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jan/feb 2018

AN INTERVIEW WITH

STEFANO BOERI ARCHITETTI

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NEWS 04 AGENDA

What is the biggest problem currently facing tree officers?

06 NEWS

A roundup of industry news

10 11 12

GRISTWOOD AND TOMS

Championing a new international accreditation scheme

NANOBIONIC TREES

Have MIT engineers created an environmentally-friendly light source?

NORTHERN FOREST

Government announces plans for a new 50m-tree Northern Forest

FEATURES 15

AN INTERVIEW WITH

18

HACKNEY TREECYCLE

22

FEMALES IN ARB

27

Stefano Boeri Architetti

Thomas Campbell tells us about his innovative, cost-cutting idea Closing the gender gap

URBAN TREE STUDY

We take a look at the research showing that urban trees grow faster than rural

30 OPINION

Rob McBride looks ahead at what the tree world can expect from 2018

31

PPE REGULATION

33

SURESET TREE PITS

35

BOOK REVIEW

36

Paul George advises on changes to PPE regulation in 2018

The benefits of resin bound tree pits London’s Street Trees: A Field Guide to the Urban Environment by Paul Wood

GROWING TOGETHER

Jonathan Hazell discusses the fractured state of the arb industry

37

TOP 10 TIPS

38

PESTS AND DISEASES

Tree planting

Tackling aphids

KIT

40 CHIPPERS

The rise of personalised chippers, plus latest models

42 ARB KIT All the latest kit

44 PRODUCT DNA Husqvarna 572XP

46 TOOLBOX

Upton Tree Services

REGULARS

48 ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

The Gillwell Oak, Chingford, London

CONTENTS

WELCOME JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 • VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 01

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elcome to the January/February issue of Pro Arb. The biggest news this month is the government’s plans for the Northern Forest, with 50m trees to be planted over the course of 25 years, in a belt stretching from Liverpool to Hull. The plan aims to bring a host o benefits to the area, such as helping to prevent ooding, absorbing pollution, and providing habitats for local wildlife. Some people have pointed out that, although this is very good news, it could distract from some of the more negative issues affecting the s orests o take stock o the industry’s opinion, we’ll be asking the question: “Do you think the Northern Forest is a worthy investment?” for our agenda question next month. This month, we spoke to two people from two different sectors, both o whom are bringing trees into cities. First up is Stefano Boeri, creator of the Vertical Forest concept, who spoke to us about the buildings he has designed around the world, which feature façades of trees and plants that help to alleviate carbon emissions (pages 15-

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Features Editor – Ashley Lampard ashley.lampard@eljays44.com Production Editor – Charlie Cook charlotte.cook@eljays44.com Subeditor – Kate Bennett kate.bennett@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Deputy Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com Account Manager – Natalie Ross natalie.ross@eljays44.com Horticulture Careers – Laura Harris laura.harris@eljays44.com

As principal tree o cer at ackne ouncil, meanwhile, Thomas Campbell is responsible for planting and maintaining trees in his local borough; we talk to him about his clever ‘treecycle’ concept on pages 18-20. As the issue of urban trees moves into the public eye, researchers are also paying close attention: the Technical University of Munich has shown that, worldwide, trees in urban areas have been growing faster than rural trees since the Sixties page tudies such as this re ect the changing relationships between trees and our growing urban environment, which I’m sure will become more essential going forward. Until next month,

ASHLEY LAMPARD

PRODUCTION Design – Mandy Armstrong Printed by Pensord Press Ltd Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: emily.maltby@eljays44.com Pro Arb is published 9 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Ashley Lampard at ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson

49 MEET THE SUPPLIER Arbortech

51

LITTLE INTERVIEW

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

AGENDA

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM CURRENTLY FACING TREE OFFICERS?

THOMAS CAMPBELL

JOHN PARKER

ANDY LEDERER

Tree officer, London Borough of Hackney Council

Chair, London Tree Officers Association (LTOA)

Development director, Institute of Chartered Foresters

“Trees are often the last thing people consider – they’re the add-on at the end of the development”

“Tree officers and managers are multi-skilled professionals doing an amazing job under considerable pressure”

“Tree officers have long been an undervalued or unknown service within some local authorities”

There’s a top-down shortage of resources, starting with central government and felt throughout local authorities. It varies between boroughs and councils, but I think that, across the board, trees are often the last thing people consider – they’re the add-on at the end of the development. They’re always at the back of the queue when you suddenly have less resources, which is making the situation ver di cult Urban environments are stressful to people because buildings are unnatural structures – it takes longer for your brain to process buildings than to process trees, which humans have evolved with and naturally recognise. This is why being in nature is more relaxing – your brain isn’t working so hard. Because of this, humans don’t really notice trees, so tree o cers have to argue more or them – as opposed to listing the benefits o a street light or a bollard, which are much more tangible. It’s one of those things that makes our job harder, which is a shame.

The biggest problem currently facing tree o cers is the same problem that the have been facing for the last decade – austerity politics and the associated loss of funding. ut simpl , ewer tree o cers are now having to deliver more work, with fewer resources than they had 10 years ago. Politicians and the general public are increasingly recognising the importance of trees, but seemingly failing to understand the fact that these trees need the right care from the right professionals. It is all very well and good to commit to planting thousands – or even millions – of new trees, but without good management from properly supported, properl resourced tree o cers and managers, these trees will never reach their full potential in terms of ecosystem services delivered ree o cers and managers are multi-skilled professionals doing an amazing job under considerable pressure, and they should start getting the recognition and support that they deserve.

rees offer so man health and wellbeing benefits to communities, and they need to be looked after by knowledgeable individuals. Trees aren’t like other aspects of infrastructure that can be chopped and changed – they take years to establish ree o cers have long been an undervalued or unknown service within some local authorities. They need to be recognised as professionals that contribute to informed decision-making. Cuts to services have impacted on some tree management budgets and, in turn, limited some tree o cer roles within certain local authorities. This is not helped by the lack of support from central government on the value of maintaining and enhancing the UK’s urban tree stock. A continued reduction of funding will impact not only the current tree stock, but also the future of the UK’s urban forest. In that regard, more investment needs to be provided at central and local government levels to support tree o cers in undertaking their work, so that they can create and preserve healthier and more attractive environments for generations to come.

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

SHARON HOSEGOOD

Managing director, Sharon Hosegood Associates

“We all have a responsibility to highlight the important role of tree officers in local authorities” he problems acing tree o cers are mani old he primar problem is the lack o unding, which affects the number o tree o cer posts within an authorit , or results in posts being cut altogether ome o cers have lost

their administration others have to cover or neighbouring authorities ow can this be good or morale, and good or trees n a ew local authorities, the role o the tree o cer is not ull understood or recognised t is rustrating, to sa the least, i an o cer s recommendations are overruled, or not sought at all ree o cers in some authorities are asked to comment on areas outside o their pro essional e pertise as other posts are cut hese pressures could affect morale and productivit hat see is a movement towards collaboration and communication e all have a responsibility to highlight the important role of tree o cers in local authorities

NEXT MONTH: DO YOU THINK THE NORTHERN FOREST IS A WORTHWHILE INVESTMENT?

the biggest problem currently facing tree officers is the same problem that they have been facing for the last decade – austerity politics

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

NEWSBEAT

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

NEW RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY KING’S COLLEGE LONDON SUGGESTS TREES, THE SKY AND BIRDSONG IN CITIES ARE BENEFICIAL FOR MENTAL WELLBEING

A study conducted by King’s College London, landscape architect J & L Gibbons and art foundation Nomad Projects has found links between higher levels of mental wellbeing and nature in cities. ‘Urban Mind: Using Smartphone Technologies to Investigate the impact of Nature on Mental Wellbeing in Real Time’ used the smartphone app Urban Mind to examine how exposure to natural features in cities affects a person s mental wellbeing The app monitored 108 individuals, who collectively conducted a total of 3,013 assessments over a single week. The assessments required the participants to answer questions about their current environment and mental wellbeing. The app then used GPS-based geotagging to monitor their locations. Results showed significant increases in participants mental wellbeing when they were exposed to natural features such as trees, sky and

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STEFANO BOERI ARCHITETTI ANNOUNCES FIRST VERTICAL FOREST SOCIAL HOUSING PROJECT

birdsong – sometimes lasting for several hours after exposure. It also revealed that the impact was greater in people with a higher risk of mental health issues. Johanna Gibbons and Neil Davidson, landscape architects at J & L Gibbons, said: “Decisions on urban planning and design aimed at improving mental health tend to be based on ‘conventional wisdom’, due to the lack o robust scientific data ur findings provide an evidence base or the benefits o nature within urban centres. We hope the results will inform future investments and policies, helping build heathier cities.” Michael Smythe, an artist and actionbased researcher at Nomad Projects, commented: “This study demonstrates the value of academic and non-academic researchers coming together to carry out cross-disciplinary work with tangible realworld implications.” www.urbanmind.info

Italian architect Stefano Boeri has announced that it will construct a new Vertical Forest in the Netherlands, following its previous projects in Milan, Nanjing, Utrecht, Tirana, Lausanne and Paris. he rudo Vertical orest will be the first Vertical Forest adopted by a social housing project, designed for use by low-income social groups – particularly oung, urban people ts oors will house affordable apartments, graced b balconies that will host 125 trees and 5,200 shrubs and plants. This will create an authentic eco-system with more than 70 plant species that can help counteract atmospheric pollution in the metropolitan environment. Stefano Boeri comments: “Urban forestry is not only necessary to improve the environment of the world’s cities, but is also an opportunity to improve the living conditions of less fortunate city dwellers.” “The Trudo Vertical Forest sets new living standards,” says Francesca Cesa Bianchi, project director. “Each apartment will have a surface area o under square metres and the benefit o one tree, 20 shrubs and more than four square metres of terrace. Thanks to prefabrication, the rationalisation of technical solutions for the facade, and the optimisation o resources, this will be the first Vertical Forest prototype destined for social housing.” www.stefanoboeriarchitetti.net

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED FORESTERS BREAKS MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS AND AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE RECORDS Michael Cresswell of NRW

A record number of applicants were promoted to Professional Member status of the Institute for Chartered Forested in 2017, with 43 applicants awarded chartered status. Natural Resource Wales (NRW) demonstrated an exceptional professional standard this year, with six members of the team awarded charter status – including four outstanding applicants who were given Awards for Excellence.

