Page 1

APRIL 2018

AN INTERVIEW WITH

KEVIN HAYES ARBORCHECK SYSTEM

REVOLUTIONISING STRESS DETECTION

AFTE R DA R K W O R K I N G AT N I G H T

EUROPEAN TREE OF THE YEAR: AND THE WINNER IS...


ISU1001 Grafter Green - AdProArb(210x265mm).indd 1

23/03/2018 11:42


NEWS

04 AGENDA How important is further education for  people going into arboriculture?

06 NEWS A roundup of industry news  10 STIHL: CORDLESS POWER  eporting back from Stihl’s recent press R event at Westonbirt Arboretum

12 30 UNDER 30 Landscaping supplier Green-tech will be  sponsoring this year’s edition

FEATURES

14 EUROPEAN TREE OF THE YEAR Rob McBride tells us who won  16 MAKING THE CUT Tree removal isn’t a black-and-white issue,  says Jasper Fulford-Dobson

17 TRAINING GAINS Jonathan Hazell considers the place of  arboricultural training

18 BUILDING TRUST Take your customer service cues from this  unlikely place, says Edward Morrow

19 PESTS AND DISEASES  artlett Tree Experts shares guidance on B dealing with leaf blotches

20 AN INTERVIEW WITH  Kevin Hayes, tree officer at the London Borough of Newham

24  AFTER DARK  How working at night affects arb jobs 28  ARBORCHECK  Putting an exact figure on tree stress 32  KEW GARDENS Specialist Certificate in Arboriculture 34 TOP TEN TIPS

KIT

Assessing the need for tree removal

38 TOOLBOX Advanced Tree Services, Surrey  40 PETZL ROADSHOW New products and future directions  42 VOLTAGE AND POWER Stihl clears up the confusion around the  capabilities of its battery products

44 PRODUCT DNA Cousin Trestec ATRAX 11.6mm  climbing rope

45 CLIMBING KIT 46 SKID STEERS 47 URBAN PLANTING 48 ARB KIT

REGULARS

CONTENTS

WELCOME APRIL 2018 • VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 03

W

elcome to the April issue of Pro Arb. Whether you believe it or not, spring is just around the corner, and with it will come a fantastic time of the year for trees. I’ve already managed to spot a few signs through the thin blanket of snow that we’ve experienced down here on the south coast. In a surprising twist to the Sheffield trees situation, as I’m sure that everyone already knows, Sheffield City Council has decided to pause the controversial tree maintenance programme. This has come about in no small part thanks to the evidence presented by the Woodland Trust and Trees for Cities to the council – and in no smaller part, I’m sure, thanks to the coverage of the work in every news publication from Private Eye to the New York Times. We were fortunate enough to have Jasper Fulford-Dobson, a consultant from Oxfordshire, get in touch this month, weighing in with his opinion on tree removal on page 16.

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Features Editor – Ashley Lampard ashley.lampard@eljays44.com Production Editor – Charlie Cook charlotte.cook@eljays44.com Subeditor – Kate Bennett kate.bennett@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Deputy Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com Account Manager – Natalie Ross natalie.ross@eljays44.com Horticulture Careers – Laura Harris laura.harris@eljays44.com

While out on the road talking to people in the arb industry, I tend to find that the increasing presence of technology in the industry can be a divisive issue. Some believe that, to an extent, a knowledgeable eye is all you need, but for a more thorough understanding of tree vitality, we spoke to Paul A. Davis at Hansatech Instruments about its helpful technology Arborcheck – check it out on pages 28-30. We also had a gentle schooling in battery technology by Stihl, ridding the myths around high voltage and telling us why the big names use 36V batteries. Until next time,

ASHLEY LAMPARD

PRODUCTION Design – Lyssa Rutherford Printed by Pensord Press Ltd Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: emily.maltby@eljays44.com Pro Arb is published 9 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Ashley Lampard at ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson

51  ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

Cromwell’s Oak, Melksham, Wiltshire

Pro Arb | April 2018

3


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

AGENDA

HOW IMPORTANT IS FURTHER EDUCATION FOR PEOPLE GOING INTO ARBORICULTURE?

LISA SANDERSON

Training developer/ ABC course manager

“For those wanting to advance their prospects further, the importance of progressing along the FE and HE framework increases” Further education (FE) can be defined as education below degree level for people above school age. For those starting out in arboriculture, this is crucial. The level of qualification and whether it is practical (e.g. Level 2 or 3 NPTC/LANTRA), academic (e.g. Level 2-4 ABC Awards/ BTEC/City & Guilds) or a mixture (e.g. Level 2 tree surgery block courses, Level 2-3 apprenticeships, Level 2 RFS certificates or Level 3 diplomas) depends on a number of things, including the job the individual wants to do (practical or otherwise), their personality, confidence levels, academic ability, age, experience, interests and any other qualifications they may already have in related fields that would support their role. The knowledge gained in FE is critical for safety, employability and insurability. It also

4

Pro Arb | April 2018

increases a person’s appreciation of urban tree management, provides job satisfaction and results in better working relationships and better promotion and pay opportunities. For those wanting to advance their prospects further, the importance of progressing along the FE and higher education (HE) framework increases, particularly for those wanting to become contract managers, supervisory roles, college/training provider technicians, entry level tree officers, instructors and tree surveyors. The importance of HE (Level 5 and above) increases for those wanting to be the owners/operators of larger contracting firms, consultants, tree officers, lecturers, expert witnesses and researchers. Education means increased safety, better tree care, better opportunities and increased job satisfaction – it’s a no brainer.

VICKI RICHARDSON

Programme manager for Level 3 Forestry & Arboriculture

“Further education provides the sector with safe, proficient operators who are able to perform tasks with limited supervision”

The Forestry & Arboriculture team at Plumpton is passionate about our industry and believes it is important to share skills. Further Education specialising in arboriculture is vital to ensure trees are managed and maintained effectively. Progressing from Level 1 through to Level 3 gives learners the essential skills in health and safety practice, as well as relevant certificates of competence and key industry knowledge. We also ensure learners leave with the key business skills that employers want, such as communication and problem solving skills and a good work ethic. We pride ourselves on keeping up to date with the latest technology, such as the PiCUS system and other equipment; this gives students the opportunity to try, test and master a wide range of tools. Further education provides the sector with safe, proficient operators who are able to perform tasks with limited supervision. The new technical qualifications will be available to students and are designed to be a high quality, rigorous and clear route into the industry. Whether someone has come from employment or straight from school, whether they’re at Level 1 or studying for a degree, we want each individual to leave ‘industry ready’ at the end of their course. We work closely

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

with employers and business to ensure all our courses are industry led and student focused, providing employers with a pipeline for their future workforce.

PHIL WADE

Director, Sorbus

“Some people are attracted by the opportunity to forge ahead in the profession through learning and applying the more technical aspects of arboriculture” A career in arboriculture can be very rewarding and provide a high degree of job satisfaction, but so often this career path is overlooked by those advising young people – possibly because they do not understand that the role of a tree surgeon has come a long way in recent years. The popular misconception is that all arborists are engaged in ‘lopping and chopping’, but this simply isn’t the case. It is true that some enter the profession because they like the idea of working with trees in the open air and not being stuck behind a computer in a stuffy office – a perfectly good reason, you may say. But others are attracted by the opportunity to forge ahead in the profession through learning and applying the more technical aspects

i can’t think of any reason why spending time in education would be bad, or how it could hold you back – it will only improve your knowledge

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

of arboriculture – aspiring to be top quality consultants and contractors. Consequently, the ongoing education of students and existing professional arborists is something that Sorbus take very seriously. We have implemented a vibrant outreach programme with colleges and universities, which has been running for several years now. We inform students and existing professionals that there is far more to the arboriculture profession than they may have originally thought, introducing them to a range of hitech products that they can have ‘hands-on’ experience with.

ANTHONY ARROW

Contract manager, Dartmoor Tree Services

“For anyone aged 16, 17 or 18, the appeal of going straight into work and earning some money is very attractive” We also have a range of other practical workshops, including Single Rope Technique, Modern Climbing Techniques and an Arbspecific First Aid at Work course – showing our commitment to providing added value to our customers. I was never very academic at school and I know a lot of arborists who were the same. I think you can progress, though it is initially

a role that people almost fall into. I now have more theory behind me and have become the contract manager for Dartmoor Tree Services, and I’ve improved my further education. The older I get, the more I realise how important it is. If someone wants to go into tree surgery or any aspect of arboriculture, I can’t think of any reason why spending time in education would be bad, or how it could hold you back – it will only improve your knowledge. I do know that for anyone aged 16, 17, or 18, the appeal of going straight into work and earning some money is very attractive. The routes are a lot easier and cheaper when you’re younger – there are apprenticeship schemes, which are great, and we’ve had a few apprentices working with us, who are always successful. I think that learning while you’re working is a good way of getting the base knowledge, but education can’t be a bad thing either.

SE OBA-SMITH

Kew Specialist Certificate in Arboriculture Student, Kew

“It is also important to have the right mentor – someone who inspires you to carry on and keep on learning” I think it’s very important, but there are certain things in arboriculture that can only be learned through practice. One thing that the qualifications do allow is a ‘pair of glasses’ to see arboriculture through. As important as that is, it is also important to have the right mentor – someone who inspires you to carry on and keep on learning, because without them you wouldn’t think of it as an option.

NEXT MONTH: HOW SHOULD THE ARB INDUSTRY COMBAT CHEAP, UNSKILLED RIVAL LABOUR (‘COWBOYS’)?

