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PROARB

O c t o b e r 2 01 8 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

A RISKY BUSINESS…

MY LOCAL AUTHORITY IS MY BUSINESS RIVAL

WHY T HE HSE IS FOCUSED ON ARB

A READING TREE SURGEON SPEAKS OUT

MADE OF STIHL FUEL-INJECT ED CHAINSAW HEAVEN F R O M C L I M B I N G A R B O R I S T T O C O N S U LTA N T

MEET JASPER FULFORD-DOBSON

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®

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Chris Pratt Arborist and Stihl TIMBERSPORTS® athlete.

STIHL understands the needs of forestry and arb professionals, like Chris. The evolution of many years of research and development, our range of specialist chainsaws combines innovative technology, optimum ergonomics and low weight to deliver exceptional cutting performance and comfort. Whether you’re felling large stands in the forest or planking timber, trust STIHL to take care of every requirement and set the standard for power and reliability.

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WELCOME

PROARB

PROARB MY LOCAL AUTHOR ITY IS MY BUSINES S RIVAL

O c t o b e r 2 01 8 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

A RISKY BUSINESS… WHY T HE HSE IS FOCUSED ON ARB

A READIN G TREE SURGEO N SPEAKS OUT

o ct o ber 2 0 1 8 • Vo l u m e 5 • I s s u e 0 8 MADE OF STIHL F R O M C L I M B I N G A R B O R I S T T O C O N S U LTA NT

FUEL-INJE CT ED CHAINSAW HEAVEN

MEET JASPER FULFORD-DOBSON

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O

f many different hues… If you went to the APF exhibition last month, you may have been struck by how incredibly diverse the tree care sector is. From colleges that train those just starting out to those at the peak of physical fitness, scaling heights at speed to the gentle craft of basket making. Trees are at the heart of it all and seeing so many components of the industry laid out on the acres at Ragley Hall, acts as a reminder of both the value of trees in our landscape and why wood is such a matchless raw material. In this issue, we have also tried to reflect this diversity and to provide insights into some

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Features Editor – Rachel Gordon proarbeditor@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com Account Manager – Natalie Ross

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of the inspirational people who are connected to the care of our trees. This includes a profile of Bruks Tree Surgery which is delighting customers by putting military values into its business offering. We also meet consultant Jasper Fulford-Dobson, who literally is at the top of the tree in terms of his knowledge, gained by working both as a tree surgeon and a tree officer, combined with plentiful study. Another perspective comes from Stuart Parry, an HSE inspector who has seen some of the worst practices in arborism and has plenty to say on how risky behaviour can be reduced. We also talk to Reading tree surgeon Jon Smith about why he has taken on his

natalie.ross@eljays44.com Horticulture Careers – Liam Colclough liam.colclough@eljays44.com PRODUCTION Design – Kirsty Turek Printed by Pensord Press Ltd Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: chris.anderson@eljays44.com Pro Arb is published 9 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this

local authority over competing services. Is it fair – or unfair – competition? Your views on this, and indeed any other issue in Pro Arb, are very welcome.

publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts. MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK

For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Max Dodd at max.dodd@eljays44.com

PROARB

Pro Arb | October 2018

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CONTENTS

s t n e cont

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r e b o t Oc 2018

36 10

44

news & views 6 > news

All the action from the arb world

10 > news extra

A tree surgeon faces tough competition from his local authority

12 > apf review

Report from this year’s woodland and forestry show

14 > Best of Botha

Interview with dynamic Kent business, Bruks Tree Surgery

features 18 > planting assessed 20 > dr duncan slater’s casebook

Clear cases for not making hasty felling decisions

22 > meet the consultant

Jasper Fulford-Dobson’s rising career

24 > pests & diseases The perils of the plant destroyer Phytophthora

Expert guidance for employers

26 > insurance advice

On why cover needs to be fit for purpose

30 > calling an inspector HSE’s Stuart Parry discusses his demanding role

34 > HEALTH & Safety – PROTECTION

Essential clothing, kit and culture

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DC Vickers’ latest instalment on the apprenticeship programme

Jonathan Hazell reviews four schemes

25 > tackling workplace bullying

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36 > time for a test

kit 38 > meet the supplier

Stihl’s latest launches and future plans

42 > focus on first aid

Emergency trauma products for arborists

44 > arbortec clothing

Why it’s all change for chainsaw trousers

46 > product dna

Greenmech’s new SURE-Trak system

49 > stump grinders

Invest in this much requested service and boost earnings

51 > ancient tree forum

Jim Mulholland relates the moving story of Thomas Shingles’ leagacy

Pro Arb | October 2018

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NEWS & VIEWS

news

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

ROUNDUP

UK GETS SET FOR STIHL’S ‘CHAINSAW OF THE FUTURE’ LAUNCH Stihl’s new MS 500i, which features electronically controlled fuel injection, is set to launch in the UK early next year and will become the most powerful production chainsaw available. The German manufacturer says it has produced a world first and that the injection technology provides both “incredible torque and rapid acceleration of the saw chain from 0 to 100 km/h in just 0.25 seconds.” The “intelligent” lightweight design results in a best ever power-to-weight ratio at 1.24kg per kilowatt, a low value which has never been achieved before by series-manufactured chain saw. The chainsaw has no start lever and roars into action

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when the handle is pulled. The engine does not require a carburettor, since the fuel metering is done via a sensor and it automatically adapts to the different operating conditions, no matter what the altitude and ambient temperature. There will also be a variant of the MS 500i with heated handles, which features nomaintenance heating strips on the front and rear handles. These keep hands warm and so boosts safe operation in cold working conditions. Stihl recently demonstrated the power of the machine in front of the world’s media, with brand manager Laura Mayr putting the chainsaw through its paces. The MS 500i was also used

by Germany’s Marco Trabert - who also attended the Stihl event – when he recently broke the world record at the 33rd World Logging Championships held in Lillehammer, Norway. www.stihl.com

LOCAL AUTHORITIES ENCROACH ON INDEPENDENT TREE SURGEONS Austerity cuts are prompting more local authorities to target private sector tree care work, which could result in more competition for independent arborists. The issue is revealed in this month’s Pro Arb, following tree surgeon Jon Smith of Big Heart Tree Care, making a complaint to his local authority, Reading Borough Council. Jon believes the local authority is acting unfairly by advertising its services on municipal vans, with council tax bills and on its website, which Jon says are not options available to any independent business. However, across the UK, local authorities are looking at ways to function more like businesses and become “commercially minded”. See News Analysis on page 10

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NEW ARB TRAINING CENTRE OPENS A purpose-built training centre, offering a range of courses for arborists has opened at Ragley Estate, Alcester, Warwickshire. The Environmental Training Centre launched at the recent APF Exhibition and will deliver high-quality arboricultural training by experienced trainers. Courses include tree climbing and aerial rescue, chainsaw maintenance, felling and cross cutting, pesticides, rigging, CPD

and refresher courses. The centre has purpose built classrooms, fully equipped workshop, indoor training tree and hard and softwood plantations on site. It will be able to provide flexible and bespoke training solutions for individuals and businesses. With skilled staff shortages industry wide, it aims to assist companies in up-skilling their existing workforce increasing staff retention, productivity

and motivation. Director Rob Keyzor who also runs Rob Keyzor Tree Surgeons and Arboricultural Consultants said: ‘’There has been a gap in the arboricultural industry for high quality training for some time and we aim to fill that gap by providing courses and forestry and land-based training through our exceptional facilities to further the career of arborists.” For info email info@etctrees.com

SUBSIDENCE CLAIMS PROMPT RISE IN TREE WORK

TOUGH TABLET SUITS TREE CARE PROFESSIONALS

The dry and hot summer of 2018 resulted in a rise in insurance subsidence claims, which created extra work for tree surgeons. Subsidence causes cracks in a property and is caused by the downward movement of a surface, causing the ground beneath the foundations of a building to become unstable. It is predominantly caused by tree roots, which are seeking out water. Some claims can be complex and long-winded, but many more are straightforward and the most common solution is to fell the offending tree, although in a few cases, crown reduction, pollarding and root barriers are used. This work is commonly apportioned to tree surgeons through loss adjusters, firms that provide the claims management service for insurers. Kevin Williams, head of subsidence at loss adjusters

Tree Diagnostics has recently been approved as the UK distributor for the ST34OT Rugged Tablet - along with others in the range manufactured by Sumo Technologies. The tablet is slim but tough and offers multi-functional wireless computing. It has a 14” touch screen with an Intel 8th generation i-quad-core processor. The tablet has a builtin smart card/CAC reader, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and optional front camera. It benefits from dual high-capacity hot swappable battery packs up to 180w and is water and dust resistant. Accessories include a foldable tabletop stand and a digital pen. Director Ian Barnes comments: “This tablet has already proved its credentials in the US military. It’s ideal for information capture and instant transmission when outdoors, so is a perfect tablet for the

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Sedgwick, a claims assessor, said: “The foundations near a tree sink further than those elsewhere in the building. You get rotation of parts of the building, which causes cracking.” He added the problem is particularly acute in the south and southeast of the UK, where the claybased soils dry out quickly and can shrink by 10-15%. In the six weeks prior to August, Sedgwick said it had experienced a rise in work of more than 350%. Sne Patel, ocf loss adjusters Crawford & Company, said there was a clear need for advice when low-level cracks appear close to vegetation, including awareness on soil type and “taking nearby influences into consideration when planning extensions, regularly trimming plants and trees, and considering the moisture requirements of different types of tree before planting.” www.sedgewick.com

arborist community and can be readily transported between working outdoors and then back to the office. We’re really excited to be working with Sumo Technologies at a time when many arborists are looking for suitable technology. Far too often, ordinary tablets, even with cases, suffer mishaps outdoors and this is a costly and frustrating experience. This model is absolutely fit for purpose.” Pricing is “very competitive” for rugged tablets, with the price a little below £860.00 for the 8.9”. Enquires can be made via email at info@treediagnostics. co.uk or telephone 01423 322 851/07831 530563. www.treediagnostics.co.uk

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NATIONAL TREE OFFICERS EVENT IS FOR ALL WHO WORK WITH URBAN TREES The organisers of the National Tree Officers Conference, which takes place on 6 November, are emphasising that the event is aimed at a wide range of people working with urban trees and not just those employed as tree officers with local authorities. Andy Lederer, development director with the Institute of Foresters, said: “This event is very much open to those working in the private sector and there is a clear benefit in understanding how the public sector operates and in building networks.” He pointed out that last year, almost 77% of delegates were employed in the public sector, while 23% were employed in the private sector. Content covers four main themes – international diversity and professionalism, legislation and protection, opportunities and biosecurity and data utilisation and topics covered in the conference include: • New ways of irrigating trees

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and the effect on growth • Professionalism in tree officers • Women in arboriculture • Regional talks on arboriculture and protection/ legislation in Guernsey, the Isle of Man and Scotland • What arborists need to know about engineering • Managing ash dieback (Norfolk County Council) • Application of biosecurity guidance (Lesnes Abbey Woods, South London) • Local authority tree surveying strategy and database improvement Why we are attending Jeremy Barrell, director of Barrell Tree Consultancy, commented: “All seven consultants at Barrell Tree Consultancy are chartered arboriculturists and Arboricultural Association registered consultants. We work in planning, where tree officers are our most important point of contact.