BARCHAM TREES PLANS FOR ARBORETUM AND VISITOR CENTRE GIVEN GREEN LIGHT BY COUNCIL PLANNING COMMITTEE

Barcham Trees has been given the go-ahead by East Cambridgeshire District Council Planning Committee for the development of an arboretum, lake, visitor centre, restaurant and shopping area on part of its 300-acre site between Ely and Soham. The company, which is the largest container tree nursery in Europe, had support from a range of interests, including ast ambridgeshire s tourism o ce and oham own ouncil The focus of the 17-acre development will be a 12-acre arboretum. “It will be aesthetically pleasing, educational, practical and a showcase for both our trade and private customers, sa s managing director ike lover ur knowledgeable staff will be on hand to share their expertise with visitors,” he says. The site will also include a lake, visitor centre, restaurant, conference centre, plant centre, shopping area and car parking. The nursery’s arboricultural director and Arboricultural Association chairman, Keith Sacre, emphasises that the development will demonstrate best practice from its beginning through to completion. “More people than ever appreciate the benefits trees provide or health and the environment, and we are determined the arboretum will be a beacon of sustainability,” he comments. www.barcham.co.uk

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Neil Stoddart MICFor, operational resource manager for NRW, commented: “We really value and respect the professionalism of our staff, and this achievement is recognition o their hard work and willingness to improve. “Last year we had a record number of entries for professional membership, and were the fourth largest contributor to professional membership with the ICF in the UK. We encourage this kind of professional improvement, so this is a great result for the organisation and also for professional forestry as a whole in Wales.” www.charteredforesters.org

REFUGEES AND ASYLUM SEEKERS HELP PLANT 700 TREES IN YORKSHIRE DALES Young saplings have been planted in a new area of woodland near Settle, with the help of refugees and asylum seekers from Darwen Asylum Seekers and e ugee nterprise are and staff rom service company Serco. The initiative was organised by the Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust (YDMT) charity. Refugees from Iraq, Somalia, Afghanistan, Ethiopia and Nigeria planted native species including oak, holly, hawthorn, bird cherry and crab apple. ore than people have benefited rom the partnership so far. “I am happy to be out today; normally I am always inside at home,” said current Dare user Habib Muhamed, who is from Somalia. “It is good to be doing something. I am so happy to be helping the environment by planting the trees.” Dare cofounder John East recently received a YDMT champion award as part of the trust’s 20th anniversary celebrations, which saw the charity give out 20 awards to recognise the contributions of the groups, organisations and individuals whose work helps to sustain and celebrate the Yorkshire Dales. Judy Rogers, community worker at YDMT, nominated John for the champion award. She said: ohn was one o the first people worked with to bring a group to the Dales through our education and outreach programme.” John said that the award will help to support future Dare clients and provide support at a local level. www.ydmt.org

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VICAR PROTESTS POISONED TREE REMOVAL, ACCUSING RESIDENTS OF VANDALISM The Reverend Chris Colledge has resigned as chair o the est liff Residents Association to protest the removal of two poisoned trees – the latest development in a story of tree sabotage in West liff, ournemouth ev olledge believes that, by taking down the trees, the community would be playing into the culprit’s hands. In July 2016, the saboteur killed three 30ft-tall Scots pines on West

liff reen, a beaut spot between the cliff top in ournemouth and several blocks o lu ur ats Holes were drilled into the trunks and filled with herbicide n an act o defiance, it was decided to keep the poisoned trees in place and plant six saplings next to them, with wire fencing erected around the young trees for protection. However, the attacker returned in July 2017,

taking a knife to the saplings; more recently, one of them was snapped in two. It is believed the attacker wants to enhance their views o oole a rom the lu ur ats espite a police and local council investigation, their identity remains unknown. “We now have an unsightly and ineffective ence strung with o cious signs and surrounding unkempt undergrowth,” said

resident Malcolm Coe. “I have canvassed the residents of the three blocks which face this shabby mess daily and received many comments. All are fully supportive of removing the signs, the fence and the scrub.” Rev. Colledge said: “The residents feel that I should be supporting them in respect of the removal of the fence and the trees. he don t have confidence in m chairmanship and my position has become untenable.” www.bournemouthecho.co.uk

NEW RESEARCH PROVIDES UNPRECEDENTED INSIGHTS INTO OAK-BORING BEETLE

ROYAL FORESTRY SOCIETY URGES POST-BREXIT INCENTIVES TO BE EXTENDED TO EXISTING WOODLANDS

The native oak-boring beetle, Agrilus biguttatus, has been collected and bred by researchers at Forest Research and Harper Adams university. These beetles appear to be connected to the decline in health of oak trees across Europe, but it is unknown whether they are the cause of Acute ak ecline, or ust attracted to trees that are suffering rom bacterial infections. The research was funded by DEFRA to improve understanding of UK distribution b stud ing the beetle s li ec cle he findings o the stud , published in the Agricultural and Forest Entomology journal, suggest that current mean summer temperatures limit the beetle’s UK distribution to the warmer parts of the country. The beetle depends on warm, sunny days, with temperatures above 15ºC, to mate and for its eggs to mature and hatch. The research also suggests that, before pupation, the beetle requires a resting period at winter temperatures. “The way in which lower temperatures restrict the beetles’ distribution provides new clarity over its ecology, including its association with Acute Oak Decline,” said PhD researcher Katy Reed. “Only a third of trees showing Acute Oak Decline symptoms exhibit the adult exit holes of Agrilus biguttatus, despite evidence of the larvae being found within the trees. In these instances, development of the beetle may have been inhibited by temperatures too cool for successful breeding of the beetle, although host tree defences also play an important role in reducing the survival rate of the larvae.” www.forestry.gov.uk

The Royal Forestry Society (RFS) has welcomed Environment Secretary Michael Gove’s plans to incentivise farmers who enhance the natural environment, including planting trees, post- re it – though it warns that incentives must include bringing existing woods back into management. The RFS also welcomes plans for a £2bn Northern Forest. “Mr Gove’s announcements are in line with recommendations by the EFRA Forestry in England Inquiry to increase the rate of woodland creation and to simplify grants and incentives,” said RFS chief executive Simon Lloyd. “However, 42% of woodland in England is unmanaged. That represents a vast resource for timber and timber products, as well as environmental services, that is simpl not benefitting the economy. We would urge him to ensure that incentives for the good management of existing woodlands are incorporated. “Along with increasing woodland creation comes a need for greater investment in the forestry supply chain and an emphasis on more research into tree diseases and pests, to ensure woodlands ourish and achieve all their objectives – whether that is for timber, biodiversity, ecosystem services or landscape enhancement.” Michael Gove pledged to “design a scheme accessible to almost any land owner or manager who wishes to enhance the natural environment by planting woodland, providing new habitats for wildlife, increasing biodiversity, contributing to improved water quality and returning cultivated land to wild ower meadows or other more natural states www.rfs.org.uk

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RFS chief executive Simon Lloyd

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gristwood and toms

NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Champions International Accreditation Programme

GRISTWOOD AND TOMS IS ADVOCATING AN INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION PROGRAMME THAT AIMS TO STANDARDISE VOCATIONAL TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACROSS THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY WORLDWIDE

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for us to see the fresh energy and eagerness they bring with them into the workplace. “This is a rolling programme, and it will continue to grow,” he continues. “Many other Danish students have registered their interest in the scheme and will be joining Gristwood and Toms in the spring of 2018, along with the previous three students, who have asked to stay on.”

to date, the scheme has gained the support of 22 countries, and hopefully, within the next year, countries such as Japan and China will sign up

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he pilot scheme, spearheaded by ABA International and UK vocational training specialists, A1 Arborists, enables chainsaw operators from around the globe to evidence their skills and qualifications to an internationally agreed standard. Arboricultural companies will be able to emplo A A-certificated workers with confidence, sa e in the knowledge that they have achieved the required operator skills and safety standards. To date, the scheme has gained the support of 22 countries, and hopefully, within the next year, countries such as Japan and China will sign up. National training manager for Gristwood and Toms, Nick Obern, has been deeply involved in the development and promotion of the standardised certification, alongside industry colleagues

rom across urope As Verifier and Assessor for City and Guilds, Nick has been an integral part of the technical team, drafting the new competency standards and quality assurance guidance. Nick and his colleagues from the University of Copenhagen have also discussed the pressing recruitment challenge that is currently faced by many UK arboricultural companies. To help tackle the shortage of qualified tree surgeons in the , Gristwood and Toms and the University of Copenhagen have jointly initiated a student transfer programme, with the first intake of three Danish students joining Gristwood and Toms in the UK for a three-month period. It has been a ‘voyage of discovery’ on both parts, with this being the first time that ristwood and Toms had taken on college students from abroad; for some of the students, the placement was their first time visiting ngland “The Danish students have worked extremely hard and learned a lot from being here,” Nick says, of the programme. “They are determined and very eager to learn; it is very refreshing

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

could nanobionic trees replace

streetlights?

ENGINEERS AT MIT HAVE CREATED NANOBIONIC PLANTS THAT COULD CHANGE THE WAY WE LIGHT OUR CITIES AND TOWNS

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treets lit by a green phosphorescent glow could be part of a strange future – led by an environmentally friendly scientific initiative engineers are asking you to imagine reading a book by the light of a glowing plant when it gets dark, instead of a lamp he engineers have embedded specialised nanoparticles into the leaves of a watercress plant, which emit a dim light he length of time that the plant glows for has increased from around 45 minutes at the start of the study to a current ield o hours Researchers predict that such plants could one day be bright enough to illuminate a workspace, or transform trees into selfpowered streetlights he vision is to make a plant that will function as a desk lamp – a lamp that you don’t have to plug in, e plains ichael trano, arbon ubbs ro essor o hemical ngineering at and the senior author o the stud he light is ultimatel powered

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by the energy metabolism of the plant itsel Currently, lighting is reponsible for around 20% of worldwide energy consumption; it seemed like a logical problem to tackle for a team that has previously designed plants that can detect explosives, communicating the information back to smartphone, as well as plants that can monitor drought conditions he plants give off their particular green glow using luciferase enzymes from fire ies, which are packed into a nanoparticle carrier he nanoparticles are made of materials that the ood and rug Administration classifies as ‘generally regarded as safe’, helping each component get to the right part of the plant and preventing them from reaching concentrations that could be toxic to the plant hough the light generated b the 10cm watercress seedling is currently around 1/1,000th of the amount that is needed to read by, researchers believe they can

boost the amount of light emitted, and its duration, by further optimising the concentration and release rate of the components he also hope to develop a simpler method of treating the plants by painting or spraying the nanoparticles onto their leaves, believing that this could make it possible to transform trees and other large plants into light sources “Our target is to perform one treatment when the plant is a seedling or a mature plant, and have it last for the lifetime of the plant, trano sa s ur work ver seriously opens up the doorway to streetlamps that are nothing but treated trees, and to indirect lighting around homes he researchers have also demonstrated that they can turn the light off b adding nanoparticles that carry a luci erase en me inhibitor his could eventually enable them to create plants that can shut off their light emission in response to certain environmental conditions, such as sunlight

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the northern forest NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

