Page 1

MARCH 2018

WINKWORTH

AN INTERVIEW WITH

ARBORETUM

TREE REMOVAL

WHEN IS IT

JUSTIFIED? STUMP AND GRIND

THE NEW STUMP GRINDERS

AWARD-WINNING PARTNERSHIP B R I S T O L C I T Y CO U N C I L A N D G R I S T W O O D A N D T O M S


®

5 STIHL TIMBERSPORTS ´ WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS. 3,500 TREES Maintained. 45 METRES OF CLIMBING ROPE. 21 DOUBLE PULLEYS. 3 PICKUP TRUCKS. 1 CHAINSAW.

Chris Pratt Arborist and STIHL TIMBERSPORTS® athlete.

STIHL understands the needs of arb professionals, like Chris. The evolution of many years of research and development, our range of specialist chainsaws combines innovative technology, optimum ergonomics and low weight to deliver exceptional cutting performance and comfort. Whether it’s a crown lift, reduction or complete removal, trust STIHL to take care of every requirement and set the standard for power and reliability.

The STIHL MSA 160 T chainsaw. A lightweight yet powerful cordless arborist saw.

Find out more at your local STIHL Approved Dealer or visit

www.stihl.co.uk Pro Arb_Arborist_Chris Pratt_Chainsaw 1_265x210.indd 1

26/02/2018 09:39


NEWS

04 AGENDA Do you think the Northern Forest is a  worthwhile investment?

06 NEWS A roundup of industry news  10 OPINION  ob McBride asks whether the R

Buttington Oak could have been saved

11 GLOBAL FOREST We take a look at the initiatives 

increasing tree cover worldwide

13 GROWING TOGETHER Professionalism is paramount within  arboriculture, says Jonathan Hazell

14 MEASURES OF SUCCESS Edward Morrow examines the three key  metrics for successful arb businesses

15 PESTS AND DISEASES Tackling box tree caterpillar 

FEATURES

17 PERFECT PARTNERS  he winning collaboration between Bristol T City Council and Gristwood and Toms

21 WINKWORTH ARBORETUM  How the National Trust is reinvigorating

this Surrey arboretum

24  OUTSIDE THE BOX  Does working outside boost mental health? 28  HOW TO PLANT A FOREST  The Heart of England Forest tells us

about its forest creation work

30  DOMESTIC VS COMMERCIAL  omparing domestic arb work with C commercial jobs

32 ETHICS OF TREE REMOVAL  hat needs to be considered before W deciding whether to fell

34 TOP TEN TIPS

KIT

Expanding your business

38 TOOLBOX Barkland Tree Specialists, Staines 

40 MEWPS We consider why a MEWP is a beneficial  addition to an arb business

42 STUMP GRINDERS How stump grinder evolution is making  the service easier to offer

44 PRODUCT DNA Stihl PR33 C Megacut pruning saw  45 FOOT SAFETY The importance of good quality boots  46 ARB KIT A roundup of the best new products 

REGULARS 48 AT YOUR SERVICE  Focusing on the wild service tree

50  ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

CONTENTS

WELCOME MARCH 2018 • VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 02

W

elcome to the March issue of Pro Arb. I received an email back in December 2017 from an arborist named Rachel Downs, explaining how her budding career in tree surgery had helped her get over a stressful period; her exposure to the outdoors, fresh air and trees – which she hadn’t been getting in her previous job as a behavioural specialist – allowed her to move on with her life. We spoke to Rachel and the mental health charity Mind about the impact working outdoors has on mental health – find the article on pages 24-26. It feels as though awareness of the importance of trees, culturally and environmentally, is starting to spread beyond the sight of just arborists and others in the tree care industry, with governments and society at large now taking notice. John Vidal, writing recently for The Guardian about the significant increase in global tree planting, called it a “eureka moment for the planet”. For more information on the global forest boom, take a look at The Global Forest on page 11, or the read

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Features Editor – Ashley Lampard ashley.lampard@eljays44.com Production Editor – Charlie Cook charlotte.cook@eljays44.com Subeditor – Kate Bennett kate.bennett@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Deputy Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com Account Manager – Natalie Ross natalie.ross@eljays44.com Horticulture Careers – Laura Harris laura.harris@eljays44.com

interviews with Winkworth Arboretum on page 2022 and The Heart of England forest on pages 28-29 to find out more about managing woodland. While all this increased tree planting is certainly positive news, my favourite tree news this month is the men and women in Mexico who have ditched conventional marriage and opted to marry trees instead, in order to raise awareness of illegal logging practices in the town of San Jacinto Amilpas, Oaxaca. Personally, I just haven’t met the right willow yet. Until next month,

ASHLEY LAMPARD

PRODUCTION Design – Lyssa Rutherford, Kara Thomas Printed by Pensord Press Ltd Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: emily.maltby@eljays44.com Pro Arb is published 9 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Ashley Lampard at ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson

Cromwell’s Oak, Melksham, Wiltshire

51 LITTLE INTERVIEW Pro Arb | March 2018

3


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

AGENDA

DO YOU THINK THE NORTHERN FOREST IS A WORTHWHILE INVESTMENT?

TONY HOTHERSALL

Director, City of Trees

“We believe that people are hardwired to want to be near nature” At City of Trees we are proud to be one of the Community Forests collaborating with the Woodland Trust in the creation of the Northern Forest. As the Community Forest for Greater Manchester, all trees we plant in the city region, from orchards to saplings and even street trees, will form part of this new mosaic of woodland, which will stretch more than 120 miles. The Northern Forest is set to be hugely beneficial, helping to tackle climate change, combat flooding, improve air quality, increase biodiversity and create habitats for wildlife. Not only that, but trees and woods can help deliver huge economic benefits: bringing new skills and employment opportunities, creating hubs for recreation, tourism and leisure, and contributing to making attractive places that people want to live, work and invest in. This isn’t even touching on the amazing health and wellbeing advantages that trees and green

4

Pro Arb | March 2018

spaces help achieve. We believe that people are hardwired to want to be near nature, and at City of Trees we are passionate about planting more trees and bringing woodland back into use, ensuring a green legacy for future generations. What’s special about the Northern Forest is that it brings together lots of different organisations, from Liverpool to Hull – all of whom want to create a cleaner, greener environment. Hopefully, its vast vision will unlock support from investors, landowners and many other partners, to help make it happen.

SIMON LLOYD

Chief executive, RFS

“We are far too dependent on a narrow range of species, many of which are threatened with pests and pathogens” The Northern Forest is to be welcomed in a region that has just 8% woodland cover – but there is a long way to go to raise the £500m needed to fully realise the 25-year project. Much of the emphasis to date has been on

the planning and planting stages, but the ongoing management of the woodlands will require commitments for decades. Woodland that is not well-planned and managed will ultimately fail to deliver the benefits that communities value – whether that is amenity, wildlife habitats, timber or local jobs. Ultimately, landowners in the area the Northern Forest is targeting will need to have a financial justification for transforming their land into woodland. A new framework for woodland creation – one that embraces productive planting and includes the nonmarket value of woods – is required to provide the required incentives. The need to futureproof our woodlands against environmental change, pests and diseases is increasing, and we believe that the Northern Forest is an opportunity to plant a wide palette of native and non-native tree species, depending on the landowner’s objectives. We are far too dependent on a narrow range of species, many of which are threatened with pests and pathogens. Much can be learned from the success of the National Forest, which increased woodland cover from 8% to 20% over 20 years. If the Northern Forest can replicate this example, it will undoubtedly be a worthwhile investment.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

CAROLINE HARRISON

England manager, Confor

“Funding must be at a level where farmers and landowners can see a future return on their investment” Confor welcomes the Northern Forest; it is great that England’s Community Forests and the Woodland Trust are supporting more productive mixed tree planting to deliver multiple economic, environmental and community benefits. This creates a real opportunity for farmers to diversify their land holdings after Brexit and produce an income from growing and harvesting trees. However, the grant money available is small, and although the proposed scheme will link up a number of Community Forests, the lion’s share of the land needed will lie within the private sector. This land will need to be affordable, and the available funding must be at a level where farmers and landowners can see a future return on their investment. There are also big opportunities for tree planting further north than the scope of the Northern Forest. In 2017, we finally saw some large-scale productive forests approved at Doddington in Northumberland and Lowther in Cumbria. There are real possibilities to create more modern productive forests in the North if a creative approach is taken. This means

looking at opportunities such as Forestry Investment Zones and finding out how to make them work to deliver real benefits to rural areas. It also means understanding that Michael Gove’s emphasis on the need for future rural support to be based on positive environmental outcomes offers the chance for a significant increase in mixed productive tree planting. Forestry has a big part to play in creating the vibrant, thriving and sustainable rural communities of the future. The Northern Forest is a positive development, but the wider possibilities for forestry in Northern England are much greater.

SHIREEN CHAMBERS FICFor

Executive and technical director, Institute of Chartered Foresters

“When you take an initiative like this and concentrate it geographically, it drives up the benefit-to-cost ratio” Research has shown that concentrated initiatives such as these deliver many benefits, far outweighing the cost involved. Though the upfront cost seems high, I understand that the benefit-to-cost ratio for this project is around 5:1, compared to HS2, which is around 2:1. When you take an initiative like this and concentrate it geographically, it drives up

the benefit-to-cost ratio. Green infrastructure generally brings benefits in infrastructure, reducing flood risk and helping to mitigate climate change. In local areas, this can involve improving health and wellbeing, increasing opportunities in access and recreation, improving the quality of the local area, enabling biodiversity, and providing ecological networks, all of which would have been evidenced. The Central Scotland Forest is much bigger than any of the Community Forests in England, and has shown real benefits in terms of economic development, which is why it was set up in the first place. I do think we’ll see similar initiatives in the future, but it is long overdue. The English National Forest was set up around 20 years ago, and the Northern Forest will be the first big forest created since then. There aren’t many large swathes of land where you can take a strategic view like this – I think that it is overdue and well placed.

NEXT MONTH: HOW IMPORTANT IS FURTHER EDUCATION FOR PEOPLE GOING INTO ARBORICULTURE?

Much can be learned from the success of the National Forest, which increased woodland cover from 8% to 20% over 20 years

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018

5


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

NEWSBEAT

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

DISEASE-RESISTANT ELM TO BE DEVELOPED IN SHEFFIELD

The English elm has gone from being the UK’s most common tree prior to the Sixties, to being one of the rarest today. Dutch elm disease, the cause of the elm’s decline, is the focus of a new initiative conducted by Sheffield resident Paul Selby. Selby, along with Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust, aims to establish eight experimental plantations across the UK, with eight varieties of disease-resistant elm being planted in Greno Woods.