“We will all be attending the conference because it is the only national event where we can meet and network with so many tree officers in one place. It offers unbeatable value for money and improves our technical understanding of the challenges in local government.” Andrew Coombes, director at AT Coombes, said: “Four of our consultants will be attending this year’s conference. We work very closely with tree officers related to predevelopment and other urban forestry consultancy work and therefore understanding their concerns, pressures and priorities is important to us. We, as arboricultural consultants, and our clients benefit from establishing good working relations with tree officers. Professional respect and co-operation between us can often produce good results for trees in the built environment. The conference seeks to raise professional standards in the local authority sector, which is important as tree officers have a key role in maintaining urban tree cover for the benefit of us all.”

Arboriculturist, Tracy Clarke, added: “As a private sector arboriculturist, I find the conference a useful day for hearing about the research, innovations and work of public sector tree officers. It keeps me up to date with the good progress being made in their part of our industry and the standards tree officers expect in their role, which I can translate to clients. It’s also a really good day for meeting many of the professionals I often only communicate with and those I haven’t seen for a while. It’s a day which helps me to build on already good relationships. Tree officers do good work and I always have a lot to learn from them to help me in the work that I do.” The event is organised by the London Tree Officers Association, the Municipal Tree Officers Association and, the Institute of Chartered Foresters. The National Tree Officers Conference takes place on 6 November at Oakengates Theatre, Limes Road, Telford, TF2 6EP. Tickets cost £37.50 and include lunch and refreshments. For more details, visit: www.charteredforesters.org/ event/national-tree-officersconference-2018/

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NEWS & VIEWS

Fighting the news good fight extra

When does competition become unfair? Jon Smith has pondered this question for some time. He owns Big Heart Tree Care, a business he is proud to describe as ‘small and simple’ because he believes in offering a professional, yet personal service to his clients. Having qualified from Sparsholt College and worked for others, Jon launched his firm in 2015. He now works with two

TREE SURGEON JON SMITH IS CHALLENGING HIS LOCAL AUTHORITY OVER ITS COMPETING TREE WORK SERVICES – A SCENARIO THAT COULD HAVE IMPLICATIONS FOR MANY SMALL BUSINESSES UNDER THREAT – RACHEL GORDON REPORTS

authorities are under the financial cosh. The government’s aim is to make them become more like commercial entities and achieve self-sufficiency. But, what if this activity damages smaller local firms unable to operate on the same scale? This is the crux of Jon’s argument. Councils are able to offer paid-for services to their residents and Reading has in fact been

council’s services were advertised on the webpage used by residents to check for constraints on trees – and that this facility was not available to any other independent tree care provider. Jon speaks out Jon became aware of a fall-off in new business enquiries and he was finding it harder to recruit – tree surgeons, it seemed, were

Jon has developed a strong reputation in his local area and is passionate about preserving wildlife as part of his business ethos self-employed colleagues that he has the utmost faith in to uphold the strong reputation he has built in his local area. He is passionate about preserving wildlife as part of his business ethos and with such a philosophy, it would seem little could go wrong. However, Jon, along with others in the region, is facing dwindling levels of business because of a competitor – Reading Borough Council. Austerity and commercialisation No one needs reminding that local

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offering tree care as a business for some three years. But, Jon felt compelled to act, when the council appeared to be ramping up its marketing of domestic and commercial tree care work. In a leaflet he received from the council, he read: “Our Arboricultural Services are competitively priced,” and it went on to describe staff as “expertly skilled and professional and able to deliver consistency and unrivalled levels of service.” Next, he discovered the

choosing to work for the local authority which he says is able to pay higher wages and offer better ‘public sector’ hours and benefits. In March, Jon decided enough was enough and contacted Reading Council’s Complaints’ Team, asking the following questions: • Was the council’s activities in line with competition law? • Were public funds being used to market their services? • Did the council accept that small firms were being

damaged as a result? • Was the council attempting to monopolise the market? The council responds A month later Jon received a reply from David Moore, the Neighbourhood Services Manager. He said he understood the nub of the complaint was that Reading was “subsidising a commercial business using public funds and this put businesses without access to public money at a disadvantage.” The council disputed this, claiming it was entitled to charge for “discretionary services” under legislation, including the Local Government Acts and the Localism Act. It stated services were funded from the income received for them and not via council tax. It was also said that there were numerous benefits from providing paidfor work to residents, including “proactive tree management”. Somewhat defensively, it stated the council was “not alone in focusing on opportunities to offset pressures on revenue budgets.” And, on the topic of unfair competition, its take on

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the meaning of this was that this referred to matters such as interfering with competitors through methods such as “disparagement”. It stressed the council avoided “all unethical behaviour” and never used disparaging terms. It added it also never used undercutting tactics even if customers ought to negotiate and it also encouraged people to obtain three quotes when seeking a provider. As for advertising, the council said it had “established channels” for communicating with customers and that its strategy here was reasonable. Jon was told his compliant was “Not Upheld”. Jon fires back Jon felt that he was being fed platitudes – he called on the council to carry out a more detailed investigation, asking for more information on how the council’s tree care machinery and vehicles were being funded. Jon said he’d suffered a fall off

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of some 90% in new business inquiries, which corresponded with the council’s higher visibility as a tree care services provider. He pointed out while he and other independent tree surgeons typically used Google advertising, the council was using its own website to promote itself. The council’s advertising was directly below the link that anyone considering tree work, and so provided an unfair advantage. From speaking to other firms, Jon picked up that some small jobs, typically involving grounds maintenance, were being turned down by the council and passed on to small independent firms. Jon said this was a type of subcontracting and could later also happen with tree work, which would upset the commercial balance. He decided he did not accept the “Not Upheld” verdict. Reading replies again In response Jon was told that capital equipment, such as tree care machinery was funded

by borrowing under accepted practice. It said further information on the amounts was not available owing to a “commercial accounting framework” being set up. It also denied that Jon’s drop off in new business queries was connected to council activity. Finally, it was argued that it was “entirely reasonable” to advertise tree care services on the council website. Jon was told that if he was still dissatisfied, he should contact the Local Government Ombudsman. Jon fights on Jon contacted the Ombudsman and is waiting for a response. He has also passed a complaint on to regulator, the Competition and Markets Authority and contacted his local MP, Matt Rodda, who has been supportive. With the story published in the local press, Jon has also spoken to fellow independent tree surgeons, but while they too are saying their businesses are being impacted, most fear expressing their

concern because they want work passed onto them by the council. Whatever the outcome, all independent tree surgeons should be grateful to Jon for shining a light on this difficult issue. It could be argued that commercial activity by councils results in more being ploughed into services for the community. But, could it also disrupt the local business economy? Tree care is just one aspect where local authorities can seek to win business and because they are such large organisations, they do have the clout to market any commercial services heavily. There are difficult times ahead but for many paying customers, surely there is great value when there are thriving small, independent firms, rather than less choice and having it provided by a large monolith? If Pro Arb readers have views on this issue, we welcome their feedback – email proarbeditor@eljays44.com

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APF

REVIEW It was wet and windy, but the weather did nothing to dampen enthusiasm among the many thousands of visitors who travelled to Ragley Hall in Warwickshire to enjoy all that this year’s APF had to offer. The three-day event featured over 320 exhibitors, some £50m of equipment and a 2,000 metre trail of demonstrations. Around 18,500 people attended and there were plenty of international visitors too, particularly from northern European countries, but also from further afield such as Japan. The organisers had also encouraged local children to visit so they could learn about the industry’s many different aspects. With plenty of food stalls and packed bars, many visitors were determined to enjoy themselves, even if there was a gale blowing. In fact, it was very much a case of carry on regardless, as all the main events took place, including the world 25m pole climbing and the European Chainsaw Carving Championships. For those wanting another dose of APF, or who are now kicking themselves for missing it, the next exhibition will take place in 2020 and once again, the venue is Ragley Hall.

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A SHOW

FOR ALL SEASONS The UK’s largest woodland and forestry show had much appeal for every type of arborist

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1. O  n parade: GreenMech’s SURE-Trak system can handle the roughest terrain 2. V  isitors watching Stihl’s timber sports 3. D  ecisions, decisions: There was some serious arb style retail therapy on offer 4. Timberwolf on display 5. Demonstrating how it’s done 6. L  ooks and practicality: Seikel puts a new spin on 4 x 4 performance 7. Getting a grip: The Timber Croc holds logs securely 8. P  ro Arb’s sales team, Jess and Natalie with Arbortec’s Winston

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Best of

Botha

BRUK AND REBECCA BOTHA OF BRUKS TREE SURGERY USE THEIR MILITARY BACKGROUNDS TO DRIVE FORWARD A BUSINESS THAT IS SETTING NEW STANDARDS IN PROFESSIONALISM

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ruks Tree Surgery is a dynamic business that has carved out its own distinctive identity. Established in 2008 and based in Birchington-on-Sea, Kent, the business has built up an enviable reputation locally and is increasingly in demand to work in surrounding counties. The company’s Facebook page shows many comments from delighted customers and a key differentiator is from employing “many ex-military staff to maintain both precision and manners within an industry not often renowned for either!” Bruk, who was born in Zimbabwe, spent 23 years in the British Army, including serving in Afghanistan, while Rebecca’s father was chief test pilot for the RAF. The couple had planned on emigrating to join Australia’s Defence Force in a lateral transfer. But, the move was unexpectedly cancelled as the UK government wanted to retain a back-up resource for potential Afghanistan redeployment. Bruk had recently returned from operational duty in Afghanistan and Rebecca was pregnant with their second child. With their London home rented out, the couple lived with Bruk’s sister in Quex Park in Birchington. Early days The couple only planned to remain there until the baby arrived and they had figured out

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The Bruk team get stuck into First Aid training what life might have in store for them next. But, it was in Kent that Rebecca had a Eureka moment: “Trees. Kent has lots and lots of trees!” They realised there could be potential to start a new, if unplanned, civilian life in the UK and run a tree care business. So, while eight months pregnant, Rebecca set up the business in a spare room, while Bruk took a month-long Army provided course, to be fully trained in tree surgery. “Bruk made contact with a friend of a friend who was a local gardener looking to join forces with a tree surgeon, while I used my media skills to set up and promote the business as