AS OF 7 JANUARY, THE GOVERNMENT HAS GIVEN THE GO-AHEAD TO THE NORTHERN FOREST, A MASSIVE 50-MILLION TREE FOREST THAT WILL TAKE 25 YEARS TO COMPLETE AND ENCOMPASS A BELT STRETCHING FROM LIVERPOOL TO HULL

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a number o benefits or the area, improving air quality in towns and cities, mitigating ood risk, boosting tourism in rural economies, increasing timber production, and promoting general health and wellbeing. These plans have, however, been accused of trying to distract the public from other, less environmentally friendly woodland schemes. Guardian journalist Patrick Barkham recently said that he believes the plans are designed to distract people from the damage that HS2 is causing to ancient woodland, or the search for shale gas within Sherwood Forest, where Ineos has recently been accused by campaigners of misleading the public. Regardless of the intentions behind the Northern Forest, it is

good to see green infrastructure making its way into the public’s and government’s lines of sight. Compare it with the appalling attempt to reach the government’s tree planting target in 2016, with only 700 of the proposed 5,000ha of trees ever being planted. Austin Brady, director of conservation at the Woodland Trust, acknowledged the importance of conserving existing and new woodland: “England is losing tree cover. We need to make sure we are protecting our most important habitats, such as ancient woodland, as well as investing in new major woodland creation schemes. “Existing approaches to increasing woodland cover are stalling, and existing delivery mechanisms, such as Community

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his ambitious new project aims to create a more environmentally friendly landscape in an area with a growing population and considerably lower than average woodland cover, currently standing at 7.6% (compared to the UK average of 13%). It is predicted that the population of 13m people within this area will grow by 9% over the next 20 years. Encompassing cities such as Liverpool, anchester, he eld, Leeds, Chester and Hull, it is hoped that the new forest will deliver major environmental, social and economic benefits, accelerating the creation of new woodland and supporting the sustainable management of the existing woodland. The massive introduction of trees could have

it is hoped that the new forest will deliver major environmental, social and economic benefits, accelerating the creation of new woodland and supporting the sustainable management of the existing woodland

Forests, are under threat. A new Northern Forest could accelerate the benefits o communit orestr , support landscape scale working for nature, deliver a wide range o benefits, including helping to reduce ood risk, and adapt some of the UK’s major towns and cities to projected climate change. “The North of England is perfectly suited to reap the benefits o a pro ect on this scale But this must be a joined-up approach. We’ll need to continue to work with the government and other organisations to harness new funding mechanisms, such as those promised in the Clean Growth Strategy, to plant extensive areas of woodland to lock up carbon. This will ensure that we can make a difference long term.” WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

pressing play GETTING YOUR ARB BUSINESS INTO THE PRESS CAN SEEM A DAUNTING TASK FOR THE BEGINNER; WADE PR’S CAROLINE WADE EXPLAINS WHERE TO START

Know the publication

ver media title is different he have different sections and different industr focuses – and, in addition, each journalist normally has their own area of interest. You are wasting your time pitching a service aimed at high-end landscapers to a publication entirely focused on grounds management and maintenance. Buy publications and go through them individually. Get a feel for their style and pull out any columns or opportunities for which your compan or service would be a natural fit

What is your angle?

You may believe that your service or company is newsworthy enough to be written about on a daily basis, but you must approach PR with an external editor’s eye, and bear in mind that the average journalist receives hundreds of press releases every day. For a press release to grab journalists’ attention, it must have a relevant angle. The easiest angle comes if you are launching a new service or business offer, as ‘newness’ – by its very nature – is news for journalists. If your communication is not around a launch, you must consider why it is relevant. What current trends or topics can you tie it to? Is there any business insight you could share that may be of interest to the overall sector? Is there anything in particular about your business that is of relevance now, either to customers or the wider industry?

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For a press release to grab journalists’ attention, it must have a relevant angle

If you are considering trying to achieve your own editorial exposure through PR, there are some practical tips to bear in mind. Creativity, excellent writing skills and an eye for news are at PR’s core, but there are equally some prosaic principles worth bearing in mind for those dipping their horticultural toes in.

Be tenacious

Call journalists

The thought of picking up the telephone to a features or news editor is, for many PR newbies, extremely nerve-racking. Prepare to be met with curt responses, especially if journalists are on a deadline – and even if they are not, the press seldom has time for stories you can’t summarise into one clear sentence. However, the benefit o actuall having a conversation with press cannot be underestimated in terms of pulling through actual coverage. In their simplest sense, conversations will lift your story above the hundreds of other unopened press releases in an inbox. Conversations also often uncover opportunities through knowing what that journalist is actually working on, and they will also ensure you are speaking to the correct member of the team.

If worked hard, one press release can result in multiple pieces of press coverage. You must be tenacious, ambitious and determined in your approach to media relations, working hard to find the right contacts to target and then going through them methodically. Don’t be put off i some ournalists sa it is not a story for them. This doesn’t always mean your story is not interesting; it sometimes just means you need to keep going until ou find the ournalists that sa es n the other hand, if you are not getting anywhere regularly with your sell-ins, or achieving the media targets you would like, it might be time to bring in the professionals.

about

Caroline Wade is managing director of WADE PR, a ‘challenger’ agency that she founded in 2015 after 15 years working across a range of business sectors, including horticulture, retail, travel and fastmoving consumer goods (FMCG). The company specialises in generating ambitious press coverage returns for clients through smart thinking and determined media relations. www.wadepr.com

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19/01/2018 13:03


AN INTERVIEW WITH

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

stefano boeri

stefano boeri architetti, milan

E

very four months, arborists and botanists will rappel down from the roofs of Milan’s Bosco Verticale, cutting and pruning, jumping between balconies and being offered cups o coffee as they descend toward the ground. These workers have been referred to as ‘The Flying Gardeners’, and their work scales buildings that almost resemble M.C. Escher paintings, with oblong balconies that jut from the side of canopy-covered façades, and trees that survive on miniscule amounts of space. Bosco Verticale is Italian for ‘Vertical Forest’, and these buildings are the brainchild of Italian architect Stefano Boeri. Stefano started to imagine high-rise buildings that were capable of housing trees many years ago. He wanted to avoid including trees for ornamental or decorative use – instead, he wanted to use trees and plants for social and practical good. he first Vertical orest was built by Stefano Boeri Architetti in Milan in 2014, hosting 900 trees from 94 different species he trend has escalated quickly, with plans for new skyline jungles è

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The original Bosco Verticale in Milan

Concept for the Liuzhou Forest City in China

Concept for Paris’s Forêt Blanche

i want architects to copy and improve on what we’ve done, to kick off a new kind of architecture that can help humanity to improve quality of life and slow climate change

all over the world: Beijing and Nanjing in China have their own Vertical Forests in the pipeline with Stefano Boeri, as do Utrecht, Lausanne, São Paolo, Los Angeles, Paris and Tirana. Though the original Milan towers were built with a uent amilies in mind, there have been developments, changes and variations in the ongoing designs. Vertical Forest projects such as Stefano’s new social housing in the etherlands orm a u taposition to these first homes in ilan or me that is a ver important step, te ano e plains ilan was designed or people with amilies and a good income, but alwa s knew that wanted to make Vertical orests as a new amil o buildings that can be built an where, or people o all backgrounds, and in an kind o climate condition ndoubtedl the largest and most ambitious pro ect o its kind, Liu hou orest it in hina plans to be an entire cit o Vertical orests t will hold a million plants and , trees and be home to , people, with hospitals, schools and small-tomedium si ed buildings – all with trees on the a ade The passion that drives Stefano’s designs is his desire to demonstrate the potential or low-cost buildings that include trees e made the decision not to put cop right on his ilan building, e plaining want architects to cop and improve on what we ve done, to kick off a new kind o architecture that can help humanit to improve qualit o li e and slow climate change in a ver pragmatic and serious wa Vertical orests aim to tackle the problem o carbon emissions right at the source around o these emissions are absorbed b orests o move orests into cities is, believe, a ver e cient wa to fight air pollution straight awa , sa s te ano ar rom causing them harm, is an importance source o nourishment or trees, which photos nthesise it into the glucose they use for respiration. aintaining the trees is essential, and the team that looks a ter the trees and plants on the a ade o the building has been keeping a close e e on them since the Milan towers’ inception. Each day they check the irrigation, humidit and conditions that the plants are exposed to. The trees and plants are seen as a common good – a wa o cleaning the cit s air, improving species diversit , and boosting mood, rather than simpl an aesthetic benefit or the apartments owners he are there ore under the ownership o all o the apartments owners, not individual residents. Has it been a challenge to get the trees of the Vertical orest to establish e have monitored

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

milan was designed for people with a good income, but i wanted to make vertical forests a new family of buildings that can be built anywhere, for people of all backgrounds, and in any kind of climate condition

The original Bosco Verticale in Milan

Concept for the Liuzhou Forest City in China

and evaluated these trees or five ears now and we don t have an problems, besides two trees that were suffering, sa s te ano ou have to consider that we have had more than species o different plants in the two towers n the ilan buildings, the team has tried to use local editerranean and uropean plant and tree species an issues and problems are e amined, and the solutions are carried over to other pro ects rees that lose their leaves in the winter were placed on the nose o the ilan building, to allow the cit s high levels o sunlight to permeate through and into the deeper reaches o the building aving seen the success o this, the team decided to use these t pes o trees to a greater e tent on the etherlands

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Concept for Paris’s Forêt Blanche

pro ect, where the sun e posure levels are much lower, in order to allow more light to reach the back end o the building or te ano and his team, problems are seen as opportunities to learn, rather than setbacks the loss o the two trees in ilan was a use ul lesson, and the team now knows not to include those two tree species in uture developments e pla e tremel close attention when we re selecting plants, shrubs, bushes and trees, in order to respect the humidit , sunlight, e posure and wind conditions that we have in different parts o the building, te ano e plains ilan is teaching us so much hope that we will learn rom an possible negative consequences ■

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

the HACKNEY TREECYCLE ticket to ride:

THOMAS CAMPBELL, PRINCIPAL TREE OFFICER AT THE LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY, TELLS PRO ARB HOW HE ORIGINATED HIS TREECYCLE CONCEPT, THE BENEFITS OF THE SCHEME, AND WHAT TREE OFFICERS CAN DO TO RAISE THE PROFILE OF THEIR ROLE

How are you calculating the money saved? We have a framework contract with three contractors who have a set price for pruning a tree. If we went to a site ourselves and pruned 10 trees, I can take the price we would pay each contractor and calculate our average saving. Overall, we have saved £8,000; after taking away the cost of the bike, pruning saws and tree officer hours on-site, the net saving is around £3,000. If it were to be done in a more organised way, the savings could be more, but this has just been a pilot scheme, trialling a different way of working. There are other benefits on top of the monetary ones – mental and physical health benefits for tree officers, for example. There is great community engagement – when you cycle past, it always brings out a smile, and you’ll hear people pondering, “What is a Treecycle?”