Pro Arb | April 2018

5


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

NEWSBEAT

GLENDALE ENCOURAGES TREE CHECKING AFTER STORMS

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

TERRAIN AERATION PROVIDES SOIL DECOMPACTION SERVICES AT HYDE PARK

Terrain Aeration has provided services to relieve compaction of soil at Hyde Park. The company used its Airforce Terralift and SuperScamper machines to treat areas of sycamores and elms north of the Bandstand, as well as the ash tree circle north of Serpentine Road. Prior to starting the work, the company conducted a radar scan for underground services and marked out the areas to be treated. The Terralift hammers a hollow probe one metre into the soil, releasing a blast of compressed air to fracture the compaction and then injecting dried seaweed, which expands and contracts with the moisture content in the ground. The probe is inserted at two-metre intervals in a grid pattern to ensure the underground

6

Pro Arb | April 2018

fracturing overlaps. The resulting holes are top-filled with Lytag, a lightweight aggregate, to provide long-term aeration and a ventilation shaft that will encourage air and water into the root zone. The result is a healthier soil structure, relieved compaction and stronger root growth. “We have used Terrain Aeration’s services for a number of years now,” said Ian Roger, arboricultural manager for the Royal Parks, “Their programme of decompaction of the soil beneath some of our most stressed trees will have long-term benefits, extending their viable lifespan and ensuring their continued contribution to the amenity of the park and the environment.” www.terrainaeration.co.uk

Arborists from Glendale have been called out to more than 200 treerelated emergencies and moved more than 300t of timber following January’s Storm Eleanor, March’s Storm Emma, and ‘The Beast from the East’. It has been the coldest winter since 1991, with blizzards, high winds and drifting snow causing collisions, gridlock and school closures. Anthony Harper, arboriculture manager at Glendale, said that while tree maintenance is important regardless of weather conditions, it’s imperative that trees are checked as soon as possible after a storm to prevent health and safety risks and further damage. “It’s important to keep on top of tree maintenance all year round, but it’s especially pertinent during periods of bad weather, which many parts of the UK have been experiencing lately,” he said. “It’s a good idea to get them checked at least once every three years by a qualified tree inspector and follow any advice or recommendations they may give. If a big storm with strong winds is predicted, it’s advisable to get an inspector out ahead of the bad weather, to assess potential risks which could be prevented.” www.glendale-services.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

GREENMECH TO SHOWCASE 200MM-CAPACITY CHIPPERS AT THIS YEAR’S ARB SHOW Visitors to GreenMech’s stand at this year’s Arb Show will be able see a selection of both tracked and towed machines, along with the brand’s latest range of 200mmcapacity chippers. The road-towed Arborist 200 and the tracked ArbTrak 200 variant will be on display. GreenMech will also be showing the road-towable QuadChip 160, featuring a 360º turntable that allows definitive positioning of the in-feed chute for convenient and safe loading at roadside or in restricted spaces. A tracked version, with the inclusion of a tilt system is available, allowing for safe working on slopes of up to 30º. www.greenmech.co.uk

PHYTOPHTHORA RAMORUM IMPACT ON SITKA SPRUCE LIKELY TO BE ‘LOCALISED AND MINIMAL’

In 2017, tree health aerial reconnaissance and follow-up ground surveys in Scotland discovered two small isolated incidents of Phytophthora ramorum on Sitka spruce. Confor has been in close contact with Forestry Commission Scotland’s tree health team and Forest Research’s leading pathologist Dr Joan Webber. “Sitka spruce is a mainstay of Scotland’s forestry and wood processing industry, which is worth £1bn annually to the economy and supports more than 25,000 jobs,” said Confor chief executive Stuart Goodall. “Therefore, we take this news very seriously, and are working closely with Forestry Commission Scotland and Forest Research. “However, one of the main attributes of Sitka spruce is its historic resilience to pests and diseases, as well as its ability to thrive in a variety of soils. It is well-known that Sitka spruce can be affected by P. ramorum, but we are reassured by past experience – and by the positive view of Forest Research experts – that the impact is very likely to be localised and minimal, due to Sitka’s natural resistance.” www.confor.org.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

CALL FOR TREES TO BE USED TO HELP ‘COMBAT FLOODING’ Leading environmental charity City of Trees is calling for trees to be used to combat flash flooding in cities and towns, as well as to clean polluted water. Flash flooding is an increasing problem, particularly in urban areas. As the UK’s population grows, more green space is being built on, which means less space for water to drain naturally into the ground. More rainwater is therefore entering sewers, leading to an increase in the severity of flooding in towns and cities. Research undertaken by Dr James Rothwell from The University of Manchester has demonstrated that trees can have a significant positive impact on managing water in towns and cities, reducing the amount of water running off the road and draining into a nearby sewer by approximately 75%. “To protect properties, we use a mixture of hard and soft engineering and natural flood management techniques, which can be a more cost-effective and sustainable way to manage flood risk while creating habitat for wildlife and helping regenerate rural and urban areas,” said Katherine Causer of the Environment Agency. “These ground-breaking projects will help to demonstrate how green spaces in our towns and cities, when well designed, can have positive benefits beyond just looking nice. “The trees will show how we can slow the flow of water running off our roads, pavements and building and help to reduce the risk of localised flooding in addition to removing pollutants which could otherwise end up in our streams and rivers.” www.ucl.ac.uk

Pro Arb | April 2018

7


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

A POWERFUL INCENTIVE: RFS STATEMENT ON THE BRITISH WOODLAND SURVEY 2017 The Royal Forestry Society has welcomed the recent publication of the British Woodland Survey 2017, saying that it provides a powerful incentive to better value the forestry sector for the future, as well as a case for action. “It is interesting to note that, although respondents were strongly motivated to diversify tree species to support biodiversity (76%) and forest health (72%), there remain significant barriers to tree species diversification as a strategy to mitigate the impact of environmental change, pests and disease,” said the chief executive of the RFS, Simon Lloyd. “We need to further explore where fears lie. We need to ensure our woodlands are fit for the future.” On new planting, respondents indicated

that, with the right incentives, they could create 26,218ha of new planting – equivalent to a 0.83% increase in the UK’s woodland area. This is a signal that the current grant system, which is not driving a step change in woodland creation, needs to be revisited. www.rfs.co.uk

FINAL TREES PLANTED IN ENGLAND’S BIGGEST NEW NATIVE WOODLAND The final trees have been planted in a forest scheme that has taken 10 years and around 45,000 volunteers to produce. Heartwood Forest in Sandridge is set to be England’s biggest new native woodland, with 600,000 new trees planted on the site. They will sit alongside ancient woodland, new wildflower meadows, walking trails and a community orchard. The last few saplings were planted by students of Sandringham School. Pupils met with the chair of the Woodland Trust, Baroness Barbara Young, and cabinet member for education at Hertfordshire County Council, Cllr Terry Douris. “It’s fantastic to see so many of our pupils getting involved in such a worthwhile project,” said Sandringham headteacher Alan Gray. “Not only does this teach them about the environment, but in today’s society, where everything they want can be attained at the touch of a button through a smartphone, it also teaches them that waiting a little longer to see a project through to fruition can be so rewarding.” www.heartwood.woodlandtrust.org.uk

8

Pro Arb | April 2018

WOMEN IN ARBORICULTURE WORKING GROUP LAUNCHED In celebration of International Women’s Day 2018, the Arboricultural Association has announced the formation of a new ‘Women in Arboriculture Working Group’, which will look at the best ways to encourage more women to get into arboriculture and address the industry’s gender imbalance that exists. The working group aims to promote and engage women in arboriculture at all levels. The Arboricultural Association observed that the industry is currently weighted towards men; according to its 2016 membership survey, only 13% of its members are female. Anyone who is interested in taking part in the working group or sharing ideas with it can join the meeting on Saturday 12 May at the ARB Show 2017; it will be taking place at the open lunch forum in the Arboricultural Association HQ tent from 1-2pm. www.trees.org.uk

FINE OF ALMOST £12,000 ISSUED FOR FELLING OF TREE IN FARNBOROUGH CONSERVATION AREA A landowner and the company that he employed have been fined nearly £12,000 for chopping down a tree in a conservation area without permission. The court heard that a planning document, along with a planning application in December 2016, had described the site as lying within the South Farnborough Conservation Area. At Basingstoke Magistrates’ Court on Thursday 22 February, both the landowner and owner of the company admitted to permitting the cutting down of a mature sycamore tree that was within the South Farnborough Conservation Area. The charge related to the felling of a sycamore tree without permission at Farnborough Road, Farnborough, in February 2017. As the site lies in the South Farnborough Conservation area, permission for any work was needed in advance from Rushmoor Borough Council. www.rushmoor.gov.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


Stihl: NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

PRO ARB PAID A VISIT TO STIHL’S RECENT PRESS EVENT AT WESTONBIRT ARBORETUM, WHERE WE LEARNED ABOUT THE BRAND’S CORDLESS RANGE – AND NEW LAUNCHES

Cordless power

M

arch saw Stihl host a press event at Westonbirt Arboretum. The event’s main news, alongside the launch of the new MS 462 C-M, was a prototype of the Stihl MS 500i, the world’s first fuel injection chainsaw. The excitement surrounding it was palpable; look out for more on this in the coming months. The other big news is the change of the Viking branding on Stihl’s line of lawnmower and groundscare products; the first Stihl cordless mowers launch in spring 2018, and the rest of the Viking range – including petrol and electric lawnmowers, tillers, scarifiers and shredders – will come under the Stihl brand and colours from 2019. The day’s main aim, though, was to demonstrate Stihl’s pro cordless products. Launched in 2009, the range now includes 29 products; as it heads into 2019, Stihl is committed to making all its cordless products compatible with the original AP battery model, ensuring older models aren’t left obsolete. In a demonstration of two Stihl telescopic pole pruners – one battery powered, one petrol powered – the cordless tool proved to be just as fast as the petrol tool. Battery kit is also lighter and quieter, making it ideal for anyone working in a sensitive environment. In addition, it often proves significantly cheaper: “An MSA 200 with the AP 300 battery can run for approximately 35 minutes on one charge, which costs

10

Pro Arb | April 2018

around 3p and takes around 35 minutes to charge,” our demonstrator explained. Last year, Stihl launched a number of new products. The first was the FSA 130 brushcutter, a professional battery tool that is available with either a bike handle or a loop handle and is designed to be plugged into the brand’s backpack battery, or an AP battery with a connecting cable to a pouch or backpack. The brand also launched two hedge trimmers, HSA 94 R (for rough cutting) and HSA 94 T (for trimming), each featuring a rotating handle to provide comfort in different positions. Another important launch of the day was the KMA 130 Kombi motor. Anyone currently in possession of an existing petrol kombi attachment who wishes to switch to the battery-powered tool would just need to spend £320 on the new cordless powerhead, plus the cost of a battery, which could ultimately save them a considerable amount in the long run. The new powerhead works with 11 Kombi tools in the range, including hedge trimmer, pole pruner, tiller, scrub cutter and blower attachments. Petrol products aren’t redundant just yet, though: as Stihl explained, range has to be taken into account when using battery tools. When it comes to working in the field, petrol tools are often preferable, providing longer uninterrupted working sessions. Stihl will be focusing on both markets as it goes forward. www.stihl.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


Niwaki Tripod Ladder EN Pro conforming to EN-131 standards

F I R S T

All landscapers and tree surgeons qualify for our 10% trade discount quote PRO10

A I D

Join us for our Spring Ladder Event at the NEW Dorset showroom Friday 20th & Saturday 21st April www.niwaki.com/openhouse New showroom now open 8 Chaldicott Barns, Semley SP7 9AW

niwaki.com

01747 445059


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Green-tech to sponsor

N

THE AWARD-WINNING LANDSCAPING SUPPLIER IS ON BOARD FOR THE 2018 EDITION OF OUR PRESTIGIOUS EVENT

ow in its fourth year, Pro Landscaper’s 30 Under 30: The Next Generation will be returning to FutureScape 2018, to recognise the achievements of ambitious young people within the industry. Last year saw the highest number of entries yet, securing its place as a highly coveted accolade within the sector. Sponsoring the increasingly popular initiative this year is award-winning landscaping supplier Green-tech. Commenting on the sponsorship, Green-tech’s chairman Richard Kay said: “I am delighted to support and sponsor Pro Landscaper’s 30 Under 30:

12

Pro Arb | April 2018

The Next Generation 2018. It’s a fantastic initiative and one close to my heart. I’m a firm advocate of inspiring the younger generation into the industry, investing in and developing them. After all, they will be the future faces of our industry. “Green-tech is a leading landscaping supplier and we are always happy to be able to give something back. We have had several of our team announced as previous 30 Under 30 winners, which has been wonderful for their confidence and motivation. They are all rising through the business. I will be personally delighted if, by sponsoring this initiative, we can contribute to helping others do the same.”