Bruk Botha

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best as I could,” says Rebecca. Bruk attended Kingswood Training, which he describes as “a fantastic experience and they go out of their way to help our crew study and train too.” All crew are required to have CS30 and CS31 as a basic level, with training provided such as first aid and courses from the ROLO (British Association of Landscape Industries). Gathering pace Over the past 10 years, the business has grown steadily and now has a rolling crew of around 16, with Rebecca managing the office operation. In addition to tree surgery, the firm provides services such as stump removal, gardening and LOLER inspections. The military connection gives the business an edge and as Bruk says: “We actively seek military crew to maintain the standards we are renowned for – we’ve always strived to stay one step ahead of other tree surgeons, but not in just the marketing method. It’s the customer service levels that win business.” Health and safety discipline is also boosted by having a high level of ex-military crew, who are “very much used to the COSH and NEBOSH culture” he says. “This must be adhered to from day one. The health and safety

folder is read from cover to cover before the new member even gets to sit in a Bruks Tree Surgery truck. “We won’t cut corners on this and kit maintenance is also essential. Although laborious, we would rather close for a day of maintenance than go out with unsharpened saws or inadequate kit. We all have our own kit and on rare occasions, we’ll hire in plant.” His current favourite item of kit is a five metre reach pole saw, allowing the crew to cut branches at height without having to leave the ground. Bruk continues: “The most enjoyable aspect of the job is the client satisfaction at the completion and walk-round/inspection point of the job, coupled with the knowledge that the tree in question has been worked on properly. “It’s also surprisingly enjoyable to revisit trees as time has passed just to see how they have developed after they have been worked on by us. I enjoy seeing the end result of giving a tree or a shrub that extra haircut it badly needed to find its shape and balance once more.” He adds he will always seek to find ways to save a tree if possible. In terms of work’s frustrating elements, he comments: “It’s having to rectify shocking work carried out on the trees by

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unqualified cowboys.” Rebecca adds: “We spread the word when we hear of any cowboys doing the rounds in the locality, but there will always be a vulnerable person who hears a good price and agrees to work. We find ourselves generally once a month correcting this, when we take a call from an upset customer who has used their services and was left with half a crown lift or a hedge cut back to the brown. There seems to be more around each week.” Recommendations matter and Bruks is a member of the Checkatrade scheme. As Rebecca says: “It helps maintain our standards. With repeat business, you could take it for granted. We will never do this with our loyal customers, and Checkatrade keeps us on our toes.” Bruks is also notable for its highly engaging website. Rebecca has ensured it is populated with both relevant business information and visuals showing the team and their work. She also handles social media: “Twitter and Facebook are time-consuming and we will be developing Instagram next year as these are great tools to use.” Strong commercial copywriting and marketing experience are invaluable, and when

The right people for the job It’s well documented there is a shortage of qualified people to work in the arb sector. However, the business also focuses on personal characteristics. “Apart from qualifications, we look for people who are adaptable, reliable and exceptional at their work, but can also handle constructive criticism as this can show if someone is a good team player,” says Bruk. “They all have discipline and need to be highly skilled, but ultimately when push comes to shove, they need to rescue colleagues if they’re in danger – as has happened – and think one step ahead of what tools or help is needed, even before someone asks.” Rebecca says there is a huge shortage of good people. “We even had a chef apply last month for a part-time role of fully qualified tree surgeon. What’s more, few tree

surgeons, aerial rescue men or groundsmen out there hold the necessary qualification, which is so dangerous.” This is physically demanding work and Rebecca says many young people are reluctant, or often just too unfit to take on and keep up with the jobs. “In this day and age of gaming and YouTube, children are often indoors and glued to a screen, whether for school work or leisure time. This impacts so much on fitness levels and the youth of today may not necessarily be as fit as the youth of yesterday.” The Bruks Tree Surgery crew will typically “cycle, run, play football, whatever it takes to keep their stamina levels high. Bruk is one of the oldest climbers in the crew but can still climb faster than any 20-year-old straight out of college… but he knows to pace himself in the tree which only experience teaches you – and carries on climbing the next day.”

in London, Rebecca honed these skills working for national newspapers and climbed her way up the ranks to become a magazine publisher. Bruks has developed its reputation further through engaging with the local community, including visiting local primary and secondary schools to talk about arboriculture and the creative wood industries and offering young people work experience. Bruk says the students are able “to experience a range of aspects from site visits to groundwork preparation and providing quotes to learning about the importance of teamwork and respect.”

members have expertise, including Bruk and colleagues Dean who creates military badges out of wood and is skilled in pyrography and Ian, who produces furniture and carvings.

The BTS crew

Enjoying a day out in London

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Bruk Botha Interview.indd 16

Carving out a new business A year after launching the tree surgery business, Bruks developed a tree carving affiliate, when after a dismantle job, a client requested a simple chair to be carved from the tree stump. There have since been many commissions and examples of work, not least from Quex Park and the Turner Contemporary Gallery. A number of crew

Future plans “Kent has been a great starting point and is a beautiful county. But, we are aware of how much the area is over-run with conifer trees and sadly there is very little diversity of species. So, we do often accept work in London, Surrey and East Sussex,” Bruk explains. He is also a gifted artist and has produced many sketches, inspired by African wildlife, available through the website. Redbubble. Rebecca says they have ambitions to “develop the carving portfolio for London highend garden and furniture catalogues so as to reach an even larger audience who may also have a larger budget to expand the carvings into multiple garden features with bespoke grounds crying out for a bespoke centrepiece.” Working hours are long and at weekends, the couple and their children enjoy walking in woods, cycling, outdoor swimming and go-karting. Long hours worked have paid dividends for this entrepreneurial business and for those working in arb, Bruks Tree Surgery is undoubtedly a source for inspiration.

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16/10/2018 14:07


S E R U FEAT r e b o t Oc 2018

18 > Planting – hits and misses

Jonathan Hazell finds that stellar examples are few and far between

20 > Duncan Slater’s casebook

The ability to repair and regenerate should never be underestimated

22 > A climbing arborist turned consultant

A career on the rise – meet Jasper Fulford-Dobson

24 > The peril of Phytophthora

Guidance from Bartlett on tackling this notorious plant destroyer

25 > Business Zone – managing workplace bullying

Essential advice for employers from Alan Price

26 > Business Zone – insurance Advice from Arborplan on covering all bases

30 > HSE in focus

The challenging work of an HSE inspector

34 > Prioritising protection

Simon Ash of Haix explains the benefits of an all-round approach

36 > Testing times for the apprentices

College continues and DC Vickers has an update

FEATURES COVER.indd 21

16/10/2018 14:15


FEATURES

VIEWS

J O N AT H A N HAZELL

Saving the best ‘til last JONATHAN HAZELL HAS SEEN A NUMBER OF CONTRASTING PLANTING EXAMPLES IN RECENT WEEKS BUT ONLY ONE MET WITH HIS APPROVAL… resilience of the site to adverse impacts, be they climate change or pest and disease for example. To make matters worse, and compounding the designers weaknesses, the maintenance was awful – the ties were strangling the trees, where the ties had broken the block had resulted in stem damage.

I

’ve visited a variety of different landscapes recently, some for pleasure and some for business. Obviously, the one unifying feature was trees, but in all honesty that’s about all. One site, an urban school, boasted modern and exciting buildings and outdoor play equipment, and a sports field, complete with a little wood set well away from the buildings. But, I came away feeling very dispirited. A lot to learn The new tree planting was of very

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Jonathon Hazell.indd 18

inferior nursery stock, with weak forks resulting in trees of very poor form. It was also approaching a monoculture – almost all the new planting to the front of the school in the remodelled car parking area was Norway maple, to the rear the palette was almost pure Himalayan birch. Moreover, there was almost no protection of the planting pits (excluding the kerbs of the car park) and so all the exposed soil around the trees’ bases was heavily compacted. Taken together these three complaints would reduce the

Nothing but the birch At a second school site, in a small rural town, the designers had got stuck on the Betula page of the catalogue – while there were a number of trees on site all were birch, but of almost every popular species or cultivar. I’m not sure that this is a valid response to resilience or the key to a sustainable landscape. In other respects though this site was superior to the first – there was good ground protection in most cases, and the maintenance was generally good. Wrong all around Another site was a corporate headquarters where the landscape was drawn from a wider palette of trees and shrubs: while I wanted to be encouraged by the future-proof site I have to say that the siting of the trees was awful – in many cases so

close to the buildings as to be a permanent nuisance, or on the edge of the car parking areas so that their growth would compromise a very precious parking space. The maintenance was also dreadful and lacked any horticultural oversight, let alone any arboricultural interest. And finally – it works The final site was another where amenity and future-proofing are important, to provide shade and amenity in a busy amusement park. The design was excellent, with a huge palette of both broadleaved and coniferous species carefully woven together for resilience, and with ground protection measures built in to the master plan from the drawing board. The maintenance was also superb, and the final difference was that there was no litter at this site either. At all these sites, I would have wanted to see good stock, well established and thriving to provide natural shade and amenity for the students, but I’m not sure that I will should I return to three out of the four in 10 years’ time… Jonathan Hazell is an arboricultural consultant. jhazell.com

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16/10/2018 16:24


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16/10/2018 14:31


FEATURES

In recovery

VIEWS DUNCAN

SOME SPECIALISTS CAN BE TOOK QUICK TO CONDEMN A TREE WHICH HAS SUFFERED DAMAGE, YET GIVEN TIME, NATURAL HEALING MAY OCCUR. IN THIS LATEST OF HIS CASEBOOK SERIES, DR DUNCAN SLATER PROVIDES FOUR HEARTENING EXAMPLES OF REPAIR

SLATER

Bark-inclusion and recovery in Liriodendron

June 2006

When a bark-inclusion fails, it can cause a large wound in the stem of a tree. If the failed limb was roughly equal diameter with the remaining limb it broke away from, then there is a risk of ‘break-back’, with the remaining stem snapping in a subsequent storm. Such a big wound is also potentially a large court for decay organisms. However, in young trees, which are particularly resilient, such failure scars often get covered over by continuing growth. Pictured is an old bark-inclusion failure wound in a tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.). I took the first image when I joined Myerscough College in 2006 and you can see in the last 12 years, that the wound has fully occluded. This sort of image is useful for our students – if they see a tree with marks like the one on the right,

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DUNCAN SLATER.indd 20

March 2018

then they can guess that it used to look like the one on the left and it helps with their interpretation of tree form. Although the wound is fully covered over, it may not be sealed air-tight and internal decay could continue if this was the case. The old wound scar may also act as a repository of dormant decay organisms that are activated when the tree is much older and enters into decline. For now, this young tulip tree has made a good recovery and has many decades ahead of it. When I put this image up on social media, two arboriculturists suggested that it should be cut down. What a shame that such risk-averse people are in charge of trees. This one has recovered well and there’s no reason to condemn it at this stage of its life.