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It might not be for everyone: there may be too many restraints. Tree officers may not want to leave the office, it might not be feasible to cycle around a large area, or they might just not enjoy cycling around. There are a lot of benefits, though. It’s all money that can be spent pruning and planting trees and paying contractors. We’re also looking at what other things we can be doing to help the trees under our care with the money we have saved. Massaria disease is quite a problem now for London’s Plane trees, and we are looking at doing some soil amelioration work to improve the growing conditions for our park trees. This will be a fair bit of money that we wouldn’t necessarily have because it probably wouldn’t be considered essential, but it is vital for the long-term health of the trees in parks such as London Fields and Hackney Downs.

I think, globally and nationally, people are starting to see the importance of being more environmentally sustainable. There needs to be a top-down and bottom -up approach

How did the treecycle project start? I’ve been working in Hackney since 2013. I was always out cycling in Hackney anyway, and I would carry secateurs and a pruning saw so that if there was a broken branch I could cut it up and leave it. There is a slight problem with leaving parts of twigs on the highway, though, so it was better to take them with me. We had access to a cargo bike through the sustainable transport team and, after using it more and more, it made sense to request my own one. My then-manager Rupert Bentley Walls supported the idea and so, after we put together a business case for it, our management gave us the go ahead in 2015. We use it for inspections and I’ve been keeping a log of savings – about £3,000 overall. We have done three solid Treecycle days with the whole team (three tree officers), and on each day we’ve saved about £1,000.

Are there any similar projects or initiatives that have inspired you? I’ve been inspired by other tree officers who I have been lucky enough to work with – Al Smith, who I was fortunate enough to work under in Camden, and Rupert Bentley Walls in Hackney. Rupert has given Hackney an amazing reputation for having the most diverse range of tree species in London, with more than 250 species on the borough’s streets. I’ve continued with and added to the palette that Rupert planted. He would also try to encourage tree officers to get out and about. Tree officers can often be tied to the office in local authorities, yet it is so important to be out working in the community. Hackney is quite lucky to have good voluntary groups like the Tree Musketeers and generally has a great community spirit. I feel the Treecycle feeds into è

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Do you expect to see the concept expand throughout the country? Not in a coordinated way, but whoever wants to do it and has a supportive local authority to make it happen is very welcome. We could definitely use a second Treecycle for Hackney, as there are three officers here and we have a regular day where all three of us go out to do some young tree maintenance. You might see a fleet of Treecycles at some point! In the current climate of budget cuts, what do you think other tree officers can do to maintain their position? Service areas are currently in a position where they need to demonstrate that they can be profitable. If there is less money coming from central government then local authorities need to generate their own

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money, which can be passed on to service areas. But is it a business or a service? I’ve never been interested in working in the private sector, as I like the idea that the public sector is about people in an area doing a job for the people of that area. You can’t expect public services to be income generators. Tree officers still need to continually raise the profile of trees and show how important they are. It can become stressful, as you sometimes lose trees to developments etc., but you must stay positive, with the holistic goal of improving your local environment and planting more trees. It does feel like the tide may be slowly starting to turn and there is some money arriving for tree planting. The air pollution crisis in London is starkly highlighting the scale of the human impact on the environment, and provides an opportunity to bring the importance of urban trees to the public’s attention. We need greater collaboration and communication between local government departments to tackle these issues. It is all interlinked, and it is imperative to make a good network with other teams and create those relationships. It is perhaps about playing the game politically – but if you can make your benefits known it can be worthwhile. There are areas in Hackney, such as Homerton – an area with high levels of deprivation – that have very low street tree numbers, and these are some of the worst areas for air pollution. If you can plant trees there and demonstrate the benefits then hopefully you shouldn’t have to continually contest the value of trees – it will become self-evident.

i like the idea that the public sector is about people in an area doing a job for the people of that area

that and hopefully inspires people to take an interest in their local environment and community. I think, globally and nationally, people are starting to see the importance of being more environmentally sustainable. There needs to be a top-down and bottom-up approach. After the National Tree Officers Conference in November, tree officers from a couple of cities expressed an interest in the Treecycle concept; I sent them the information and they are going to look into it. Other London boroughs have said they would be interested, too. As a fairly new project, I imagine that it could develop in any number of ways in the future.

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

women in arb the gender gap:

IT’S NO SECRET THAT ARBORICULTURE IS AN INCREDIBLY MALE-DOMINATED INDUSTRY, WITH FEW WOMEN CHOOSING A CAREER IN THE SECTOR. JOSEPHINE HEDGER AND TRACY CLARK TELL PRO ARB ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCES IN THE FIELD, AS WELL AS THEIR ADVICE FOR ANY WOMEN STARTING OUT

Routes into the industry A common refrain among those complaining about the skills shortage in the arboriculture industry is that more could be done at school level to encourage young people to pursue an arb career – and this thinking can be extended to target girls in particular. Educational institutions such as Forest Schools incorporate exposure to the outdoors into their curricula, and Josephine believes that more schools could be doing their part. She herself has been part of local career days, and believes that a national 24-month programme to promote careers in the arb industry could help enormously. “The kids are always

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The fact that there are many women in the industry leading by example is probably the strongest tool for attracting more females, and that is only going to grow

P

ro Arb’s recent seminar at FutureScape discussed the current issues facing the arboriculture industry, including skills and apprenticeships, valuing trees, and the lack of female arborists working in the sector. It was collectively agreed that the industry is clearly not connecting with women who may potentially be interested in it. Josephine Hedger, owner of Arbor-Venture Tree Care and a UK representative for the European ISA Tree Climbing Championships, believes that the Arb Association could be doing much more to attract women into the industry. “There is a lot of potential for them to work with schools, or educational programmes online and on TV,” she says. “Recent television shows have shown an increased interest in the industry, and people are starting to become more aware of trees.”

interested,” she says. “I’ve done career days, but it is only because I work for and am visible to the school. I don’t know how you would do it nationally, unless something like the Arb Association, LANTRA or City and Guild was involved.” Tracy Clarke, chartered arboriculturist and director at Tracy Clarke Tree Consultancy, believes that women who are already working in the industry can have a significant role to play in encouraging others to get involved. “The fact that there are many women in the industry leading by example is probably the strongest tool for attracting more females, and that is only going to grow,” she says. “I’ve been in the arboricultural industry for a long time, and the number of women, doing a range of work, is constantly increasing.” Tracy was driven into arboriculture by her desire to make a positive difference to the world, as well as the excitement of the role. “I am a bit of a thrill seeker,” she tells us. “When a friend of mine told me that she was going to study trees, I found out more about it myself; the thought of climbing trees, using a chainsaw and doing something practical in the environment really appealed to me, so I decided to go for it and study arboriculture. I was so excited. “I went to Houghall College in Durham to study and I became quite engrossed in the subject. I found that I loved studying the theory about trees and their associations, and I just loved the practical side as well – what a way to spend a day learning! It was a very tough course, with lots of work, but it really changed the course of my life and was worth it. I’ve never looked back.”

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

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The male-tofemale ratio is low; there is the potential for a larger female presence if girls are introduced to the industry in school, but unfortunately it depends where you are in the country, what influences you’ve had and what you’ve been exposed to

A lot of people within the industry discover arboriculture by chance, having never known that it was a career option. Josephine found out about it while studying on a different course, and moved to arboriculture in her second year of college. “I had no idea people did it for a living,” she says. “I grew up outside, surrounded by forests, and my dad had a couple of sawmills, so I had always been around chainsaws – but I had never seen anyone climb a tree before college. I loved it. After I did the course I started working at some companies near me, and fell in love with it.” Josephine currently climbs in the ISA Tree Climbing Championships; she represents the UK chapter in the European Championships and has travelled to many competitions in Europe, the US and Australia. She has held the world record in footlocking, and is a three-time World Tree Climbing Champion (2008 in St Louis, 2010 in Chicago and 2014 in Milwaukee) and a two-time European Champion (2014 and 2016). “I used to do the pole climbing competitions at local shows,” Josephine explains. “I did that for a couple of years and met someone who did tree climbing competitions. There was a competition at one of the trade shows I did one summer, which I was interested in; I took my gear and entered. I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing and I wasn’t very good at it; for a few years I only did it once a year. Someone said I’d be better if I put in more practice, so I stopped doing the pole climbing, went to a few more competitions and got hooked.”

Though the female presence within the arboriculture industry is increasing, there is some debate on whether it is enough. “There are more females working in the industry now than ever before,” Josephine explains. “However, the male-to-female ratio is low; there is the potential for a larger female presence if girls are introduced to the industry in school, but unfortunately it depends where you are in the country, what influences you’ve had and what you’ve been exposed to. I was lucky – I was following a very vague path and happened to find it. There are probably many women out there who would love to do arb work but have never been exposed to it.” Tracy believes that the industry can offer a variety of work for women. “Over time, the industry has become so varied that there are many opportunities for both men and women to forge a career. Some women continue down the practical route, others, like myself, take a consultancy role or work for local government. There are also lots of other organisations within the industry, such as the Woodland Trust, National Trust and the Forestry Commission, which offer a wide range of roles that women do very well in.” Battling the naysayers At the FutureArb seminar, the conversation turned to historical sexism within the industry, and it was startling to hear about the difficulties that some women have faced. One speaker spoke about a woman he knew who had been a senior arb officer at a London borough in the late Eighties; the men working beneath her

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when i was training, of all the ranges of chainsaw boots available, stihl was the only supplier that made them small enough to fit my feet. i’m not sure whether that has changed much over the last 20 years

presumed that she couldn’t climb and didn’t know what she was doing, although in fact she was a more talented and experienced climber than any of them. “It’s not only physical, but mental, too,” says Josephine. “It depends on who you work with. It is male-dominated and there is a stigma attached to being a woman. Unfortunately, a lot of women I talk to have worked in negative environments, being put down with sexual comments made, though fortunately for me I have never had this experience. “If it’s what you enjoy doing, keep at it, and don’t let anyone stop you doing it,” she advises. “Keep learning and try to progress. There isn’t necessarily the same career path for women, unless you work for a large company with the ability to move into managerial roles. You’ve got to be able to think about your position long-term – what you would like to do with your skills. The main thing is not to let people put you down.” Tracy has similar words of encouragement for women starting out in arb. “Be confident and authentic. If you are unsure what the industry has to offer, you could consider contacting professional organisations such as the Institute of Chartered Foresters or the Arboricultural Association, and they can put you in touch with other female professionals who can share their experiences with you or give you advice,” she suggests. “We’re all very approachable, and because we work in the industry, we know what is on offer, and can point you in the right direction if we can’t offer help ourselves. We can certainly ask the right questions to help you decide what you are interested in, and what route you need to take to make it happen.”

