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108

FULLY ENDORSED BY THE AUSTRALIAN TILE COUNCIL

DIGITAL ADHESIVES GUIDE WATERPROOFING STANDARDS

TRENDS

|

F E AT U R E D P R O D U C T S

BATHROOM DESIGN TRENDS & MOSAICS |

TRADE FAIRS

|

INDUSTRY NEWS


108 CONTENTS

ADHESIVES GUIDE 10 The Digital Adhesives Guide has an expanded,

brand new look in 2021. Using Tile Today’s digital capacities, we have made changes so it is more useful for professional end-users in the tile industry by categorising the adhesives based on applications, then providing live links to manufacturer’s products pages and external data sheets. This section is large enough to have its own table of contents and it has links that take you directly to tile applications and brand pages. Before the guide, we revisit a brief history of adhesives.

BATHROOMS 32 A look at tile trends and products in modern

Australian bathrooms, and the VitrA Colour ceramic collection.

WATERPROOFING 43 In this section, Tim Christopher (Consultile)

provides his perspective on the latest update to Waterproofing for Domestic Wet Areas (AS3740). We also highlight products for waterproofing, and compliance membranes and testing.

CAULKING 56 Ben Burdett (Efflock) writes about the importance

of a backing rod in caulking.

MOSAICS 59 The use of mosaic tiles for kitchen backsplashes.

It's a trend that's becoming more popular, especially in high-end kitchens. Tim Christopher (Consultile) writes about mosaics installation; and the latest ranges from TREND Group and Ezarri. There is also mosaic imports data from Peter Halliday.

RETAIL FOCUS 76 Tile and Bath Co is an online retailer and

represents what many customers want from their buying experience.


PROFILE 79 Two longstanding tile professionals, Denis Suess

OAM (TDSE) and Damien Costello (Austile Imports) are working together to sell a range of grates.

STATISTICS 82 Peter Halliday presents the data for ceramic tile

imports during 2020.

INDUSTRY ROUNDUP 87 The Australian Tile Council establishes a technical

committee; Beaumont Tiles’ natural stone emulation tiles; 2021 Pantone Colours and their influence on tile ranges; terrazzo tiles made in Los Angeles; Dulux forecast colours on hallways; Instagram-worthy interior designs; outdoor tiles by Ceramiche Refin; and a new app for tilers developed in New Zealand.

Find Tile Today on social media @tiletodaymagazine @tiletodaymagazine tile-today-magazine

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


PROFESSIONAL MANUAL TILE CUTTER

Key Features * Professional manual tile cutter for straight and diagonal cuts of ceramic, single-fired and stoneware material * Aluminium magnetic breaking foot with rubber to protect and avoid scratching the tiles * Worktops with specially designed springs guarantee a rapid separation of cut tile and provides an excellent finish result * Strong aluminium body creating a rigid yet, lightweight machine

ART6601EV

Profi EVO 630mm Manual Tile Cutter

ART6850EV

Profi EVO 880mm Manual Tile Cutter

ART61300EV

Profi EVO 1330mm Manual Tile Cutter

ART61000EV

Profi EVO 1000mm Manual Tile Cutter

ART61600EV

Profi EVO 1630mm Manual Tile Cutter

To find your nearest reseller visit www.dta-aus.com.au


FO REWO R D

TILE TODAY

It has almost been a year since Tile Today began its digital journey, and it has given us the opportunity to explore and broaden the content we deliver for our readers in the industry. In this issue, we decided to take it a step further and use Tile Today’s digital capabilities to make it easier for installers and specifiers to choose the right adhesive for their projects in the totally updated and revamped Adhesives Guide. It is interactive with “clickability” from the directory to product listings, and externally to data sheets for more information. Try it for yourself, starting on page 14.

