of the District Statesurefice Monday, April 22, will Cattaraugus,make of each purpose be online for summerof New York,tickets andClerk. enjoy the to 2019. estimated necesFURTHER levy an additional TAKE FURTHER sary for payments programs, by mid-April.” upcomingTAKE performances! NOTICE, that ap(not to exceed) NOTICE, to boards of Summer that Programs are plications for abvoting on the at http://$21,000 to lease 2 cooperative listed online (two) 30 passenger sentee ballots for budget and education services springvillearts.org/sca/ the Annual District Trans Tech school propositions shall shall be set forth in On June 15 from consist of voting on buses and $19,500 Vote may be apfull with no deduc6:30following p.m. to 9 p.m., the plied for during to lease 1 (one) IC the tion of estimated school business propositions, and state aid. Said Springville Center forCE the66 passenger hours (7:30 am – on each of the othstatement will be 2020 International 4:00 pm) at the available, upon School Bus for er propositions as Office of the Clerk request, to taxpayeach of the next are authorized by of the District ers within this law and the rules of five years (five anbeginning April 23, District during the nual payments) this Board to be 2019. Complete hours of 7:30 am commencing with voted on at said applications must Prevailing Time to the 2019/2020 time: be received by the 4:00 pm Prevailing school year. PROPOSITION District Clerk at Time from NO. 1 - Basic SALAMANCA — PROPOSITION Morgan Bonn least seven (7) April 30, 2019, to NO. 3 – EllicotBudget Stephen A. Steiner, 24, of Promotions days before the Director May 14, 2019 tville Memorial Shall the following Chaffee, was charged at 8:45 election if the ballot exclusive of SatLibrary Tax resolution be adopis to be mailed to p.m.toSunday with driving urdays, Sundays Shall the following ted, wit: the voter, or the and holidays, in the be RESOLVED while abilitythat impairedresolution by day before the elec- Business Office of the basic budget for adopted, to wit: alcohol and equipment tion, if the ballot is Ellicottville Central Resolved: Shall the the Ellicottville violation, both infractions. to be delivered proposition be apCentral School School. personally to the proved authorizing District “Dis- to a third By Order of the He was(the released voter. A list of all the Board of trict”) Board of Education party.for the fiscal persons to whom Education of the year commencing Ellicottville Central absentee ballots Ellicottville Central July 1, 2019, and School District that have been issued School District to ending June 30, the District Clerk is will be available in levy taxes annually 2020,Publisher as presentedJim hereby directed to Bonn the Office of the in the amount of by the Board of arrange for the use District Clerk on $32,042 and Jennie to pay Acklin Education, is of voting machines Advertising Manager each of the five over such monies hereby approved for said Annual business to the trustees of and adopted and School District Promotions Director Morgan Bonn days prior to the Annual the Ellicottville the required funds Vote. District Vote, and therefore are BY ORDER OF Library. Memorial Managing Editor Kellen M. Quigley such list will also be THE BOARD OF hereby TAKE FURTHER Graphics Johnson, Kelsey Mader posted at the appropriated EDUCATION NOTICE, that a votand Aubrie polling places for MELISSA ing machine will be the necessary real Writers Croft, DebtheEverts, the Annual District SAWICKI, used to record property taxes Caitlin DISTRICT CLERK vote on the budget, Vote. required shall be Jolene Hawkins, Rick Miller, on the propositions, raised by a tax on and on the election TAKE FURTHER the taxable All content © 2019 Springville Times Contributors Dickinson NOTICE, that the ofJaime Members of the property in the Board of Education. Board of Education District to be levied

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April 12-18, 2019

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716.592.9533 137 EATON ST. SPRINGVILLE, NY

CONCORD LAND REALTY

Helen Brogan 716-864-6371 David Brogan 716-592-4009 Dennis Sibley 716-498-6332 Rick Brownwell 716-864-0414 www.concord landrealty.com