Equipment evolution It can be a challenge to find equipment designed appropriately or specifically for women; Tracy has found that the choice of PPE equipment for women is still very limited. “When I was training, of all the ranges of chainsaw boots available, Stihl was the only supplier that made them small enough to fit my feet,” Tracy says. “I’m not sure whether that has changed much over the last 20 years.” “There’s not a huge amount out there designed specifically for females,” Josephine agrees. “A couple of companies in the past have tried to do a few things – Simarghu has designed a harness for women, and it is really interesting to see companies becoming more aware of us. The biggest problem is sizing. A lot of women have small feet and differently shaped legs to men. We obviously have hips, and things like chainsaw trousers haven’t been designed with that in mind. Teufelberger did a light version of its TreeMotion harness, which is nice – it’s lighter, smaller and suppler. Josephine also notes that manufacturers are becoming more aware of the benefits of a high powerto-weight ratio; while these developments haven’t been made specifically with women in mind, women are certainly benefitting from them. “Battery products are brilliant to use whether you’re male or female,” Josephine says. “Those little top-handled pruning saws are very light and make your life easier – it’s easier to climb with them, regardless of your gender. Manufacturers are more aware of the aware of the design of products now, which is a good thing.”

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study: urban trees grow faster RESEARCH BY THE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH HAS DEMONSTRATED THAT URBAN TREES SEEM TO GROW FASTER THAN THEIR RURAL COUNTERPARTS; WE DELVE INTO THE REPORT

A

new study headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows that, worldwide, trees in urban areas have been growing faster than their rural counterparts since the Sixties. This is the first time a study has been undertaken that looks at the effect of climate change and the urban heat island on urban trees. Similar research has already been carried out with regard to forest growth under recent conditions, but this study has been done in the belief that the knowledge will be transferable to urban environments. The study comes at a point when the importance of street trees in the urban environment is becoming more apparent. According to UN calculations, urban populations worldwide will increase by more than 60% by 2030, continuing to almost 70% by 2050 – meaning urban trees will become increasingly important for the health and wellbeing benefits they can provide. The study was carried out by analysing tree rings from 10 metropolises worldwide; specifically, it looked

at 1,383 trees from boreal, temperate, Mediterranean and subtropical climates. It shows that growth in most of these urban areas has accelerated since the Sixties, which can be attributed to a combination of increasing temperatures, extended growing seasons and reduced or intra-annually redistributed precipitation. Where areas are warmer and drier, and water is scarcer due to climate change, tree growth is reduced: under a Mediterranean climate, the researchers didn’t find any significant difference between urban and rural tree growth before or after 1960. According to the study, the higher growth rates of urban trees appear to be closely related to their urban climate, which is characterised by the ‘urban heat island effect’, where the daytime surface and air temperatures of sealed city centres is increased. It can also be attributed to higher CO2 concentrations, larger annual atmospheric nitrogen è

The study was carried out by analysing tree rings from 10 metropolises worldwide; specifically, it looked at 1,383 trees from boreal, temperate, Mediterranean and subtropical climates

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Urban trees can suffer from substantial water stress due to high temperatures, modified precipitation patterns, and the unfavourable soil conditions that arise from compaction and being surrounded by impervious surfaces

zones, however, urban tree growth has profited less in recent decades when compared to rural tree growth. The acceleration of tree growth means increased carbon sequestration, accelerated above and belowground spatial expansion, and earlier provision of many ecosystem services. However, the study also shows that urban trees will age faster, potentially needing earlier replacement and replanting. Urban planners and tree officers will need to take this information into account when planning for future tree planting, monitoring similar studies in the future to see how it develops.

deposits, and lower ozone concentrations. Urban trees also demonstrated higher productivity than rural trees, particularly in cities that are located within the boreal climate zone. Urban trees can suffer from substantial water stress due to high temperatures, modified precipitation patterns, and the unfavourable soil conditions that arise from compaction and being surrounded by impervious surfaces. The study assumes that the trend towards a declining difference in growth rates between aging urban and rural trees is linked to the limited water supply faced by bigger urban trees. The mechanical impact and reduced gas diffusion within the rhizosphere may be reducing root growth and preventing water uptake. This could mean that the potential water consumption of older, larger trees may not be fulfilled within an urban environment, resulting in reduced tree growth. Research suggests that urban tree growth may develop in different ways depending on a combination of the key causal effects, such as temperature, water supply, length of growing season, CO2 and CO3 concentration, and nitrogen deposition. The report suggests one example of this, stating: “The extension of the growing season length caused by both the urban heat island effect and climate change may be in the magnitude of up to 11% for European cities, assuming an urban heat island effect of 8.8 days, a global warming effect of 10.5 days within a period of 30 years, and an average growing season length of 180 days.” Adverse conditions, such as limited rooting space and high pollution, do not appear to cancel out the benefits that current urban climate and atmospheric contribute to tree growth; in temperate and subtropical

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22/01/2018 15:27


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web: www.dbm-hire.co.uk 22/01/2018 14:01


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

OPINION

ROB MCBRIDE LOOKS AHEAD TO ANOTHER BUSY YEAR OF CAMPAIGNING, FORGING LINKS AND PUTTING TREES IN THE SPOTLIGHT

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Opinion JanFeb.indd 30

By visiting these trees and gaining media attention, we hope to bring people’s focus to the sometimes unnecessary felling of valuable trees

A

s we start another New Year, I am set to wondering just what wondrous tree stories will emerge in 2018. It is quite exciting to be imaging positive tree stories – literally coming out of the woodwork. However, sadly, I realise that there will also be more tree protection campaigns to be pursued. he destruction o mainl health street trees in he eld will feature until a compromise is reached, hopefully sooner rather than later. Rather surprisingly, the Brimmon Oak – winner of UK Tree of the Year in 2016 and runner-up of European Tree of the Year 2017 – is having to be looked at again with respect to the proposed work inside the root protection area and the lack of transparency around the method statement for this work, which is not publicly available for proper scrutiny. This matter is being pursued by the tree’s owner, myself, and a very kind arborist – more on this later in the year. On a more positive note, the annual European Tree of the Year contest kicks off on ebruar , when the voting month starts do take a look at all of the stunning contestants, and get voting. As I write this piece I am busy trying to arrange my self-funded trip to ‘meet’ all 13 contestant trees in this competition. During this trip – undertaken in partnership with TREEspect, of which I am joint founder and director, and working with the EPA – I will be highlighting the plight of some of the many European trees that are under threat. By visiting these trees and gaining media attention, we hope to bring people’s focus to the sometimes unnecessary felling of valuable trees. Whether they be heritage trees, veteran trees or simply trees that are loved by their communities, we will help the campaigns around them get more attention, and hopefully enable solutions other than felling. If the adventures of my 2015 tree trip are anything to go by, I should be in for a ‘treet’!

ABOUT Rob McBride, ‘The Treehunter’, is a campaigner for ancient trees. www.treehunter.co.uk

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22/01/2018 15:20


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

put your safety first

ppe in 2018

WITH EUROPEAN PPE REGULATION ABOUT TO BE REVISED, PAUL GEORGE OF LANDMARK TRADING EXPLAINS WHAT THE KEY CHANGES WILL BE, WHY THEY’RE HAPPENING, AND HOW THEY WILL HELP THOSE WORKING IN THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY

the new ppe regulation aims to improve the rules around ppe, as well as update them to fit the technological advances of today’s market

our industry is our PPE, or personal protective equipment – a vital barrier that protects us from potentially fatal incidents every day. PPE is so ubiquitous in our industry that to leave home without it would almost be like leaving naked. his ear marks the first time since the establishment of the PPE Directive in 1989 that changes are being applied to the regulations controlling the manufacture and sale of PPE. Let s take a look at how these changes will affect you over the coming year.

The key changes of the PPE Regulation

oving hearing protection rom ategor to ategor ssuing a eclaration o on ormit with each , or at least a link to where it can be obtained A compulsor five- ear limit on validit esponsibilities outlined or importers and distributors relating to protection rom hand-held chainsaws have been added to ategor

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PPE.indd 31

I

n any industry, there’s always the potential for accidents and misuse of vital equipment – but when you use chainsaws and chippers, and work at heights, the stakes are raised. We’ve all heard the unfortunate stories that have made the headlines, and a few of us have tales of our own near-misses, whether it’s due to faulty equipment, unsafe practices or getting a bit too comfortable when using dangerous machinery. The one saving grace we have in

The PPE Directive The universal health and safety standards that the PPE manufacturing and retail industry has in place today are all due to the formation of the European Union. To facilitate a single European market for goods and remove barriers to trade, the European Union set up the New Approach Directives. This saw the minimum requirements for health and safety standardised and consistently enforced throughout the EU and other trade partners of the European Economic Area (EEA). The PPE Directive mandated a homogenisation of standards for PPE across Europe, leading to the strengthened framework of safety regulation throughout the single market. In April 2016, the new PPE Regulation was introduced, with a two-year transition period that ends on 21 April 2018. After this, the mandates of the regulation will be fully applied è and enforced.

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22/01/2018 15:21


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

he new egulation aims to improve the rules in place around PPE, as well as update them to fit the technological advances o toda s market he egulation replaces the irective as a legislative act that must be applied in its entiret across the , although it does not have to be transposed into each member state’s national law or us in the , that means the regulations have not been repealed, and the ersonal rotective quipment at ork egulations , which govern the emplo er on the suitabilit , provision, maintenance, instruction and use o , still stand hat constitutes our and when we have to wear it will remain the same, but now, the egulation is the legislation that employers, manufacturers and suppliers must adhere to n general, the changes to the irective won t impact how ou use da to da – but the larger industr implications will have a lasting trickledown effect

should eliminate inferior products and suppliers and clean up the industr the new five- ear limit on certificates is an important part o this, as is the clarification that, when selling in urope, it is the importer or distributor who assumes liability or the manu acturer s obligations Essentially, the only changes you should notice are an increase in transparency from those

you buy your equipment from, and less inferior products appearing on the market he egulation puts the consumer and user ront and centre ou re bu ing new this ear, there s no reason or ou to make an significant changes to what you buy, although you may notice some inferior products disappearing from the shelves

The essential PPE in 2018

If you’re in the market for new PPE, but don’t know where to start, here are our recommendations to fully upgrade your PPE in the new year: reemme an on hainsaw oot – com ortable, lightweight and well built olidur pedition hainsaw rouser – lightweight, with durable rein orcements to knees and right thigh Arbortec reathe e hainsaw rouser – compliant, e ible and durable, with strong stitching uffmaster orestr round elmet – comes with ratchet wheel si e ad ustment, lightweight chipper muffs and large visor or good protection et l Verte Vent limbing elmet – comes with ad ustable ventilation slots and available in si colours, including neon ellow or e cellent visibilit