Dog damage to Tilia in Moor Park This sequential image was not what I was expecting. In a park in Preston, this lime tree (Tilia tomentosa Moench) was used by an irresponsible dog owner to train a dog to bite and grip with its teeth. What a really anti-social thing to be doing in a public park, but this type of tree damage is on the rise at the moment. Unfortunately, due to the popularity of keeping particular breeds of dog with particularly stupid people. The image on the left shows extensive damage, including removal of bark and teeth marks into the sapwood of this newly planted tree, back in 2008. On my return, I was expecting to see a long vertical seam on this bite wound, but there was

Dog bites to Tilia tomentosa stem

very little disruption to the bark – in the righthand image you can just make out where the teeth penetrated the sapwood, shown in the marks on the bark of the stem. Lime trees (Tilia) are particularly good at producing surface callous, which can replace lost bark in situ, rather than having to only grow from the sides of the wound. This is facilitated by the large ray system that is found in the sapwood of lime trees – and that also goes some way to explain the species’ considerable resistance to wood decay too. In this case, the bark was better than the bite: this tree has recovered from the dog attack very successfully and will come to contribute to this public park for many decades to come.

10 years later...

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16/10/2018 14:11


FEATURES

Battle with cattle – base of damaged ash Many people are familiar with the damage to trees that can be caused by deer, rabbits and squirrels. But, living in a rural area, I get to see a lot of damage caused to trees by cows, sheep and horses. Of the three, horses often do the most damage. I’ve seen a 200-year-old parkland oak destroyed by debarking by horses. And, I’ve found the smaller goatlike horses and ponies, cause more of that sort of damage. Saying that, it was only last year I was advising an orchard owner about his new plantings, and found the most bark-damaged old pear tree I had ever seen. Goats had been clambering on the limbs of the tree to nibble off whatever they could reach, which was a lot, as goats are good climbers.

Anyway, in an ill-conceived ‘experiment’ at college (not one of my ideas), which can only be called ‘let’s put the sheep in the woodland and see what happens’, this young ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior L.) was quite severely debarked at its base by these woolly ‘goats’. So much so, that

November 2014

I wondered if it would recover at all. The initial damage was done in 2010, and you can see there was already considerable recovery around the wound by 2014. The tree continued to grow rapidly, and much more of the wound has been occluded now. It has helped that the sheep have been

kept at bay – or they would have surely finished this tree off. That’s a remarkable recovery by this tree, but it now faces the threat of ash dieback, a fungal infection of ash trees that has spread all across England and has been on Myerscough College’s campus for three years now.

April 2018

On the mend – red oak fork repair This young fork in a red oak (Quercus rubra L.) was unfortunately split by a traffic strike on the day before the college’s Open Day. Someone was moving straw bales around and caught one of the side branches of this fork, and it was pulled away.

June 2014

February 2016

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DUNCAN SLATER.indd 21

I have monitored the repair that the tree is enacting on the wounded fork, taking sequential photographs (as pictured). It is useful to see these stages of repair and their rate to help an arboriculturist anticipate whether a wound will prove problematic to a tree or heal quickly.

November 2017

When I shared this sequence of images on LinkedIn, a friend helpfully pointed out what else had changed in the tree over that time. Look to the left of the wound on the tree fork, and you will see the branch bark ridge that joins the two branches together. Notice how, over three growing seasons (2014–17) this has grown two or three inches in height: proving more interlocking wood grain to support the fork as it has to bear the weight of the larger limbs that it holds aloft - and there was me just looking at the wound surface! Yes – I must thank Ian Braddock of ADAS for that observation on these images. The average arborist is taught

about secondary-thickening in trees using the example of the tree’s trunk – and that tends to lead to most arborists thinking of tree’s only incrementing by making their woody parts wider, not taller. In the case of branch bark ridge, though, the increment growth occurs at the top of the junction – so it is a part of the tree that grows and gets further away from the ground over time. Perhaps something you’ve not thought about yourself, but, once seen, it will help you interpret the growth of tree forks much better.

Duncan Slater is senior lecturer in arboriculture at Myerscough College

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16/10/2018 14:11


FEATURES

The consultant who climbed to the top JASPER FULFORD-DOBSON IS A FORMER CLIMBING ARBORIST, WHO’S NOW A HIGHLY QUALIFIED AND ARBORICULTURAL ASSOCIATION-REGISTERED CONSULTANT. SO, IS THIS A ROUTE OTHER TREE SURGEONS COULD CONSIDER?

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asper Fulford-Dobson is one of the UK’s foremost experts on trees, being one of the elite 42 registered consultants with the Arboricultural Association. His consultancy, Fulford-Dobson Associates, based in Henley-on-Thames, launched in 2012 and among its work, inspects more than 30,000 trees across 100 historic sites for a national heritage charity, advises local authorities and acts as an expert advisor in many other roles. But Jasper also has a clear understanding of what it’s like to work at the sharp end of tree surgery. He was employed as a climbing arborist working in the UK and California – redwood territory. Early days Jasper began his training back in 1991, when he studied for the National Certificate in Horticulture (Conservation) at the Berkshire College of Agriculture, which included tree felling competence training in woodland. He also attended Merrist Wood, studying for a National Diploma from 1996 to 1998 – it was here that he remembers a consultant coming to speak to students, which helped sow seeds of inspiration about this profession. Yet while he may have a head for heights, Jasper also has a head to acquire knowledge

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Meet the consultant.indd 22

according to the string of letters after his name – MArborA, MCIHort, Tech Cert (Arb), CEnv, CUEW. Even so, academic study is just one aspect on the path to consultancy. “It requires a totally different skill set than that of a hands-on arborist or tree surgeon, a higher level of qualification, professional (or chartered) membership and many years of broad experience beyond contracting or education. That all takes time, patience and the willingness to continue learning and improving,” he explains. Typically it would take around five

Practical experience Jasper gained several years’ experience for a forestry consultancy firm, and previously had worked within local government – all the time gaining an understanding of all aspects of tree care and management, including the legal aspects in order to meet the requirements of the AA’s registered consultant scheme.” He’s also been a freelance contractor and worked as contracts manager for an arborist firm. The prospect of working for a local authority with its corresponding bureaucracy did not

Satisfaction comes when a client is open and honest with me and then takes action on my advice for the benefit of the tree or its wider locality

years to become sufficiently knowledgeable in the technical aspects of arboricultural surveying, inspections and report writing. “You will also need to do additional competence training while on the job. Working under a senior consultant enables mentoring which is vital for learning skills such as integrity, impartiality and effective communication.”

have huge appeal but Jasper spent three years as a tree officer for Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council and South Oxfordshire District between 2005–2008. For someone who loves the outdoors, this does not appear a natural fit. “I did three years – sounds like a prison sentence doesn’t it?”

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16/10/2018 14:30


FEATURES

Monitoring tree succession planting in wood pasture land

He says: “I got involved with the more strategic side of tree management, which is a higher level of work where you are working alongside the planning department advising on impacts and tree protection. I learnt a lot and it was crucial for my development. But I found it hard adapting to life in a local council office. “I found there was an element of cynicism which fostered a climate of ‘us and them’ between tree officers, tree surgeons and consultants who were viewed as working for the ‘dark’ side.” Collaboration improves He explains this attitude was pervasive and reveals: “I found myself influenced by it and at times was guilty of box ticking and being somewhat obstructive. I’m ashamed to admit it, but that was nearly 10 years ago now and, despite the diffulties of austerity, things are improving. Thankfully a lot has been done by the industry in terms of breaking down these attitudes and encouraging more collaboration and a solution-based approach.”

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Meet the consultant.indd 23

Nowadays, he says there is far more harmony. “Consultancy means offering impartial advice free from outside influence or commercial interests. If tree surgeons stick to what they do best, which is offer commercial tree work services for their clients, then there should be no conflict with their tree consultant brethren. The grey area is surveying and inspections, which is a service increasingly offered by tree surgeons now. “I can’t see how the advice arising from those surveys or inspections can be free from commercial interest when the same company relies on a team of tree surgeons ready with their chainsaws for its turnover.” Jasper’s experience at the coalface gives him a certain credence with clients, however he feels there is still limited understanding among the public of what consultants do. “People often can’t seem to get their heads around anyone working with trees at a more professional level beyond the concept of people swinging around on ropes or felling dangerous trees.”

More education needed He says that a lack of understanding can also mean consumers engage tree surgeons who could potentially be unqualified and/or incompetent. “Unfortunately, I don’t think there is going to be the will or a permanent solution for getting rid of cowboys, although the AA do a pretty good job of public information.” Tree surgeons are well aware that their careers can be limited by injuries and Jasper says he has been affected by a bad back. Yet, a tree surgeon nearing the end of their climbing career should think hard about whether the consultancy route is right for them. “It depends on personality and skill sets. The natural progression should be from tree surgeon to arboricultural technician and there’s no shame in choosing that as the ultimate goal either. Not everyone is cut out for the pressure and responsibility of performing in the consultancy arena. Just the same as you don’t have to be a climber to be an arborist.” He continues: “our industry should be welcoming, roomy and accepting that everyone has different talents and interests within the wide umbrella of arboriculture.” In demand Jasper’s varied work all played their part in allowing him to qualify as a chartered consultant. Candidates are required to submit evidence from across the whole tree care arena and to demonstrate this knowledge both verbally to a panel of consultants and in writing. Current plans include expanding his consultancy to meet increasing demand, but, he will remain in close contact with all clients. “Satisfaction comes when a client is open and honest with me and then takes action on my advice for the benefit of the tree or its wider locality. It’s what we all want I’m sure. Being approached by clients who can’t be honest or who have been badly advised by other professionals is frustrating though. I am however getting better at screening and filtering out the chaff which helps to achieve a more rewarding working environment.” Consultancy is certainly not for everyone but those with determination, commitment and perseverance, it can indeed be a rewarding career, as Jasper’s case illustrates so clearly.