Proudly produced and printed in Australia ELITE PUBLISHING CO PTY LTD ABN: 27 006 876 419 PO BOX 800, Templestowe, Victoria, Australia 3106 Ph: + 61 3 9890 0815 Fax: + 61 3 9890 0087 Email: info@elitepublishing.com.au Website: www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au www.elitepublishing.com.au PUBLISHER Vicky Cammiade vicky.cammiade@elitepublishing.com.au

(l&r) Phil Scardigno (Gripset) and Troy Hogan (RLA Polymers)

This edition is also significant for the announcement that RLA Polymers will acquire the Gripset® business (Axis Industries). We will follow up this story in a future edition but to read more, go to page 31. Other key features to read in this issue include an update on the waterproofing standards, design trends in bathrooms, mosaics in kitchen backsplashes and tile imports for 2020. This content-packed issue can be accessed easily on a computer, smartphone or any other mobile device. You can bring it wherever you are and it is easy to travel with, from the jobsite, store or other workplaces to the home. We are positioning Tile Today to be at the forefront of digital publishing in any industry, and we hope you will take the journey together with us. Just click here to subscribe https://bit.ly/3dJ5EBc Until next time,

EDITOR Betty Tanddo betty.tanddo@elitepublishing.com.au INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT Joe Simpson joe.simpson@elitepublishing.com.au MACHINERY EDITOR Philip Ashley philipneilashley@yahoo.com.au GENERAL MANAGER Georgia Gilmour Georgia.Gilmour@elitepublishing.com.au CIRCULATION For circulation enquiries please email: info@elitepublishing.com.au GRAPHIC DESIGN Plum Publishing Pty Ltd dave@plumpublishing.com.au PRODUCTION For artwork and production enquiries please email: dave@plumpublishing.com.au ELITE PUBLISHING CO PTY LTD PUBLISHERS OF: Flooring Magazine, Discovering Stone Magazine, Finishes & Surfaces Magazine, TileToday Magazine, Supplier Magazine and FB Magazine.

Betty Tanddo Editor

Leading the Industry

Endorsed by Australian Tile Council www.australiantilecouncil.com.au

FRONT COVER IMAGE The Satin mosaic wallpaper is one of the new designs from the Tropical Splendor collection by TREND Group. This design reflects a three-dimensional flowing effect, emulating the fabric of satin. It features TREND's exclusive 24k gold tiles which are suitable for any application. Satin is a unique creation by TREND but the company is able to produce any design or image into a mosaic with the assistance of its design team based in Vicenza, Italy.

108

FULLY ENDORSED BY THE AUSTRALIAN TILE COUNCIL

Please note: Shade variation is an inherent feature of tile production. The Publisher is not liable for any discrepancy between images published in Tile Today and actual products.

DIGITAL ADHESIVES GUIDE WATERPROOFING STANDARDS

TRENDS

|

F E AT U R E D P R O D U C T S

ELITE PUBLISHING CO PTY LTD. All rights reserved. No part of this publication maybe reproduced, transmitted or copied in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without the express prior written consent of Elite Publishing Co Pty Ltd. Viewpoints, opinions, claims, etc expressed in articles appearing in this publication are those of the authors. The Publishers accept no responsibility for the information supplied or for claims made by companies or their representatives regarding product performance, etc or for any errors, omissions, misplacement, alterations, or any subsequent changes, or for any consequences of reliance on this information or this publication.

BATHROOM DESIGN TRENDS & MOSAICS |

TRADE FAIRS

|

INDUSTRY NEWS


Make your tile business more streamlined, personal & powerful HARMONiQ – the breakthrough all-in-one ERP system tailored to the unique needs of tile & flooring businesses Simple. Powerful. Easy to use. And unbelievably flexible. HARMONiQ is the first in its category that can be truly personalised to the way you want your tile & flooring business to operate and your people to work together. It offers all the features a tile & flooring business needs to manage complex inventory and process requirements, as well as fine tune business performance – in a single scaleable system that can grow as you grow.

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SEE HARMONiQ IN ACTION Call 02 9542 2000 to book your free demo, or visit harmoniq.com.au/tile-software to learn more about how HARMONiQ helps you do business better.