6

News.indd 6

Pro Arb | March 2018

Paul Selby has been working to try and save the Chelsea Road elm in Sheffield from the Streets Ahead programme. Through his work on the Chelsea Road elm he met the project’s national lead, Dr David Herling, and together the pair came up with the idea for the Sheffield branch of the elm initiative. David’s life’s work has been protecting elms and bringing them back to the UK. “The idea behind the eight experimental plantations is to establish a range of resistant elms across varying climate and soil conditions countrywide, from Exeter to Edinburgh,” he explained. “Above all, we want to make these new trees visible, so that our potential stakeholders can make up their own minds about which are suitable for wide-scale planting. “The information and evidence gleaned from the eight plantations will then be used to inform the commercialisation of the best new clones, so that, one day, elms may once again be a familiar tree in the UK landscape. The partnership of the Sheffield community in this has been inspirational.” www.wildsheffield.com

NEW TREE OFFICER EMPLOYED TO OVERSEE 3,500 NEW TREES PLANTED IN CROYDON Croydon Council is to spend £900,000 on planting 3,500 new trees throughout the borough over the next five years. Between 2018 and 2023 and at an annual cost of £180,000, an average of 700 trees per year will be planted in a bid to improve the borough’s air quality. Varieties will include cherry, plane, and maple. Areas with the poorest air quality will have trees planted first, meaning that the town centre and more northern wards are likely to be prioritised. Local councillors and residents have requested that other locations with higher pollution levels, such as road junctions, also be prioritised. The council has also recently appointed a new tree planting officer, whose job will involve coordinating where to put the new trees and making sure they remain healthy. www.croydon.gov.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 13:55


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

PRIVATE TRAINING PROVIDER THE TRAINING TREE UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Lisa Sanderson (centre) with Dr Katherine Deeks and Dr Caroline Gorton

The Training Tree, a private training provider of the ABC Level 4 diploma in arboriculture, has seen a major shift in its management, with Lisa Sanderson taking over the business. Formerly a training developer and lecturer at The Training Tree, Lisa will be taking on the business as her own with the support of Jago Keen, the company’s founder. Courses at The Training Tree are tailored to allow

10,000 NEW TREES TO BOOST ROADSIDE WILDLIFE HABITAT IN THE SOUTH WEST Highways England is starting a major programme of tree and shrub planting along the A30 and A38m in a bid to create a 105-mile corridor of wildlife habitat. The work is taking place across 21 sites in Devon and Cornwall, and involves the planting of 10,000 native trees and shrubs to fill or reduce gaps in hedgerow and woodland along the roadside. In total, the planting will provide around three extra miles of vegetation and connect more than 105 miles of habitat on the verge and land adjacent to the A30 and A38. The scheme is being delivered under Highways England’s national Biodiversity Plan, which is being supported by a £30m national investment programme over the next five years. The plan recognises that road verges and associated land can be managed to provide areas of habitat relatively free from human access, which may be scarce in the surrounding landscape. These road verges can also be used to connect fragmented habitats in the wider landscape, enabling plant and animal populations to move and interact, and thus become stronger and more resilient. www.gov.uk/government/organisations/highways-england

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

News.indd 7

students to fit education in around their varied and busy lifestyles. This modern approach allows students to take pauses when ill health, work pressures or other life stresses require their attention. The company is also firmly dedicated to supporting learners, with a made-to-measure approach to tutoring and mentoring. The company will now be registered as The Training Tree Learning Lounge Ltd, trading as The Training Tree. www.thetrainingtree.co.uk

NEW LASER SCANNING ‘WEIGHS’ TREES TO ASSESS CARBON STORED IN FORESTS

New laser scanning technology has revealed that one sycamore near Oxford has almost seven miles of branches. The aim of the project, carried out by University College London, is to ‘weigh’ the trees to accurately assess the carbon stored in forests and what role they can play in tackling climate change. A three-dimensional picture of the trees is built up using thousands of points of data, collected using lasers. This reveals the structure and its volume, which allows an estimate of mass. Forests are earmarked to provide around a quarter of the greenhouse gas emissions reductions under international efforts to cut climate change, but estimates of how much carbon is stored in tropical forests could be as much as 45bn tonnes out from the true number, the researchers said. www.ucl.ac.uk

Pro Arb | March 2018

7

27/02/2018 13:56


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

YORKSHIRE WATER PLEDGES TO SUPPORT THE NORTHERN FOREST WITH 1M TREES

NEW RFS ONE-DAY COURSES LAUNCHED

Yorkshire Water has pledged to plant 1m trees across Yorkshire over the next 10 years in a bid to reduce flood risk, offset carbon emissions and support the creation of the Northern Forest. The company has already been working with volunteers to plant 200,000 trees at Gorpley reservoir near Todmorden, as a part of its flood management scheme. As one of the biggest landowners in Yorkshire, with 28,000ha, Yorkshire Water has been working with the White Rose Forest Partnership to assess where the trees will

Courses on Woodland Archaeology, Tree Health, Tree ID, Forest Soils and GIS management planning have been added to the Royal Forestry Society’s one-day course selection for 2018, along with its popular courses on Grading and Measuring your Timber, a Guide for Caring for your Wood and Essentials for Measuring Woods and Trees. The first of the courses, Woodland Archaeology and Tree Health, will be held in April. All courses will be open to both members and non-members, and can be booked via the RFS website. www.rfs.org.uk

have the most impact on flood reduction, carbon, recreation and wildlife Chief executive Richard Flint said the company was keen to ensure it managed its land in a way that “makes the most of the benefits that a healthy natural environment can provide”. He went on: “Crucially, we also want to see these new woodlands provide opportunities for local people to get out and enjoy the health and wellbeing benefits that spending time in the natural environment can provide.” www.yorkshirewater.com

RARE BUTTERFLY HALTS FELLING OF ELM TREE IN SHEFFIELD

SOUTHAMPTON TREES PROVIDE MORE THAN £1M WORTH OF BENEFITS TO THE CITY

The White-letter hairstreak butterfly has temporarily saved a Sheffield elm tree that Sheffield City Council wanted to fell because of the apparent risk it posed to the highway. The threat of felling to the elm is due to Sheffield’s controversial Streets Ahead initiative. The White-letter hairstreak declined in the Seventies when its food was reduced by Dutch elm disease. They are difficult to spot, living at the tops of elm trees throughout England and Wales. “Due to the deteriorating condition of the tree, we now have to carry out pressing safety work to tackle extensive decay in the tree to ensure public safety,” said Cllr Bryan Lodge, the council’s Cabinet Member for Environment and Streetscene. Material pruned from the tree will be stored and then searched by hand by experts for butterfly eggs, he went on. “In the interests of securing the best outcome for wildlife, we have decided to assist with the council’s butterfly relocation plan, involving our staff who have previous experience of Whiteletter hairstreak egg relocation,” said Liz Ballard, Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust’s CEO. “We hope this will help to improve the chances of success for securing a future for the butterfly colony. “We will continue to call on the council to reassess and reconsider the need to ultimately fell the Chelsea Road elm tree.” www.sheffield.gov.uk

Research led by the University of Southampton has shown that Southampton reaps £1.29m worth of benefits from the hundreds of thousands of trees in its city parks and urban spaces. The study looked at factors such as climate regulation, air pollution removal, flood protection, provision of wildlife habitats and the benefits that tree access bring to people’s physical and mental health. The university worked in collaboration with Southampton City Council, Forest Research (the research agency of the Forestry Commission) and social enterprise Treeconomics. Researchers used specialist software to assess the value of the tree population to the city. Southampton has an estimated 267,000 trees, equivalent to one per city resident, or 52 trees/ha – covering a total of 929ha. In 2016, students collected data on urban trees from 414 randomly selected plots across the city, including information on tree species, trunk diameter, height, crown size, condition, shading and land use. The study found that, overall, there is good diversity of tree types, with a total of 103 different species. However, there are large numbers of English oak and sycamore – just exceeding the recommended limit of 10% for any one species per tree population. The report suggests that increasing diversity, by planting a wider variety of trees on new developments, would help to combat pests and diseases and provide adaptability to climate change. It is hoped that the overall canopy cover can be increased from 18.5% to 25%. www.southampton.ac.uk

8

Pro Arb | March 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


2 1 1M1A– Y 2018

Home of The ARB Show

p on the p A w o h S B R eA Look out for th oogle Play and trees.org.uk re, G Apple App Sto

t s e g g i b s ’ K U e h T r i a F e d a r T b r A e r pu

forward to k o lo & le p o e p reat

t some g

t fun, me a re g s a w 7 1 0 “Arb Show 2

od Food

Show Ales & Go

as

ns & Aren New Attractio

Join us

petitions

Demos & Com

gy

nolo The Latest Tech

next year.”

osphere Unrivalled Atm

w o h S B R A e h T .uk/ g r .o s e e r .t w w w #ARBshow18

Principal Sponsor of the ARB Show for the 14th year

Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


ROB MCBRIDE DISCUSSES THE RECENT FALLING OF THE ANCIENT BUTTINGTON OAK, AND WHETHER IT COULD HAVE BEEN SAVED

S

ince I reported the recent demise of the Buttington Oak in a winter storm, and the news was picked up by a number of major news outlets (including BBC News, The Times and The Daily Mail), many people have contacted me with regards to what may now happened to the fallen tree. At this stage the landowner, who I am in contact with, has an arable crop growing in the field, and understandably does not want any activity taking place until it is harvested. I have some early ideas for what could be done with the tree trunk, as do many of the people who contacted me. When the larger and more well-known

Pontfadog Oak fell in 2013, many discussions about what to do with it took place, but nothing ever came of the ideas that were mooted (although the tree’s owner is now creating beautiful handcrafted jewellery out of the wood); ideally we can avoid this happening again. The Buttington Oak sits next to the River Severn and Offa’s Dyke, very close to the site of the Battle of Buttington, which was fought in 893 between the Vikings and an Anglo-Saxon-Welsh coalition. It was recorded on the Ancient Tree Hunt site (no. 31758) and had the third largest girth of any oak in Wales. As an ancient pollard, the Buttington Oak was far from a ‘natural’ tree: its location is

It has served as a marker along Offa’s Dyke for a thousand years, making it culturally significant

no accident, and it has served as a marker along Offa’s Dyke for a thousand years, making it culturally significant. The big question is: why did it collapse? I write this in an apartment in the Bulgarian capital Sofia, partway through my European Tree of the Year tree tour, and can confidently say that if a tree such as the Buttington Oak had been located in most European countries, it would still be standing. The level of recognition and statutory tree protection in many European countries is so much better than the TPO system we have in the UK, with its loopholes that allow the decimation of older trees. The

OPINION NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Buttington Oak, which has been split for a number of years, could have been propped, reduced, cabled and subjected to a root protection area many years ago, and all at a reasonable cost. I do understand that not all old trees can have this treatment, but a tree that is a thousand years old and has an 11-metre girth definitely should have been a candidate. In the December of 2017, I had a private meeting with Hannah Blythyn, the new Welsh Minister for Environment, and we discussed statutory protection for significant trees – we need it now, before any more of our arboreal wonders are lost through neglect. We are failing in our duty of care to our heritage.

ABOUT Rob McBride, ‘The Treehunter’, is a campaigner for ancient trees. www.treehunter.co.uk

10

Pro Arb | March 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

THE RISE OF THE

GLOBAL FOREST PEOPLE AND GOVERNMENTS ARE INCREASINGLY COGNISANT OF THE BENEFITS TO BE REAPED FROM TREES; WE TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THE INITIATIVES THAT ARE AIMING TO BOOST FOREST COVERAGE GLOBALLY

I

f you ever want to understand a cultural shift, look to Willow and Jaden Smith. The celebrity siblings teamed up with Just Water and TreePeople in February to plant trees in Los Angeles; if an understanding of the importance of trees has made it onto the celebrity ladder, there’s a good chance the rest of the world can see it, too.

February has seen plans emerge for the planting of millions of trees across the world, following the UK’s own 50m-tree Northern Forest

February has seen plans emerge for the planting of millions of trees across the world, following the UK’s own 50m-tree Northern Forest; Pakistan and China have both revealed their own schemes for increasing forest coverage, while a global initiative to reinvigorate Madagascan

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Opinion The rise of the global forest.indd 11

mangrove forests in protest against Donald Trump has also been put into motion. While the Northern Forest highlights this potential cultural shift, the UK’s perspective on trees as a whole is something of a mixed bag. Sheffield’s ‘Streets Ahead’ programme speaks for itself: while it has done a lot to raise the profile of trees in cities, opinion is incredibly divided. Other councils have perhaps learned from this, with Croydon’s new 3,500 trees and tree officer to oversee them, Southampton’s announcement of the £1.29m boost to the economy that its trees provide each year, the 10,000 new trees planned to boost roadside wildlife in the South West, and Sefton Council’s plan to seek advice from tree experts when protests were held against its plans to fell trees. Stories such as these have been making their way into national newspapers, with the larger stories gaining global coverage. We are also now at a point where global warming is at the forefront of many people’s minds, and it is clear that trees are starting

to be seen as a solution to an impending problem. China: 84,000 square kilometres China has recently made the decision to exercise its military power in an unconventional way, reassigning 60,000 soldiers to plant trees in a bid to fight pollution. The People’s Liberation Army, along with some of the nation’s armed police force, has been withdrawn from its posts on the northern border to plant trees in the Hebei province. The initiative aims to plant 84,000 square kilometres (32,400 square miles) of trees in the province, which encircles Beijing, by the end of the year – an area roughly the size of Ireland. This planting will increase the country’s forest coverage from 21% of its total landmass to 23% by 2020. Madagascar’s ‘Trump Forest’: 1m trees If this seems like a slightly less impressive number, it is because this particular scheme isn’t in conjunction with the government. Donors will be paying to plant 1m trees as part of a drive to counter

the U.S President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement, as well as his support for rejuvenating the American coal industry. The project, dubbed the ‘Trump Forest’ by the founders of the website that has raised the funds to support it, has received support from across the world – from France to the Czech Republic. More than $130,000 has been raised to plant mangroves in Madagascar through The Eden Reforestation Projects, a U.S.based non-profit that is focused on restoring forests. Pakistan: 130m trees This impressive number of trees will be planted across 99,077 acres of forest land in five districts of South Punjab. The South Punjab Forest Company will be spearheading the project, with help from the private sector. The completion of the project should add 240bn Pakistani rupees (Rs) to the economy, with the government earning Rs 20bn. The project will also help reduce the logging pressure on natural forests of the country.