Pro Arb | October 2018 23

16/10/2018 14:30


FEATURES

GLYNN PERCIVAL AND EMMA SCHAFFERT ASSESS THE PROBLEM OF PHYTOPHTHORA ROOT ROTS AND PROVIDE SOLUTIONS TO TACKLE THIS DANGEROUS CONDITION

PDEISSEATSE Beware the & h w at c

Phytophthora bleed symptoms on young holly tree

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he genus Phytophthora is composed of 60 species of pathogens that cause considerable damage to trees and shrubs worldwide. Translated Phytophthora means ‘plant destroyer’ and several species exist in the UK, including P. ramorum, which has had a devastating impact on Japanese Larch forests, after ‘host jumping’ from rhododendrons. Most outbreaks are commonly associated with soils that are poorly drained or receive excessive irrigation. Phytophthora can be especially prevalent on newly developed sites where soil is severely disturbed or compacted from construction and building activities. It is also a common disease in commercial ornamental tree and shrub nurseries. Infection usually progresses from the root collar or fine roots, into the larger ones and eventually the tree trunk. Loss of water and nutrient absorbing capacity and stored carbohydrate reserves in the root cause an eventual decline of the tree canopy. Where is it found? Phytophthora is common on azalea, rhododendron, Japanese holly, boxwood,

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Pest and disease.indd 24

plant destroyer Phytophthora cankers on semi-mature alder tree trunk

hemlock, laurel, fir and yew. Significant mortality has also been recorded across a wide range of genus such as Aesculus, Tilia, Prunus, Taxus, Chamaecyparis, Abies and Erica, with the main causal agents being P. cambivora, P. cinnamomi, or P. cactorum. Signs of infection Symptoms of Phytophthora vary depending on the susceptibility of the tree species, the virulence of the specific Phytophthora and site/environmental conditions. Symptoms include a reduction in shoot growth, small leaves, thinning of the crown, chlorosis, twig and branch dieback and eventually death. Diseased roots are reddish brown and brittle. These symptoms are often confined to fine roots and lateral roots less than 5mm in diameter. Decline occurs over a period of months or years. Management Where soils are poorly drained and prone to flooding, use species that are tolerant to waterlogged/flooded soil conditions and/or apply drainage. Use soil moisture probes to monitor soil moisture conditions. If the soil

Phytophthora spores with distinctive “lemon” shape and double membrane around the peripheral edge

is compacted, prepare the planting area by cultivating and incorporating organic matter. Likewise, excavation of the root collar is recommended using air-excavation technology. The systemic fungicide Subdue is approved for Phytophthora control in amenity landscapes and is also recommend as a soil drench. Drenches should be applied twice annually, or three times if the tree is heavily infected, across spring, summer, and autumn. Excessive mulch should be avoided – a 5cm maximum mulch depth is recommended. Favoured coarse mulches, such as bark nuggets or wood chips should be used and shredded bark products avoided, as they tend to retain water. Research trials worldwide have also shown phosphites can be highly beneficial in the suppression of Phytophthora diseases. These can be applied as bark or foliage sprays and/or soil drenches. In conclusion, treating surrounding susceptible plants on a preventative basis is highly recommended. Dr Glynn Percival is plant physiologist/technical support specialist at Bartlett Tree Research Laboratory www.bartletttree.co.uk and Emma Schaffert is research technician

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16/10/2018 16:10


FEATURES | BUSINESS ZONE

How to deal with a bullying allegation ANY EMPLOYER MAY HAVE TO MANAGE THIS POTENTIALLY DIFFICULT SITUATION – ALAN PRICE HAS SOME EXPERT GUIDANCE

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t is fundamental that employers are aware of how to deal with allegations of bullying effectively in order to avoid negative consequences. Not only does an employer have a duty of care towards his employees to provide a safe working environment, failure to act in this situation may see the employer facing a claim in employment tribunal. Informal approach? When an allegation is made, it’s important to realise that an informal approach may be the most appropriate rather than immediately instigating a formal procedure. Informally approaching the employee involved with a sympathetic ear may be enough for them to open up to you. If they are not forthcoming with information about the bullying, you can introduce it to the conversation by telling them that there are routes available via which any problems they have can be addressed, and that they should not suffer in silence. If they feel able, they may be able to stop the bullying behaviour themselves by speaking directly to the individuals, or they may require assistance from other workplace personnel. Some individuals may be unaware that their behaviour is causing offence to others and

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BZ Bullying.indd 25

once informed any ill behaviour may stop. The formal route If the employee would like the situation to be dealt with via a more formal route, or the informal route has not been successful, or is not deemed appropriate, then more formal procedures should be implemented using the organisation’s grievance procedure or personal harassment procedure. This will include holding a formal meeting with the employee so that you can gain much more detailed information about the alleged bullying, including names, dates and any witnesses present. Impartiality is essential You will then need to undertake a thorough investigation, including speaking to the alleged bully in an investigatory discussion. It is important to remember that investigations regarding bullying should take place both quickly and impartially. Any investigation must be objective and all factors should be considered i.e. harassment being felt differently by different individuals. It is not considered a breach of confidence to interview an alleged bully and indeed many policies on bullying or personal harassment within organisations include this

step specifically. It could not be a rounded or a full investigation if the alleged bully is not spoken to as part of the investigation. Your decision on whether the grievance can be upheld or not i.e. whether you can, from the available information, ascertain that the employee has suffered from bullying, should be conveyed to the employee. If the grievance is upheld, this may mean the consideration of some action taken against the perpetrator(s) in accordance with your disciplinary procedure. Anti-bullying and equal opportunities policies are vital in order to set out your stall with regard to acceptable treatment of colleagues. These will inform employees of what is expected from their behaviour and also what the potential consequences are for any breaches.

Alan Price is Peninsula’s employment law director. Launched in 1983, the company offers HR, employment law, tax and payroll advice, employee assistance programmes, and health and safety support and training. www.peninsulagrouplimited.com info@peninsula-uk.com

Pro Arb | October 2018 25

16/10/2018 08:44


BUSINESS ZONE | FEATURES

Cover that’s fit for purpose IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT TREE SURGEONS HAVE INSURANCE THAT IS APPROPRIATE TO THE WORK THEY DO; SANDRA WRIGHT RECOMMENDS UNDERTAKING A ROOT AND BRANCH REVIEW

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tree surgeon is more likely to suffer a work-related injury than someone employed in the construction industry. So, it’s crucial to make sure that their insurance is up to the job of providing comprehensive protection. Know what you need There is a range of relevant insurance for tree surgeons, including public and employers’ liability, and plant and personal accident. Some may also want to consider professional indemnity, cover for commercial vehicles, engineering or health insurance. But this should not be a question of guesswork – an experienced broker can advise on exactly what is needed. Equally, a broker can provide guidance on what disclosure a client should make. So, for example, if a tree surgeon undertakes rail trackside or utility/powerline vegetation clearance, then standard liability policies may exclude this or have a height or indemnity limit that is too low. Furthermore, one of the biggest risks is climbing with a chainsaw – this must be disclosed and proper safety rules followed. Beyond chainsaws, tree surgeons also tend to work with sharp-edged equipment and tree felling, too, can prove extremely hazardous, posing a risk to people and property in the

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BZ Insurance.indd 26

immediate vicinity. Other inherent dangers, such as winchequipment failure, electrocution by overhead powerlines and, less obviously, exposure to sawdust, petrol fumes and other substances can threaten the life and wellbeing of tree workers. Overcoming misconceptions In our experience, every single client will need advice. Many have the misconception that they will be covered for everything if they just take

requirement if they use labour only sub-contractors. Understanding the specific risks facing arborists is vital and we hear plenty of stories where clients feel let down by brokers who are generalists. Whether it is policy exclusions or unexpected demands for additional premiums, arborists need help from specialists who speak their language and understand their risks. It is the broker’s job to ensure there are no unpleasant surprises.

if the tree surgeon undertakes rail trackside or utility/powerline vegetation clearance, then standard liability policies may exclude this or have a height or indemnity limit that is too low out public liability. However, this does not cover them for injuries to themselves (personal accident cover is required for this) or that employers’ liability is a legal

Quality counts This is a sector where insurers may enter and offer cover that appears very competitive only to find that they are caught out by some big

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16/10/2018 08:48


FEATURES | BUSINESS ZONE

claims. It is important, therefore, to ensure the policy is underwritten by a reputable provider, who is going to remain in the market and has a good reputation for paying claims, developed over years of operating. Sustainable premiums from a quality insurer are what count, rather than a cheap price and an insurer that disappears at the first whiff of trouble.

volume of business to be able to withstand a claim in the millions. A good broker, too, should understand tree surgeons and help them through the process. The biggest claims typically come under employers’ liability, but working with chainsaws at height can, of course, create life-threatening and disabling injuries. So, it is vital that the

This is not an easy market to provide insurance for as claims frequency is unpredictable, so the insurer need a large volume of business to be able to withstand a claim in the millions

Claims commitment It is welcome that industry standards for tree surgeons have improved significantly over the years, in part as a result of stricter requirements from insurers. While this can never eradicate claims, it has improved working practice and has made tree surgery insurance more attractive to providers. Claims are rare, but they can be catastrophic when they happen. This is not an easy market to provide insurance for as claims frequency is unpredictable, so the insurer needs a large

insurer knows the trade and will be there for the long term. Choosing an unrated or weak insurer might save a little cash upfront but have devastating consequences later. Risk management matters Risk management is fundamental but can be as basic as a common-sense approach to security. Recently, a client advised us he was unable to meet the security condition on our plant policy for his flail head – an add-on to a tractor. So, we talked about other aspects that

would improve the risk such as keeping the items covered and out of sight and keeping the entrance to his yard blocked by his own parked car. Another example is the burning of debris endorsement that requires our clients to stay on site for up to one hour to ensure that the fire does not spread. A client is also more likely to obtain a fair premium if they can show they are professional and take risk management seriously. This includes having relevant qualifications, such as chainsaw certificates, working at height qualifications and aerial rescue. Some insurers offer discounts for experience, as well as having no claims and membership of trade associations, such as the Arboricultural Association. Let customers know you’re covered Having proper cover and making sure this is correct for your business is something that should also set clients’ minds at rest. You will be well aware that there are cowboys in most sectors, and amateurs with chainsaws calling themselves ‘arborists’ are a danger to us all. Customers should always ask to see a copy of a tree surgeon’s insurance. We issue multiple ‘to whom it may concern’ letters to all our clients so that they can prove to their customers that they have valid insurance. We also encourage our clients becoming members of the Arboricultural Association because it helps in finding a reputable firm. Such businesses know what they are doing, they take safety seriously and tend to have fewer claims. Just being a member demonstrates that the trader takes an active interest in staying up to date with the changing industry regulations and the latest safety procedures.

Sandra Wright is Senior Account Handler for Clear Insurance Group, which provides Arborplan. For more advice on insurance packages for tree surgeons visit: www.thecleargroup.com/for-yourbusiness/tree-surgeons Email: sandra.wright@thecleargroup.com or telephone 01483 274792

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Pro Arb | October 2018 27

16/10/2018 08:48


4EST RANGE HIGH MECHANICAL IMPACT RESISTANCE SAFETY BOOTS FOR FORESTRY OPERATIONS WITH BRUSHCUTTERS Introduction

Forestry work is among the activities characteristic of rural areas, one of the most dangerous and where there are many serious accidents. In previous years there have been accidents at the level of the lower limbs in forestry operations, particularly to the feet, which involved the use of brush cutters and other manual cutting tools, and thus require special safety measures. The most common accident causes using brushcutters are: - Projection of variable size particles (less than 5mm diameter) with velocities in the order of 200m/s, resulting from the fragments of cutting discsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wear; - Projection of steel fragments (with several dimensions and random directions) with velocities around 200m/s due to the impact between the disc and anthropogenic materials and/or natural materials, such as rocks in the ground; - Projection of anthropogenic materials namely wires that are used in agricultural infrastructures such as in wire fences. The wires when rolled into disks and/or sickles reach rotation speed of 200m/s extending it according to their section, usually less than 4mm diameter.

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FEATURES

Calling on

an inspector HSE INSPECTORS HAVE WIDE-REACHING ENFORCEMENT POWERS TO DEAL WITH UNSAFE WORK AND PLAY A VITAL ROLE IN ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND HELPING FIRMS REDUCE RISKS. PRO ARB SPOKE TO STUART PARRY ABOUT THIS ESSENTIAL WORK AND HOW HE APPLIES IT TO THE TREE SECTOR

S

tuart Parry, is an inspector for the HSE’s Forestry, Arboriculture and Agricultural Machinery team, who’s been with the government body for 13 years.