How DW Tiles future-proofed their business and transformed customer confidence with HARMONiQ ERP DW Tiles is a ceramic tile importer and wholesaler, who has grown into one of Australia’s major tile suppliers. In operation for 25 years, they operate out of a single Sydney location, serving over 200 customers across NSW and acting as a stock partner of some of the country’s biggest tile retailers. Since 2005, DW Tiles had been using the same ERP system - even after 10 years the system was still working well and supporting the business operations. However, Manager Cheryl Zhang could foresee issues, as the system had limitations which would stop them being able to upgrade their processes in the future, including: Not being built on an SQL platform Inability to integrate with new systems or programs Inability to be upgraded to keep up with business growth Only providing low-level data insights and accessibility

"We realised that if we wanted to upgrade, or if we wanted to integrate with any new add-ons or programs, we couldn't. We'd have to build any new additions around the existing system". Cheryl Zhang, Manager - DW Tiles They were extremely limited and would only continue to face problems down the track - there was no way to make the old system work for new situations. Wanting to future-proof the business, they knew they would need to move to a new system.

A long search for a new ERP Cheryl first started considering a change in ERP five or six years ago. But knowing what a big job upgrading an ERP operation can be, she didn’t want to rush into a choice. Cheryl and the DW Tiles team considered several different options getting demonstrations and even installing sample systems comparing the benefits and how they would serve DW Tiles in the long run. Understanding the functionality of the software was paramount. It was in early 2019 that, through industry word of mouth, the team came across Micronet Systems. A solution that had been used throughout the Tile Industry for a long time, she knew Micronet was a trusted name.

After talking to Managing Director Drew Arthur, he suggested DW Tiles consider HARMONiQ, Micronet System’s newest ERP solution.

“When we compared HARMONiQ to the other options we’d been looking at, we could see it was much more suitable for our needs.” Cheryl Zhang, Manager - DW TIles

Focusing on training made for a smooth implementation While Cheryl was confident in her choice of ERP, that didn’t stop apprehension amongst employees. “We have a low staff turnover, so we have people who have been with us for 10 years using the same old system all that time. There was a lot of hesitation from them, especially because they didn’t feel the old system was broken”. But for future functionality, a change needed to happen, and so implementation went ahead in early 2020. And quite quickly, the hesitative response turned into a positive one. “Implementation went extremely well. I would say 200% better than I expected. Everyone is happy. And when I say everyone, I mean every single one. After three months, all staff could use the new system very well and have been commenting very positively on it.” Achieving this positive response relied heavily on staff training. During the customisation period, HARMONiQ’s Distribution Business Process Specialist John Schrooten worked closely with Cheryl to ensure they had all the functionality they needed, simultaneously training her in the system. “John has a background in the Tile industry, so we spoke the same language and he had great knowledge of our business and products”. Cheryl was then able to pass on the training to her teams, offering training on specific HARMONiQ functions depending on their role. It was an efficient method, made staff feel comfortable, and ensured everyone was trained in what they needed.

“The training was very, very well done, and we were very lucky to work with John.” Cheryl Zhang, Manager


Widespread benefits just one year in After almost 12 months using HARMONiQ, DW Tiles have noticed a range of benefits and improvements – and they only expect the list to grow as time goes on.

Improved stock management HARMONiQ gives the DW Tiles teams a more in-depth view of data - including all-important stock data. While their previous system only allowed them to view stock level, HARMONiQ gives them the ability to view stock level, shade, size, location and so much more. Staff now always know what stock is available, how much of it, and where to get it from.

DW Tiles’ NSW Warehouse

Clearer communication The amount of data, matched with accessibility and integration of this data, has allowed for better communication between business departments. Those in the office processing orders now have full visibility of stock in the warehouse, improving visibility and collaboration across the business.

A new level of Customer Service The Improvement in data visibility and functionality has allowed DW Tiles to provide a higher level of service to their customers. Thanks to a mobile app integrated with HARMONiQ, the sales team now can check stock wherever they are, giving customers up-to-date information and making informed suggestions. They are also using HARMONIQ’s purchasing platform, which allows them to capture future shipment status. They can pull this information through API onto their website, so when stock isn’t currently available, customers can see when the next shipment is expected.