Jim Wilkinson, managing director of Pro Landscaper magazine, said: “At Pro Landscaper we are very proud of our products and their position within the market, but 30 Under 30: The Next Generation has to be one of the most significant initiatives that we have launched. By the end of 2018, we will have recognised 120 members of the landscaping industry’s ‘next generation’. We also love to keep in touch with our previous winners, most of whom have continued to develop and grow their careers within the sector. “We are delighted that, since its inception, the whole landscape industry has gotten

behind the initiative, though this has made the judging more difficult; over the years, both the quantity and quality of entries has risen substantially. “This year, we are thrilled to welcome Green-tech on board as sponsor; we know that developing young people in the industry is a particular passion for Richard and Rachel Kay, so our partnership for 2018’s 30 Under 30: The Next Generation is the perfect fit. We’re sure the class of 2018 will be spectacular, and we can’t wait to see the entries.” Application details for 30 Under 30: The Next Generation 2018 will be announced in the near future.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


WWW.PROLANDSCAPERBUSINESSAWARDS.COM

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST NOW

8 FEBRUARY 2019

CROSS-INDUSTRY AWARDS REWARDING CONSISTENT EXCELLENCE

PL AWARDS.indd 1

22/03/2018 13:34


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

european tree of the year

I

have just hotfooted it back from Brussels and the EU Parliament, where the European Tree of the Year (ETOTY) 2018 awards ceremony took place. I look back at the last seven weeks and feel a little tired, but enriched and definitely inspired. Portugal’s Whistler Oak is officially the world’s largest cork oak (Quercus suber), as recognised by the Guinness Book of Records – but now it can lay claim to another prestigious title, as winner of European Tree of the Year 2018. It was the tree’s debut appearance in this fun contest, which is aimed at promoting the arboreal treasures of Europe. Its 26,606 votes confirm the affection people have for Portugal’s numerous productive cork trees and for its richly biodiverse, culturally rich and thriving montados – expansive treescapes where millions of continually productive cork oaks

grow. Hopefully, the montados may soon be designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site – they currently sit on Portugal’s ‘Tentative List’ of possible sites for submission. I have dreamed of visiting this wonderful area of Europe for so long, and my recent trip to the montados far exceeded everything I had imagined. The official ETOTY website (www.treeoftheyear.org) says of the Whistler Oak: “The Whistler owes the name to the sound from countless birds that lay on its branches. Planted in 1783 in Águas de Moura, this cork oak has already been stripped more than 20 times. In addition to the contribution to the cork industry, it has huge relevance for ecosystem services and fighting climate change. With 234 years, the Whistler has been classified as ‘Tree of Public Interest’ since 1988 and is registered in the Guinness Book of Records: ‘the largest cork oak in the world’.”

ROB MCBRIDE REPORTS BACK FROM THE EUROPEAN TREE OF THE YEAR 2018 AWARDS CEREMONY, AND SHARES HIGHLIGHTS FROM HIS ANNUAL EUROPEAN ‘TREE RIDE’

It was not only Portugal that I visited on my annual European ‘Tree Ride’. In all, I managed to visit nine of the 13 entries. Starting in a bitterly cold Lithuania, my frozen hands stuck around through Belgium, Poland, Czechia, Slovakia, Hungary and Bulgaria –

local schoolchildren lining up to ask me difficult tree questions! Russia’s first entry to the contest, ‘The elder of the Belgorod forests’, came in third, with 21,884 votes; I couldn’t visit it because of the visa and administration costs – a shame, as it looks a stunner.

I have dreamed of visiting this wonderful area of Europe for so long, and my recent trip to the montados far exceeded everything I had imagined

it was not until I headed out west, to Spain, that things warmed up. Spain’s stunning and rare ‘Ancient elms of Cabeza Buey’ were every bit as exciting as the Whistler Oak, and came in second place with 22,323 votes. This small town is now firmly on the map, after a campaign that saw much of its community participating in the promotion of their tree. Many of the residents were in evidence as I arrived at the tree, with

In addition, this year, I was asked to be the official #TreesInNeed ambassador, and was able to highlight many tree causes across Europe – from the 50 trees threatened by the building of a Metro station in Brussels, to the 2,000 trees that are to be felled in a Budapest city park. My role allows me to raise the profile of these trees, and meet local communities.

ABOUT Rob McBride, ‘The Treehunter’, is a campaigner for ancient trees. @thetreehunter

14

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


2 1 1M1A– Y 2018

Home of The ARB Show

p on the p A w o h S B R eA Look out for th oogle Play and trees.org.uk re, G Apple App Sto

t s e g g i b s ’ K U e h T r i a F e d a r T b r A e r pu

forward to k o lo & le p o e p reat

t some g

t fun, me a re g s a w 7 1 0 “Arb Show 2

od Food

Show Ales & Go

as

ns & Aren New Attractio

Join us

petitions

Demos & Com

gy

nolo The Latest Tech

next year.”

osphere Unrivalled Atm

w o h S B R A e h T .uk/ g r .o s e e r .t w w w #ARBshow18

Principal Sponsor of the ARB Show for the 14th year

Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

I

JASPER FULFORD-DOBSON ARGUES FOR A MORE NUANCED APPROACH TO THE WAY WE VIEW TREE REMOVAL

recently saw an article in an arboricultural magazine which put forward a multitude of planning policies that could be convincingly used to argue for the retention of trees in almost any given situation. By the time I had finished reading it, I was concerned that those tasked with assessing and making decisions about the impacts of tree removal might see this as an opportunity to adopt a narrow mindset of ‘tree retention at all costs’, irrespective of the long-term vision. It reminded me of an interesting conversation I had a while ago with the head gardener of a historic property, which revealed the disparaging and often cantankerous nature of us humans when it comes to opinions on tree felling (and that includes arboriculturists, associated professionals and laymen alike).

He had to consult with various interested parties and stakeholders for a proposal to restore a historic vista dating back to the classic ‘gardenesque’ period of the late 18th century, which would require removing a section of secondary woodland and around a dozen or so individual specimen trees. These comprised a mix of species (birch, larch, lime and oak) – mostly early-mature trees that could reasonably have been categorised as high or moderate quality using the blueprint of British Standard 5837 (Trees in relation to design, demolition and construction – recommendations), had the project required a tree survey and constraints plan for planning consent – which, for the record, I don’t think it did. The objections were vociferous and made the national press. Our humble and very experienced

approached him to agree that the vision was a good one. With advances in science and our increasing understanding of the benefits of trees, those charged with their care and management are being strongly encouraged by academics and influencers to retain trees wherever possible. However, we can learn much from head gardeners and our horticultural brethren, who work in some of the country’s most picturesque landscapes; their pragmatic

Those charged with tree care and management are being strongly encouraged by academics and influencers to retain trees wherever possible

much the better for it. Some new planting has been implemented to soften the exposed bare ground, using native and exotic understory shrub species that respect the original design concept. I asked the head gardener if he had received any positive comments from the public, visitors or various stakeholders in the light of these improvements. “Absolutely,” he told me – mentioning that “quite a few” of the original objectors had humbly

making the cut

head gardener friend dodged the usual flak from various angles and plodded on, eventually securing just enough support to be able to realise this long-term restoration plan – which was formed by input from various experts on preserving and restoring historic landscapes. A few years on from the tree removal, the vista is restored to its former glory – and there is no doubt in my mind that, from an arboricultural perspective in its widest sense, the landscape is

ability to see the bigger picture is demonstrated in this example. Arboriculture and urban tree management professionals are striving to gain respect from other related disciplines, and with that comes the responsibility to demonstrate a balanced and proportionate approach to tree removal – rather than a fingerwagging and sanctimonious ‘retain at all costs’ stance, which usually only serves to put people off.