Pro Arb | March 2018 11

27/02/2018 11:52


Trees in the Planning Process

Supported by: GreenBlue Urban; Lockhart Garratt

ŠAHMM/Urban & Civic

Overview:

Programme:

Highlighting the importance of trees and urban greenspace in the planning world, and vice versa, this half-day programme includes:

Understanding the Rudiments of BS 5837:2012, Nick Bolton MICFor

- trees in relation to design, demolition and construction - effective planning conditions - importance of local planning policy - best practice in arboriculture and landscaping. On: 13 April at Merton College, Oxford

The Importance of Local and Effective Planning, Ian Phillips MRTPI CMLI Arboricultural Methods and Site Supervision, Sharon Hosegood FICFor Making the Right Tree, Right Place Happen in Practice, Martin Gammie MICFor Securing Full Mitigation Value. Matt Searle MRTPI MICFor

Book now at

www.charteredforesters.org/event/icf-rtpi-trees-planning-process/


growing

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

together

L

ast month, I explored a number of the broad ideas behind my assertion that there is no place for an arboricultural industry, but every place for an arboricultural professional. The bottom line is that I think there should be trained, skilled and competent tree-workers – but who they are employed by and whose shirt they wear matters not one jot to me. Provided they are the staff appointed to carry out the tree work, I’ll be happy. It’s when the less well trained, experienced and competent outdoor staff willingly get involved in complex and potentially dangerous works that I get concerned. I recently walked away from a situation where the trimming of a coniferous hedge by an inexperienced ticket-holder had resulted in a trapped chainsaw, and colleagues had been called to try to release the trapped bar. Whether there was egg on face I cannot say – perhaps it was the fault of the saw? In my opinion, the skilled operative still has an invaluable role in properly looking after trees for a whole gamut of reasons that are quite often tree or site specific. In general terms: • Tree work is most efficiently accomplished by a skilled craftsman; therefore, they are likely to be better value for money than a different member of the green team casually using a chainsaw • The tools they use are, let’s be honest, fundamentally dangerous, and the use of those tools should be restricted to those who have been trained and are being supervised in their use • The places they have to go to work are often unattractive (20m up in a Lombardy poplar or bucket is enough to set anyone’s adrenaline flowing). Of course, each case will turn on its facts, and there’s a good argument for using a grab wagon to tidy storm damage rather than a skilled chainsaw operative, for example. But

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Jonathan Hazell March.indd 13

IN THE SECOND PIECE IN HIS TWO-PART SERIES ON THE STATE OF THE TREE CARE SECTOR, JONATHAN HAZELL ARGUES THAT INDIVIDUAL PROFESSIONALISM, RATHER THAN INDUSTRY-WIDE ORGANISATION, IS WHAT’S REALLY IMPORTANT

where work has been prescribed on a tree with a long-term future, it makes sense to me that the work is done in a manner that will cause least harm to the tree. Perhaps street trees that are cyclically pruned on a three or four-year cycle can be used as training grounds for new entrants to the industry – errors can be pruned out during the next round of works. For significant trees in the public eye, though, I would hope to see a good technical specification for reasonable and proportionate works carried out by trained, skilled and competent people. I get the impression that more and more work is being undertaken by, or on behalf of, fewer broader-based players (think Glendale, Ground Control, idverde etc.), and I find it gratifying, in an inverse sort of way, that so much of the poor quality work I see while driving is in private gardens, where those bigger players do not tend to operate. It’s not new to see poor work, and it can be difficult for the untrained eye to pick up work that has been carried out to a high technical

quality, but again, that is not new – the work of the competent professional often goes unnoticed because the tree is left with a pleasing and natural appearance. But does the client really notice, and does that encourage investment for that market sector in better brooms, rather than higher technical skills? The market for arboricultural services will always remain fractured. Buyers will range from the lone individual who is seeking a direct relationship with their tree care worker, to procurement managers in multisite, multiservice providers who are seeking to drive costs down. Curiously, each of these options tends to drive the price down; the individual buyer is often incredulous that it can cost that much to prune a tree, and the naïve supplier will do the work simply for the cash flow rather than walk away. The other route may involve a number of organisations subcontracting the service, and with a handling charged levied at each level, there may be very little left of the original value left for the team that actually ends up doing the work. www.jhazell.com

Pro Arb | March 2018 13

27/02/2018 11:03


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Measures of Success

N

Target revenue A common metric is that every £1 you invest in marketing should create at least £5 in revenue. For example, if you invested £500 into marketing, your target revenue should be £2,500. If this is not the case, take a look at your past client demographics. Did you receive business mainly from residents, businesses, estate agents, landscape referrals, municipalities, etc.? Once you know this, you can think about how you got that business and use the marketing medium that caters best to that specific group. Sales conversion Next, you have to go out and close the deal

Pro Arb | March 2018

Business Tips.indd 14

TIPS

AUTHOR, ACCOUNTANT AND ARBORIST EDWARD MORROW BREAKS DOWN THE THREE KEY METRICS THAT ARE CRUCIAL IN A SUCCESSFUL TREE CARE BUSINESS

umbers are important – even when it comes to the tree care industry. If you don’t see the numbers, or the impact they have on your tree care business, you could be missing significant growth opportunities. Find out how new clients are discovering you. Did they come from past clients, new referrals, radio adverts, billboards or social media, for example? When you get a new enquiry, always ask them how they heard about your business – this helps you to gauge your marketing efforts, so that you can start to make your marketing strategies as precise as your felling cuts.

14

B U S INE S S

with the prospective clients. Find out sales conversion percentage by taking the number of jobs that you got and dividing it by the total number of jobs that you assessed. For example, if you looked at 25 jobs and closed 12, then you have a 48% closing rate. This allows you to see how successful you are at selling your services. Your sales conversion ratio can tell you a lot about your sales process. Once you know and understand this number, you can ask better questions, especially if your results are not favourable – for instance: “Did we overbid on these jobs?” or “Did we not present our unique value proposition well enough to prospective clients?” Gross margin Understanding margins help you control profitability better. This formula is simple, and all about efficiency: Sales - Direct Cost = Gross Profit. Your direct cost is essentially the money you have to spend to get the job done – for example, the cost of the personnel involved. First, set a gross profit percentage target. This target will depend on several factors: how you operate, your personnel, the amount of equipment used, and your profitability target. If you want a 50% margin, your total direct labour costs should not exceed 50%. So, if you bid on a job for £2,000, then your costs should not be more than £1,000. Your desired gross margin

depends on the amount of sales and the return that the company needs – not just to stay in business, but to thrive. Typically, gross margin should be at least 30% to ensure that the company has enough sales to cover the remaining fixed and variable costs of the business. Second, use a simple spreadsheet to track your gross profit per job. Start with the price of the job minus the direct hauling, climbing, and ground costs. Knowing the power of margin helps you make course corrections quicker along the way. Keep these three metrics in mind as you manage your tree service.

ABOUT Edward Morrow is an author, accountant and arborist. info@accountstaffers.co

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 10:48


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Box tree caterpillar GLYNN PERCIVAL AND EMMA SCHAFFERT FROM BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS DISCUSS THE CONTROL OF THIS ASIAN INVASION

& PESTASE DISE

Causal agent Adult moths lay pale yellow eggs on the underside of box leaves in late March. When these eggs hatch, the caterpillars

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Bartlett's pests and diseases.indd 15

Box plants can survive being attacked as long as the larvae don’t eat the bark of the main stems

Adult box tree caterpillar

eat the leaves and produce a webbing and trail of pellets. After defoliation, the caterpillar becomes a pupa in a chrysalis, emerging as a semi-transparent white moth. In the UK and Ireland, the box tree caterpillar has two or three life cycles per growing season (late March-October), with each life cycle lasting six to eight weeks depending on temperature – 21-33ºC being optimal. Box plants can survive being attacked as long as the larvae don’t eat the bark of the main stems; consequently, fertilisation, mulching and irrigation will help plants recover from damage. Control No natural enemies of box tree caterpillars exist within the UK

and Ireland. Consequently, biocontrol measures are limited. In addition, box tree caterpillars contain a range of toxins that make them unpalatable to birds and mammals. As pupae can survive temperatures as low as -30ºC, it is highly unlikely that naturally occurring winter temperatures in the UK and Ireland will influence box tree caterpillar populations once they are established. Insecticides, such as spray oil in combination with a synthetic pyrethroid, offer the best form of control. They are mainly formulated as water-based sprays and applied when caterpillars are present. The insect growth regulator Dimlin Flo is also highly recommended due to its persistence on box foliage,

T

he box tree caterpillar (Cydalima perspectalis) is a defoliating pest of box (Buxus) plants. Although native to East Asia, adult moths were first recorded in the UK in 2008. By 2011, larvae were reported in private gardens in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, and by the end of 2014 the moth had become established in parts of London and its surrounding counties. Where caterpillars are found, severe defoliation occurs.

Symptoms of box tree caterpillar damage

providing long term control. Dimlin Flo kills only moths and caterpillars, and has no effect on beneficial insects. Application early in the growing season is recommended when adult box tree moths are observed. Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. kurstaki (trade name Dipel) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces an insect-specific endotoxin which perforates the box tree caterpillars’ gut lining, leading to paralysis and death. Bacillus treatments must be repeated three times, at intervals of about 10 days, because they mainly kill young larvae – the kill rate drops as the larvae age. Also available are pheromone lure traps that attract adult males, reducing the number of fertilised eggs laid by females. Pheromone traps should be in place from March to November. www.bartletttree.co.uk

Pro Arb | March 2018 15

27/02/2018 10:41


Focus on... Vahva Jussi trailer crane and IronHorse

www.marshalllogging.co.uk


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

perfect partners

PRO ARB EXPLORES THE RADICAL AND AWARD-WINNING PARTNERSHIP BEING FORGED BETWEEN BRISTOL CITY COUNCIL AND GRISTWOOD AND TOMS

I

n 2014, Gristwood and Toms and Bristol City Council started what has become an award-winning partnership to provide arb services to the city. The Industry Partnership Award and the CED Stone Group Supreme Winner recently awarded at the inaugural Pro Landscaper Business Awards held at Canary Wharf was in recognition of the partnership, working together as a collaborative team for the benefit of everyone involved, instead of using the conventional client-contractor model. Working together, the council and Gristwood and Toms have delivered a number of out-

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

of-the-ordinary initiatives throughout the city. These have included community watering days during a prolonged drought during the summer of 2017, whereby Gristwood and Toms provided labour and equipment for no extra cost; the initiative to plant one tree for every child in Bristol, which has seen more than 49,000 trees planted so far; and community days, held to encourage local people to raise environmental awareness. Though the woodfuel station has been running for around 10 years, it was not realising its full potential, and Bristol City Council, in collaboration with Gristwood and Toms, has

produced a business plan to take the business forwards, utilising both parties’ skills and experiences. Bristol City Council’s business manager for nursery and biomass Rod Pooley, the council’s nursery/biomass operator Ben Brown, and Gristwood and Toms’s contract manager Matt Loader are the key people involved in this partnership arrangement, which has seen Gristwood and Toms working closely with the council to make everything more efficient. “It’s not about the bottom line,” Matt stresses. “It looks complicated, but it’s not. It’s just two companies coming together to make things work.” 