“Being able to pull real-time stock availability information into our website has reduced a lot of pressure on our customer service team. It also boosts customer confidence”. Cheryl Zhang, Manager

Quick and easy reporting In their previous system, reporting was incredibly hard. It would take Cheryl at least two hours to compile reports, having to pull data from different areas of the system. HARMONiQ now does this automatically, reducing reporting time to just 10 minutes - even for the most complicated reports. Much of the reporting is now done in a real time manner using on-screen reporting and dashboards.

Thinking about ERP? Make sure it’s a good match The original reason HARMONiQ stood out as the most suitable option for DW Tiles was that it was so easily configured to the Tile Industry. Cheryl was highly aware of the unique needs of tile businesses – including with stock management and calculating item quantity – and was highly impressed that these functions were already built into HARMONiQ, making the implementation process so much simpler. “We didn’t have to waste time starting everything from scratch. HARMONiQ is at least 60-70% customised for tile industry, if not more.” Cheryl Zhang, Manager No stranger to an ERP implementation, Cheryl truly believes that the most important thing is to find a system that understands your industry, because every single industry has got their specific requirements. The ERP system and the industry must work hand in hand; the system needs to understand the industry, and the industry needs to be able to use the system in their way – which is why HARMONiQ has been able to offer what other systems couldn’t. “HARMONiQ really understands the tile industry. Everyone in our business loves it - from the boss to the warehouse staff.” Cheryl Zhang, Manager

For full details or a no-obligation demonstration of HARMONiQ, call us on 02 9542 2000 or visit https://harmoniq.com.au/demo/ to schedule a demo with one of our industry experts.


From the Romans to the polymers TILE ADHESIVES HAVE, AS YOU WOULD EXPECT, AS DEEP A HISTORY AS TILES THEMSELVES — THOUGH THE MOST EXCITING PART OF THAT HISTORY TAKES PLACE OVER THE LAST 250 YEARS

The former Portland Cement Works in Lithgow (NSW) opened in 1902. It is undergoing a transformation to become a cultural and tourism hub known as The Foundations.


Tile adhesives today


Tile Today Adhesives Directory

2021


ADHESIVES Asking someone to "get me some tile adhesive" is about as useful as asking someone to "get me some pasta" — it's a failure And just as being served a serious plate of pasta seems less like eating a meal and more like entering into a brief but fascinating relationship with a place, a culture, and sometimes a family, so choosing the right adhesive — exactly the right adhesive — can transform the way you set about a project, the results and your work's longevity. The fact is that the last 40 years have been something of a boom time for tile adhesive developments. More and more additives have been developed, and new uses for polymers and resins have added more versatility to the way tiles can be used. That's great for the industry, but it also means every tile installer has to spend serious time thinking about adhesives. all this can present. Our goal is to provide our readers with the tools they need to make choosing the best adhesive as simple as possible.

interior) and quite narrow categories (can be used on existing tiles, can be

link, and be taken to a clear description of the adhesive, as well as a link to further online information. It's quick, it's simple, and hopefully it will help launch you in the right direction from the start, making your most recent project just that little bit easier to get started on.


CONTENTS Use for: Floors

15

Use for: Other Surfaces

15

Use for: Walls

16

Exposure: Interior

16

Exposure: Exterior

17

Floors - Concrete

17

Floors - Compressed Fibre Cement Sheet

18

Floors - Existing Tiles

18

Other - Shower Floors

20

Other - Granite/Marble

21

Other - Swimming pools/total immersion

21

Other - Slim tile or panel 3mm to 5+mm thick

21

BRAND: SIKA

22

BRAND: RLA

24

BRAND: RLA

26

BRAND: Kerakoll

27

BRAND: Kerakoll

28

BRAND: ACT

30

14 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


ADHESIVES DIRECTORY Use for: Floors LINK

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

LINK Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Use for: Other Surfaces LINK

CODE

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ACT Australia

BioGel No Limits

13648

ADH-55

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 15


DIRECTORY Use for: Walls LINK

CODE

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

Click to view

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Flexibond NS

RL7140-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Exposure: Interior LINK