Why change the PPE Directive? he irective, although su cient or the last two decades, did have its limitations hese were largely concerning the weaknesses in the procedure or t pe approval and the effectiveness o market surveillance – each led to an in u o in erior products on the market Let s ace it, when it comes to protective equipment, the last word ou want to hear is subpar here was evidence o procedural weaknesses in the marking processes, allowing less reputable manufacturers to sell substandard products with legitimate certificates and apparent qualit assurance Additionall , the new technologies and processes or developing PPE for the market had outstripped the original methods used to ormulate the irective What are the effects of the PPE Regulation? he primar effect o these changes is that our equipment will be held to a higher standard, and ou will be sa er in our ob reclassifying products such as those relating to protection rom hand-held chainsaws to ategor , their manu acture will be sub ect to more stringent oversight, and there will be increased regulation over that alread e ists within that categor , such as harnesses he egulation will demand increased accountability from the supply chain, which

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ABOUT Paul George is the managing director of Landmark Trading Ltd, and has worked in the arboricultural industry for more than 15 years. Landmark Trading is one the UK’s leading suppliers of arborist equipment. You can connect with Paul on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or call Landmark Trading on 01780 482231. www.landmarktrading.com

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22/01/2018 15:21


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

the benefits of resin bound tree pits

sureset

DURABLE, LOW MAINTENANCE AND ATTRACTIVE – SURESET TELLS US WHY RESIN BOUND TREE PITS ARE THE IDEAL SOLUTION FOR URBAN TREES

G

one are the days when a tree was planted without much thought given to where or why. The environmental and ph sical benefits o trees are now widely recognised, and they also play a major part in landscape designs, which are well known to help reduce stress levels and even calm tra c You rarely see a tree planted in bare soil – it provides a place or leaves and litter to gather, is prone to vandalism, and is o ten used as a doggie toilet. Most trees are now planted in a pit o some kind For a tree to survive and thrive, its roots need to have an adequate water supply and room to grow. When root management, tree support and protection, drainage, maintenance and aesthetics are all taken into consideration, the most popular tree pits are grille, resin bonded, ower beds, and resin bound paving A grille tree pit at or vertical is permeable, and provides good water supply and protection. Grilles can look at bit industrial, and some designs still allow litter and leaves to accumulate – which will require maintenance.

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Resin bonded is a single layer, non-permeable system that requires a water tube to ensure that there is an adequate ow o water to the roots The gravel is only stuck to the resin on one side, so there is the potential or the stones to come loose and scatter. hile ower beds are both prett and permeable, they will need regular maintenance replanting, weeding, sweeping etc to keep them looking good. Resin bound paving is permeable, allowing water to reach the roots o the tree and eliminating the need or a watering tube A resin bound tree pit provides durability, but also the

e ibilit to allow tree growth he resin bound s stem mi es stone and resin thoroughl together, ensuring that each stone particle is completely covered in resin. During the laying process, minute voids are created that allow water to pass through. An elegant option, the benefits o a resin bound tree pit include: • A smooth sur ace that is eas or street cleaning machines to pass over • Very low maintenance • An accessible finish • nough e ibilit to be laid around mature trees with e posed roots

SureSet permeable paving offers tree pit solutions in both Supply and Lay and Supply Only options. SureSet permeable resin bound paving is made rom natural aggregate, marble or rec cled materials and clear V stable resin, delivering a smooth, sophisticated sur ace SureSet FlexiSet is made rom rec cled rubber, mm natural aggregate and clear V stable resin elivering a natural, rustic finish, le i et can be installed directl on to t pe aggregate or in some cases directl onto a membrane , making it ideal or woodland trails, gol courses, ogging paths, c cle tracks, equestrian centres, drainage channels, roo gardens – and, o course, tree pits

Pro Arb | January/February 2018 33

22/01/2018 15:23


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22/01/2018 14:36


book LONDON’S STREET TREES: A FIELD GUIDE TO THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT BY PAUL WOOD PUBLISHED BY: SAFE HAVEN RRP: £12.99

What becomes evident throughout the book is something that anyone involved in the tree industry has known for a while – that London trees have worth outside of the benefits to the environment and mental wellbeing

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review

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

P

aul ood s guide to London street trees starts off impressivel with a oreword b a or o London adiq han – a mark, perhaps, o ust how important trees have become to London, and how a shi t in appreciation or what trees do is starting to impact the policies o some o the government s higher-ups A book celebrating the diversit o London s trees, and those that make up the common staples, is a pleasure or an one – rom a reader with a casual interest to a tree o cer looking to diversi their stock he ver first street trees to be s stematicall planted in London were London planes, which lined Victoria mbankment in and consequentl became so associated with the cit that the took on its name, despite being a h brid introduction rom the ontinent that onl arrived in the late th centur aul ood reveals that, rather surprisingl , onl o the trees in inner are planes, and the make up ust o trees in reater London e suggests that, even though there are plans in place to plant more trees throughout the cit , e are unlikel to see man new avenues o planes hat becomes evident throughout the book is something that an one involved in the tree industr has known or a while – that London trees have worth outside o the benefits to the environment and mental wellbeing here is a histor that surrounds the trees throughout the cit , such as the Vau hall s asis o ew ealand where, a ter houses were le t empt and dilapidated in the ighties, the residents decided to create a garden o trees that are native to ew ealand or the stor o a ormer local councillor obin rookshank ilton who, inspired b the cherr trees gi ted rom ok o to ashington a ter the econd orld ar, decided to tr and create a local anami cherr blossom estival in London aul proves that trees throughout London are as diverse and culturall eclectic as the residents themselves, and litters London s treet rees with interesting and amusing anecdotes throughout eaders looking or a street-b -street guide to where the can find a particular tree will be disappointed, but to mark out each tree would come closer to a ob or rdnance urve nstead, aul gives the general areas where readers can find certain trees, along with a ew short, but wonder ul guides to some tree trails throughout London

Pro Arb | January/February 2018 35

22/01/2018 12:51


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

I

growing

together

IN THE FIRST OF A TWO-PART SERIES ON TREE WORK ORGANISATIONS, JONATHAN HAZELL NCP car park in Milton Keynes ASKS WHY THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY IS IN SUCH A FRACTURED STATE

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Pro Arb | January/February 2018

Jonathan Hazell JanFeb.indd 36

no one has any real grasp of the size of the market for arboricultural services, because both the demand and the supply sides are so divided

n the past ve touched brie upon the idea that there is no place for an arboricultural industr , but ever place for an arboricultural pro essional, and ll e plore the idea over this issue and the ne t What do I mean? Over the past ew decades, various people have shared ideas or uni ing the arboricultural industr under one bod or another, et there has been no dominant uni ing orce – and, as such, no single universall accepted and recognised voice has emerged ndeed, there is an ever-increasing arra o competing voices, presumabl all ollowing the principle o roucho ar re use to oin an club that would have me as a member The market for tree work services is ractured, and those divisions are e ploited b the suppliers some ocus upon the private householder, while others support the in rastructure companies ome tree services are provided b an arboricultural specialist, while other work is carried out as part o a larger multiservice contract which could mean tending the vicarage garden or the whole o a etropolitan orough ouncil ne consequence is that no one has an real grasp o the si e o the market or arboricultural services, because both the demand and the suppl sides are so divided an unintended consequence is that there is no single industr bod that is recognised b the demand side At the same time, there is an increasing demand for the operator to hold evidence o training or tree work service skills, so the trained and competent individual is rightl proud to be recognised as a cra tsman ne analog that I could draw is to liken these individuals to lions led b donke s

s it the ault o the organisations eing generous, suppose each was begun or led b special interest groups who believed that the had something unique to offer, although that ma not alwa s be the case an o the arguments put orward to usti each organisation have struck me as akin to discussing how man angels could dance on the head o a pin – strikingl irrelevant in most cases, and merel camou age or sel interest, in m opinion Is it the fault of the service providers? How man have e ploited commercial differences to prevent a common approach being taken to a range o issues h isn t there one common approach to the provision of tree work services among local authorities, or e ample Is it the fault of the clients? How man are sophisticated enough to realise the consequences o their actions o the set out to divide and rule in order to keep costs down or maintain a riendl service provider s it the ault o the individual an people involved in arboriculture are what a ormer colleague described benignl as unemplo able – strong individuals with enormous sel -belie and a health disregard or authorit , who are too much the maverick to survive in a bureaucrac and completel at odds with the idea o being organised into an sort o trade union n ne t month s column, ll be discussing wh , while there is a need or skilled operatives, there ma in act be no need or an tree workocused organisations www.jhazell.com

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22/01/2018 15:08


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

GLYNN PERCIVAL FROM BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS ON TREATING AN APHID INFESTATION 2

& PESTASE DISE

A

phids are small sap-feeding insects, generally 1-5mm long and with soft bodies. There are more than 500 species in Britain and northern Europe; those that attack trees include green apple aphid, large willow aphid, pear-bedstraw aphid, damson-hop aphid, cherr black , elder aphid, lime leaf aphid, sycamore aphid and beech aphid. Body colour varies between species; for example, green apple aphid, which infests ornamental apples, pears, rowan and hawthorn, is a bright green to yellow-green colour, while large willow aphid is dark brown and covered with fine gre hairs Young, vigorous trees, or those heavily fertilised with nitrogen, are most severel affected Symptoms Primary damage to trees results rom the effects o the aphids feeding upon young tissue,

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Bartlett_JanFeb.indd 37

which weakens and distorts new growth (Figure 1). Secondary effects result rom ouling o the leaves and stems with honeydew, which encourages the growth of a fungus known as sooty mold (Figure 2). Transmission of viruses from diseased to healthy plants on the aphid stylet and in the saliva is also a problem. Causal agents Some aphids feed on more than one plant, such as apple grass aphids, which feed on the young new leaves and blossom of apples until summer, before migrating to oats, grasses and reeds for the rest of the summer. Lime leaf aphids, on the other hand, are restricted to limes. Reproduction is mainly asexual and most aphids seen on plants are parthenogenetic females that are capable of giving birth to live young. Young aphids mature in about one week as summer temperatures increase, allowing

1 for a rapid rise in the population when conditions are favourable. Their reproductive potential is so great that it has been calculated a single aphid could give rise to about 10m tons of aphids after 10 days of summer breeding. Control The main danger period for trees is from March-October, and non-chemical control is seldom effective in these conditions he many insecticides available for use have to be applied before aphid populations are too high, in order to be effective his calls for careful examination of trees or the first signs o damage it is applied at the wrong time, then it will either be too late and the damage will have been done, or the predators of these insects will also be destroyed by the insecticide. Because the aphid life-cycle is quick and the predator life-cycle is slower, the aphid population will build itself up again rapidly in the absence of any predators – leading to an increase in aphid damage. Chemical controls include winter washes based on spray oil, plus an insecticide on dormant trees during December and January. Contact insecticides such as soap or spray oil are used on growing trees, and kill aphids mainly by direct contact. Due to the non-persistent nature of these chemicals, re-infestation may soon occur, and repeat sprays at 14-21 days may be necessary.