Pro Arb | March 2018 17


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Waste not, want not The yard works as a constantly moving system, where nothing is wasted. “The chips run the boiler, which runs the dryer, which dries the rest of the material,” Matt explains. “The RHI goes back into the grid and the money goes back into the council.” A new 500kW boiler, replacing the old 400kW version, heats up Bristol’s Blaise Plant Nursery, which was previously consuming more than 80,000L of LPG and oil each year to heat the greenhouses. This cost around £19,000 a year in energy bills, and produced more than 100t of CO2 annually. Thanks to the partnership, the nursery is now home to the South West’s first local authority wood fuel station; its fuel is the wood ‘waste’ generated by the company’s tree work. The first biomass boiler installed won the Regan SW Green Energy Award for ‘Best Renewable Energy Project in the South West.’

18

the nursery is now home to the south west’s first local authority wood fuel station, its fuel consisting of the wood ‘waste’ generated through the company’s work

Pro Arb | March 2018

“All the trees in Bristol that need to be pruned or felled get brought back here,” says Ben. “We chip it and dry it, and then it goes into the boiler, which heats up the wood chipper and the nursery.” Ahead of the game The moisture content of logs that are currently going onto the site – wood that has been dead for a while but has only been recently cut down – is around 50%. The UK’s wood fuel accreditation scheme, Woodsure, requires wood fuel suppliers to prove that the moisture content of their product is below 30% before they can sell it, due to the detrimental effects that burning wood with a high moisture content has on the environment. Bristol City Council’s current process achieves this standard, and plans are being made to install a kiln dryer for drying logs in the very near future.

“What Woodsure is trying to do is limit people burning wet wood wherever possible – not by penalising the people who buy logs from the petrol station, for example, but by accrediting the companies that manufacture the wood,” says Matt. “Us putting a kiln in for that purpose is, I believe, 12 months ahead of the game.” Give and take Matt describes the partnership as “a really good working relationship”. He continues: “Local authorities can be tricky, but Rod’s bosses let us get on with it. Providing it doesn’t look like it is flawed in any way, they aren’t worried. The Pro Landscaper award has cemented that – Rod’s bosses are very happy with it.” The partnership works towards its general goal together. For example, when the nursery needs composting mulch, which Gristwood and Toms has in spades, the council can take it from them; Gristwood and Toms provides the timber trailer and the council provides the tractor to operate it; when the Gristwood and Toms team is felling trees, Ben will pick it up in the tractor; and when the council wants the

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

wood chipped, it will receive the use of the chipper at a reduced rate. “It’s always in our best interest for everyone to work efficiently,” says Matt. “It isn’t necessarily about providing one piece of equipment to make lots of money. Yes, at the end of the day it is a business, but it is about taking the good with the bad. If the nursery wants to do its own project, that’s fine.” Self-sufficiency The initial contract established between Gristwood and Toms and Bristol City Council outlined that the wood produced from the yard would be fed back into the Bristol zone boilers, creating what is essentially Bristol’s own selfsufficient energy source. The problem that they are currently facing is a lack of demand. “At the moment we’ve got a couple of schools, community centres and the pavilion, and we’re hoping to get some more in the pipeline,” says Ben. An important part of this self-sufficiency, if it comes to fruition on the scale that the council and Gristwood and Toms are hoping for, is making sure nothing is wasted. Rod tells us that, as a part of the contract, the council has to use the arisings that the team produces.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

“We’ve now started to mulch them, putting the mulch into the flowerbeds around the city, meaning everything is used,” explains Rod. “It is all recycled, in some way, back to the city.” Going green This green initiative and partnership is unique to Bristol City Council, something that Rod attributes to Bristol’s reputation for being a particularly green city – it won the European Green Capital Award in 2015. “We’ve got to be carbon neutral by 2050,” Rod explains, speaking of the pledge supported by Mayor of Bristol Marvin Rees. “We’ve already hit the 2020 target three years early, so we’re way ahead of reaching the 2050 target. This scheme is all a part of that.” “The publicity of the Pro Landscaper awards should help publicise the initiative and the hard work put in so far,” Matt says. “It should encourage more people to buy into it.” “The infrastructure is fantastic,” adds Rod. “You won’t find this in any other local authority in the country. You might have the wood fuel yard, but you wouldn’t have the concrete and the separation, with the dryers. I know there isn’t another one in a local authority in the country; they haven’t invested the money.”

Setting the standard Though the initiative is working well, it is proving difficult to find companies that are willing to make the initial investment. Ben suggests that raising the profile of this project is essential for getting other local authorities to undertake similar projects in the future, and that this initiative is the standard that others will be aiming to emulate. “In that sense, we’ve got to make it work.” Matt explains that the companies that he is currently working with outside of Bristol are very happy with their timber being sent to this initiative. “They know that it is sustainable, where it has gone, what it will produce and where it is going from there, compared to say, being split up and chucked into someone’s fire and releasing toxins into the air. I’ve got some housing associations that are really happy for their timber to come here, just because they know where it is going – they’ve been here and had a look around. We’re part of the Woodsure certification scheme, so whatever wood we use is accredited. We can’t use any old woodchip, dried and then sent out.” Pro Arb looks forward to seeing where this groundbreaking partnership goes next. www.gristwoodandtoms.co.uk

Pro Arb | March 2018 19


A visit R us Forestry & Firewood B a Machinery Specialists Sh t th owe

Biomass Chippers

Firewood Processors

Portable Sawmills

Log Splitters & Saws

www.fuelwood.co.uk 01926 484673 PA4 Visit our Stand No: 1940-2000 and see our newt:equipment... r

eale

Visit usStand at APF on stand no:our1940-2000... Visit our No: 1940-2000 and see new equipment... ted d

poin

e: sales@fuelwood.co.uk

Plantoil ad 118x91 Sept'14_PROARB 25/09/2014 14:44 Page 1

NEW ZT1844 STUMP GRINDER ap ewly

N

r

eale

ted d

poin

ly ap

New

26.5 OR 38HP PETROL ENGINE OPTIONS Jo Beau wood chippers

Jo Beau Wood Chippers

Jo Beau wood chippers

Bandit 18SVC screen chipper

Multitek firewood processor

Jo Beau Stump Grinders

Multitek firewood processor

Bandit 105 turntable chipper

caring for the environment

Bandit Stump Bandit Wood Chippers Bandit 105 turntable chipper Bandit 18SVC Grinders screenCOMPACT chipper • HIGHLY MANOEUVRABLE !

er sellCONSOLE CONTROL SWINGS SIDE TO SIDE FOR GREATER VISIBILITY Best er! t sell

Bes

Farmi PTO Chippers

Bandit HB20 Sidewinder stump grinder Bandit HB20 Sidewinder stump grinder

Multitek Firewood Processor

Hammel 750D ‘Special Edition’ shredder

Hammel 750D ‘Special Edition’ shredder

Don’tDon’t forget … we are Greenteeth dealer forget… weare area aGreenteeth Greenteeth dealer… Don’t forget… we dealer…

Visit ourour stand where a warm welcome awaits you, along withwith lightlight refreshments. Visit where aa warm welcome awaits you, along refreshments Visit ourstand, stand, where warm welcome awaits you, along with light refreshments

• CHAINSAW OIL • 2-STROKE OIL • SAW BLADE OIL Tel:01476 01476 568384 568384 www.globalrecycling.eu Tel: 568384 www.globalrecycling.eu Tel: 01476 www.globalrecycling.eu Unit 7 Ruston Road, Grantham, Lincolnshire NG31 9SW

Unit Unit 7 Ruston Road, Grantham, NG319SW 9SW 7 Ruston Road, Grantham,Lincolnshire Lincolnshire NG31 Creating Opportunities for a Better Environment

Creating Opportunitiesfor foraa better Better Environment Creating opportunities environment

www.plantoil.co.uk 0800 013 7363


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

WINKWORTH ARBORETUM

W

GRAHAM ALDERTON, HEAD GARDENER AT WINKWORTH ARBORETUM, TELLS PRO ARB WHAT IS INVOLVED IN RESTORING AND MAINTAINING THE NATIONAL TRUST’S ONLY ARBORETUM

inkworth Arboretum, located near Godalming in Surrey, was founded by Dr Wilfrid Fox, whose goal was to paint the landscape with autumnal reds and yellows, but handed over to the National Trust in the Fifties. Winkworth boasts more than 6,500 trees and reaches the peak of its busy period during bluebell season; head gardener Graham Alderton tells us how he and his team are restoring the arboretum to its former glory.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

How do you check the health of the trees, and what technology do you use? As is the case with most National Trust properties, there are three different category bands: those that are very close to important or busy areas, which are checked once a year; those that are checked every two years; and those that are checked every three years. Each individual specimen is checked by our gardeners, who are trained accordingly at

different levels. The tree safety management training consists of two and four-day courses. We are hoping to train volunteers as well. We do everything by eye; if we see an issue then it is noted and dealt with accordingly. We don’t currently use any technology – some tree consultants us various bit of kit, and if it became cheaper we would consider using some items, but I don’t believe there is any substitute for checking manually. 

Pro Arb | March 2018 21


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Sorbus Hill was once home to the National Collection. The gardens team manually removed all the bramble two years ago as it had got out of control. Last year it was covered in bracken so we used a remote control mower to run over it and bruise it, which weakened it. This year we will spray Asulox in September if the trial area we sprayed last year confirms it works. What plans do you have for the future? We’re aiming to get the arboretum back to Dr Fox’s original plans. Our short-term plans are to tidy up areas that have been neglected. Once we have done that then we will concentrate on the important specimens, and look at the succession planning of trees that were put in 70 years ago. The best view for autumn colour is from the meadow. I believe Dr Fox walked this way from his farmhouse to his secretary’s house across the arboretum. Dr Fox would have seen the landscape painted red and yellow and reflected in the lake through October and November, and that’s what the team is trying to bring back. We’re removing the self-seeded trees, but to reassure the public we have installed interpretation to explain why we are doing this. On a site like this we are essentially gardening with larger plants. It’s a managed arboretum, not a woodland, and it’s important to give the trees a bit of space. Is it yourself and the staff on site that do the tree work?

22

It’s a managed arboretum, not a woodland, and it’s important to give some of the trees a bit of space

Pro Arb | March 2018

Previously there were three gardeners onsite and contractors were called in for tree works. We’ve now trained our senior gardener and have since employed a trained climbing arborist to join us. The staff here do a bit of everything, arboriculture and ranger work – we try to do everything ourselves. Would you like to hire more arborists in the future? I would love to – if we could get the funding I would like to hire two full time arborists for, say, two years, and then they could go through everything and make this place look the way it is supposed to. Where do you source your trees? Though we don’t currently have a great deal of them coming in, we have sourced some from botanic gardens and places that we know adhere to the Nagoya protocol. The Plant Conservation Centre holds plants for us that have been previously propagated, and when the plants are ready they will send them down. Do you have many problems with disease? There is a bit of honey fungus in one area – we might need to dig a trench encircling the affected trees in an effort to contain it. We burn infected material onsite and wait for it to die out. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/winkworth-arboretum

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

dr fox would have seen the landscape painted red and yellow and reflected in the lake through october and november, and that’s what the team is trying to bring back

Pro Arb | March 2018 23


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

OUTSIDE THE BOX

PRO ARB INVESTIGATES THE LINK BETWEEN WORKING OUTSIDE AND IMPROVED MENTAL HEALTH, SPEAKING TO HAYLEY JARVIS OF THE MENTAL HEALTH CHARITY MIND AND ARBORIST RACHEL DOWNS

A

couple of years ago, Rachel Downs (above) was working as a certified consultant behavioural psychologist. Each working day, she ran between classrooms – working with teachers and teaching staff to help children with complex needs, finding time for admin jobs along the way, never knowing whether it was light or dark outside. The stress of the job eventually began to take its toll, leading to depression and panic attacks. Rachel’s case isn’t unique: mixed anxiety and depression is estimated to be the cause of one fifth of all lost working days in Britain, and is one of the most common mental disorders in the country. Major depression is thought to be the second most common cause of disability worldwide. While she was still working as a behaviour analyst, Rachel found a group of friends who happened to be passionate arborists; at the weekends and after work, they would climb recreationally, giving Rachel her first taste of tree climbing. From that point onwards, she was hooked, finding her work life easier as she started spending more of her leisure time outdoors. Ultimately, she moved back to South Wales and started working with a tree surgery company, and is now in the process of starting her own business. British culture is starting to pick up on the beneficial impacts that being outside can bring. Forestry schools are increasingly popular, with children who attend them said to be more confident and possessing higher social,