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

LINK Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Flexibond NS

RL7140-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

16 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll


DIRECTORY Exposure: Exterior LINK

CODE

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

Click to view

RLA Mastik

Click to view Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

RLA Polymers

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Floors - Concrete LINK

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

LINK Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 17


DIRECTORY

Floors - Compressed Fibre Cement Sheet LINK

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

CODE

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Floors - Existing Tiles LINK

CODE

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

LINK Click to view

PRODUCT

PRODUCT

RLA Unigrip

Click to view

CODE

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

18 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

RLA Polymers

RLA Polymers

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

PRODUCT

RLA Stoneset

Click to view

Click to view

RL7172-20

Sika

Click to view

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

619372

LINK

ADH-55

RL7153-15

Davco SMP Evo

COMPANY

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

COMPANY

Click to view

Click to view

ACT Australia

CODE

CODE

COMPANY

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

628648

Sika

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll


DIRECTORY LINK

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Flexibond NS

RL7140-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

CODE

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Walls - Plasterboard LINK

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

LINK Click to view

Click to view

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Flexibond NS

RL7140-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 19


DIRECTORY

Other - Shower Floors LINK

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

Tilebond Extra

RL7110-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

LINK

ACT Australia

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Lite

RL7121-14

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

20 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

ACT Australia

COMPANY

RL7132-20

Click to view

ACT Australia

CODE

RLA Fastset

COMPANY

Click to view

CODE

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

Click to view

ADH-66-Light

Click to view

PRODUCT

CODE

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll


DIRECTORY Other - Granite/Marble LINK

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

ADH-41 Premium Smooth White Powder Mastic Style C2ETS2

ADH-41

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

Click to view

ADH-31 Quality Rubber Modi-

ADH-31

ACT Australia

Click to view

RLA Mastik

RL7152-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7165-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7145-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7550-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RL7172-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Click to view

Click to view

PRODUCT

CODE

ACT Australia

ACT Australia

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Polymastic

RL7194-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

Davco Powder Mastic

619262

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Lite

529240

Sika

Click to view

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

Click to view

628648

Sika

Click to view

8800

Kerakoll

Click to view

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

Biofast

14831

Kerakoll

Click to view

Universal Eco

13485

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Other - Swimming pools/total immersion LINK

CODE

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view

Davco SMP Evo

619372

Sika

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Click to view

Sika

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Fastset

RL7132-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

RLA Stoneset

RL7131-20

RLA Polymers

Click to view

PRODUCT

PRODUCT

Click to view

CODE

COMPANY

Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

Other - Slim tile or panel 3mm to 5+mm thick LINK

COMPANY

LINK

ADH-66 Light Premium Lightweight C2ETS2

ADH-66-Light

ACT Australia

Click to view Click to view

Click to view

ADH-55 Premium Polymer

ADH-55

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-44 Premium Powder Mastic C2ETS1

ADH-44

ACT Australia

Click to view

ADH-33 Premium Rubber

ADH-33

ACT Australia

Click to view

RLA Unigrip

RL7153-15

RLA Polymers

Click to view

PRODUCT

CODE

PRODUCT

CODE

COMPANY

RLA Flexibond NS

RL7140-20

RLA Polymers

CTA Prohesive Megalite

529241

Sika

13639

Kerakoll

Click to view Click to view

BioGel No Limits

13648

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Revolution

14852

Kerakoll

Click to view

BioGel Extreme

13652

Kerakoll

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 21


Davco SMP Evo

VIEW DATA SHEET VIEW DATA SHEET

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Davco Powder Mastic

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

VIEW DATA SHEET

VIEW DATA SHEET

VIEW DATA SHEET

BRAND: SIKA

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

CTA Prohesive Megalite

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

CTA Prohesive Lite

Interior Exterior Wall Floor


LITE WEIGHT ADHESIVES

Formulated with LITE WEIGHT GLASS TECHNOLOGY

40%

Lighter with GREATER COVERAGE THAN A 20KG BAG of traditional cement based adhesive Non-slip/slump HIGH BOND STRENGTH premium quality