Horoscopes

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ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Curiosity is a useful tool, Aries. Keep a handle on it this week. Do not go delving into situations that do not involve you, or you could end up in trouble. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, if a certain person’s boastfulness is causing concern, you may need to speak up or simply avoid that person for the time being. He or she may just be blowing off steam. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, save yourself a lot of frustration and accept the way things are right now. Focus on the positives in your life and count your many blessings. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 The universe has an important lesson to teach you, Cancer. It involves giving up a little bit of control so you can benefit in unknown ways. This is challenging, but worth it. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, think twice before you commit to any projects or confirm appointments with others. You have to have all of the details worked out in advance before you can proceed. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, if relationship issues are confusing you, it might be the right time to distance yourself and go it alone for a little while. This will help you get your bearings.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Reach out to your to friends this week and ask them for advice on your current situation, Libra. They know you well enough and may have some important insight. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio your creativity is easily channeled this week and you are bound to surround yourself with others who are eager to brainstorm ideas. This can prove beneficial. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 You have set goals and your feet are firmly planted on the ground. These are assets that will serve you well, and others will soon look to you for inspiration. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Try a different approach if you want to see results, Capricorn. Doing the same thing over and over again hasn’t worked for you thus far as it pertains to your relationship. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Take the scenic route if you are going on a trip, Aquarius. Getting sidetracked is the goal this time around, and you can wander off to parts unknown. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Support a friend who needs a strong shoulder to lean on, Pisces. This person isn’t likely to ask for help, so reach out.

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April 12-18, 2019

How to protect your yard from deer

With more than 60 different species of deer worldwide, there’s a good chance individuals will have some sort of interaction with these majestic animals at one point during their lifetimes. Deer, which live on all continents except Antarctica, can survive in everything from mountainous areas to wet rainforests to suburban neighborhoods. These herbivores are voracious eaters that will search far and wide for their meals. Home landscapes tend to be easy pickings for foraging deer. Many people are excited to see deer in their neighborhoods and yards because they can be such graceful creatures to behold. However, once deer start to munch on ornamental trees, annuals and flowering shrubs, the novelty of these animals may wear off. Furthermore, deer also can be covered in ticks that spread illnesses like Lyme disease. Here are some tips to keep deer at bay. • Avoid tasty morsels. Deer

like English ivy, lettuces, impatiens, pansies, and hostas. Fruit trees also are targets. Choose other plants to grow, and wait until after early spring, when deer aren’t as concerned with regaining weight lost during the

winter, to get them in the ground. • Use fishing line to deter deer. Put a few stakes in the ground and then run fishing line at a height of about three feet. Deer can sense movement but do not have keen vision. As the deer

Potential culprits behind thinning grass

Thick grass is often a hallmark of a healthy lawn. If grass begins to thin, homeowners may feel as though all the time and effort they spent tending to their lawns was for naught. Thinning grass can be caused by any number of things. And while it might take a little effort to address, thinning grass can be treated if homeowners correctly identify that cause of the problem.

Leaf spot The Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst notes that leaf spot diseases affect both cool- and warm-season turfgrasses. Various fungi can cause leaf spot. Symptoms and the timing of the appearance of leaf spot will vary depending on which fungi is causing the problem. For example, bipolaris sorokiniana, which affects grasses in warm, wet summer months, produces small spots that are dark purple to black. Dreschslera poae is another fungi that causes leaf spot, and it also produces dark purple to black spots. However, it tends to appear in the spring when the weather is cool and moist. Understanding the different fungi and when they typically strike can help homeowners identify what is causing their grass

to thin. In such situations, professional landscapers can be invaluable resources as well.

Stripe smut The University of Maryland Extension notes that stripe smut primarily poses a threat to Kentucky bluegrass that is older than three years. Pale green streaks that run parallel to the veins in the leaves and leaf sheaths are symptomatic of stripe smut, which tends to be noticed in spring and fall, when weather is cool. As the disease progresses, stripes turn black or a silvery gray, causing the leaf blade to shred and curl. After the blades have shred, they turn brown and die. The grass thins because stripe smut makes it vulnerable to problems like drought. Ascochyta leaf blight Lawns suffering from ascochyta leaf blight will become straw-colored. According to the lawn care and pesticide experts at Ortho®, when a lawn is affected by ascochyta leaf blight, its healthy grass blades will be mixed in with diseased grass blades. Most prevalent in the spring, this disease can affect grass at any time during the growing season. That’s because the ascochyta fungi invade leaf blades through wounds, such as those that can result

from mowing. Ortho® notes that dull lawn mowers can contribute to the disease, which might disappear on its own and can even return after it’s seemingly been cured. Various issues can cause grass blades to thin. Working with a landscape professional is a great way to combat such issues before they compromise the look of a lawn.