How did you train to become an inspector? I joined with around 100 other recruits. Our initial training included a mix of practical, legal and academic work over a two-year period. I worked closely with experienced inspectors who taught me how to inspect workplaces, investigate incidents and take prosecutions – inspectors have a range of powers to deal with unsafe work and of course, this includes prosecution to hold people and companies to account. Legal and academic training was delivered by the University of Warwick and we had to gain a postgraduate diploma and NVQ Level 5. How long has the arb tree sector been in your remit? After undertaking several investigations into unsafe tree work, I became the lead inspector for arboriculture in January 2018. One of my main duties is to provide advice to colleagues in field teams investigating accidents in arboriculture. I also draft internal and external guidance, represent HSE within industry

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groups and events, collate data on incidents and issues and respond to external enquiries. Are health and safety standards within tree care improving or worsening? It’s extremely difficult to get a definitive picture. There seems to be little change in the number of arborists killed at work – three in 2016, three in 2017 and two so far in 2018. Last month, I stopped a tree surgeon who was working on his own next to a four lane road in a city

Are many UK operatives not using correct PPE? Not necessarily, but I often only hear about the incidents where correct PPE wasn’t worn. PPE together with good work positioning remains a key control measure to prevent injury, but other factors such as training, competence, risk assessment and planning, systems of work, equipment selection and maintenance are all more important in reducing risk, rather than relying on PPE to save the day.

One of my main duties is to provide advice to colleagues in field teams investigating accidents in arboriculture centre. He had dropped his arisings onto the pavement and a restaurant car park with no segregation of his drop zone. He was also working from ropes with no provision for aerial rescue, his equipment had not been thoroughly examined, his ladder was damaged, he could have used a MEWP, he wasn’t carrying a personal first aid kit and he hadn’t had any refresher training in years.

Does this sector have a problem with tree surgeons employing people on a sub-contracted, ad hoc basis? There’s no excuse for not making proper checks. If you’ve someone working for you on a sub-contract or self-employed basis, you’ve a legal duty to check they are competent to do the work. We publish questions to help companies select a suitable

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FEATURES

contractor for tree work – see hse.gov.uk/treework/areyou/contractors.htm What can be done to improve controls to improve tree work safety? In health and safety terms, there are relatively few occupations where the requirements for someone to work in an industry are detailed in statutory regulation. Perhaps one of the biggest challenges to regulating arboricultural work is its peripatetic nature. It’s very difficult to carry out an unannounced inspection of a work site if you don’t know where it is! However, there is a well-established training framework, including refresher training and if every arborist followed this, standards would improve. Is it a problem that anyone can set up as a tree surgeon? Yes, unfortunately people can and do market themselves as being able to undertake all sorts of tree work, when in reality they don’t know what they are doing. Such people need to understand that if they do work for which they are not trained, they are breaking the law and putting themselves and others at risk.

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Is this sector blighted in particular by cowboys? There are certainly unqualified and incompetent individuals undertaking arboricultural work. Unless an inspector happens to be in the area, and sees the work from the road, we can only take action when people let us know. If readers see unsafe tree work, contact us at hse.gov.uk/contact/concerns. Is there an issue with machismo in this sector? It’s actually quite a small minority of individuals who can damage the image of the sector through their unsafe behaviour. The vast majority of arborists I interact with see working safely as an integral part of their professionalism, even if some seem to think complying with health and safety legislation is optional and will cut corners. What is the Arboriculture and Forestry Advisory Group? AFAG meets twice a year and is an important forum where HSE works with industry

representatives to identify health and safety issues and devise solutions. Much of the work we do is relevant to arb – PPE and chainsaw training are recent topics for example. Anyone can access the agenda and minutes of AFAG meetings on the HSE website at hse.gov.uk/ aboutus/meetings/iacs/aiac/afag/index. Participating organisations such as the AA, UAG, ISA and MTOA have their own arrangements for disseminating information to members. When it comes to accidents, are there common failings? It’s frustrating that when details of accidents cross my desk, it’s rare to see something new. People are still being hurt and in some cases killed, in the same ways as they were 20 years ago. The three most common types of accident involve: • Falls from a ladder or the tree • Being struck by falling objects, usually branches • Contact with moving machinery, typically the chainsaw

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FEATURES

Key ways in which arborists can prevent injury to themselves or to others at work include making sure: • Everyone is adequately trained and competent • That enough time has been given to planning the job and devising a safe system of work • The work equipment is suitable for the job and it’s been maintained • Employees or contractors had been provided with suitable information and instruction about the work, the site and emergency arrangements • The person in charge takes supervision seriously and challenges any unsafe work practices, even if they’re working with a good friend or long-time colleague. Think how you would feel if they got badly hurt and you didn’t do something when you should have? Why do firms think they can get away with flouting rules? Perhaps it’s exactly that – they may have got away with unsafe ways of working in

details about accidents linked to tree work – how do you deal with this? If someone dies due to a work-related activity, the HSE will normally attend the scene to work with the police. I’m afraid I’ve had to do this quite often as a frontline inspector. In my present role, I support those doing that work in arboriculture rather than do it myself. My training and a close network of colleagues has always helped me with the more challenging aspects of our work, although we have formal staff support arrangements such as counselling too. The responsibility of identifying the causes of whatever happened also provides you with a focus when dealing with potentially distressing work. Why is it essential to keep training up to date? Skills and awareness of safe working practices can degrade over time. Regular refresher and update training is not expensive, helps maintain levels of competence and can prevent serious incidents. There are also multiple sources of free health and safety information online. Many

My training and a close network of colleagues has always helped me with the more challenging aspects of our work the past and assumed there won’t be any consequences if they carry on in the same way. Of course, the reality is different. Does there needs to be more public awareness about the need to use a qualified tree surgeon? In the domestic market, yes. But there is already good guidance available if people look for help. Many local authorities provide information on their websites for homeowners on how to select a good tree surgeon. The AA also produce a leaflet on this topic and of course run their Approved Contractor scheme. You will have seen some distressing

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of the misunderstandings I see in online forums could be easily avoided if people read the freely available publications from the HSE website. It’s a free resource for those working in arboriculture and the Arboriculture Association already host a link to our pages. Awareness among competent arborists of the site is quite high, but we want more to visit.

membership provides access to advice and support. Membership of approved contractor schemes also helps to drive up standards of health and safety within the industry. What would be on your wish list to ensure a well-trained and professional UK arb sector? In an ideal world, I’d like to see the following: • Domestic and commercial clients drive improvement by only selecting arborists that have costed and planned to do work safely • Work is carried out in accordance with published guidance such as the AA’s Industry Code of Practice for Tree Work at Height • Arborists recognise that the topic of health and safety is a vital component in their CPD • The HSE is notified about unsafe work. Find out more – visit the HSE’s tree work webpages at hse.gov.uk/treework

Should a tree surgeon register with the AA? There are many benefits for an individual or company joining a trade body and a key part of my role is to work with such organisations. While you don’t have to belong to a trade organisation to be competent at your job,

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16/10/2018 12:09


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FEATURES

Making protection

a priority

MITIGATING ACCIDENTS IS ACHIEVED WHEN THERE IS EMPHASIS ON THE RIGHT CULTURE, SAFE KIT AND QUALITY PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AS SIMON ASH EXPLAINS

T

ree care work is a high-risk activity. More than 4,000 people have had their lives affected by the work that they do, and many more tree work-related injuries go unreported, skewing our concept of the major incidents in the sector. Health and Safety Executive research highlights the vast majority of fatal and major injuries in tree work are associated with chainsaw operations, being struck by a tree or tree branch and falling from height. The preservation and maintenance of personal protective equipment (PPE), operations and lifting equipment remains a headache for site management, although consciousness and workplace diligence can do much to prevent accidents.

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Safety Haix.indd 34

In a precarious working environment, managers should emphasise the importance of investing in quality PPE and encouraging workers to maintain their protective gear, driving awareness and education. Complacency is the real danger here; this attitude towards PPE and safety equipment tends to increase the amount of carelessness and distraction at work, increasing the risk of injury. Routine tasks and performing a job for a prolonged period also increases the risk of workers becoming complacent, as they could feel that they are highly experienced and not at risk of making a mistake. This is a dangerous oversight; arborists and tree surgeons need to be completely alert and focused at all times

as they perform intricate tasks with powered tools and equipment such as chainsaws. Unconcerned, distracted workers could face fatal consequences. In the last five years, the industry has seen an influx of technology that has advanced the ways in which arborists and tree surgeons can do their job. Technology is bettering work methods, providing ease for workers, as well as adding a further layer of safety when workers operate off the ground.However, reliance on technology can hinder a worker’s attitude, acting as another safety blanket that breeds complacency. Employers and site operation managers need to reiterate to workers that PPE and advanced technology does not render them unexposed to potential incidents.

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FEATURES

Best foot forward â&#x20AC;&#x201C; what arborists need to consider The right kit offers protection against many industry hazards. Protective boots are an essential part of PPE, and ensuring workers wear footwear compliant to safety standards and with the right protective features is critical for preventing injuries. Most arborists are required to select and purchase their own boots; therefore, it is important for them to know how to choose the right footwear for the right job and to look out for features that provide them with the best protection. Employers and site management should be on hand to advise and share guidance on what workers should be looking out for to include:

Accidents can still happen and it is critical workers have a good understanding of this. There has long been an assumption that years of experience is crucial, however, stacking up years in service is not the be all and end all. Management have a responsibility and a duty of care to provide guidance on good practice in health and safety, training and PPE to everyone, both new and longstanding employees. Successful management of health and safety requires coordination of activities and communication of information, and must start from the top down. Leading by example will not only resonate and encourage workers on the ground to follow suit, it will go a long way in fundamentally improving health and safety performance across the industry. Promoting a better safety culture To combat attitudes that there could be a skills shortage and a complacency issue in the industry there is an increasing pressure on managers to instil efficiency, flexibility and competence. There are courses available that offer training and qualifications in workplace safety and developing the skills to meet future challenges. Lantra, the body for land-based and environmental training courses and qualifications, is one example that aims to improve the development of workforce

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Safety Haix.indd 35

Chainsaw protection Chainsaw protection for all forestry professionals is essential. The EN ISO 17249:2013 standard relates to safety footwear with resistance to chainsaw cutting. Category levels range depending on the level of protection required for the chainsaw speeds: Class 1 (20 m/s), Class 2 (24 m/s), Class 3 (28 m/s). Waterproof Comfort is key for all arboricultural and treerelated work. Workers suffering from cold or wet feet will be distracted and not able to concentrate on the tasks. This is when accidents are likely to occur. Waterproof knowledge and understanding of health and safety within the sector. Through real-world application of good health and safety practice, these courses employ a hands-on approach that will have workers engaged and ready to comprehend how to tackle complacent thinking at work. Involving workers in health and safety through effective training will help to reduce the number of workplace accidents and injuries, and create a culture, where safe and health working becomes second nature to everyone. Investing in quality footwear is a priority and for more information on HAIXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s range of boots visit haix.co.uk, or to find your nearest dealer, contact Workware workware.co.uk

boots should adhere to at least the EN ISO standard: 20345/20347, the minimum that European standard manufacturers should achieve. Durability Boots with tried and tested membranes, such as GORE-TEX, offer incredible waterproof durability and breathability, creating a resilient barrier against outside water penetration. It is also worthwhile for workers to invest in boots with hydrophobic leather, which provides outstanding insulation and all-year foot protection. Grip and oil resistance A firm grip is necessary for this all-weather profession. Workers should opt for a deep tread to guarantee a firm grip on any terrain. Selecting boots that offer abrasionresistance, puncture resistance and an antislip rubber compound will provide enhanced protection against sharp objects the worker may encounter underfoot. Replacements The recommendation is that workers replace their boots every 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;18 months in order to ensure the level of protection is intact. It is not worth the risk in wearing worn-down, deadened boots that become ill fitting and unsupportive, which could do more damage than good.