ABOUT Jasper Fulford-Dobson MArborA, MCIHort, CEnv is an Arb Association Registered consultant with more than 28 years’ experience working with trees and wooded landscapes. He runs an independent consultancy in Oxfordshire. www.fulford-dobson.com

16

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Training

gains

A

JONATHAN HAZELL PONDERS THE VALUE OF TRAINING IN MODERN ARBORICULTURE

n old joke goes: “What if we train them and they leave?” “What if we don’t and they stay?” We have a legal obligation to provide basic chainsaw training, but it can be difficult to justify the money spent on this training, particularly when it comes to transient or part-time staff. However, outside of the obvious health and safety concerns, training will help reduce your exposure to risk from a maverick employee, who may cause damage to your business’s reputation – whether that’s through providing poor customer service, making mistakes that require rework or causing relationship issues in the team. There are a number of obvious benefits to be gained from training staff, notably: • Trained staff are better at their job – they can do the work efficiently and effectively, with the minimum of risk and in the shortest possible time. • Training will ensure consistency in service delivery, and thus in the culture of your business.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

• Becoming known for your training will encourage recruitment of new team members – and retention of those who have been with you for some time. • A culture of training will encourage innovation and the use of new techniques or machinery, giving your business the edge. Last autumn, I was fortunate enough to spend an hour in the skies above Northamptonshire in a light aircraft – a vintage French twinseater – and my pilot told me about air freight’s move towards the use of self-flying planes. Apparently, the skies are safer if there is no pilot to mess about with the controls, and the move toward autopilots is likely to take hold in air freight before commercial airlines. I wonder if arboriculture is moving in the same direction: more and more work is apparently now being undertaken by machines such as tree shears, MEWPs, mulchers and so on. Ideally, the operator of these machines will be trained, and become competent and skilled over time – and this

may cause staff with finely honed manual skills to be ‘let go’. As Richard Branson once said, you should train people well enough that they can leave, but treat them well enough that they don’t want to. He also said, contrary to popular wisdom, that “clients do not come first. Employees come first. If you take care of your employees, they will take care of the clients.” But what training opportunities are there in further and higher education that will benefit the practising arborist? I was once involved in degree programme boards and was incredulous at the waffle that the academics included, and the weight that certain modules were given. One programme was especially vague – it provided the discipline of reading and writing, but the understanding of arboriculture was lacking. I see a lot of tree reports, and many authors improve with age – as they mature, they offer a more rounded and attractive product. Is training, then, any substitute for years of experience on the job? www.jhazell.com

Pro Arb | April 2018 17


Building trust NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

EDWARD MORROW SHARES FOUR KEY SERVICE LESSONS THAT TREE CARE BUSINESSES CAN LEARN FROM ONE UNLIKELY PLACE – DISNEY

T

ree care services can learn a lot from Disney. You may be perplexed and wonder what an entertainment company has to do with arboriculture. The point is not to create wacky characters to do your tree assessments or create fun rides and amusements for your clients, though – it’s all about how Disney operates, and using its strategies to build a first-class service. Does it still seem far-fetched? Well, let’s look at the four ways in which Disney creates exceptional service; use these strategies to positively impact your customers while positioning your tree care service as a trusted and well-respected company. Safety A safe tree service is a happy tree service. There are many horror stories in the industry, most of them due to arborists and climbers who neglect safety practices and standards. A ‘safety first’ approach truly makes a difference – it puts your clients at ease, extends the useful life of your equipment, and ensures your crew keep coming back for more tree removal and pruning action. Show This doesn’t mean assessing your tree jobs in a Mickey Mouse costume – rather, it means

18

Pro Arb | April 2018

B U S INE S S

dressing the part. Having a team with tidy and matching uniforms is a good start. Obviously, making sure all crew members have helmets and safety vests is not only ideal, but also common sense and best practice – this plays into safety. Sporting a nifty harness, climbing accessories and tree ascension tools is a great way to communicate to your clients that your team is well qualified to tackle the task set out before them. It shows that you and your team mean business. How you present yourself speaks volumes – done right, you can communicate that your service is professional without having to open your mouth and say it. Courtesy Showing respect on the job is a must – this goes for how your team interacts with each other, as well as how you address your clients. Team members should refrain from using foul or negative language, keep their work area tidy, and carry themselves with the utmost respect. Your clients will feel comfortable around your crew, and know that they hired the right service. Efficiency Effectiveness determines how well you perform a task; efficiency determines how quickly you get it done.

TIPS

Efficiency is important because no matter how effective your business is, it could lose money if it takes a long time to complete a project. Time is money, and working slowly will keep you on jobs much longer – driving up labour costs, machine hours and overheads. The difference between a profitable tree service and an unprofitable tree service is efficiency. It’s quite challenging to do exceptionally well in all four of these areas simultaneously. Notice what your company excels at, but also take a look at the areas where you are having the most trouble. Leveraging these four areas of exceptional service will take your tree care service higher on a marketing, operational, and even financial level.

ABOUT Edward Morrow is an author, accountant and arborist. info@accountstaffers.co

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Leaf blotches

GLYNN PERCIVAL OF BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS PROVIDES ADVICE ON MANAGING LEAF BLOTCHES Leaf blotch on walnut

& PESTASE DISE

L

Treatments with fungicides are effective, but few products are registered for control

Guignardia leaf blotch of horse chestnut

eaf blotches are an extremely common sight on trees and shrubs, and are caused by a range of fungi – including species of: Glomerella, Discula, Diplocarpon, Gnomonia, and Guignardia. Leaf blotches can cause defoliation and may weaken trees, predisposing them to fall prey to other pests. However, it is very rare that these fungi cause twig or branch dieback. When branch dieback occurs, it is usually caused by root disease, girdling roots or a similar root disorder. Consequently, tree death rarely results from infection by leaf blotch fungi alone.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Symptoms The damage first appears as small water-soaked blotches on the leaf surface, which in most instances turn reddish-brown in a matter of days. Blotches are often surrounded by a yellow border, which may fade during development. Small, black fruiting bodies called pycnidia also appear on the infected areas. The size of the blotch varies greatly, and while the growth of a small blotch may be inhibited by the present of leaf veins, larger blotches often merge together, resulting in the leaves curling upwards. Causal agents Infection is caused by a range

of fungi that overwinter on decaying plant material. Spores are released in mid-spring and are mainly dispersed to growing leaves through water splash. Blotches appear 10-20 days after infection, and the pycnidia appear from June onwards. Control Treatments with fungicides are effective, but few products are registered for control. Consequently, control is primarily achieved through good sanitation measures. Fallen leaves should be collected and removed from the area to reduce the amount of disease available the following spring. During winter, clean and/

or light thin the crown to improve circulation of air – dense foliage prevents air movement and inhibits leaf drying after rainfall. In areas where there is history of the disease, resistant tree species should be planted. Application of phosphite and calcium-based fertilisers are recommended, ideally based on soil test results. Phosphite and calcium sprays and/or soil drenches have been shown to stimulate tree vitality. Bartlett research trials conducted at the University of Reading have showed that both phosphites and calcium are useful in the suppression of leaf blotches. www.bartletttree.co.uk

Pro Arb | April 2018 19


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

An interview with

Kevin Hayes

KEVIN HAYES, TREE OFFICER AT THE LONDON BOROUGH OF NEWHAM, TELLS US ABOUT WHAT HIS JOB INVOLVES, THE EVOLVING ROLES OF TREE OFFICERS, AND THE EFFECTS OF FUNDING CUTS ON LOCAL AUTHORITY ARBORICULTURE

How did you get into arboriculture? Before I worked in arboriculture, I had jobs in a number of industries, but primarily in printing. After working in a fume-filled building with just one window, I decided I needed to work outside, and hopefully in changeable locations. A job came up in a local paper as a groundsman for a small-time tree surgeon, and it all started from there. Why did you choose to work for the council? I began at college, while doing my National Diploma in arb, and chose to do work experience at a local authority, doing tree surveys. I had to learn a lot of different amenity trees, as up until then I’d mostly been

20

Pro Arb | April 2018

working on native trees. I’ve been working for local authorities on and off ever since – I think this is my third or fourth. Can you explain your role as a tree officer? As the only remaining tree officer in the borough, I am responsible for all of the dayto-day inspections, service level agreements, and carrying out school surveys with regards to risk. I also manage and inspect all of the housing trees, in both communal and individual gardens. I manage the woodland and shelter areas, manage the programmed works for housing, highways and parks, inspect the parks and play equipment, work out budgets and chase up contractors. I also

answer enquiries from the public, councillors, the mayor, the business support team and the landscape architect, as well as dealing with planning or TPO applications, housing enquiries, and insurance and legal enquiries regarding tree damage. What does Newham Council do in terms of tree work? Over the years, my colleagues and I have managed to get most of the larger, more problematic trees onto a regime of cyclic management. We go for the ‘little and often’ approach, if possible. Due to increased planning for new development sites, we have issues when it comes to keeping what

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Over the years, my colleagues and I have managed to get most of the larger, more problematic trees onto a regime of cyclic management

we have in their current locations. Planning generally trumps trees, so I do what I can. How does it compare to other work? It’s more of a lifestyle than anything. Working for the government means that you have to be tactful at all times – on and off the clock. The work, once you get the hang of it and

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

can deal with the amount of it, is fairly straightforward. It’s time management that’s the issue. Sometimes if feels as though everyone wants you, the next moment it’s quiet. It seems to come in waves, and you have to be the beachhead. There’s always something to do, and it can be fairly varied – you have to wear a lot of ‘hats’.

Pro Arb | April 2018 21


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Local authorities have all had funding cuts, which means they can no longer deal with things in broad strokes. Newham is doing remarkably well with what it has

Has the role of tree officers changed in recent years? I would say the job in itself is fairly similar. The issue now seems to be the ease in which you can be reached. There are still the same complaints regarding light blockage, TV reception, etc., but there are far more enquiries to deal with, so time management and prioritising is the key approach. How do you feel the controversial work at Sheffield has impacted the role of councils when it comes to trees? That’s an interesting question. Councils all seem to be going in different directions when it comes to how they manage their trees. The Sheffield incident could have happened

22

Pro Arb | April 2018

to any of us, in reality, but it does seem that some councils are looking to cut costs in the short term without looking at the bigger picture of what outsourcing actually costs. I think the Sheffield situation is a good example of a worst case scenario – as some councils change their business models in attempts to be more self-sustaining, they are finding out that things that look good on paper often work differently in a real-world scenario. What challenges do you face? All of them. Local authorities have all had funding cuts, which means they can no longer deal with things in broad strokes, and this leads to time management issues and stress. Restructuring can also lead to

gaps in local knowledge and history. Once you get into a rhythm, it’s difficult but not impossible. Newham is doing remarkably well with what it has. Do you feel councils are beginning to realise the benefits of trees? Definitely. We try to plant and retain as many trees as we can, we use renewable highway schemes to plant the biggest but most lowmaintenance trees we can. Everyone loves trees – just not the one outside their house! They want it removed, we want to retain it, and everyone else is somewhere in between. Sometimes you win, sometimes you don’t – it’s a learning curve. At least I have more windows now.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


“Vega is a firm, smooth-profiled 11.7mm. The skinny, firm line will suit any mechanical positioning or access device, and it will also work as an access line.” Joe Harris, Arborist Into Trees

TECHNICALLY BETTER

Take the BOUNCE out of SRT with the VEGA 11.7mm climbing line See us at The Arb Show & APF 2018 marlowropes.com

Pro Arb advert april 2018.indd 1

21/03/2018 09:45

RECRUITING NOW ARBORIST CLIMBERS TREE SURVEYORS CONTRACT MANAGERS

ECOLOGISTS

GROUND STAFF

FIND OUT MORE ONLINE:

gristwoodandtoms.co.uk/careers


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

after dark: nightwork

24

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

ANTHONY ARROW, CONTRACT MANAGER AT DARTMOOR TREE SERVICES, TAKES US THROUGH THE PRECAUTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS THAT HAVE TO BE TAKEN WHEN CARRYING OUT WORK AT NIGHT