24

Pro Arb | March 2018

communication, motivation and physical skills, as well as gaining a strong knowledge of and respect for their natural surroundings. King’s College London, along with J & L Gibbons and Nomad Projects, undertook a study to try and understand the impact on people’s mental health of time spent outdoors. The team found that being outside and feeling in contact with nature were associated with higher levels of mental wellbeing – and this was especially evident in individuals who were already at an increased risk of suffering from mental health problems. The team’s paper, ‘Urban Mind: Using Smartphone Technologies to Investigate the Impact of Nature on Mental Wellbeing in Real Time’, used a smartphone-based app called Urban Mind to track how exposure to natural features in cities affected people’s mental wellbeing. Over the course of the study, Urban Mind monitored 108 individuals, who collectively completed 3,013 assessments over a one-week period. Dr Andrea Mechelli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London said: “These findings suggest that short-term exposure to nature has a measurable beneficial impact on mental wellbeing. From a clinical perspective, we hope this line of research will lead to the development of low-cost scalable interventions aimed at promoting mental health in urban populations.” The mental health charity Mind has been using similar information-based programmes

to study the benefits of ecotherapy for several years. Schemes that use ecotherapy to improve mental health and physical wellbeing are conducted through gardening, food growing and environmental conservation work, along with various other activities in nature. Hayley Jarvis, the charity’s community programmes manager, says that access to nature-based activities and outdoor exercise such as gardening have been proven to boost mood and help strengthen mental wellbeing. “In fact,” she says, “research shows outdoor exercise can be as effective as antidepressants in treating mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety.” With 64.7m antidepressant prescriptions written in England in 2016, at a cost of £266.6m to the NHS, this certainly seems like an important avenue to examine. “For some people who suffer from depression, engaging in physical activity or other alternative therapies and outdoor activities may be more appropriate, cost-effective and less likely to cause any side effects,” says Hayley. One problem that is currently faced by the large number of people who work in offices is a lack of natural daylight. “The colours, sounds and smells we find outdoors stimulate our senses in a way that gyms and urban environments don’t,” Hayley tells us. “Gardening, going for walks and other outdoor hobbies such as birdwatching provide a great alternative to traditional sports. Relaxing in an outside space helps us to switch off from everyday pressures, relieves stress, and gives us time to clear 

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Research shows outdoor exercise can be as effective as antidepressants in treating mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety

Pro Arb | March 2018 25


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

our heads, especially if you are based in a big urban city or have little access to natural daylight at work.” Hayley goes on to say that being surrounded by nature can boost overall mood, helping people to become more physically active, providing them with the skills and confidence to get back into work or training, and helping those who feel lonely or socially isolated from people or the world around them to connect with others. A great deal of the understanding surrounding the link between mental health and the outdoors comes from mindfulness therapy. “It is a buzzword at the moment,” Rachel says. “It is founded on behavioural analyses, trying to get people to take a moment to notice trees, clouds and so on, and get an experience from the moment.” Rachel explains that these therapies are more accessible when carried out outside, where there are less distractions – as well as fewer links to the stresses we associate with being inside, such as work and other responsibilities. “Outside, the noises and senses of nature are more present, allowing you to be mindful for longer.” Mindfulness encourages individuals to be open to their surroundings. “You can focus on looking at specific trees, one tree in particular, its bark, the fissures on the bark, the lichens on the fissures,” says Rachel. “Listen to the wind

26

Pro Arb | March 2018

Outside, the noises and senses of nature are more present, allowing you to be mindful for longer

blowing through the leaves and watch how the light shines through the canopy. Mindfulness needs to be practiced often. If we do it while walking through a park, we will be more likely to have a pleasant experience and do it again.” With children increasingly reliant on technology, it is more important than ever to start getting them outside more often. Forest schools have become popular throughout the UK and the rest of Europe; children who attend are taught by teachers who are passionate about getting them involved with nature. Rachel, who is planning on engaging with schools through her tree surgery company, believes that forestry schools can provide an alternative model of success for children. “There, children can be taught that you do not have to be good academically to be successful,” she says. “I feel that the term ‘successful’ is misused. It is generally used to describe people who have high-powered, high-paid jobs, not people who work outside. But we want our children to be happy – that is success.” Having transitioned to tree surgery from a more academic role, Rachel is representative of a feeling that resonates through many arborists. “It is about capturing a child’s motivation and nurturing their ambitions,” she says. “If they like climbing trees, then open their minds to careers within arboriculture, tree surgery, landscaping, garden designing,

environmental consultancy, environmental science. Horticultural jobs such as biodiversity officer or crop physiologist may be less wellknown, but it’s something that the youth of today can thrive at.” There is no evidence to suggest that individuals with outdoor careers are measurably happier than those with jobs indoors, such as office or retail work, but it is clear that people should be trying to get out into nature as often as possible. The Urban Minds research showed that the increase in mental wellbeing brought about through exposure to trees, the sky and birdsong had a lasting impact that was still evident several hours after the initial exposure. Rachel believes that many people are not maximising the benefits they could be gaining from the nature surrounding them. She tells us that it is important to try and promote the concept of ‘green infrastructure’, looking after green spaces and trees. “Much of it is about teaching the next generation how to look after our planet and get the most out of it,” she says. “I am starting a project to take children climbing trees with ropes, teaching them how to safely climb trees and inspiring them to be outdoors. I feel many kids will benefit from this – many children who struggle with the academic side of school can be given selfconfidence in finding something they are good at and passionate about.”

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


TAKE THE GRIND OUT OF STUMP GRINDING! High performance Predator tree stump grinders - now available in East Anglia exclusively from Ben Burgess. Want a demo? Contact the team today.

Niftylift - Half Page.indd 1

19/02/2018 17:46:04


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

The Heart of England Forest: how to plant a forest FOREST CREATION IS A HOT TOPIC THANKS TO THE PLANS FOR A NORTHERN FOREST; WITH THAT IN MIND, WE SPEAK TO STEPHEN COFFEY, HEAD FORESTER AT THE HEART OF ENGLAND FOREST, TO FIND OUT WHAT PLANTING A NEW FOREST ENTAILS

I

n early January it was announced that The Woodland Trust would create a new Northern Forest, with help from The Community Forest Trust and the government. The new forest will consist of 50m trees being planted over 25 years, spanning from

28 Pro Arb | March 2018

Liverpool to Hull. The initiative is hoped to bring a number of major benefits for the area, including improved air quality, decreased flood risks, improvements for rural economy, recreation and timber production. With such an ambitious project on the horizon, Pro Arb spoke to Stephen Coffey, head forester at the Heart of England Forest, to find out what this project will entail. The Heart of England Forest has its origins in 1996, when publisher Felix Dennis planted his first small wood, Ralph’s Wood, near his home in Dorsington, Warwickshire, with the help of The Forestry Commission. This first wood of 7,200 trees sparked the idea of establishing a large native broadleaf forest, and he subsequently founded The Heart of England Forest charity in 2003. Fast

forward to 2017 and the charity has created more than 3,000 acres of new woodland. In 2017 it planted a record-breaking 185,000 trees across 272 acres, and its 1.5 millionth tree overall; the charity’s ambitions are for the forest to eventually span 30,000 acres. Felix Dennis passed away in 2014, but his vision of bringing trees back to the local landscape continues. Thanks to Felix, Stephen and the Heart of England Forest, the country’s largest new native forest is bringing native wildlife back to the area, and helping endangered species to thrive. Not only does the initiative bring in tourists, who are keen to see wildlife such as kestrels, barn owns and tawny owls, but as the forest grows, the team has also started to plan for off-road bike tracks, woodland play areas,

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

camp sites, and a café and arts centre. The success of the Heart of England Forest and the Northern Forest comes at a time when government’s tree planting levels are lacking. In 2016, for example, the planting rates were dramatically low, with the government planting just 700ha – against its target of 5,000ha.

What problems does the forest and the initiative face? The main threat to our woodland will be climate change, along with the associated pest and diseases that are new to this country. We hope the species mix we’ve used will be largely resilient to climate change, pests and diseases. Another challenge could be purchasing the land to create the forest. We are 10% of the way to our aim of planting about 30,000 acres of woodland, so still have a large amount of land to buy. We need funds to buy the land, and we need that land to be available. What are your plans for the future? We have lots of exciting plans for the future, to complement our core tree planting activities. Two that we are working on at the moment are agroforestry, working with our organic farm team to produce top quality beef and lamb in the

Here and right: Charlotte Wright Photography

Charlotte Doran Davies (charlottedorandavies.co.uk)

Which species of tree do you focus on within the forest? We plant 27 species of native broadleaf trees and shrubs, with a focus on establishing oak woodland; as such, about 40% of the species mix is oak. Other species include hornbeam, small-leaved lime, sweet chestnut, wild service, wild cherry, birch and rowan.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Heart of England Forest.indd 29

forest, and educational activity, with the aim to deliver forest schools and collaborate with universities on meaningful forest-related research. Can you tell us a little bit about what goes into planning and planting a forest? Assuming we own the land, it can take up to two years of planning before we can put a tree in the ground. For all our woodland creation, we need permission from the Forestry Commission before we can go ahead. As part of the consent, we have to show we have consulted on heritage, ecology and landscape with stakeholders such as the District and County Councils, or on the impact on water with the Environment Agency. We also consult our woodland creation sites’ neighbours. All of this will influence the design of the woodland. An important feature of our woodland is internal open space. Be it wide tracks or small glades, this provides more woodland margin, increasing biodiversity and habitats. We plant in the tree dormancy period, between November and March. The trees are 40-60cm and either bare root or cell grown. We have our own tree nursery, staffed by volunteers, which produces upwards of 30,000 of the 100,000-plus trees we plant each year. The planting is undertaken by our own staff, volunteers and local contractors. Do you think the Northern Forest is a worthwhile investment? All tree planting is a worthwhile investment, so we would certainly support the creation of the Northern Forest. We would also welcome support for the creation of a ‘Midlands Lung’, of which the Heart of England Forest can be an important part.