Simon Ash is UK sales manager for HAIX, the footwear specialist, which has its headquarters in Bavaria, Germany.

Pro Arb | October 2018 35

16/10/2018 14:21


FEATURES FIVE MONTHS INTO THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMME AND CLIMBING SKILLS ARE ON DISPLAY… EVEN IF THERE ARE SOME GAPS IN BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. DC VICKERS PROVIDES THE LATEST PROGRESS REPORT

Testing Times

VIEWS DC V IC K E R S

T

his is a good point to reflect on what’s been achieved to date and it’s also a requirement for our apprentices to complete a quarterly diary. Unfortunately, for the apprentices at least, I had planned a ‘surprise’ 50 question test, for all subjects covered so far. There were no books, notes or discussions allowed about what the answers could be. The test served two purposes: firstly, it highlighted areas in which they needed to do more work and those they were comfortable with, and secondly, it showed how much they’d covered and make the quarterly diary easier to write. To be fair, the test wasn’t marked and they were happy

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DC Vickers.indd 36

to share their answers as we discussed each of the questions afterwards. It was an interesting exercise as it showed common areas where more effort was needed – one of them was binomial nomenclature. There’s definitely a kind of learned helplessness when it comes to Latin naming conventions, a mindset that says: ‘I can’t do or remember it.’ This was despite covering the area with discussions, short videos and course notes covering the area. However, the quiz did focus minds and the quarterly diary reflected their strengths and weaknesses. On the rise Some of the apprentices are now able to begin the process of climbing at work. The remainder of the week was spent on this, out of the classroom, building the apprentices’ skills and knowledge about the practical side of the arborist’s role. The apprentices were at different stages as some had never climbed, while others drew upon rock climbing or climbing

wall experiences. Climbing also brought in other aspects of tree work, such as Visual Tree Assessments, with the apprentices asked to carry out a risk assessment before climbing. Engaging employers It’s important the college, as training provider, can demonstrate close links with the employers. I had arranged with each employer for the apprentices to complete the risk assessment using one of their own Site Specific Risk Assessment forms from their workplace, which can then be used as evidence in their portfolio. Different employers also utilise different equipment – some will allow the use of Petzl ZigZags, for example, while others won’t. Some prefer their climbers to use the Hitchclimber and others allow any appropriate equipment.

The days spent climbing and discussing related issues gave the apprentices a chance to access the tree, move around the canopy and try out new skills within a supervised, ‘no-pressure’ environment – and they enjoyed being away from the workplace. The quiz and the quarterly diaries will help us produce a more individualised learning plan going forward and the apprentices can go back to the workplace with a few more climbing skills.

DC Vickers has been tasked with developing the resources for and managing the arboriculture provision at BCA. DC is a qualified teacher and is also a City & Guilds NPTC assessor, covering many of the chainsaw units. For more information, contact DC at dvickers@bca.ac.uk or on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/dcvickers

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16/10/2018 10:04


Kocti otber 2018

38 > Meet the Supplier

An in-depth look inside the Stihl machine

42 > Focus on First Aid

Fast and effective treatment for serious accidents

44 > Protective clothing – all change Check out the new Arborflex range

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49 > Stump grinders – gear up your business Have the right equipment to offer a complete service

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16/10/2018 15:43


KIT

e h t t e e M supplier

Made of

Stihl

RACHEL GORDON VISITED STIHL’S HEADQUARTERS IN GERMANY TO FIND OUT ABOUT THE CHAINSAW SPECIALIST’S LATEST LAUNCHES AND ITS PLANS FOR THE FUTURE

S

tihl is synonymous with chainsaws but the company also has plenty more to offer its arborist, landscaping and consumer customers. With a significant presence around the world, Stihl has a workforce of almost 17,000 and a strong focus on innovation. The business is huge throughout Europe, but some 30% of sales occur in the US. But it is Waiblingen, near Stuttgart, which is the heart of the Stihl enterprise, where the still family-owned business owns sprawling headquarters. These are connected to a large public park and offer the ideal setting to show of its latest developments. Even though there was a buzz around digital, there remains high demand for its traditional fuel-driven products. Certainly the biggest excitement was around the forthcoming launch of the MS 500i – a beast of a machine, available in the UK next year. Fuel-injected The MS 500i’s unique features can be seen in its fuel injection capability – a generator provides power for the whole system

38 Pro Arb | October 2018

Meet the supplier.indd 38

and continually monitors the crankshaft position and engine speed. There is also a temperature and pressure sensor in the crankcase. These both feed information to the injection controller, which analyses the readings and works out how much fuel is needed, how long the injection interval should be and the appropriate injection timing – it then sprays the desired quantity of fuel directly into the crankcase. Cordless development Another product likely to be on plenty of

benefit is that it is exhaust free and can be used without wearing hearing protection.

Even though there was a buzz around digital, there remains high demand for its traditional fuel-driven products arborists’ wishlists is the cordless saw, MSA I61 T. This is a handy but powerful model and suits those both working in the tree or in a MEWP. It allows the user to cut finely and precisely and weights just 2.1kg. A further

Digital forestry Arborists who work in densely wooded areas will also find the LogBuch innovation an indication of how forestry work will take place in the future.

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16/10/2018 14:16


KIT

LogBuch is a software solution that links local data with voice guidance. The aim is to eliminate unreliable spray-on markings on specific trees – ie those which need felling, treatments or to be retained. Instead, using geolocalisation and a smartphone, precise instructions can be set up and then followed by workers, who will see where to go and what to do on a digital map.

virtual reality for chainsaws. Stihl works with 35,000 dealers in some 160 countries. With legendary German efficiency, Stihl

Solutions for gardeners There were also new tools on show and the impact of digital could be seen in new launches such as the robotic lawnmower, the iMow, which can be accessed anywhere via phone or tablet. The Smart Garden Hub, meanwhile uses intelligent technology to control watering via a sprinkler system – the aim is to increasingly allow consumers to manage their gardens remotely, including via devices such as Alexa. This sprinkler system uses smart technology to water gardens and also larger spaces such as sports fields. The device is controlled remotely and uses up to date weather information – a core benefit is that water consumption can be cut by up to 50%. Meanwhile, the RMA 765 V cordless mower is aimed at professionals and could suit those working in urban areas since it is powerful, quiet and emission free. The new HLA 56 cordless hedge cutter has a double-sided cutting blade and the bendable cutter bar can be adjusted to trim tall hedges and then sort out ground cover plants. Stihl has also launched four new compact pressure washers with new features, including a rotary nozzle to deliver strong cleaning with optimised storage and easy manoeuvring.

is taking a multi-pronged approach when it comes to providing high quality equipment

Dealers remain core Exponential growth in online retailing could mean that the traditional dealers’ role is questioned. However, Stihl has emphasised that this will remain its preferred route for professional products, given the need for expert advice, and the company is investing in more training for its dealers, such as with

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Meet the supplier.indd 39

for its target markets. The impending MS 500i looks to be a formidable new arrival – and for the

Andreas was a qualified mechanical engineer and his first chainsaw was a two-man electric model. A petrol chainsaw was announced in 1929 competition, this is undoubtedly the manufacturer to watch.

Germany’s top logger, Marco Trabert, gets hands on with the MS 500i

Pro Arb | October 2018 39

16/10/2018 14:17


KIT

Fuel injected: The new launch in action

A long pedigree Andreas Stihl’s aim when he started the company in 1926 was to “make people’s work in, and with nature, easier”. Andreas was a qualified mechanical engineer and his first chainsaw was a two-man electric model. A petrol chainsaw was announced in 1929, and it was not long before the name and business took off. It also retains a family presence, with grandson Nikolas Stihl being chair of the supervisory and advisory boards. The company has a strong reputation for

being a good employer, with the average length of service being more than 16 years and an excellent apprenticeship programme. The company incorporated in the US in 1974 and in 1978, Andreas Stihl in the UK was founded. Stihl became more active within the garden tools market with the purchase of Austrian manufacturer Viking in 1992. The brand name has also become increasingly well known in part through the launch in 1985 of the Stihl Timbersports event, which was held for the first time in the UK this year.

Swinging into action: Brawny stars of the Timbersports world, which has just taken place at the Liverpool Echo Arena

40 Pro Arb | October 2018

Meet the supplier.indd 40

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

16/10/2018 14:17


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n o S U C O F aid first

To the

rescue ACCIDENTS HAPPEN AND IF IT’S A SERIOUS ONE, ARBORISTS NEED THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT TO STEM BLEEDING FAST

The Celox range of emergency trauma products was developed for soldiers on the battlefield and has been used by the British armed forces since 2006. But, while they may not be facing combat, tree surgeons can also suffer some extremely severe injuries, such as falling from height or being cut by a chainsaw. This is why an advanced first aid kit or trauma kit with haemostatic products could literally prove life-saving. The term ‘haemostatic’ refers to stopping blood loss. If blood is kept within the body, the chances of survival from a severe injury are increased. Acting quickly can make a huge difference and can prevent life threatening haemorrhage. In minor injuries, blood will typically clot, but when there

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is a traumatic injury, this natural clotting process may not occur due to heavy blood loss, shock or the body cooling. Toni Murch is a trained paramedic and the UK training and business development manager for Celox and spends much of his time teaching life-saving skills for those in higher risk sectors, through using appropriate first aid products. He comments: “A serious injury can happen at any time and as they will be well aware, tree surgeons can be particularly at risk. Paramedics may well not turn up in time to deliver first aid so this may need to

be carried out by colleagues, or even by the injured tree surgeon themselves.“ Haemostatic agents are a staple part of a professional first responder’s kit –they would typically be used to stop bleeding in serious injuries typically associated with a stabbing or shooting. They have an equally valuable place for tree surgeons and I’ve been incredibly encouraged by the response from the APF show, where I did a number of demonstrations. It’s also good news that so many more tree surgeons are receiving first aid training – with the right knowledge and the right first aid products, more lives will be saved.”