A

large portion of the initial planning for this work on the A380, which connects the Torbay area with the A38, was conducted by Devon County Council. Dartmoor Tree Services used subcontractors with experience in nightwork to help, ensuring that the subcontractors were aware of what the project would entail and that they would be working late into the night. “The traffic management was substantial due to the business of the road,” Anthony explains. “The A380 is quite a major road and required a substantial amount of signage. It needed to be right, to avoid severe problems.” Avoiding problems Operating potentially dangerous equipment at night can pose obvious threats to workers, particularly when it comes to roles that can be risky even in the daylight – so it’s absolutely crucial to provide sufficient lighting and communication channels. “Light is an obvious issue,” Anthony says. “We used very tall sodium lights – they were essential to provide sufficient visibility. We towed them to site behind one of our vehicles. They’re called floodlights for a reason – they really did create an amazing amount of light. When we were working in areas where not all the trees were being felled, some branches did obscure the light slightly, so positioning the lights correctly was essential – but they really were very good. You can’t do nightwork by the

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 25


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

headlights of a vehicle and a head torch.” The team was clad head-to-toe in high-vis clothing, with headtorches, to make sure they were always visible to one another. “These precautions were essential to make sure that everyone was lit up and able to see what they were doing,” says Anthony. “We had eight or nine people on site at each time across various locations, so the lack of light made it awkward. You need to be more aware of what is going on, and make sure the team is always working together.” The project on the A380 involved the felling of some large trees, so it was vital that nobody was in the wrong place at the wrong time. “We made sure everyone was fully aware of what was going on and fully visible,” Anthony tells us. Antisocial working hours The decision to conduct the work at night was taken because of the nature of the Torquay-bound road, which had a high volume of traffic due to a nearby Plymouth-bound road. “There are traffic jams on that road all of the time, and doing that work during the day would have been very strenuous on the traffic,” Anthony says. Fortunately, Devon County Council was happy to pay the extra costs involved for nightwork: “We all got paid over our normal hourly rate. We wanted to make it worthwhile for everyone, including our staff and sub-contractors, due to the antisocial hours. I think that was a big bonus for all involved.” Considering the locals Though there were no residents or businesses nearby, the team did have to consider the surrounding area’s hibernating dormouse inhabitants. “We were working under a dormouse licence, with an ecologist on site for certain areas.” Anthony tells us. “Dormice are ground nesting, so the ecologist had been through and given it a sweep in areas that were going to be nesting spots. “Luckily, any other nocturnal animals are long gone as soon as you start the chainsaws.” Knowing the limit Although, according to Anthony, all of the work on this occasion was fairly straightforward, there are potential limits to what can safely be undertaken at night. Anthony explains that the team did have a MEWP on sight, and there was some climbing involved, though not a great deal: “I think that if it was a really awkward dismantle with lots of rigging, and if there were power lines involved, it would be really awkward to see the extent of where the branches are and judge the weights of limbs. If the work is straightforward enough, working at night shouldn’t be a problem, but as the technicality increases, I think it would be hard to undertake some of the tasks.” www.dartmoortreesurgeons.co.uk

26 Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Operating potentially dangerous equipment at night can pose obvious threats to the workers, particularly when it comes to roles that can be risky even in the daylighT

“

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 27


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Arborcheck:

Monitoring tree vitality

PAUL A. DAVIS, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICER AT HANSATECH INSTRUMENTS LTD, EXPLAINS THE WORKINGS AND BENEFITS OF ARBORCHECK, A SYSTEM THAT MONITORS TREE VITALITY AND DETECTS STRESS IN TREES

A

rborcheck is a tool that allows arboricultural professionals to accurately assess the tree vitality by examining the inner workings of the leaves. The system is derived from a plant physiology research tool that we manufacture, which allows plant scientists to probe the mechanisms of photosynthesis by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence. On a healthy tree, when a leaf absorbs energy from the sun, a high proportion of that energy (about 85%) is used for photosynthesis, with the surplus reemitted as fluorescence from within the chlorophyll. If the tree is under stress from drought, nutrient deficiency, root damage, disease, etc., and the photosynthetic mechanisms are

28

Pro Arb | April 2018

compromised, this significantly affects the amount of sunlight that the leaves are able to process. The reduction in energy used by the leaf for photosynthesis results in an increase in chlorophyll fluorescence, as the leaf reemits more energy than usual. The great thing about the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence is that it is able to detect stress very soon after the onset of the stress factor. As soon as stomatal closure takes place in response to stress, photosynthesis is limited and the fluorescence level increases. This can be days or even weeks before you see anything on the tree. We also factor in chlorophyll content, another important indicator of stress – issues such as lack of light, drought, certain

herbicides and nutrient deficiencies have an effect on leaf chlorophyll content. Both these tools together can give a clear indication of the presence of many biotic or abiotic stress factors, or of a decline in vitality. We collect benchmark data for chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll content at Barcham Trees, whose crop has been independently validated as being in optimum condition by Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories. We then compile this data into the Database of Benchmark values (DBV), which provides us with a speciesspecific dataset for more than 400 individual tree types – mostly down to cultivar level. The DBV is an integral component of the Arborcheck Android App, supplied with the

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


system. It allows Arborcheck users to make a comparative analysis of leaf fluorescence and chlorophyll content between a tree they need to assess and a tree of the same type that is in optimum condition. The system is particularly suited for use before, during and after building work on sites where TPO (or in fact any) trees exist and have been highlighted to developers as ‘must not damage’ trees. Arborcheck has been

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

The great thing about the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence is that it is able to detect stress very soon after the onset of the stress factor

used to test trees in these situations, but also in cases where damage, particularly to root systems, has occurred. Routine monitoring following damage is critical, as it can give an early warning if vitality begins to decline. Routine monitoring of newly planted trees is another area where Arborcheck excels. It’s able to provide detailed information of how the tree is performing post-planting. This is particularly useful when developers

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

are required to guarantee planted stock for a period of time following completion of a project as it allows developers to highlight potential issues with planted tree performance and remediate before the problems escalate. It’s also useful where remedial work has taken place. By measuring chlorophyll fluorescence, you can see clearly if your actions are positively affecting the tree’s photosynthetic performance.

Pro Arb | April 2018 29


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Biosecurity is the word on everyone’s lips, and since Arborcheck can detect the onset of stress early, it is ideal for identifying potential biosecurity issues early on – particularly if used as part of a routine monitoring programme. In North America, research by the USDA has shown that chlorophyll fluorescence can be used as a powerful previsual indicator of stress in ash due to emerald ash borer (Pontius and Hallet, 2014). There is a strong business case for consultancy services to promote themselves as Arborcheck Technicians. Many consultants have done well from selling their services as PiCUS experts, and the same model applies here. Physiological tree health assessments are increasingly being requested in addition to visual assessments, and that’s the beauty of Arborcheck – it goes beyond the visual. This year, we will start offering a consultancy service based on Arborcheck

30

Pro Arb | April 2018

measurements. For one-off requirements, we’re conducting measurements either on site or through leaf samples sent to us, and are providing Arborcheck vitality and stress reports. If necessary, we can provide the client with a more detailed interpretation of the results by calling on the expertise of industry professionals and researchers who have used chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for many years, such as Keith Sacre, Glynn Percival, Jon Banks and Simon Holmes. Developments in scientific data interpretation models, coupled with advances in technology, mean there are always new things to explore. We’re expanding the data collection programme in other areas of the world to allow Arborcheck to be used with region-specific Benchmark Databases. We’re entering the third year of data collection in Australia, with a new programme commencing in Hong Kong later in 2018.

The more people adopt the technology, the more we’re discovering new ways to use Arborcheck. Coupling Arborcheck data with i-Tree is one of my favourite new ideas. i-Tree gives a great overview of what potential a tree inventory offers in terms of ecosystem services, while Arborcheck shows how the trees are actually performing. For example, trees alongside a busy highway would likely be under-performing compared to trees in open parkland; Arborcheck data within i-Tree could highlight these differences and allow a more informed tree care plan to be constructed, based on physiological performance rather than a visual assessment. We’ve got a great case study ongoing with Trees for Cities this year and I’m excited to see how the two systems can integrate. I think it will prove to be a really powerful tool. www.arborcheck.com

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


Commercial Vehicles with Body Conversion New vehicles for the Arb industry supplied throughout the UK

• • • •

Available with fully welded aluminium bodies, Arb conversions to used & factory tippers Tow bars, tool boxes, LED lighting & sign writing available Finance options available

Call 020 8539 0611 www.tipmaster.co.uk


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Kew gardens:

specialist certificate in Arboriculture SE OBA-SMITH IS A STUDENT AT KEW GARDENS, UNDERTAKING ITS SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE IN ARBORICULTURE – A ONE-YEAR, FULL-TIME COURSE THAT CONCERNS EVERYTHING AFFECTING TREE CARE, FROM THE NURSERY TO THE ARBORETUM. HE TELLS US ABOUT HIS ROUTE INTO THE INDUSTRY, AND HOW THE KEW CERTIFICATE IS DIFFERENT TO OTHER ARB QUALIFICATIONS

What inspired you to start a career in arboriculture? When I was 16, I worked at a solicitors’ firm in Dublin, and though it was interesting, I felt a compulsion to be outside. Family and friends encouraged me to look at a career in horticulture, and after looking into different careers and trying different jobs, I saw that an apprenticeship had come up on Hampstead Heath. I jumped at the opportunity, as I thought it would be the ideal place to learn the craft.

terms of the work, as we use the singlerope technique for climbing, and I had to learn it from scratch. It’s also taught me a lot about tree selection, tree law and a large selection of trees worldwide. The work is very proactive, which has given me a different approach to possible tree management. What has been particularly interesting is observing old arboriculture techniques that were cutting edge at the time, which you still see on a lot of the trees today.

How has your experience of working and learning at Kew been so far? I’ve found it to be of a very high standard. There has been a steep learning curve in

What sort of topics are covered on the arboriculture course? It’s split into two lecture blocks, one on agriculture and the other on propagation.