sika.com.au 1300 22 33 48


Tilebond Extra

Wall Floor

RLA Mastik

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

RLA Unigrip

RLA Lite

RLA Flexibond NS

VIEW DATA SHEET

Interior Exterior

VIEW DATA SHEET

VIEW DATA SHEET

VIEW DATA SHEET

BRAND: RLA

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor


VIEW DATA SHEET

BRAND: RLA Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

RLA Fastset

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

RLA Stoneset

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Wall Floor

26 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


VIEW DATA SHEET

BRAND: Kerakoll Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Biofast

VIEW DATA SHEET

Universal Eco

VIEW DATA SHEET

BioGel No Limits

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

BioGel Revolution

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 27


BRAND: Kerakoll VIEW DATA SHEET

BioGel Extreme

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

Kerakoll offers zero efflorescence solutions Eco-friendly Italian adhesive manufacturer, Kerakoll has been working to alleviate issues in the building industry with tailored solutions to make products easier to use (single component non epoxy). and to reduce reliance on materials that are known to create environmental, greenhouse gas problems, such as those caused by Portland cement. Kerakoll has developed geo-binder technology to replace Portland cement in its rapid setting adhesives and concrete restoration products, as well as its unique resinbased grout. Established in 1968, Kerakoll is considered a major innovator in the green building sector and the inventor of the single component adhesive. Its products are ecologically safe and green in an authentic way. Kerakoll products remove harmful petrochemicals, substituting them with mineral based materials and natural plant matter. Kerakoll said it is the only company that has ecotested and certified each of its over 1700 products through the SGS Institute, the world’s leading inspection, verification, testing and certification company in Switzerland.

How to avoid efflorescence Substrate Preparation – Isolation Step 1. Waterproof the substrate using Kerakoll Nanoflex Tanking Membrane to trap efflorescence in the cement substrate

Step 2. Where falls are required, use Kerakoll Keracem Eco (engineered screed) which allows a three-hour work time and rapid drying time. Keracem Eco is a binder for screeds to be used ideally with washed river sand and water to provide high compressive strength with 32MPa and the ability to lay after 24 hours speeding up the construction process. Repeat Step 1 to trap efflorescence in the screed

Adhesive for Stone or Tiles Step 3. Stone and tile adhesive using Kerakoll BioGel Revolution provides zero Portland cement with the introduction of Kerakoll's GeoBinder technology. This is a single component rapid setting adhesive just requiring water.

Grout for Stone or Tiles Step 4. Stone and tile grout available in 50 colours using Kerakoll Fugabella Color providing zero Portland Cement with the introduction of Kerakoll's Geo-Binder Resin technology. This is a single component grout just requiring water.

Silicone Sealant for Stone or Tiles Step 5. Stone and tile sealant available in 50 colours using Kerakoll Fugabella Color Silicone providing a flexible silicone sealant for the application of expansion, sealing and joints.

For more information, please contact Kerakoll at www.kerakoll.com.au


VIEW DATA SHEET

BRAND: ACT Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall

VIEW DATA SHEET

Floor

Interior Exterior Wall Floor

30 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


AN N O U N C E M E NT

RLA Polymers acquires Gripset RLA Polymers Pty. Ltd. recently announced that it entered into an agreement to acquire the Gripset® business, brand and related activities of Axis Industries. According to the company, the Gripset brand and range of products have a leading position in the waterproofing segment throughout Australia and New Zealand. They are at the forefront of providing industry training, technical support and cutting edge technologies for waterproofing applications. RLA will operate Gripset as a separate business unit within RLA and be welcoming the entire Gripset team in sales, marketing, technical, customer service and training (GAPP), in addition to the full support of owner Phil Scardigno. Gripset has a loyal customer base and they will benefit from having access to RLA’s broader

(l&r) Phil Scardigno (Gripset) and Troy Hogan (RLA Polymers

range of technology and products. There will also be an increase in logistical support from each local RLA facility located in all major cities. RLA managing director, Troy Hogan, said, “We are looking

forward to expanding both the RLA and Gripset product ranges to meet growing customer needs”. “The Gripset digital marketing presence is second to none in the industry and we look forward to further supporting their activities with additional content and resources”. As founder and managing director of Gripset, Phil is very happy with the arrangements. He said, “I believe the Gripset brand is a great fit for RLA’s continued expansion, enabling our waterproofing technologies to gain a broader reach across the national construction industry”. “The market leading scale which now combines RLA and Gripset production volumes will allow us to drive efficiencies and deliver consistently high quality products from RLA’s ISO 9001 accredited facility in Kilsyth Victoria”, adds Troy.