When using these chemicals, care should be taken to avoid ph toto ic effects in the case o fruit bearing trees, ensure that two weeks elapse after spraying before harvesting. Synthetic insecticides are absorbed by leaves and poison the sap that aphids feed upon, providing excellent control of aphids feeding in protected situations such as rolled or curled leaves, galls or higher branches. Harvest fruit at least 3-4 weeks after applying synthetic insecticides. considering biocontrol, adult convergent ladybird beetles are effective release three tablespoons) per small tree.

The many insecticides available for use have to be applied before aphid populations are too high, in order to be effective

aphids

Pro Arb | January/February 2018 37

22/01/2018 14:48


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

top 10 tips

planting trees KEITH SACRE, ARBORICULTURAL AND URBAN FORESTRY DIRECTOR AT BARCHAM TREES, OFFERS HIS ADVICE ON TREE PLANTING. IT IS IMPORTANT TO HANDLE TREES WITH CARE, WITHOUT ALLOWING THEM TO BE THROWN AROUND ON-SITE OR TO BECOME STUCK IN ANY CONDITION THAT MIGHT EXPOSE THEM TO EXTREME HEAT OR COLD. SIMILARLY, THE TREE WILL REQUIRE THE BEST START, IN NUTRIENT-RICH, GOOD QUALITY SOIL THAT IS FREE FROM FROST. WATERING IS KEY ONCE TREES ARE PLANTED, AS IS A KEEN AFTERCARE PROGRAMME.

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22/01/2018 15:25


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

1

Evaluate the constraints of the site fully prior to planting

3

Select the most appropriate species given the remaining constraints

2

4 5

6 7

8 9

10

Ameliorate those constraints as far as possible

Select high quality nursery stock, as outlined in BS 8545 Ensure planting pit is of a suitable size and that there is adequate substrate volume Plant tree to correct depth, as outlined in BS 8545 Ensure tree is anchored or staked correctly, as outlined in BS 8545 BackďŹ ll and consolidate soil. Mulch with organic material 2-5cm minimum Irrigate to settle Ensure adequate management and maintenance for at least two seasons, as outlined in BS 8545

about

Barcham Trees’ nursery is situated in the heart of Cambridgeshire. Covering more than 300 acres of land, it is by far the largest tree nursery of its type in Europe. www.barcham.co.uk

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Top10tips_JanFeb.indd 39

Pro Arb | January/February 2018 39

22/01/2018 15:25


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

personalised woodchippers

P

latest kit GREENMECH ARBORIST 150

• 150mm (6in) chipping capacity • Powered by either a 26hp or 34hp Kubota diesel engine • Features GreenMech’s patented isc- lade chipping technolog • as to tow with subkg weight • hree- ear parts and labour warrant

RRP: £13,950

sales@greenmech.co.uk

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FÖRST DIRECTOR DOUG GHINN DISCUSSES THE RISING POPULARITY OF PERSONALISED ARB EQUIPMENT

ersonalisation as an effective business tool has come on leaps and bounds in recent years, as marketers recognise the importance of personalisation in customer engagement. One of the biggest areas that this has been evident in or the general consumer is online. Today, there s a wealth o data available that enables a brand to develop a relationship with a potential customer through the whole life cycle of a purchase. This isn’t just a ‘welcome back’ type message – it includes product recommendations, online tracking, social media and targeted Google

ads, regular email programmes, and a host of other tactics that help ou engage more effectivel with your customers and ultimately encourage repeat purchases. Personalisation isn’t just limited to online, though – it’s also becoming popular in our industry. The personalisation of woodchippers, for example, isn’t a new concept – it’s been around for ears owever, there s no doubt that it’s more popular now than it ever has been be ore As a business, Först has developed an e cellent reputation in the sector or providing highperformance and robust machines, backed up with a commitment

FÖRST ST6P

• ForstGrip feed roller system • pen top wheel mm , twin 8in blades • riggs tratton Vanguard – hp V twin petrol engine • Auto ntelligence o tress evice • hree- ear warrant RRP: £

www.forst-woodchippers.com

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22/01/2018 15:53


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

boost staff morale, and can also be antastic or helping to increase brand awareness ersonalising our machine in line with our brand is the most common request we have – such as the two blue rst woodchippers that A ut Above ree pecialists has to re ect its brand identit , merchandise and the rest o its eet, or the white rst machines that rockwells orestr has or the same reasons An additional advantage o this service is that it can help to increase on-site sa et ontracting, or instance, has its machines personalised in matte black with a high-visibilit re ective

orange he bright colour o the woodchipper helps aid the team when working earl in the morning or later in the evening, when visibilit can be restricted e have also recentl had a request or a pink rst woodchipper rom a customer in enmark – he is looking at how he can rent this particular machine out to help raise mone or ancer esearch

FÖRST XR8

• peciall designed to navigate sloped, rugged sur aces • draulic legs • Li ts off its caterpillar tracks to operate on railwa embankments • igh per ormance • trong visual identit RRP: £

www.forst-woodchippers.com

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Kit_Chippers.indd 41

hether ou want our machine personalised or not is reall down to pre erence At rst, we have an e tremel strong brand identit that our customers recognise and are proud to be associated with, so the o ten don t want to change an thing e still personalise at least one machine ever week, though, so it s clearl something that s here to sta he onl advice we give customers is that personalising can affect residual values in the long run – bu ers o used machines are generall looking or something in standard colours, so that is something to bear in mind

If you have your machines personalised with your own corporate colours, it can look extremely professional and help to increase brand awareness

to provide a first-class service offering his service offering includes the personalisation o rst woodchippers with whatever colours our customers want he process is simple i one o our customers wants to personalise their woodchipper, we will work with them ever step o the wa to ensure their machine looks e actl the wa the want it to All we ask or is an e tra two weeks lead time or deliver here are a number o advantages to personalising our woodchipper ou have our machines personalised with our own corporate colours, it can look e tremel pro essional, can

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22/01/2018 15:53


ARB NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

KIT

COURANT

Flash code beacon kit • Rechargeable on a 220V power supply or a cigarette lighter socket • Good visibility • Easy to use and clean • Magnetic • Waterproof • Crushproof • Delivered with a neon green cordelette RRP: £135

www.sorbus-intl.co.uk

HUSQVARNA T525 chainsaw

• Husqvarna’s lightest tree-care chainsaw, weighing 2.7kg • A powerful, low-emission X-Torq petrol engine ensures a professional performance, and is perfect for pruning and trimming jobs • A secondary belt eyelet makes it quick and easy to connect the saw to the climbing harness • Easy to use, with an auto return stop switch – meaning the stop switch automatically resets to the ON position for trouble-free starting • Air filter cover – quick release cover saves time when cleaning or changing air filter • Retained bar nut – meaning you are less likely to lose it • Low Vib – effective anti-vibration dampeners absorb vibration, creating more enjoyable working conditions and reducing the strain on the user’s hands and arms • Air Injection – centrifugal air cleaning system for reduced wear, longer operating time between filter cleanings, and improved productivity and longevity RRP: £510

www.husqvarna.com 42

Pro Arb | January/February 2018

Arb Kit JanFeb.indd 42

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22/01/2018 15:50


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

VEGA

24-plait polyester jacket • Lowest -certified elongation currently on the market (1.2%) • Diameter: 11.7mm • esigned specificall or new generation o mechanical climbing techniques • Ultra lightweight RRP: POA

www.marlowropes.com

RIKO

Bandsaw sawmills • Manufactured in Europe • Petrol or electric powered • Range of models from 66cm timber diameter upwards • Static or UK IVA approved road towable • Full UK parts and technical support

RRP: £3,750

enquiries@riko-uk.com

STEIN KRIEGER

HENCHMAN

Sentinel chainsaw trousers Type C, class 1

Professional tripod ladder

• Multi-directional material for increased movement and comfort • Pre-formed ArmortexKFM abrasionresistant knees (waterproof) • ArmortexKFM tear-resistant waterproof greave • ighl re ective seam piping or sa et in low-light conditions • Two zipped side pockets – downward closure RRP: £199

• Wide, sturdy platform rung for safety and comfort • All three legs are independently adjustable for stability on uneven ground • 150kg safe working load • Clawed anti-slip feet prevent sinking/slipping, with rubber foot covers for hard/delicate surfaces • Three-year guarantee

enquiries@frjonesandson.co.uk

RRP: £325

www.henchman.co.uk

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Arb Kit JanFeb.indd 43

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22/01/2018 15:50


product dna

NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Husqvarna 572 XP

the ignition timing at top RPMs. This means a 30% decrease of internal pressure build up in the engine, compared to Husqvarna chainsaws without this feature – giving smoother operation, lower operating temperatures and maximum possible uptime. 4. Optimised filtration

1. 12% higher cutting capacity The 572 XP has an 12% higher cutting capacity – even when using long guide bars – when compared to older Husqvarna chainsaw models within the 70cc range. This is made possible with the new engine layout and improved cooling, which is a prerequisite for ensuring high power output. The engine gives users a 30% broader RPM range compared to previous generations, increasing the optimal range from a band of 2,000-3,000RPM. The lighter and smaller diameter o the wheel generates rapid acceleration. Combined with good torque, this is the most powerful 70cc chainsaw Husqvarna has ever made. 2. Power-to-weight he cranksha t and mu er, together with other critical components, have been designed for functionality, and extra reinforcements have been made for enhanced strength and reliability. To balance out this increase, weight optimisation has decreased the weight of several components. This translates into a weight of 6.6kg and a power level of 4.3kW, a considerable powerto-weight improvement compared to previous

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Husqvarna chainsaw models in the same displacement segment. 3. Cooling capacity up to 20% Cooler engines equal better power and performance and increased product lifetime. The 572 XP’s cooling capacity is up to 20% higher than previous generations of Husqvarna chainsaws – achieved through the combination of new hardware, digitalisation, and engine control (soft cut-out system). When it comes to hardware, the heat barrier in the 572 XP is made from specially crafted polymers that are heat resistant and lightweight, provide extreme insulation, and are integrated within the cover. Low carburettor temperatures are fundamental for good starting ability, as fuel today starts to evaporate at very low temperatures. igital air ow anal sis enables optimisation o air ow in the product, thereb refining the placement of cooling apertures and internal de ectors in the he newl designed internals also mean less dust and dirt particles will get trapped in the cooling fins The soft cut out system (an ignition management system) protects the engine from harmful over-revving by automatically adjusting

Standard on the 572 XP is a heavy-duty air filter with a large filtration sur ace area to enable longer use and better filtration he larger filtration area – when compared to previous generations – means an increase in working intervals with maintained performance, and requires less requent cleaning mproved filtration capacit and a well-sealed system helps stop abrasive particles entering the combustion chamber, for a chainsaw with a healthier engine that can operate for longer. 5. 10 times quicker air/fuel mix adjustment With the launch of the 572 XP, AutoTune has been updated, making automatic adjustments up to 10 times faster than the previous version. This means the machine will always be correctly tuned in ever-changing operating conditions, which maximises uptime as users need not worry about carburettor adjustments. Auto une also significantl reduces e haust emissions, assisting in long-term compliance with worldwide emissions regulations and a cleaner working environment.