ABOUT Stephen Coffey is the head forester at The Heart of England Forest, which offers events such as tree planting days and guided walks through the forest. To find out more, visit: www.heartofenglandforest.com

Pro Arb | March 2018 29

27/02/2018 11:00


DOMESTIC vs commercial NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

ARBORIST AND CONSULTANT ROB KEYZOR TAKES A LOOK AT HOW DOMESTIC ARB WORK DIFFERS FROM COMMERCIAL JOBS – FROM THE WORK-LIFE BALANCE TO EASE OF GAINING WORK

Tickets and training Each commercial sector requiring arb work needs different tickets and accreditations; the construction sector, for example, requires CSCS cards for individuals, and may require a CHAS or SMAS accreditation depending upon which company you are working for. Some companies have odd rules that can catch you out – Taylor Wimpey now requires all telehandler drivers to pass their own operator’s course. The electrical distribution sector has its own set of NPTC competencies, and, again, individual company rules and induction processes – which they like to charge handsomely for. The railway sector and Highways England have their own accreditation schemes, although the requirements of the NHSS18 for the highways seem to dissolve away the further down the subcontracting chain you go. Lifestyle The main lifestyle difference is within the railway sector, which can involve weekend, night-time and holiday working. As such, we made the decision to steer away from this work. Never say never, though – we have had to change the focus of our business before now, when one sector has taken a downturn, and we may have to do the same again at any time. Domestic and commercial The main difference between domestic and commercial work is the scale. Commercial contracts are typically larger and may

30

Pro Arb | March 2018

involve more plant. At this time of year, and with the construction sector accessing many more greenfield sites, hedge removal is very much in demand and we are feeling pressured all over. However, this will cease come March and the bird nesting season. Pay Pay is whatever you can get, as in all industries. Some sectors, however, focus more on the service they get, rather than the pay. Council work is generally poorly paid, and, although many councils have fair business policies and pay promptly, they rarely enforce this upon their principal contractors, such as the well-known national companies. This can leave the smaller specialist companies down the line waiting for more than 60 days before payment is seen. Access to work It is easier to get domestic work where there are no prequalification questionnaires, competency requirements etc., and price is the main driver. Enjoyment When private work is good, it can be very good. The teams enjoy being welcomed in by the householder, as well as the appreciation they get from a job well done. Management of many small domestic jobs can still be quite intensive, though, with every job – however small – requiring a site visit, quotation, planning, risk assessment and invoicing. www.robkeyzortreesurgeon.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

when private work is good, it can be very good. The teams enjoy being welcomed in by the householder, as well as the appreciation they get from a job well done

Pro Arb | March 2018 31


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

The Ethics of

Tree Removal

ree removal has sometimes drawn an ambiguous line on ethics – something that has been highlighted more than ever in light of the events in Sheffield. The local government’s Streets Ahead programme, a citywide project aiming to upgrade the area’s roads, streetlights, bridges and structures, has led to widespread tree felling – which local protesters and Sheffield Trees Action Groups (STAG) are trying to stop. Here, arboriculture has turned into a political and social issue for citizens. Activists use their civil liberties to protest tree felling, as they call for their elected representatives to take action. The clash has recently been underscored by violence, with protesters wearing masks and even threatening arborists. The issue is so hotly debated that even the Environmental Secretary Michael Gove has waded in to discuss alternative solutions to felling the kerbside trees. In such a situation, where should an arborist stand? Many arborists have found themselves in situations where they were expected to cut down a healthy tree for the benefit of a client. But in cases like Sheffield, the loss of multiple mature, healthy trees seems too much of a waste when alternative routes could be explored and the trees potentially retained. There is always more than one side to a story. Let’s explore all of them, and see how this dilemma could be addressed. Fighting tree removal To those who are against tree removal, the common premise is that trees are a precious natural resource. They take decades to reach full maturity and contribute to ecological health and quality of living, providing clean

32

Pro Arb | March 2018

Tree Felling Ethics.indd 32

air, mitigating adverse environmental effects (including climate change), conserving energy by cooling streets and cities, promoting wildlife diversity, increasing property values, and adding recreational benefit for the community. These examples show that trees are of value socially, communally, environmentally and even economically. The cutting down of trees, especially mature trees, can lead to poor air quality and a higher risk of flooding, and could deprive future generations of the health and wellbeing boost they provide.

for arborists who want to stay ethical, It is about weighing up the benefits and environmental responsibilities against the risks and issues

T

PAUL GEORGE OF LANDMARK TRADING TAKES ON THE THORNY ISSUE OF TREE REMOVAL – WHAT NEEDS TO BE CONSIDERED, AND WHEN IT’S ETHICAL TO FELL

Some people consider tree removal wrong if it is done without valid justification. Various factors, such as maturity, length of lifespan, overall health, structural integrity and strength, are to be thoroughly reviewed before taking any step. Other activists strongly support the implementation of maintenance solutions over complete tree removal. This includes pruning, the removal of dead or diseased branches, and bracing. They believe that in many cases, cleaning, thinning, raising and reduction are enough to reduce the risk posed by damaged trees.

Supporting tree removal For advocates of tree removal, there can be benefits that are perhaps overlooked by protesters. For a start, trees are renewable sources and, if removed, new trees can be planted. In some cases, felled trees are replaced with other species that are healthier, more environmentally diverse, better placed, or more aesthetically pleasing. Some extremists support irresponsible logging practices, putting corporate greed above sustainability. However, when felling is carried out responsibly, trees are sources of useful by-products such as wood and cellulose, and they allow manufacturers to produce commodities such as wood, paper, cleaning compounds, and even industrial explosives. Some supporters also back tree removal for civic causes. For example, felling makes road widening and infrastructure development possible, and these improvements can result in better accessibility and economic progress in the long run. There are also cases when weak trees are life-threatening and dangerous to communities. Leaning trees, cracked lower trunks and large, broken limbs are potentially hazardous and may cause injury to people and damage to properties. Removal of decayed and damaged trees is doubly essential before a severe storm strikes. In terms of landscaping, tree removal is sometimes key to creating an aesthetically pleasing area and delivering clients’ requests. At times, large trees – healthy or otherwise – may obstruct passage and sunlight. Removal also gets to the root of tree pests and diseases. One example is the oriental chestnut gall wasp, which affects chestnut trees; it causes abnormal growths, called

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 13:01


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Many arborists have found themselves in situations where they were expected to cut down a healthy tree

galls, to form on buds, leaves, and petioles. Insecticides are unlikely to be effective because the galls encase the larvae of said pests, protecting them from chemical treatments. The primary solution is to eliminate affected trees, to keep the pests from preying on other trees. In other cases, diseased trees need to be removed to help prevent the disease becoming more widespread. Weighing it up For arborists who want to stay ethical, it is about weighing up the benefits and environmental responsibilities against the risks and issues, taking a balanced view, and, if necessary, being prepared to turn a job away if it is clearly unethical to carry out the client’s request. There are good reasons to fell trees, but irresponsible practices are inexcusable. Verify first if a tree can still be preserved, or if it is no longer wise and cost-effective to maintain it. Check your client’s motivation behind the tree removal. Determining the best course of action is essential before anything else. Here’s a list of criteria to help review a tree’s viability: • Species – Some tree types typically have weak wood or shallow roots, are prone to diseases, or are invasive due to prolific seeding. These characteristics allow them to cause damage, making them

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Tree Felling Ethics.indd 33

undesirable. Examples are the black locust, Siberian elm, and willow. • Health – A tree should be cut off if 50% of it is damaged. Although an unhealthy tree may survive for years, they often have stunted growth or an abnormal appearance. • Structural integrity – Check for large dead branches. While crossed branches can be pruned, a tree with a trunk that is more than 25% dead can be subject to tree removal. If all dead branches are located on one side of the tree, it may become lopsided and unsafe. A hollow trunk also compromises the tree’s strength. • Root damage – If an excavation has damaged more than half of the tree’s roots, it can be marked for felling. • Environment – Trees that have grown near bodies of water often have shallow roots. On the other hand, removing nearby trees can cause extreme stress to remaining trees if they were to face a sudden change in sunlight exposure, usually causing them to succumb within three to five years. • Available space – While trees in the forest grow well in clusters, that will not work for houses and commercial areas. It is best to keep large trees at least 20 feet away. As for those along roads and thoroughfares, they must not interfere with drivers’ and pedestrians’ lines of sight.

Staying ethical Here are tips for remaining ethical as an arborist: • Stay up to date with trends and legislation affecting the industry • Adhere to acceptable arboricultural practices and regulatory issuances • Be prepared to offer alternative solutions where possible, such as bracing or remedial work • Prepare clear and well-written plans and estimates, and communicate them to your customers to avoid confusion. Some arborists even claim to select their clients, only offering their services to reputable firms and individuals. Whatever your strategy is for staying principled, ensure you practice in a professional and safe manner.

ABOUT Paul George is the managing director of Landmark Trading Ltd, and has worked in the arboricultural industry for more than 15 years. Landmark Trading is one the UK’s leading suppliers of arborist equipment. You can connect with Paul on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or call Landmark Trading on 01780 482231. www.landmarktrading.com

Pro Arb | March 2018 33

27/02/2018 13:01


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

top 10 tips Expanding your

business

EDDY GRIFFITHS, HEAD OF OPERATIONS AT COUNTRY GROUNDS MAINTENANCE LTD (CGM), DISPENSES ADVICE FOR EXPANDING YOUR BUSINESS

34

Pro Arb | March 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

1 2 3 4

5

6

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Go for quality Buy machinery with a good reputation and trust that quality will pay in the long run. Buying cheap is good in the right environment, but letting a client down due to poor equipment never goes down well. Maintain equipment Maintain your equipment in line with manufacturers’ guidelines, and make the most of warranty periods. Invest in individuals Decide who your key players are and allow them to flourish and work with autonomy. Assess their performance regularly and ensure they are rewarded for their strengths. Raise awareness Have passion for your brand and ensure you stand out for the right reasons. Uniform commercial vehicle decals or colours can make a huge difference and are often the best form of advertising. Accreditations can make a difference to winning work – an ARB Approved arborist is less likely to be turned down by local authorities or larger organisations.

7 8

9

10

Stay sustainable Bid for work that’s guaranteed for the duration. Three to five-year contracts allow you to invest in machinery, offering security. Use your staff Before recruiting, explore long days and seven-days-a-week working. After this, employ labour that’s flexible – this can be advantageous. Invest in equipment that can improve productivity, such as skid-steers or larger chippers. Winning ways Make time to network and invest in office support to help you win new work. Very often, a good bid writer will win more work than a full time estimator. Figure out what works for you, with the aim of eventually having both options. Perfect performance Lastly, always exceed your clients’ expectations and do a good job. Word of mouth is such a powerful tool.

Keep your clients Never lose sight of the people who already pay the bills. Regular meetings with high-value clients are essential, even if it’s a short telephone conversation on the way to your next site – it keeps the client warm and aware that you are ready to price their next job. Adopt a strategy Produce a strategy for where you want your business to go – and make sure you stick to it. If you have limited equipment, target the work you can do with it. Don’t just roam free with your approach: direct your mind to where you need to go. Monitor your budgets weekly, and understand what isn’t making good money for you – those jobs should be your least priority.

about

CGM Group is an ARB Approved, East Anglia-based contractor that covers grounds maintenance, landscaping, arboriculture and facilities for both domestic and commercial customers. www.countrygrounds maintenance.co.uk

Pro Arb | March 2018 35


You will love the performance of the CAMON SG30 Stump Grinder, fitted with the hard wearing Greenteeth® system. You’ll be equally impressed by the low running costs, simple teeth changes and excellent build quality.

Our UK built SG30 Stump Grinder cannot be beaten on performance, reliability or price.

Honda GX390 banks engine Fitted with 8 Greenteeth Reinforced chassis Only 63cm wide Folding handlebars Made in the UK Find out more by visiting

www.tracmaster.co.uk or call 01444 247689.

SUBSCRIBE NOW! £95

PER YEAR

M O N T H LY I N D E P E N D E N T NEWS-BASED MAGAZINE W E E K LY E M A I L W E B S I T E U P D AT E

AN IN

TERV

TION S

STEM TH

IEW

WI

OLOG

JUNE

2017

E

IN DE R TONE COM PTH: TH MON BEECE H

R.indd

12

Tailor made training and workshops Tree surgeon fast track courses t 033 345 678 86 e training@hi-line.co.uk w hi-line.co.uk/training f hilinetraining i instagram.com/hilinetraining

22

7

er 201

decemb

WITH G RVIEW LANNIN CAPE P LANDS LTD P U O GR

AN INTE

PLY NOW AP

COVE

Industry recognised qualifications

ICAL

USIN E FLO FLOOG TREES FO W D PR EVEN R TION

COPP

High quality arboriculture, forestry, first aid and chainsaw related training

Contact Emily Maltby: 01903 777575 Emily.maltby@eljays44.com

TH CALL UM CAMP B EL L SOUT SOLU HERN EC

TRAINING

C

MOD ITY RO RB KIT ERN OT201 S8 TREE A NEW FOR P ITS 01/06/

2017

NEW PPE

D

H O ME

jan/feb

2018

unfogable mesh eye protection

REGULA TION

WHAT TO

11:38

UL THE MO BREAK

Y MILDEW POWDER

AN INT ERVIEW WIT

STEFAN H ARCHIT O BOERI ET TI

SSIONS GE V EMI

STA OR PETROLEL? DIES

EXPECT

PET RSONAL S ISED TO ROOCHIPPERS

BAT CON

NEXT BIG

SERVAT

ION FOR

ARBORI

THING

STS

17 14:07

30/11/20

dd 1

c_Final.in

CoverDe

Cover_JA

NFEB.indd

1

W O ME N

IN ARB

TACKLI

NG THE

GENDER

GAP

22/01/201

8 15:51

Informing and engaging the UK’s arboriculturists with the latest news, products and best practice

www.meshsafetyglasses.com 0845 2222 039


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

KIT FOCUS

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018 37


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

TOOLBOX CHAINSAWS

We use a combination of Stihl, Husqvarna and Echo chainsaws at present. Our staff usually use whichever they prefer to use, providing it is suitable for the task at hand. We also have a couple of Stihl electric chainsaws that we use for noise sensitive works as they are quieter to run, which has been important on a couple of recent jobs.