planting lavender and marigolds, which emit strong aromas. Deer will be reluctant to walk through because the smell can interfere with their ability to find food and assess their environment via their sense of smell. • Stock up on soap. The tallow in soap helps keep deer away, according to the University of Vermont Extension Department of Plant and Soil Science. Scented soaps like Irish Spring may be especially good at warding off deer. • Plant in levels. Raised beds and sunken gardens can discourage deer from coming into the yard because they aren’t avid climbers, offers the home and garden resource This Old House. • Employ harmless scare tactics. Deer are skittish, and any unfamiliar movement or sound may scare them away. Cans hung from strings, sundials and lights can keep them at bay. Deer will seek out an easy meal, but homeowners can take steps to safeguard their trees, flowers and shrubs.

approach your garden, they’ll brush against the “invisible” fishing line and then get spooked off. • Plant plants that produce strong aromas. The experts at Good Housekeeping suggest

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www.SpringvilleTimes.com

Page 11

Things to consider before building a greenhouse

Avid gardeners may be enticed by the idea of a greenhouse that allows them to explore their passion for plants year-round. While it’s true that greenhouses afford this luxury, there are important things to consider before erecting a greenhouse in your yard. Greenhouses require ample time to maintain. Greenhouses are not self-managing; they require heat, water, venting, electricity, and maintenance on the part of gardeners. Individuals need to determine how much time they have to devote to a greenhouse and then consider their options. Start by choosing the size of the greenhouse. Many experts, like those at the home and garden information site The Spruce, suggest getting the largest one you can afford and fit into the yard. It is much easier to fill a large greenhouse than try to expand on a small one later on. Next, consider whether you want to build the greenhouse from scratch or utilize a prefabricated kit that can make easier work of the job. Kits typically contain all of the materials needed, and are easiest for someone who is a

construction novice. Look for “grower greenhouses,” which are all-purpose options with adjustable shelving and space for growing plants full-term. The next step is deciding

where the greenhouse will be located. The goal is to have a consistent amount of sunlight year-round. A south-facing locale is ideal, and structures should remain north of the

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How color can affect your garden

Flower gardens can add color and awe-inspiring appeal to a property. The National Gardening Association notes that gardeners can find nearly every color of the spectrum in flowering perennials. So whether you prefer soft pink, are partial to bright red or want to relax in a garden and gaze at something deep blue, chances are you'll find a perennial to tickle your fancy. The NGA offers the following breakdown of colors to help gardeners learn how their gardens can set the mood they're looking for. Bright colors A garden full of bright colors like red, orange, magenta, and yellow can provide a landscape with vigor and energy. The NGA notes that brightly colored flowers can withstand especially bright sunshine, meaning gardeners can marvel at their

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of the sun during all seasons before choosing a location. Doing so ensures that the sun is not obscured in the winter or fall. Select a spot that also has ample drainage, as you will not want water pooling up along the sides of or underneath the greenhouse. Raise the greenhouse on footings to alleviate flooding concerns. Consult with a gardening or agriculture expert about the best way to heat the greenhouse. Options abound with electric-, gas- and propane-powered heating sources. Some systems will require venting. You also will need to know what is available and legal in your area. Check to see if you need a building permit for the greenhouse and any accompanying heating elements. Once the greenhouse is situated, you can begin to add other items, like benches, additional shelving, hooks for tools, and even an automated watering or misting system. Greenhouses take commitment, but the reward is the chance to enjoy gardening all year long.

appearance even when the sun might be adversely affecting other plants and flowers. Pastel colors Pastels, which include soft pink, powder blue, lavender, and peach, create a tranquil feeling in a garden. This makes pastel perfect for those who want their gardens to be a relaxing, peaceful respite from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The NGA notes that pastels may looked washed out in the midday sun, so they might be best enjoyed early in the morning or late in the afternoon.

Complementary colors Complementary colors are those that are opposite one another on the color wheel. Orange and blue are examples of complementary colors. According to the NGA, complementary colors can add creative energy and vitality to

a garden.