ABOUT Husqvarna (UK) Ltd consumer.support@husqvarna.co.uk www.husqvarna.com/uk

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22/01/2018 15:22


Focus on...

C450 Treeshear

CS580

www.marshalllogging.co.uk

PA Ads JanFeb.indd 6

22/01/2018 13:58


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

TOOLBOX WE TALK KIT WITH DENNY SWEET, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT UPTON TREE SERVICES, DORSET

CHAINSAWS We use Stihl and we always have done – never tried anything else! We’re happy with them, so have stuck with them. We also use Stihl hedgecutters and blowers – they are reliable and extremely powerful.

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES AND TRAILERS We have an Isuzu truck, which we got because of its 3.5t towing capacity and five-year warranty. It’s a good, reliable vehicle, and they’re reasonably priced as well. We also have a Valtra T194 fitted with a Botex 580B forestry crane; this is our fourth Valtra and fourth Botex loader, and they’ve all been absolutely awesome machines. The knowledge and service given by Jas P Wilson and our local Valtra dealer Chris Cox Ltd is second to none. As a result of this, we don’t need to go anywhere else. We have found both the Valtra and Botex machines to be very reliable and user friendly, and in the event of breakdown, Jas P Wilson and Chris Cox Ltd are both more than happy to assist at the drop of a hat. We bought the Unimog U1750 in 2008 and coupled it with a TP 250 TPO chipper, which is a good combination. It’s a great bit of kit for clearance work and an asset to our company, but requires a lot of specialist maintenance to keep it in tiptop condition.

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22/01/2018 15:24


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

PPE Our staff choose their own chainsaw trousers and boots. The Pfanner trouser and boots consistently seem to be the most popular, and seem to last the longest. We generally go for Petzl helmets and MSA Sordin visors and hearing protection, coupled with Sena Bluetooth communication kits.

STUMP GRINDER We’ve got a Rayco RG100X stump grinder; this is our third Rayco stump grinder, and it’s by far the best. When we were shopping for a new stump grinder, we tried out a few of the leading manufacturers’ stump grinders and found the Rayco to be the most powerful and effective machine. It has proved to be very reliable, and is a pleasure to operate.

CHIPPERS

We recently upgraded our tracked chipper from a Timberwolf 190TFTR to a 280TFTR. We had the 190 for four years, it was a great machine and very reliable; the 280 was a natural progression. So far it has been great, and a huge improvement on the 190. We have used Timberwolf chippers from day one – I have found our dealer and Timberwolf to be very helpful and it’s nice to be able to buy a British machine and do our bit to support the UK’s manufacturing industry.

EXCAVATOR We have a Komatsu PC138US, with forestry attachments including the Dymax 14in tree shear and the Intermercato Tiger Grip 42 S grab. We chose the Komatsu because it is very compact for a 13t machine, with zero tail swing, which means it’s great in the woods. We’ve owned it for three years now, and it has been a great machine. We chose the Dymax tree shear and Tiger Grip grab because of their reliability and the great service offered by the dealer, Approved Hydraulics.

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22/01/2018 15:24


the ANCIENT TREE

column

Each month we feature an ancient British tree. This month the Ancient Tree Forum introduces us to...

The Gilwell Oak, Chingford, London

G

ilwell Park is, for many, one of the most important sites in the scouting movement. The site was purchased in 1919 to provide a suitable outdoor space for the organisation, and played host to the first ood adge course later that year. It has been synonymous with this award ever since – so much so that it is commonly believed that the beads given to ood adge recipients are made of wood from the Gilwell Oak, a tree at the centre of the site. In recognition of the importance of this tree to the Scouting movement, the oodland rust crowned the ilwell Oak England’s Tree of the Year 2017. Prior to being purchased by the Scouts, Gilwell Park was a part of various private estates. Large, impressive trees were typically valued and admired on such estates, as they were a way for the landowners to show off their wealth A number o veteran oak trees persist on the site today, but none as famous as the Gilwell Oak. In the mid 18th century, the nearb hite ouse originall called sborne all was built its location is likely to have been chosen due to the proximity of the tree. Today, the tree stands next to the Gilwell Park Conference Centre, and is a must-see for all visitors to the site n ortunatel , the effects o its popularity are beginning to show,

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with the soil around the tree having become compacted over the years. Soil compaction removes the air spaces within the soil, which can potentially lead to anaerobic conditions and waterlogging issues. Unless remedied, the impact upon the soil will eventually cause the tree to decline in health. Gilwell Park lies on the fringe of Epping Forest, which is an important site for veteran trees, having a population of around 50,000 of them. Given its proximity to the forest, Gilwell Park was chosen to host the Ancient ree orum s summer orum, and the three-day training course ‘Valuing and Managing Veteran Trees’ in oth events took advantage of the wealth of veteran trees in the vicinity, and, of course, any visit to Gilwell Park would not be complete without a trip to the Gilwell Oak. he Ancient ree orum s training programme is now available at www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk/ events. The programme includes a number of one-day introductory courses, as well as a three-day ‘train the trainer’ course being held in ere ord

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management at www.ancienttree forum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

22/01/2018 12:50


You will love the performance of the NEW CAMON SG30 Stump Grinder fitted with the hard wearing Greenteeth system. You’ll be equally impressed by the low running costs, simple teeth changes and excellent build quality.

Our UK built SG30 Stump Grinder cannot be beaten on performance, reliability or price.

Honda GX390 banks engine Fitted with 8 Greenteeth Reinforced chassis Only 63cm wide Folding handlebars Find out more by visiting

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22/01/2018 14:42


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

Call 01903 777 580 or email laura.harris@eljays44.com with your vacancy

CLIMBERS AND GROUNDSMEN

TRAINEE AND EXPERIENCED CLIMBERS

We are currently seeking climbers and groundsmen to join our team, covering all of London and its surrounding areas. Training will be provided as necessary as part of our continued professional development program. The applicants will be required to work 7am-4.30pm Monday-Friday, although the need for flexibility to meet the needs of the business is vital. All applicants must already have NPTC units CS30, 31, 38 and 39, with a minimum of one year’s experience within the industry preferred. Full driving licence preferred but not essential. Please do not apply unless you hold the required qualifications.

Due to expansion, Advanced Tree Services is seeking to employ full time trainee and experienced climbers. Ideally you should hold the relevant NPTC or Lantra units (use of a chainsaw in a tree and aerial rescue as a minimum). Driving licence and access to your own transport are desirable but not essential.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

TRAINEE CLIMBERS AND ARBORISTS

SITE OPERATIVE

Glendale is looking to recruit staff who will bring enthusiasm, expertise and fresh ideas to the table and who are looking to further their arboricultural career. Due to growth of our arboriculture business in the South East, we are currently recruiting for arborists in the following contract areas: Hillingdon, Waltham Abbey, Radlett and Sevenoaks. We are ready to invest in our trainees and apprentices to make them top climbers and earners within the company. If you aspire to or are working towards the relevant NPTC qualifications we would be interested to hear from you.

Greenfields Countryside Ltd is looking for a site operative, who will be involved in all aspects of forestry and landscaping maintenance, including grass seeding and cutting, weeding, pruning, turfing, planting, felling, spraying, fencing and all other general forestry maintenance operations. You will be expected to carry out practical skilled maintenance and new work operations to set standards and schedules, using petrol and diesel fuelled machinery such as strimmers, mowers, hedge cutters and chainsaws. You will be involved in, and carry out, regular maintenance checks on vehicles and machinery.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

BARKLAND TREE SPECIALISTS Location: Staines

ADVANCED TREE SERVICES Location: Dorking

GLENDALE Location: South East

GREENFIELDS COUNTRYSIDE LTD Location: Leicestershire

IT WORKS 20,000

OVER JOBSEEKERS VISIT OUR SITE A MONTH

OVER

450

cvs online to browse cv

48,000

OVER emails are sent to candidates monthly

5

strong candidate APPLICATIONS per job on average

● Weekly jobs mailer ● Feature jobs inside relevant print magazine ● Jobs featured on weekly news and round up emails ● Different solutions to secure quality applicants

official job board:

visit the website at horticulturecareers.co.uk call Laura today on 01903 777580

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22/01/2018 15:07


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

little

INTERVIEW PRO ARB’S LITTLE INTERVIEW IS FUN, THOUGHT PROVOKING AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO THE PEOPLE WHO WORK WITHIN THE INDUSTRY

For your chance to appear in a future edition of the magazine, simply answer the questions below and return them, along with a head and shoulders photo, to: claire.maher@eljays44.com. It’s as simple as that! Don’t think too deeply, just fire back your answers and look out for yourself in a future issue.

natalie ross

Account manager, Pro Arb

What’s your go to reference book? The Secret. ©Twocoms / Shutterstock.com

the

Favourite species of tree? Red oak. If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? Teaching. Best moment in your career thus far? Being asked to look after Pro Arb magazine, of course. One piece of technology you couldn’t live without? Phone.

Thank you in advance for your participation.

Favourite sandwich filling? Salmon and cream cheese. Karaoke song of choice? Westlife – Flying Without Wings Who would play you in a film of your life? Charlize Theron. Favourite sporting memory? Managing to hit the ball at our summer staff game o rounders

rhys perkins

Top of your bucket list? Visiting the Grand Canyon.

Trainee arborist , MWMAC

Favourite species of tree? Oak.

Favourite sandwich filling? urke and stu ng If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? IRATA rope access. Best moment in your career thus far? Discovering the Petzl ZigZag. One piece of technology you couldn’t live without? The Petzl Zigzag.

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Little Interview JanFeb.indd 51

Karaoke song of choice? Mumford and Sons – I Will Wait. Who would play you in a film of your life? Elyes Gabel.

© Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.com

What’s your go to reference book? Claus Mattheck – The Axiom of Uniform Stress.

Favourite sporting memory? Alex Honnold free soloing El Capitan. Top of your bucket list? Having a go with a Stihl MS 880.

Pro Arb | January/February 2018 51

22/01/2018 15:54


EW L N O R O U T O N R IG VE ES O D C E IS N D LI N O

IT’S NOT JUST A TREE

150

kg

of C02 can be absorbed by a tree each year, helping to mitigate climate change.

TREES SAVE LIVES CONTACT US TODAY TO DISCOVER HOW UNCOMPACTED SOIL SOLUTIONS ENABLE TREES TO THRIVE. greenblue.com | 0800 018 7797

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