STEVE OWENS, CO-OWNER AND PARTNER OF STAINES-BASED BARKLAND TREE SPECIALISTS, TALKS PRO ARB THROUGH THE COMPANY’S KIT

SCREENER We have various-sized 360 diggers for use with tree shears, and a timber grab, which we use to load up our trommel screener. This screens woodchip in our recycling yard to produce various grades of woodchip and biomass. We are looking to purchase a three-way screener soon, which will speed up the screening process.

STUMP GRINDERS At present we have three handheld stump grinders – one Rayco &and two Danequip. We have also just purchased a Bandit ZT1844 to go with our Vermeer 252.

38

Pro Arb | March 2018

ToolboxMarch-V4.indd 38

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 11:44


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

CHIPPERS We currently have Schliesing, Vermeer and Timberwolf chippers. We have recently purchased Timberwolf chippers, which I have been unsure of in the past, but I have been surprised at how good they are. We have also just ordered a Bandit 12XP chipper with 12in capacity. We have a crane-fed Heizohack whole-tree chipper, which is used for our site clearance works.

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES AND TRAILERS We currently run a fleet of nine vehicles, all of which are owned by us – we do not lease or hire. At present, our fleet ranges from a 32 tonne roll-on/ roll-off bin lorry down to a 4x4, with various vehicles in between. These include an 18t grab lorry, a 7.5 tonne lorry and 3.5t transit vans.

PPE

Our staff are free to choose the PPE they prefer and we meet the costs for this, within reason. If someone wants a specific item that is more expensive than most similar products, then we pay towards the cost and they pay the difference. Choices for PPE used to be far more limited, but now there is a much wider selection available.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

ToolboxMarch-V4.indd 39

Pro Arb | March 2018 39

27/02/2018 11:45


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Raise your game

I

f you’re taking down a dead tree, especially one that may have weak limbs, a MEWP is going to be beneficial when it comes to safety. It will also have significant benefits when it comes to access – if you’re doing work over, say, a body of water or a phone line, using a MEWP will allow you to set up from a vantage point further away from the destination and use the telescope to get to the tree, staying away from potential hazards. It can be more expensive to use MEWPs when compared to conventional techniques, such as using ropes, but they also prevent the physical strain of tree climbing. It is less physically strenuous to stand in a cage and operate a lever than it is to throw your body weight around a tree for three or four hours. When you do a method statement or risk assess the area before carrying out the work,

40

Pro Arb | March 2018

MEWPs

TOM JAMES, HEAD OF UK SALES FOR NIFTYLIFT, EXPLAINS WHY A MEWP CAN BE A BENEFICIAL ADDITION TO AN ARBORIST’S ARSENAL you need to fundamentally consider the safety of the work. The industry is starting to consider work safety more thoroughly when it comes to trees and access, and consequently MEWPs are starting to be used a lot more. I personally sell a lot of MEWPs to tree surgeons now – five to 10 years ago it was much less common. The current rules and regulations surrounding health and safety are starting to be more stringent, and they’re only going to get stricter; MEWPs allow a safer way of working. There can be disadvantages, such as timber falling on the boom, but I believe that, providing you approach the work in a safe and coordinated way, you will be safer using a MEWP than climbing a tree. Hazards are fairly commonplace when it comes to tree work, and unless you are doing straightforward felling or reducing work, a MEWP will be a great option when risk assessing.

There are a lot of different kinds of MEWPs, which can all come in handy depending on the task at hand. If you’re working on a flat tarmac surface with a tree over an office block, you could use a trailer mount machine, which allows you to get right up to the tree. If you’re working on an area surrounded by large, muddy hills, you might use a tractor unit. The joy of this industry is that there is a machine for every job. I used to be a tree surgeon and the company that I worked for had a truckmounted CTE; when that was on a job, it made life so much easier. One example where a MEWP would have made a tangible difference was while I was working on a canal contract; we were using waders to get down the canal in the height of winter, getting freezing cold and wet; if we’d had a narrow tractor unit to get down to the canal path, the job would have been much less unpleasant.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

VERSALIFT LAT135-H E6 PICK-UP MOUNTED PLATFORM

• New stronger, lighter boom with re-engineered pedestal • 1kV certified LV insulation • Low travel height – less than 2.6m • Fully hydraulic proportional control • National Small Series Approved, allowing fast delivery RRP: Enquire with Versalift www.versalift.co.uk

SPIDER 18.90 PRO

• Super compact • Track widening system • 9.2m max outreach • Hybrid option available • 18m working height RRP: Under £50,000 www.promaxaccess.com

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018 41


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

STUMP GRINDERS Stump and grind

A

re tree surgeons losing out on one of the most rewarding niches in the industry? Whether it’s for disease control, building development or just cosmetic reasons, tree stump removal is a service many arb professionals are asked to complete for clients – but many are unprepared to do it profitably. The most common removal method is to grind the stump with a hydraulic or beltdriven cutting wheel, mounted on a wheeled or tracked machine. These stump grinders can be pushed or self-propelled, varying in size and grinding ability. Without the right kit, stump grinding can be an expensive, fatiguing and time-consuming job. In the past, a full stump removal service would involve having multiple pieces of equipment to tackle different sites. Predator has spent 15 years designing stump grinders from an operator’s perspective and knows that, with the right kit, optimised for UK conditions and priced affordably, stump removal can be another string to any tree surgeon’s bow, regardless of budget or contract.

42

Pro Arb | March 2018

SIMON BRADSHAW, UK HEAD OF SALES AT PREDATOR, ON WHY IT’S EASIER THAN EVER FOR ARBORISTS TO OFFER STUMP GRINDING SERVICES

While stump grinding is in demand, and in many cases is an easy upsell, it’s a service that many tree surgeons barely feel incentivised to offer. If a firm accepts a contract but doesn’t own a stump grinder, then it may have to hire. Add fuel, time spent grinding and returning the hired kit, and the operator can be lucky to break even. Quite often, a firm will not want to let its client down and will simply subcontract the work elsewhere, losing the job and the profit. A factor that is particularly relevant to the UK is access. When a stump needs to be removed, it will likely be where the client (and tree surgeon) doesn’t want it to be – in a back garden, only accessible to a stump grinder through a tight garden gate, or via a side alley with various drainpipe and shed-related obstacles. A larger stump may warrant a more powerful machine, and traditionally this type of kit is imported from countries where access is not a priority for the operator. The machine can be more than 35in wide, which is often wider than the standard UK garden gate. If it’s too big to get onsite, then

the only option for the operator is a smaller, less powerful stump grinder, which may be fatiguing, slow and unproductive. Narrow access and high productivity is a big deal for professionals who offer stump removal in the UK. Getting a tracked, highpowered stump grinder into the back garden of a terraced house is no mean feat, but it can now be done with the Predator 38X. At 26in wide and with an 18in grinding depth, it can take on both residential and commercial sites, saving the operator time and money and opening up new opportunities for contracts. Smaller firms want something entry level and affordable, which is likely to be a pedestrian machine, but they also want low fatigue and enough productivity that they are incentivised to look for business. A small stump grinder with a pivot, such as the Predator 360, can be productive and low fatigue – and still cost less than many generic pedestrian machines. The market is seeing a push towards innovation, and for UK customers this will be a very good thing.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

PREDATOR 38X

• 26in-wide variable tracks • 18in grind depth • 54in cutting slew • Available in manual or radio control • One stump grinder for every contract RRP: £18,995 www.predator-mfg.com

DANEQUIP 25SP

• 28in working width, supplied with transportation wheels allowing the machine narrow to 26in • Hydrostatic drive, allowing faster, easy movement of machine • Electromagnetic clutch for safe engagement of cutterwheel • Disc brake system • 227kg, well-balanced machine • 14in cutting depth RRP: From £5,995 www.danequip.co.uk

GEKO ENGINEERING STUMP BEAVER

• Use of the stump grinder increases the utilisation of your mini digger, adding another service • Minimal maintenance, super reliable, just replace blunt teeth – no engine to service, belts to adjust, etc. • Operate without vibration or effort to grind stumps, even below ground level • Easy to transport and store on its own stand, supplied complete and ready to work • Fully guarded for safety to operator and other workers RRP: £3,700 www.gekoengineering.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018 43


product dna

NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Stihl

PR 33 C Megacut pruning saw

33cm long.

Scabbard for right and left-hand use, for safe and comfortable use.

Ergonomic two-component grip for comfortable work and excellent grip, even during wet conditions.

Three-sided Japanese ground blade for fast and precise cutting.

Conical blade width for easy cutting (blade does not get stuck in wood). Weighs 391g.

Impulse-hardened teeth using a high carbon chrome steel for high durability, long-lasting sharpness and corrosion protection.

44 Pro Arb | March 2018

CONTACT 01276 20202 enquiries@stihl.co.uk www.stihl.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

FOOTWEAR

SIMON ASH, UK SALES MANAGER AT HAIX, ON WHY SUITABLE FOOTWEAR IS KEY TO SAFE PRACTICES

STEP ON

I

n order to work safely in busy times, foresters must wear the appropriate safety footwear, ensuring protection against accidents such as slips, trips and falls and other hazards, including chainsaws. Often, forestry workers who are responsible for purchasing their own safety footwear choose cheaper shoes that lack quality and protection. With so many safety shoes on the market, how do individuals know what to purchase, and what safety features are important? What is the risk? Every 25 minutes, across all workplaces, someone breaks or fractures a bone due to slipping, tripping or falling. In forestry, with so many hazards and different terrains, there is an increased chance of this happening. Slippery substances such as oils, grease or rain, mud left on the rungs of a ladder, and general debris are all risks that could form trip hazards and other incidents. If workers experience such accidents, they could develop serious injuries or debilitating health conditions, such as musculoskeletal disorders. This will not just affect an individual’s health, but also the productivity of the business in general, as they may be unable to work due to the pain. Wearing footwear that complies with safety standards and has the right protective features is critical for preventing injuries.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Footwear.indd 45

Know your standards All safety boots must adhere to the EN ISO 20347:2012 regulation as the umbrella standard for safety footwear. Requirements include:

The HAIX Protector Ultra • EN ISO 17249:2013 certified • Anti-slip VIBRAM sole • Waterproof Gore-Tex inner lining • Level 2 cut protection • HAIX two-zone lacing system

• Resistance to water penetration and absorption • Antistatic • Penetration resistance. Footwear suitable for a forestry professional must comply with the ISO 20345:2011 standard. This specifies basic but optional additional requirements for general purpose safety footwear. Basic requirements that will improve worker protection against incidents includes a 200J toecap, and other properties may include upper resistance to water penetration and absorption. Other features of the HAIX forestry boots that ensure optimum safety include chainsaw cut protection, compliant to EN ISO 17249:2013. This standard relates to safety footwear with resistance to chainsaw cutting, and can be category level 1, 2 or 3, depending on the level of protection offered. The levels are relevant to the chainsaw speeds:

Focus on footwear HAIX boots incorporate the latest materials and footwear technology to offer comfort and protection for forestry professionals. Other features in HAIX boots that will help to improve safety include: • Arch support, to ensure correct posture • Sturdy soles, to give feet a strong platform on a range of surfaces • Gore-Tex membrane, keeping

• Level 1 – 20 m/s • Level 2 – 24 m/s • Level 3 – 28 m/s. To meet different requirements, HAIX’s range of forestry boots exceeds the required standards. However, individuals must identify risks and consider features they need before selecting footwear.

feet warm and dry • Chainsaw cut protection. Invest Wearing appropriate footwear could be the key to ensuring forestry professionals are protected from workplace hazards. With 2018 expected to be a busy year for the forestry industry, it has never been more crucial to make sure you invest in the correct footwear www.haix.co.uk