Harmonious colors These colors are those that are next to each other on the color wheel, such as orange and red. The NGA recommends harmonious colors for gardeners looking to create a unifying feel in their gardens without resorting to a monochromatic color scheme. Harmonious colors give off a gentle feeling that can make for a relaxing garden atmosphere. Monochromatic colors Monochromatic gardens can be awe-inspiring even though they stick to a single color and don't provide an array of awe-inspiring colors. The NGA notes that gardeners with monochromatic gardens make them interesting by using plants of various sizes and shapes.

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Page 12

www.SpringvilleTimes.com

Rafting on a sunny day

April 12-18, 2019

Photos by Rick Miller Sunny, warm weather and whitewater rafting mixed on Cattaraugus Creek as guests and guides from Zoar Valley Rafting & Canoe Co. tested whitewater rapids near Gowanda on Saturday.

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2013 CHEROLET TAHOE LT2 4X4

P6471, PEARL WHITE, ABSOLUTELY STUNNING WITH 5.3 V-8, POWER MOONROOF, 6 SPEED, AUTO, HEATED DUAL POWER SEATS W/ CONTROL CONSOLE, TILT, CRUISE, PREMIUM SOUND AM/FM, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, TRAILER TOW, 78,000 PAMPERED MILES, 22” CHROME WHEELS.

P6271A, EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, POWER SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, SUPER SHARP!

COLORADO Z/71

P6468, CREW CAB, DURAMAX DIESEL 4X4 SHORTBED, AUTO 6 SPEED H.D., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. HEATED LEATHER, 20,000 MILES.

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P6370, “HIGH ALTITUDE” EDITION, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. HEATED LEATHER SEATS, P. MOONROOF, A/WHEELS & MORE! 28,000 MILES, SHOWROOM PERFECT!

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P6431, 4 DOOR, SHORTBED, AUTO, 6 SPEED, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/ FM STEREO, CD, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, TRAILER TOW & MORE! 33,000 MILES, SUPER SHARP! HURRY ON THIS ONE!

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2003 DODGE RAM EXT. CAB 4X4

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SE 4 DOOR BIG 2.5

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2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO Z-71

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P6432, I PREMIUM PLUS AWD, BIG EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, P. SKYROOF, PW, PL, P. SEATS, REMOTE START, FOG LAMPS, 40,000 MILES, SHOWROOM PERFECT!

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P6464, EFI 4 CYL., AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, A. WHEELS, 42,000 MILES, VERY WELL KEPT.

TU065A, EFI 4 CYL., 6 SPD., AUTO, 186K, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, LADY OWNED AND HIGHWAY DRIVEN! NEW INSPECTION & READY TO GO!

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2017 FORD FUSION SE HYBRID

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2017 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE AWD

2004 DODGE RAM CREW CAB

5,995

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P6461 AWD, EFI 4 CYL., 6 SPEED, AUTO, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, ONSTAR, XM SATELLITE, P. HEATED LEATHER, PW, PL, PEARL WHITE, SUPER SHARP!

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P6465, V-6, AUTO, OD, 7 PASS., DUAL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, 40,000 MILES, STEEL GRAY WITH BLACK & POLISHED WHEELS, THE SHARPEST WE’VE SEEN!

Z-17 DOUBLE CAB

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2014 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 4 DR.

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WAS

“PRICED SILVERADO LT Z-71

PIC, 4X4 SHORTBED, DOUBLE CAB, 5.3 V-8, AUTO, 6 SPD., CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, TRAILER TOW, PW, PL, P. SEATS, TRAILER TOW, 18” WHEELS, 40,000 MILES.

2002 CHEVROLET H.D. 3/4 TON 4X4

SILVERADO, EXT CAB, SHORTBED, 6.0 V-8, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, A. WHEELS, TRAILER TOW & MORE!, 100K, NEW INSPECTION.

2017 FORD ESCAPE AWD SE PLUS P6473, ECOBOOST, 4 CYL., TURBO, AUTO, OD, CLIMATE CONTROL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM STEREO, CD, PW, PL, P. SEATS, ALUM. WHEELS, 47K, EXTREMELY CLEAN & VERY SHARP!

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