32

Pro Arb | April 2018

Arboriculture focuses on tree selection, tree purchasing, tree law, pests and diseases, and tree pruning, while propagation looks at nursery stock, grafting, layering and cutting techniques. You are also tested on your knowledge of plants and shrubs. To pass, you have to reach 50% on all of those topics. Where do you hope to go after you complete the course? It depends on what is available after September – I’m interested in staying within the practical side of arboriculture for as long as I’m physically able to. I would like to work and travel across different continents and countries, and I would be interested in working in all different aspects of

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

The work is very proactive, which has given me a different approach to possible tree management

the industry – from roots through to tree officer work and nursery work through to climbing. Working in different countries has an appeal, as trees are regarded in different ways throughout the world and it would be good to have that knowledge for the future. What are the requirements to get onto the course? You need CS30 and CS38, a Level 2 certificate in arboriculture, and six months’ continuous experience. Will you be undertaking an exchange? I haven’t so far, but I think I will be doing one in the summer. I would like to go out to the USA. I’ve never been before, and Americans have a very different culture around tree surgery – they have the ISA, and there is greater awareness of the sector. It’s a much bigger industry, with more companies, bigger machinery and more money going into it. It would be interesting to see how different it is. To my knowledge, they do less reductions, focusing more on crown thinning and chemical use, and are more into removal, taking down big trees. As a member of the next generation of arborists, what problems do you think

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

trees and the industry will face in the near future? I think that, as the world gets more connected, the spread of pests and diseases will increase. It’s important to learn from the mistakes of the past, which is something we do well as an industry. Biosecurity is important, and I think that proactive measures such as diversifying tree stock in the UK would be a good way to deal with the threat. It’s also crucial for the industry to be globally connected and to act as one. You can see that already, with different countries alerting each other to the spread of pests and diseases, but it’s important to maintain. What is most important to me, though, is building people’s awareness of the industry – without that, there won’t be a next generation of arborists to preserve trees and fight against pests and diseases. How is a Kew qualification different from other arb qualifications? It’s different in that it focuses specifically on botanical arboriculture, so there is a greater spotlight on the issues that you would deal with in a botanical garden. There is also a focus on conserving the existing tree stock – the approach is very proactive, with a lot of

mulch and air spade use, and we aim to keep canopies as large as they can be, allowing trees to grow to their full potential. We also get the chance to learn about and work on trees from all around the world, which we wouldn’t be able to on other courses. www.kew.org

Pro Arb | April 2018 33


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

top 10 tips

Assessing the need for

tree removal DECIDING WHETHER A TREE NEEDS TO BE REMOVED CAN BE A TRICKY BUSINESS. LEE DAVIES, CONSULTANT AT ARTEMIS TREE SERVICES, OFFERS ADVICE TO HELP ARBORISTS THROUGH THE PROCESS

34

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

A

s tree professionals, we understand the wide range of social, economic and environmental benefits that trees provide – absorbing pollution, reducing the severity of flooding, and improving the health and wellbeing of society as a whole. It is therefore incredibly important that these benefits are conserved wherever practicable. However, there will be circumstances when tree removal needs to be considered – below are 10 tips for navigating these circumstances.

1

2 3 4

5

No train, no gain Obtain suitable training to enable you to recognise significant defects in trees that may dictate removal. Ideally, anyone inspecting trees and advising clients on their condition should hold a minimum of NQF Level 3 in arboriculture, or an equivalent qualification; they should preferably hold the Lantra Professional Tree Inspection Certificate, too. Be systematic Use a systematic and consistent approach when inspecting trees – it will help to ensure that potential hazards are not missed. This can be achieved by using an inspection sheet or checklist to make sure that all parts of the tree are recorded.

6 7

8 9

Count the cost Weigh up the value of the tree against the reasons for felling. If young trees or trees of poor quality are causing a nuisance, it may be more cost efficient to remove the problem trees and replant in a more suitable location. Explore your options For higher value trees, alternative options to tree removal should be considered. If leaves from a higher value tree are causing a nuisance by blocking up gutters, it may be better to solve the problem by installing gutter brushes or guards, for example. If trees are causing a mess on cars, can a carport be installed, or a car cover used instead of felling? Under new management Also consider alternative tree management options. For example, could pruning prevent or reduce a nuisance or risk, while retaining the tree and the benefits it provides? Side effects Trees growing in groups offer each other protection from the wind. Removing a tree from a group may suddenly expose the remaining trees to winds that they have not adapted to withstand. It may be necessary to crown-reduce these trees to prevent an increased risk of storm damage.

Hit the books Arborist field guides, such as those produced by the Arboricultural Association, are very helpful for identifying defects in trees and understanding their significance. Some species of fungi can present a higher risk than others, and infected trees may need to be removed.

10

Pest interests Keep up to date with current pest and disease threats, as well as guidance on treatment options – current information can be obtained from the Forestry Commission (www.forestry.gov.uk). In a small number of cases, a tree may have to be removed to prevent the spread of disease.

about

Expert advice In some circumstances, where a greater level of expertise is required to assess whether tree removal is necessary, you may have to seek help. This can include using laboratory identification services to correctly identify a pest or disease, or employing an arboriculturist to undertake further investigation using specialist decay detection equipment.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

All in order Finally, if tree removal is required, you will need to find out if the tree is protected by a Tree Protection Order (TPO), or if it is situated within a conservation area. You may need to gain consent or notify the council before a tree can be removed.

Artemis Tree Services is an Arboricultural Association-approved contractor and CHAS-accredited tree surgery company based in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire www.artemistreeservices.com

Pro Arb | April 2018 35


Terrain half - Pro Arb .qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 16:59 Page 1

WE MAKE THE EARTH MOVE

TerralifT deep peneTraTion relieves compacTion, waTerlogging and panning

d co an mp r essed air

e On

at ion

sea weed

f no Injectio

Terrain aeraTion’s TreaTmenT is long-Term for parks, Trees, sporTs piTches, golf courses, bowling greens and gardens. ask The experTs. we have 25 years of experience of making The earTh move.

me etr tre d eep pen

SEE THE EARTH MOVE ON VIDEO W: WWW.TERRAINAERATION.CO.UK T: 01449 673783

Orion Forestry

Authorised Dealer

Petrol Powered Capstan Rope Winches in Stock PCW5000 - 16kg 1000kg pull, 4 stroke, upto 18 metres/minute

PCW3000 - 9.5kg 700kg pull, 4 stroke, 10 metres/minute

OrionForestry.co.uk 01279 813591

SHOWROOM AT Takeley Business Centre Dunmow Road, Takeley, CM22 6SJ

Download the FREE Pro Arb app today 1

Go to the App Store

2

Search ‘Pro Arb’

3

Download the free app

4

Choose and download your issue

APRIL 2018

AN INTERVIEW WITH

KEVIN HAYES ARBORCHECK SYSTEM

MARCH 2018

REVOLUTIONISING STRESS DETECTION

WINKWORTH

AN INTERVIEW WITH

ARBORETUM

AFTE R DA R K W O R K I N G AT N I G H T

TREE REMOVAL

WHEN IS IT

JUSTIFIED?

STUMP AND GRIND

EUROPEAN TREE OF THE YEAR: AND THE WINNER IS...

THE NEW STUMP GRINDERS

AWARD-WINNING PARTNE

RSHIP

B RI S T O L CI T Y CO U N CI L A N D G RI S T WO O D A N D T O M S


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

KIT

FOCUS WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 37


TOOLBOX NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

CHAINSAWS

We have a suite of Stihl chainsaws. We dabbled with Husqvarna when it brought out the top-handle, but found that they were difficult to repair. We’re finding Stihl to be the benchmark chainsaw that everyone tends to use. We have noticed the standard does feel like it’s dropping, due to the need to make them lighter and more fuel efficient, but we’ll stick with them as they’re relatively cheap and easy to repair. We have two electric top-handles, which are good for working early in the morning and late at night – particular in a city like London. The vast majority of our work is with local authorities and can require Sunday work or working near roads before the heavy traffic.

DOMINIC BLAKE (CENTRE), CEO AT SURREYBASED ADVANCED TREE SERVICES, TAKES US THROUGH THE COMPANY’S KIT SELECTION CLIMBING EQUIPMENT AND PPE We buy all our climbing equipment from Honey Brothers, as it’s local. Tree surgeons like their shiny new kit – anything that’s new on the market tends to be preferred. We do supply high-quality kit, such as the Komet Dragonfly harness and the Teufelberger treeMOTION. If the tree surgeons want to upgrade their kit, we will pay a certain amount for a certain harness and they can pay the difference. The same goes for PPE. They’re supplied with Petzl Vertex helmets, Stihl X-Flex chainsaw trousers, and Meindl Woodwalker chainsaw boots, but, again, if they want to upgrade them they can pay the difference. What we do supply, though, is good quality and lasts a long time.

CHIPPERS We’ve stuck with Timberwolf, which are good. They don’t require a tow licence and, considering this, they’re powerful. We’ve got a slightly larger tractor version, too – a Heizohack. We’ve probably used the ones we have for six years, and we’re planning on sticking with them.

38

Pro Arb | April 2018

STUMP GRINDERS We have everything from the small pedestrian Danequip grinder and a Predator 28X right up to the big remotecontrol ones – we used to have the Predator P75, but our newer one is the P65. The remote-control stump grinders work well, as they take the operative away from the danger area. Danequip always gives us a good service and is always available on the end of the phone when you need help.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS MEWPS

OPM SPRAYERS

We have a small MEWP, which is a Spider 18.75, and a 23.12 Hinowa. Both are tracked. The Hinowa lift has to go on the back of the lorry, but the Spider can be towed behind a normal 3.5t vehicle, making it very versatile. It also has narrow access – the tracks fold up to get through garden gates and similarly narrow situations. We use the MEWPs an awful lot – sometimes in conjunction with a lot of crane work. We sometimes have to hire in lorry-mounted MEWPs for removing oak processionary moth (OPM) nests.

VEHICLES The majority of the fleet is 3.5t – either Nissan Cabstars or Mitsubishi Canters. We used to run 7.5t cargos, but we ended up phasing them out because they weren’t economically viable to keep on the road. One of the new Mitsubishis is 7.5t, however, as it meets the emissions regulations going into London. It helps to have 3.5t vehicles because the younger guys don’t need a special licence to take them on the road. We have one large roll-on rolloff bin lorry, a 38t HGV, which has

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

We have four OPM sprayers, all from an Italian company called Tifone. They’re custom-built to sit in the back of the Nissan Navara. We bought one the first season we did OPM. They’re electrostatic, ultra-low volume spray units – ideal for the application of DiPel, the pesticide we use for OPM. Over the years we’ve increased the fleet, so now there are four units, serviced on a regular basis by a company down in Petersfield. The OPM issue is only going to grow and spread, so we foresee the units being busy for years to come.

been invaluable for large crane jobs as we can lift large sections of timber straight into the back of the bin lorry and take it down to the yard for processing. It speeds up the whole process. Rather than hire another company in to do the work, we can keep costs down and keep it all in-house. All of the vehicles we use are leased. We used to buy the larger vehicles, but you end up throwing money at them just to keep them on the road. They’re then still under warranty, so it works out to be more cost effective.