ABOUT Based in Bavaria, Germany, HAIX is a functional footwear specialist with a worldwide reputation as a ‘safe brand’. Wherever people need high performance footwear that will not let them down, HAIX has become the brand of choice – in Europe, North America and Asia. www.haix.com

Pro Arb | March 2018 45

27/02/2018 11:05


ARB NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

KIT

HUSQVARNA

XP Power 2 and XP Power 4

• Premixed alkylate fuels • Ready to use straight from the can • Fuel does not deteriorate • Biodegradable • Engine lubricant contributes to low engine temperatures RRP: 1L £5.50, 5L £19

a roundup of the best new products

www.husqvarna.com/uk

MULTIONE

Multifunction loader – 5.3 model • Telescopic boom with a maximum lift height of 2.75m • Highly manoeuvrable and very low in weight (1,050kg) • Maximum tipping load of 1,140kg, with centre pivot steering and clever traction management • 170 different attachments for one machine • Light and nimble RRP: £21,500

www.multione.com

MAKITA

DCU180Z 18V brushless wheelbarrow

• Maximum loading capacity: 130kg • Maximum climbing angle: 12° • Forward speed (Hi): 3.5km/h • Reverse speed: 1km/h RRP (body only): £819.60

www.www.makitauk.com

TIMBERWOLF

230PAHB and 230PWHB chippers • Class-leading 230mm x 160mm feed opening • 230PAHB: 32.5hp Kubota WG972 petrol engine, 230PWHB: 37hp B&S Vanguard V twin petrol engine • Sub-750kg towing weight • Two quick-access reversible blades • Quad force rollers RRP: POA

www.timberwolf-uk.com 46

Pro Arb | March 2018

Arb Kit March.indd 46

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 13:59


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

Call 01903 777 580 or email laura.harris@eljays44.com with your vacancy

ARBORICULTURAL OFFICER

ASSISTANT NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OFFICER

EAST HERTS COUNCIL Location: Hertford

East Herts Council is looking to appoint a self-motivated, proactive person to join an enthusiastic department focused on looking after the environment. Responsibilities will be determining applications for tree work and conservation area notices within set timescales, and providing a professional arboricultural service to the council, advising on all matters relating to tree protection and care. The successful candidate will have a recognised qualification in arboriculture and an excellent working knowledge of the relevant legislation and regulations relating to trees and hedgerows. Good communication skills are essential, as well as the ability to deal with challenging situations and people using tact and diplomacy. You must have experience of working in a similar arboricultural post for a local authority, and be able to manage your own workload efficiently and plan for long-term tasks alongside a busy day-to-day schedule. You will have experience of enforcement in relation to illegal tree work to collate evidence and conduct interviews, and will provide arboricultural advice in respect of subsidence or damage claims against the council relating to its own tree stock. You should be able to use Microsoft Word, Excel and other computerised systems to manage output and customer enquiries.

READING BOROUGH COUNCIL Location: Reading Reading Borough Council is looking for a part-time candidate to help fulfil the tree-related functions of a busy planning section. Reporting to the natural environment officer, the role involves the preparation of Tree Preservation Orders, processing tree works applications and Section 211 Notices, commenting on planning applications in relation to tree and landscape matters, processing High Hedge complaints and ensuring compliance in all these respects. The successful candidate will have a degree or similar relating to the natural environment, e.g. arboriculture or an arboricultural qualification level 2 or above, with some experience in a similar role and a proven track record of being well organised and motivated to manage the large caseload and to meet targets. Experience of dealing with members of the public, agents and applicants (listening to their concerns, dealing with their complaints and negotiating with them) is required, as is the ability to work alongside colleagues in the team. We need someone who can build effective links within the council and with external customers, and who has excellent oral and written communication skills, and good IT skills.

It is important that you have the ability to travel across the District and be able to attend occasional evening and weekend meetings.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

IT WORKS 20,000

OVER JOBSEEKERS VISIT OUR SITE A MONTH

OVER

450

cvs online to browse cv

48,000

OVER emails are sent to candidates monthly

5

strong candidate APPLICATIONS per job on average

● W  eekly jobs mailer ● F  eature jobs inside relevant print magazine featured on ● Jobs  weekly news and round up emails ● Different  solutions to secure quality applicants

official job board:

visit the website at horticulturecareers.co.uk call Laura today on 01903 777580 WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018 47


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

FACTFILE Recommended landscape Make good urban trees; in the wild, tends to be found in ancient woods and hedgerows Leaf persistence Deciduous Crown shape Broadly domed and spreading Height at maturity 10-25m Soil conditions Prefers clay or lime-based soils Bark identification Dark brown and patterned, with cracked, squareshaped plates Leaf identification Jagged, maple-like palmate leaves; turn copper to scarlet in autumn

48

Pro Arb | March 2018

A

At your service SORBUS TORMINALIS

PAUL WOOD, AUTHOR OF ‘LONDON’S STREET TREES: A FIELD GUIDE TO THE URBAN FOREST AND THE STREET TREE BLOG’, FOCUSES ON THE WILD SERVICE TREE

s I began to think about which species to choose for this tree focus, a whole set of selection agonies began to take over; I am sure I am not alone in finding this task almost impossible. My favourite species has changed over the years, and perhaps even according to season. I have a deep fondness for beech trees, I never really got over my childhood love of monkey puzzles, I have long been fascinated by strawberry trees, cherries excite me every spring, and communing with towering coastal redwoods in California has been a memorable experience. But choose I must, and so I have plumped for a rare native of ancient woodlands. It was this species that I, as a singular, tree-obsessed child, most wanted to find: a flowering tree with distinctive leaves, and brown berries that are allegedly edible after being bletted – a process of rotting through freezing and unfreezing. It is, of course, the wild service or chequers tree, also known as Sorbus torminalis. It’s a tree with a lot of myths surrounding it, which I feel duty-bound to recount here: wild service tree fruits were apparently used by the Romans to flavour beer, and its name evolved from a corruption of the Latin word ‘cerevisia’ meaning ‘beer’. The tree’s other name, chequer, apparently derived from the checkerboard appearance of the bark on mature trees (very plausible, but not as interesting). I also discovered that pubs with the name ‘Chequers’ were likely to be named after this tree. Despite frequenting dozens of country inns, with, of course, the primary intention of finding their namesakes growing nearby, I have yet to find one in the vicinity of a rustic tavern – so it was with considerable surprise that I bumped into a wild service street tree outside a boozer in north London, the misleadingly named Stoke Newington

Tea House. I’ve since found several more thriving as street trees in London, and Lewes in Sussex. Despite a natural penchant for shady woods, wild service trees make great street trees, with the benefit for tree enthusiasts of being much easier to appreciate in this situation. At the moment, the highway trees I’m aware of are small, and I’m unsure how large they might become. I hope they’ll be closer to the related whitebeam than their other cousin, the rowan, which – in London, at least – does not thrive. The easiest way to recognise wild service trees is by the distinctive leaves: spiky and palmate, somewhere between a hawthorn and a maple, they turn golden orange through to scarlet in the autumn. In May, the blossom opens in clusters and is similar to other related Sorbus species, but perhaps slightly whiter and more distinct than whitebeam. Fat brown berries develop and stay on the tree until December after leaf fall. I am hopeful this is a tree we will see planted much more frequently in urban situations in the future. As well as being native to the UK, with all the benefits to wildlife that implies, London is specifically within its natural distribution range, and it flourishes on the city’s clay soils. Wild service trees are interesting, attractive and unusual, and, I believe, deserve to be considered for more towns and cities. More please! Paul leads regular walks around London’s Urban Forest with the Museum of Walking. Find out more on his blog, thestreettree.com

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Wild service tree fruits were apparently used by the Romans to flavour beer

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | March 2018 49


the ANCIENT TREE

column

Each month we feature an ancient British tree. This month the Ancient Tree Forum introduces us to...

Cromwell’s Oak, Melksham, Wiltshire

C

romwell’s Oak can be found within the corner of an old agricultural field adjacent to the town of Melksham. This tree is one of few remaining glimpses of the historic landscape that covered the local area; the region in which Cromwell’s Oak sits was once a vast medieval forest, and a favoured hunting ground of Tudor kings. The tree has a girth of 7.1m and is thought to be around 700 years old. Its hollow trunk bears the scars of historic fire damage, unfortunately all too common in such important trees. While it shares some common features with other ancient oaks, the tree’s history is not just locked up in its annual rings; it also features in the history books. This ancient oak is thought to have played a part in a nationally significant event: the first English Civil War. According to legend, Oliver Cromwell stayed at a nearby farm in 1643. After the Parliamentarian army faced a crushing defeat at the hands of the Royalist cavalry at the Battle of Roundway Down, this mighty oak played a gruesome part in the aftermath of the battle when, on the orders of Cromwell, some of his unruly soldiers were hanged from its boughs. Through conversion to agriculture, the historic landscape has been lost; the land was enclosed, and until 2006 managed as dairy farm.

50

Pro Arb | March 2018

Ancient Tree.indd 50

Due to the large size of the tree, the cattle would congregate under its crown for shelter. As is common in such circumstances, the tree suffered from the effects of livestock damage, with compaction of its rooting environment and damage to lower part of the trunk through rubbing. In 2006 the farm was sold to enable the construction of a secondary school. Thanks to the valiant efforts of a local tree officer, the importance of this tree was recognised; the school, Melksham Oak Community School, even takes its name from the tree. Alarmingly, the tree report that was prepared to support the development of the school recommended that all of the deadwood be removed – an unfortunate example of a risk-averse consultant not understanding the habitat and aesthetic importance of deadwood in veteran trees. Again, thanks to the tree officer, the deadwood was left intact. The rooting environment was also protected by mulching and installing a fence. Despite this tree’s long and hard life, and its brushes with history, it stands as a living monument, reminding us of historic land use and acting as an education resource for school pupils.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management at www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

27/02/2018 10:29


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

INTERVIEW PRO ARB’S LITTLE INTERVIEW IS FUN, THOUGHT PROVOKING AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO THE PEOPLE WHO WORK WITHIN THE INDUSTRY

For your chance to appear in a future edition of the magazine, simply answer the questions below and return them, along with a head and shoulders photo, to: claire.maher@eljays44.com. It’s as simple as that! Don’t think too deeply, just fire back your answers and look out for yourself in a future issue. Thank you in advance for your participation.

David ‘Dak’ Wiles

Managing director, Henchman

What’s your go to reference book? Google. Favourite species of tree? Silver birch – evokes childhood memories. If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? Sportsman. Best moment in your career thus far? Today.

everyone’s peace, none. Who would play you in a film of your life? Steve McQueen – yeah right...

Favourite sandwich filling? Salad – at least it’s not quiche.

Favourite sporting memory? Of mine – one-handed diving catch to save my friend from cricket ball impact from horizontal mid-wicket 6, while quite tipsy during a village idiots’ game. Professional? England’s Rugby World Cup win in Australia.

Karaoke song of choice? Blue Monday or, for

Top of your bucket list? To Alaskan powder ski.

One piece of technology you couldn’t live without? A safe garden ladder.

Contracts manager, Rob Keyzor Tree Surgeons and Arboricultural Consultants Ltd

What’s your go to reference book Diagnosis of Ill-health in Trees by R.G. Strouts and Tim Winter. Favourite species of tree? The magnificent baobab.

If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? Expedition medic. Best moment in your career thus far? Discovering and recording the world’s tallest planted tree in South Africa – a 267ft Eucalyptus regnans. One piece of technology you couldn’t live without? iPhone.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Little Interview March/April.indd 51

Jaguar PS / Shutterstock.com

little

Tom Kitching

By BAKOUNINE / Shutterstock.com

the

Favourite sandwich filling? Chicken and bacon with mayo. Karaoke song of choice? Wonderwall by Oasis. Who would play you in a film of your life? Jude Law. Favourite sporting memory? South Africa winning the Rugby World Cup. Top of your bucket list? To spend a night in the world’s tallest tree!

Pro Arb | March 2018 51

27/02/2018 11:32


Portfolio 3 JB Landscapes.indd 67

28/02/2018 16:08

Pro Arb March 2018  
Pro Arb March 2018  
Advertisement