The Celox product range • Celox Gauze A proven gauze dressing that stops lifethreatening bleeding within three minutes of compression. •C  elox Rapid The latest generation haemostatic gauze, which is the haemostat of choice of the UK MOD for all British armed forces. Celox Rapid works in just 60 seconds and has been demonstrated successfully in hypothermic and coagulopathic bleeding. • Celox Granules These haemostatic granules are available in a 15g sachets and mould to irregular wound shapes, significantly reducing blood loss. •C  elox-A Applicators Celox-A is a syringe type applicator pre-filled with Celox Granules that can be used to deliver the granules directly to the point of injury. • Foxseal This is an occlusive dressing specifically for the treatment of open chest wounds. What is chitosan? This is the core active ingredient in Celox products is called Chitosan, a material refined from shrimp shell. On contact with fluid such as blood, Chitosan absorbs, swells and forms an adhesive gel, which sticks to tissue around the forming a gellike plug. Chitosan does not rely on the body’s natural clotting process. Chitosan in Celox products has been in use since 2006 with no reported allergies to date.

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16/10/2018 14:42


REGISTer now F I R S T

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TUESDAY20 NOVEMBER 2018 SANDOWN PARK RACECOURSE ESHER, SURREY

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KIT

All change for chainsaw trousers

ARB KIT

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LAUNCHED AT THIS YEARS APF, THE ARBORFLEX RANGE FROM ARBORTEC IS A BRAND NEW 2 IN 1 CONCEPT WHICH IS POISED TO TAKE THE MARKET BY STORM SAYS WINSTON BROTHERS Chainsaw users are now able to select the right protection according to their needs and have the flexibility to change the exterior of their trouser dependent on the job type, circumstances and weather. This is a revolution in PPE clothing and the concept works when the Arborflex Base Layer is worn with

the Arborflex Skins Outer Layer, which provides tailored levels of protection and performance. This means that depending on the type of job or environment, the arborist will always have the most suitable level of protection and ‘skin’ for the job. The outer skins can also be worn on their own, therefore freeing the wearer

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KIT

of the unnecessary chainsaw protection when working on pruning or landscaping jobs, for example. Those working in the arb industry have different roles, typically being on ground or working at heights, and this new range makes it easy to get the crucial matter of protective clothing right. Simply pick the right base trousers and then move onto your skins. This also means when it comes time to replace trousers, it is now only necessary to replace the outer skin, saving money in the long run. The Arborflex Base range comes in three models and is in an easy to remember ‘traffic light’ colour system: • Arborflex A - Red - (Type A) full front protection only • Arborflex B - Orange - (Type A Plus) full front protection and halfway • Arborflex C - Green - (Type C) full all around protection Once the suitable base layer (chainsaw protection) has been selected it’s then onto the choice of skins. Arbortec has launched

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four initial collections: • Pro Range: Featuring high performance materials and advanced designs, available in three colour options • Mid Range: Hi Viz - based on existing Breatheflex material and meeting approved standards for highways and rail • Casual Range: Offers a modern, casual look and comes in a choice of five colours • Waterproof Range: Suitable for working outdoors in all weathers and available in two colours The whole Arborflex ‘Skins’ outer layer collection can also be worn separately from the base layer as a regular pair of trousers. For your nearest supplier, check out the Arbortec range at www.arbortec.com and on its social media channels @arbortecfw Winston Brothers is Arbortec’s brand development manager

Pro Arb | October 2018 45

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TAKING ON THE

product T O U G H E S T T E R R A I N

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GREENMECH’S NEW SURE-TRAK SYSTEM OPTION OFFERS HIGH PERFORMANCE AND A RANGE OF SAFETY FEATURES FOR THOSE USING THE SAFE-TRAK 19–28 WOODCHIPPER

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rborists often need to work on uneven ground or traverse embankments, which is why GreenMech’s recently introduced SURE-Trak System option provides an appropriate and safe solution. Improvements with optional pivoting now mean greater stability and performance when used as an extension to the SAFE-Trak 19–28 woodchipper. How it works GreenMech describes the system as “next generation” – independent pivoting track assemblies allow each track to maintain contact with the ground while following the contours to provide a surer footprint and improved stability. The system, which is patent pending, now allows safe crossing of even steeper slopes in excess of 35 degrees. Its assistance in keeping the body of the machine level also protects the engine by keeping it within approved manufacturer tilt levels. It provides the extra levels of adjustment above normal tolerance to ensure the safety of the operator, crew and machine in the most challenging of conditions. Sales director, Martin Lucas, says: “Now with the optional pivoting SURE-Trak system allowing the operator to make both side-to-side and longitudinal adjustments, even more extreme conditions can be tackled with ease. The new development to our Arb range made a big impression at this year’s APF and will do so well beyond.” The SAFE-Trak 19-28 model is also the only tracked chipper certified for use on both Network Rail and Deutsche Bahn.

www.greenmech.co.uk

46 Pro Arb | October 2018

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KIT

Healthy earnings from the daily grind

FOCUS ON

stump grinders

BARRETO DOES THE BUSINESS

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arreto expands options with its new BAR31SG stump grinder, featuring the Track Trencher undercarriage to keep the machine stable, these are robust, award-winning and minimum maintenance machines. The Barreto BAR31G stump grinder features a hydraulically-driven cutter wheel that is raised and lowered into the stump and then moved from side to side to cut down. Power options consist of a 31hp Briggs and Stratton Vanguard V-Twin engine. Coupled to two gear pumps, the large gear pump drives the cutter wheel and the smaller pump works the tilt and swing cylinders. The tracks are driven by independent hydrostatic pumps mounted on the rear of the engine for easy access and simple linkage control. Counter balance valves on each track drive prevents the track motors from slipping while the cutter wheel is engaged in the cutting process while operating on a slope. The cutter wheel operation and cutting wheel arm are operated by controls mounted on the console. The cutter wheel

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WHY RISK LOSING WORK TO A COMPETITOR WHEN HAVING THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT MEANS YOU CAN OFFER A COMPLETE SERVICE?

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any customers want an unsightly stump removed after felling and with the right equipment, an arborist can leave a site looking pristine and ready for development or replanting. What is more, stump grinding can increase revenue streams considerably. So, if there is demand out there, a stump grinder should be a serious contender for capital investment – and one that can be quickly recouped. This is because while renting can provide a solution, the right model may not always be available or there could be waiting time. So, take this opportunity to check out some of the best models on the market:

is activated by a switch on the control stick and has a secondary safety switch to prevent accidental engagement. Back and forth movement across the stump, as well as depth of cut, are easily controlled by handles on the console, allowing for carefully controlled movement of the cutter wheel as it reduces the stump chips. All hydraulic drive to the cutter wheel eliminates costly belts and increases end users’ satisfaction by ensuring there is no loss of power because of a damaged belt or mechanical component. The track drive increases manoeuvrability around the workspace, creating customer satisfaction by allowing them to complete their tasks with increased efficiency.

Features include: • Easy controls operate the track and cutter wheel • Time-tested track design absorbs impact and provides stability • Hydraulically driven, center-mounted cutter wheel provides 134 degrees head swing • The engine is coupled to two gear pumps; a larger one drives the cutter wheel and smaller pump works the tilt and swing • Counterbalanced valves on track drives prevent track motors from slipping. For more details visit www.hscmsc.co.uk, email sales@hscmsc.co.uk or telephone 01905 763027

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TORO IS UP TO THE TASK

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oro’s SGR-13 Stump Grinder (22619) is well-balanced and easy-tooperate, turning stumps into mulch using the exclusive cutting wheel with easily replaceable grinder teeth. The SGR-13 offers one of the smoothest cutting experiences of any walk-behind grinder on the market and it comes with accompanying attachments and lift handles for easy loading. For more details visit www.toro.com/en-gb or email toro.salesuk@toro.com.

F O C UgSrinodenrs

stump

POWER UP WITH PREDATOR

T

he manufacturer offers an impressive range, with the focus on narrow access and power – accessibility to properties that may be in close proximity is crucial in more urban areas. Sales manager Simon Bradshaw comments: “Our focus is high performance but compact and we can advise tree surgeons about what will be the right model for their work. I’ve seen many examples where our customers have seen this area of business take off and it’s a great service to promote via social media, for example.” At entry level and suited to small firms, the ST-661 is a portable option stump grinding attachment for the Stihl MS 661 chainsaw. The Predator 38X is one of the most

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popular with tree surgeons because of its power but compact size. It is low maintenance and can be transported with ease on a pick-up truck. The range also includes radio controlled models such as the 38RX, 50RX or 56RX. Radio control allows strong visibility and improved safety and positioning and there is no need to stand behind the machine when grinding. The controller has a range of 400 yards and cannot be interfered with by other units as it has its own frequency and will shut down if any interference occurs. The top of the range

56RX, with its rugged tracks, offers serious torque and has a rear hydraulic PTO for attachments meaning it can provide effective site clearance. For more details visit www.predator-mfg. com, email info@predator-mfg.com or telephone 0845 402 1756

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16/10/2018 11:30


ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

Shingles’ legacy column

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homas Shingles was head gardener at Tortworth Court for 22 years in the 19th Century. With such a long service, he was undoubtedly the person to thank for the diverse tree collection that exists on the site today. His grave lies within the graveyard at Saint Leonard’s Church, on estate. Behind Thomas’ headstone sits a Cretan Maple (Acer sempervirens); a tree species that does not appear anywhere else on the estate. Even more fascinating than this tree’s semi-evergreen habit and ivy-like leaves, is the story of how it happened to grow at this location. Thomas was an avid plant collector: local folklore tells that his pockets were always full of seeds of interesting and unusual plants. While employed as head gardener, Thomas and

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lives on

JIM MULLHOLLAND DISCOVERS THE MOVING STORY BEHIND THOMAS SHINGLES’ CRETAN MAPLE, WHICH CAN BE FOUND ON THE TORTWORTH ESTATE, SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE

his family lived locally in a house provided by the estate. However, after his death, his wife and children were evicted from the family home, desoite his long service. Given Thomas’ penchant for collecting seeds, it’s no surprise that he happened to be buried with some. In the top pocket of his burial suit were seeds of the Cretan maple. It’s said to be the final tree he planted and some small revenge on the estate that evicted his family. Native to southern Greece and Turkey, there are known to be a number of old specimens planted in France. Three years before his death, Julia Countess of Ducie passed away in Nice, south France. Julia’s body was returned to Gloucestershire and buried within 11 days of her passing; quite a feat in those days given the type of transportation available. It’s likely that Thomas was part of the

group sent to return Julia home, and that he encountered this unusual tree species along the way. This is just one of the many stories that surround trees and highlights their importance in our cultural heritage. Whether you choose to believe the story or not, I leave you to decide. However, I feel it only adds to the wonder of this tree, and is a fitting memorial to Thomas; continuing his legacy long after he died.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management. www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum

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