Pro Arb | April 2018 39


Petzl NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Roadshow

PETZL TOOK TO THE ROAD THIS MONTH TO SHOWCASE ITS NEW RANGE OF ROPE ACCESS EQUIPMENT. WE CAUGHT UP WITH THE BRAND AT THE CASTLE CLIMBING CENTRE IN LONDON TO SEE WHICH DIRECTION IT’S HEADING IN

T

hough the not all of its new products are currently commercially available, the Petzl team was eager to explain the new standards of these products. The highlight of its new harnesses was the Astro Bod Fast, which hit the market in March; certified to European and Russian standards, it is designed for efficiency and comfort during rope ascents. The Astro Sit Fast, meanwhile, will be available in May; it has an openable ventral attachment point to allow for optimal integration of equipment, turning this seat harness into a full-body harness when combined with a Top Croll S or L chest harness. With Brexit rapidly approaching, members of the audience were keen to find out how it would affect harness standards and pricing. The Petzl team understandably wanted to keep its cards close to its chest, but did remark that, though the UK government could come up with new British standards, the brand would still need to meet existing EU standards in order to sell to Europe. The subject is, however, unpredictable: Petzl lowered its prices before the referendum in order to be competitive, unaware of what the outcome of the vote would be, and then had to increase the prices again six months later once Brexit had been confirmed. For anyone looking to show off their climbing skills, Petzl will be holding the 2018 edition of its international Petzl RopeTrip on June 7-9 in Duisburg, Germany. The event, which is held every two years, will bring together rope access workers from around the world for a competition and a technical symposium. The event includes rope access competitions, where judges will be focusing on how the participants respect safety regulations while moving around at height – with the chance to win a trophy. There will also be a Climb Up Race, showcasing a key skill at the heart of rope access, along with an international rope access symposium. www.petzl.com

40

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


Invest in the Vermeer BC190XL 8” chipper TO GET TOUGH TREE WORK DONE

Celebrating new beginnings

• 8” (20 cm) X 12” (30.5 cm) infeed opening • 34.9 kW (48.8 PS/48.1 hp) 4 cyl water-cooled Kubota diesel engine • Automatic drive belt tensioner • Offset oversized horizontal feed rollers • Smartfeed with infeed auto reverse • Push-button throttle control

07879 600050 leslie.goodman@vermeeruk.co.uk

Join us in the classroom for the level 4 dip arb and

www.vermeer-uk.co.uk

SKIDSTEER

Pay no VAT

HIRE SOLUTIONS BOBCAT & JCB TRACKED LOADERS FITTED WITH FORESTRY MULCHERS AVAILABLE FOR SELF DRIVE HIRE

Sign up for your early bird September enrolment NOW!

Contact Geoff for price & availability 01963 824895 www.thetrainingtree.co.uk learn@thetrainingtree.co.uk

awards Recognised Centre

01600 860670 hire@skidsteerhiresolutions.co.uk www.skidsteerhiresolutions.co.uk

Inv BC

• 8” ( • 34.9 coo • Aut • Off • Sm • Pus

ww


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Voltage and power: clearing up the confusion ADVERTISING TENDS TO MUDDY PEOPLE’S UNDERSTANDING OF WATTAGE AND POWER: THERE CAN BE AN ASSUMPTION THAT, THE HIGHER THE WATTAGE OR VOLTAGE, THE MORE POWERFUL THE PRODUCT WILL BE. WE SPOKE TO STIHL ABOUT WHY THIS IS UNTRUE

42

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

S

tihl is regularly asked why it only Harnessing the power the product would have lost nearly 20% uses 36V for its battery products; As has been said, voltage is related to power power through the battery’s charge level. on the face of it, 36V appears but does not equal power. Power = voltage (V) Instead, the control module compensates less powerful, and somewhat x current/amps (I). For Stihl, power = 36 x I, but further and increases the current to 60A. So counterintuitive for the brand. remember that full voltage (36V) requires 100% 30 x 60 = 1,800W of available power. The first thing to be establish is that voltage, battery charge, so it’s the ‘I’ (current) that’s while related to power, does not actually equal extremely important to understand. An intelligent battery management system, power. In fact, most high end professional where the control module constantly varies the manufacturers have settled on 36V as it makes Let’s use Stihl’s MSA 200 in an example: current to compensate for drops in voltage, the most technical sense, making for a more - At 100% charge, the product has 36V, ensures that available power is constant and efficient and reliable design. and 50A of current generated by the control won’t drop as the battery gets lower. The One of the biggest advantages of 36V module. 36 x 50 = 1,800W of available power product will have the same power whether products is that the battery is 100% they allow for a charged or 1% An intelligent battery management system, universal system: charged. In other where the control module constantly from a domestic words, it will perform varies the current to compensate for drops AK 10 battery to a just like a petrol in voltage, ensures that the available backpack battery, product, which has all of Stihl’s batteries 100% power whether power is constant and won’t drop as the are 36V. This means the tank is full or battery gets lower all products can be about to run dry. charged, diagnosed and used with a universal charging system - At 50% charge, the voltage has dropped What’s next for battery products? and diagnostic tool. Stihl believes that its cordless chainsaws to 33V. If the current is the same, the Higher voltages generate more heat and can rival entry-level petrol equivalents; at the product loses power, because 33 x mean that lower currents have to be used, 50 = 1,650W. Instead, the control module moment, making a cordless chainsaw to rival and more working parts are required to bring compensates for the drop in voltage and the likes of the MS 661 or similar would need the heat down to manageable levels. Stihl’s increases the amperage to approximately such a large battery pack and motor that 36V battery products can operate with much 55A. So 55 x 33 = 1,800W of available power the operator would be unable to lift it. The higher current outputs and with fewer working - At 10% charge, the voltage is now down to industry is now concentrating on increasing parts are simpler and cheaper to maintain, 30V. Power would be down to 1,500W the capacity of their batteries to expand their service and use. if the current were kept the same – meaning range and power larger professional tools.

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 43


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

product dna Cousin Trestec ATRAX 11.6mm climbing rope

Technical specifications • Diameter: 11.6mm • Weight: 102 g/m • Core percentage: 45% • Sheath percentage: 55% • Number of falls: 8 • Impact force: 520 daN • Number of strands: 24

• Static elongation: 2.8% • Breaking strength: 3,070 daN • Breaking strength (with figure-of-eight knot): >1,500 daN • Shrinkage in water: 0.5% • Materials: 100% polyester

1. Patented splice The team at Cousin Trestec has developed a brand new splice for this rope – so slim that it can be threaded through a Petzl ZigZag or ART Lockjack. This makes installing mechanical devices on a main climbing line much simpler and quicker. Cousin Trestec supplies a rope needle that can be used to choke around the eye and pull the rope through the mechanical device. This new eye is the slimmest currently available, and gives a definite advantage for the growing number of arborists who use mechanical devices. 2. Construction ATRAX rope has been developed to have minimum slippage between the core and the sheath. This means that the rope does not bunch or milk, and runs smoothly through all mechanical devices. The tight 24-strand construction means that there is very little water absorption when the rope is wet, and thus no increase in diameter.

44

Pro Arb | April 2018

3. Long life Because ATRAX rope has been developed to work well with mechanical devices, it has a smooth exterior that flows smoothly through metal cams, allowing it to self tend easily. In the extreme testing the rope has undergone, it has shown remarkable abrasion resistance; even after heavy use, the rope does not fluff up and continues to perform well. 4. Availability ATRAX is available in Green and Orange or Blue and Yellow, and in 25m, 35m and 45m hanks with a spliced eye. Prices start at £94.80, and it is available from Buxtons Ltd.

ABOUT 01785 712397 enquiries@buxton.net www.buxtons.net

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


CLIMBING KIT

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

VEGA 24-PLAIT POLYESTER JACKET

• Lowest CE-certified elongation currently on the market (1.2%) • Diameter: 11.7mm • Designed specifically for new generation of mechanical climbing techniques • Ultra-lightweight RRP: POA www.marlowropes.com

ART SPIDERJACK 3 • Multifunctional device for ascending and descending with running double rope • Left and right-handed • Comes with two cams: for ropes of 11-12mm diameter and 12-14mm diameter • High quality stainless steel frame • Service life: 10 years RRP: £282 www.frjonesandson.co.uk

ISC HALO RIGGING PLATES • Halo Rigging Plates are machined from superior grade aluminium • Available in three sizes: Small (MBS 40kN), Medium (MBS 50kN) and Large (MBS 70kN) • Halo Plates feature a central hole surrounded by six equi-spaced apertures, each of which is capable of accommodating multiple karabiner connections, giving the user multiple loading options • Halo Rigging Plates should form part of a compatible system; they were developed to match the ratings on ISC Karabiners and Prussik pulleys, at 40kN, 50kN, and 70kN • CNC machine-radiused edges make the apertures rope and webbing-friendly RRP: Small – £15, Medium – £24, Large – £50 www.sorbus-intl.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 45


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

skid steers

VERMEER S925TX MINI SKID

• Improves efficiency on the jobsite, with 6in (15.2 cm) ground clearance to help operate on uneven terrain and tough ground conditions • High-mounted track sprocket reduces premature wear and tear in rocky soil conditions • To help operational safety, the ground drive and boom/ bucket motion are limited when the operator steps off the platform until the operator steps back on the platform • Designed with maintenance in mind, the S925TX provides easy access to daily service points by removing panels • Equipped with heavy duty loader arms, it has exceptional lift capabilities, and can efficiently lift 420kg to 2.2m and transport materials around the jobsite www.vermeer.com

BOBCAT S630 SKID STEER LOADER • Lift cylinder cushioning reduces harsh movements, with less vibration, quieter operation and increased comfort, plus sound dampening features for a quieter cab • Cabs are designed for all-round visibility, allowing better sight lines and easier operation • A new range of forestry cutter attachments was released in 2017, including the FRC150ST forestry cutter for mulching trees and underbrush in minutes • The variable front gate can be adjusted to provide the coarseness or fineness of mulch that the finishing requires • Delivers a greater forward reach at mid-range heights for dumping over a wall, backfilling or unloading flatbed trucks www.bobcat.com

KANGA TK216 ‘KID’ (2 SERIES) TRACKED MINI LOADER • The world’s smallest multitasking compact skid steer loader • Ideal for working in and accessing confined spaces where larger, and especially articulated, machinery often can’t reach • Even fits through a standard internal doorway with an overall width of less than 800 mm, as well as into stables and animal pens, through a standard-sized passageway at the side of most domestic properties, etc. • Features rubber over-tyre track design, giving the operator an edge when it comes to power, speed, durability, ease of use and safety • Available in tracked (TK216) or wheeled (KK216) options www.kangaloader.co.uk

46

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Urban planting

GREEN-TECH LASER-CUT TREE GUARDS AND GRILLES • • • • •

A range of contemporary laser-cut tree guards and grilles A stylish and robust alternative Bespoke service offered – Green-tech can manufacture to drawings and designs supplied by the client, including logos and personalisation Manufactured in stainless, mild or corten steel Available in 275 carbon steel (finished, galvanised and powder-coated any standard RAL colour) or a polished stainless steel product in a choice of grades RRP: POA – made to order www.green-tech.co.uk

PLATIPUS D-MAN FIXING SYSTEM • Ideal for roof gardens and urban planting, where services can be an issue • The system is supplied complete, so there is no requirement for heavy kerbstones • Cells can be used individually or in multiples • Cover, protect and build up large planting areas and roof gardens • Strong, compact and lightweight cells with a unique cup for valuable water storage. RRP: POA www.platipus-anchors.com

ROOTGROW PROFESSIONAL MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

• Sustained plant nutrition • Better natural vigour • Reduced plant mortality • Improved drought tolerance • Reduced replant problems. RRP: £140 per 10L tub www.rootgrow.co.uk

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Pro Arb | April 2018 47


ARB NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

KIT a roundup of the best new products

NIWAKI Tripod ladder

• Conforms to EN-131 standards • Loadbearing capacity of 150kg • Reinforced lower rungs and a chunkier back leg • All landscapers and tree surgeons qualify for a 10% trade discount – quote PRO10 • Available in a range of sizes – 6ft, 8ft, 10ft and 12ft RRP: From £249

www.niwaki.com

STIHL

Cordless KombiEngine KMA 130 R

• Compatible with all current Stihl Kombi Tools and four new Kombi attachments • Weighing only 3.2kg for the powerhead and shaft • Lightweight and cordless, with high torque and low vibration • 800g lighter than its petrol alternative (KM 94 RC-E) • Used in conjunction with the AR backpack batteries or the AP battery belt, the KMA 130 R utilises three power levels to enhance energy efficiency • Launches in May 2018 RRP: £1,070 for the KMA 130 R combined with the AR 1000 backpack battery and AL 500 charger

MAKITA

DUC353Z chainsaw • 36V direct drive 1,100W-output motor • Perfect balance, with twin batteries at 5.2kg ready-to-work weight • Back-handle saw with metal gear oil pump and steel chain catcher • Zero emissions, super-quiet operation; total control and high levels of efficiency and safety as standard • Removable chain catcher for fast and efficient machine servicing RRP: POA

www.makitauk.com

www.stihl.co.uk

48

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


Plantoil ad 118x91 Sept'14_PROARB 25/09/2014 14:44 Page 1

PR ESEN TS

 2018

caring for the environment

THE UK’S LARGEST FORESTRY, WOODLAND AND ARBORICULTURE EXHIBITION

20/21/22nd September 2018 Featuring: Husqvarna World 25m Poleclimbing Championships European Chainsaw Carving Championships Stihl Timbersports UK Forwarder Driving Championships The UK’s largest display of traditional woodland crafts Fencing in the 21st Century Over 2 miles of working machinery 320 exhibitors Over 22500 visitors

• CHAINSAW OIL • 2-STROKE OIL • SAW BLADE OIL

Ragley Estate, Alcester, Warwickshire B49 5PS For Further Information: Tel: 01428 723545

www.plantoil.co.uk 0800 013 7363 unfogable mesh eye protection

info@apfexhibition.co.uk www.apfexhibition.co.uk

TRAINING High quality arboriculture, forestry, first aid and chainsaw related training Industry recognised qualifications

www.meshsafetyglasses.com 0845 2222 039

FOLLOW US!

Tailor made training and workshops Tree surgeon fast track courses t 033 345 678 86 e training@hi-line.co.uk w hi-line.co.uk/training f hilinetraining i instagram.com/hilinetraining

Secateurs, hedgeshears and the world’s finest pruning saws in superb, tempered Japanese steel KST 230

KST 217

Silky Fox Saws

KST 103

Pro Arb Magazine

@proarbmagaxine

@proarbmagaxine

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Foxley Estate Office, Mansel Lacy, Hereford HR4 7HQ

Hayauchi 490

Pocketboy 170

Tel: 01981 590224 Fax: 01981 590355 enquiries@silkyfox.co.uk

Visit silkyfox.co.uk to find your local stockist


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

Call 01903 777 580 or email laura.harris@eljays44.com with your vacancy

ARBORICULTURAL CONSULTANT

ARBORICULTURAL SURVEYOR

We have an opportunity for an arboricultural consultant based in Billericay, with site visits in North and West London. Reporting to the senior arb consultant as part of the Ground Control Project team, you will deliver BS5837 arboricultural consultancy and timber valuations for Costain Skanska Joint Venture (CSJV) under the current HS2 Enabling Works. The project team will utilise the latest technology, innovation and best practice to help facilitate this nationally significant project. You will manage the delivery of the arboricultural reporting and client liaison to provide exceptional customer service and exceed client expectations. You must have at least five years’ experience, a Level 4 or 6 qualification in Arboriculture, excellent tree identification skills, a full and clean UK driving licence, working knowledge of the planning system in relation to trees and BS5837 ‘Trees in relation to design, demolition and construction’, exceptional written and verbal communication skills (including report writing and data presentation), and understanding and technical application of stage 2 investigatory works (i.e. Aerial Tree Inspections and decay detection). It is preferable that you have practical tree surgery experience, a Level 4 qualification in Forestry, a working knowledge of AutoCAD and GIS, an understanding of wider industry risk assessment methodologies (i.e. QTRA or THREATS), and are a member of the Arboricultural Association or Institute of Chartered Foresters.

We have an opportunity for an arb surveyor to join our arboricultural department on the HS2 project, based in North West London. You will be part of the Ground Control HS2 Project team, delivering BS5837 arboricultural consultancy and timber valuations for Costain Skanska Joint Venture (CSJV) under the current HS2 Enabling Works – Area South works package. The project team will work to the highest professional standards, using the latest technology, innovation and best practice to help facilitate this nationally significant project. In working with CSJV protect team, we will seek to support the ‘No Net loss target of HS2’, offering advice and guidance that will avoid unnecessary removals and reduce or mitigate the potential impacts on retained trees along the route. Through outstanding customer service and exceptional operational delivery, you will ensure that all project requirements are met, services are delivered safely, on time and budgeted margins are achieved or exceeded. You must have a Level 3 qualification in Arboriculture (minimum), a Professional Tree Inspector certificate, a full and clean UK driving licence, excellent tree identification skills, current knowledge of industry best practice, sound written and verbal communication skills, and effective IT skills, including MS Office and survey data collection software – with aptitude to learn new technology

GROUND CONTROL Location: Billericay

GROUND CONTROL Location: North West London

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

IT WORKS 20,000

OVER JOBSEEKERS VISIT OUR SITE A MONTH

OVER

450

cvs online to browse cv

48,000

OVER emails are sent to candidates monthly

5

strong candidate APPLICATIONS per job on average

● W  eekly jobs mailer ● F  eature jobs inside relevant print magazine featured on ● Jobs  weekly news and round up emails ● Different  solutions to secure quality applicants

official job board:

visit the website at horticulturecareers.co.uk call Laura today on 01903 777580 50

Pro Arb | April 2018

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM


the ANCIENT TREE

column

EACH MONTH WE FEATURE AN ANCIENT BRITISH TREE. THIS MONTH THE ANCIENT TREE FORUM INTRODUCES US TO...

Major Oak, Nottinghamshire

A

rguably one of the world’s most famous trees, Major Oak puts Sherwood Forest on the map, with its name conjuring up images of Robin Hood and his band of merry men. However, it has not always been known by its current, rather grand title – in the mid-17th century it was known as the Cockpen Tree due to the prominence of the sport of cock fighting that used to take place there. The tree takes its current title from Major Hayman Rooke who, in 1790, included the tree in his popular book about the ancient oaks of Sherwood: “On the north side of the great riding is a most curious ancient oak... The trunk, which is wonderfully distorted, plainly appears to have been much larger; and the parts from whence large pieces have fallen off are distinguishable... I think no one can behold this majestic ruin without pronouncing it to be of very remote antiquity...” With a girth in excess of 10m, this tree is reputed to be in the region of 1,000 years old. There is a long history of people visiting this tree, with a wealth of photographs recording people’s trips. Unfortunately, this interest has had its toll on the health of this tree. Above ground, it is clear that the tree has been propped – a photo dating from 1904 shows the team that fitted the original braces, most likely in relation to concerns about the hollow trunk. Cavities and exposed wood have also been covered with fibreglass, presumably in a misguided attempt to slow the rate of decay. While these issues have a strong visual impact, they are not

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

the most significant problems faced by the Major. Given the tree’s popularity since the Victorian era, the sandy soil around the tree has become compacted, inhibiting normal root function. The tree was the centre of discussion at the Thinking Arbs Day led by Ted Green, founder and president of the Ancient Tree Forum. Attendees discovered that, in an attempt to alleviate this compaction, several layers of mulch have been added over the last 10-20 years. It has recently been identified that this mulch isn’t having the desired effect – instead of encouraging the decompaction of the sandy soil beneath, it is simply adding extra weight. In places, the mulch is reaching a depth of 30cm, exacerbating the compaction problem. To address this problem, the mulch is gradually being taken away, and alternative methods of decompaction are being investigated. This case study highlights the potential dangers of prescriptive management and the importance of monitoring. Only through evaluating the effects of management can we ascertain whether it is having the desired effect. If this tree, and many others in the UK, are to stay alive for another 1,000 years, we must constantly seek to improve our knowledge and base management on data rather than speculation. Thanks to Reg Harris of Urban Forestry (Bury St. Edmunds) Ltd for providing photographs of the Major Oak.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management at www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum

Pro Arb | April 2018 51


Pro Arb April 2018  
Pro Arb April 2018  
Advertisement