BATHROOMS

FROM GRAND TO COMFY: BATHROOM TILES FOR A POST-COVID WORLD

SO, TO CUT TO THE CHASE, ONE OF TILE TODAY'S PREDICTIONS FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS IS THAT WE'RE GOING TO SEE A REDUCTION IN THE USE OF LARGER FORMAT TILES IN BATHROOMS. That can seem a little controversial. If you look at the bathroom suggestions put forward in 2021 by major homebuilders such as Metricon, the big format is still a big deal. We're certainly seeing fewer big format tiles in the layouts in consumer design magazines, but that's been a trend for some time. And let's face it, the design of the average — even high-end average — suburban bathroom is very different from what makes it onto the glossy pages of a style magazine. All of which highlights the problems that come with trying to forecast styles for areas like bathrooms. In fact, it's easy to feel you're in the grip of some kind of Einsteinian relativity when forecasting house design. Just as the stars we see in the night sky are really those stars as they were four or more years ago (because it takes that long for the light to get here), so when we look at the images of new bathrooms in the pages of design magazines, we're really seeing something that had its genesis two or more years ago. That was probably when the designer, architect or homeowner first set pencil to paper (or SketchUp to laptop screen), followed by a year to get it built, and then the magazine editor scheduling a photoshoot, writing the article, and getting it into print. 32 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

On the other side of that, of course, is just how long new ideas take to make it from the design gurus to the average suburban homeowner. Frequently, there can be a gap of two or three years from the image on as glossy page to the tile adhesive going down to make those ideas real in someone's middle-ofthe-road renovation. Except — confusingly — when it's not the case, and a new style is taken up rapidly and comprehensively. Then, on top of all of that, you have something like the COVID-19 pandemic take place, bringing a severe disruption to the home life of many. In such cases, the order gets completely reversed, and it's the homeowners who are doing the radically new designs, and design magazines catching up to them. In fact, it's only going to be in 2021 that we really begin to see the impact of the pandemic on bathroom design. That's partly because those bathroom projects that were completed during 2020 relied on plans made pre-pandemic, and partly because many thought the effects of the pandemic might have faded by the end of 2021. Today, most would agree that those effects will stretch into 2023, and likely beyond that as well.

CONSUMER MAGAZINES Having some grasp of what is going on in style magazines for the home can be helpful for many tile businesses. While these magazines do tend to show more of the "high-end" designs, and often those that are closer to the cutting edge than most clients want, they do have a subtle influence on the tile decisions clients make. One trick when it comes to these magazines is that most of them are available digitally, and the cost for an annual subscription is often quite low. At Tile Today, we particularly like the Australian magazines House & Garden and Home Beautiful. We also like the UK magazine Living Etc. You can add to that some of the other European magazine, such as ELLE Decoration, which has UK, French and Italian versions (all very different). The best digital subscription site is probably ZINIO (www.zinio. com/au), and they frequently run discounts of 30% or more on annual subscriptions. On the pages that follow we've highlighted some of the spreads that we think deserve consideration when we're thinking about tiles in Australian bathrooms. Two of them are from Living Etc., and show that lovely touch the British have with stronger colours, especially in


the bathroom. The spreads are about adding both warmth and bit of visual zing to rooms that can easily look grand but a bit austere. The spread from Australian House & Garden is a bit more towards the austere, but shows how the right tiling can really soften a bathroom — even when using white tiles. The spread from Australian Home Beautiful is subtle in its use of warm tile tones, to create a sense of something comfy and familiar.

WHERE MODERN BATHROOM TILE DESIGN CAME FROM All of these spreads indicate the possibility of moving away from what's become the "standard" design for larger bathrooms in Australia: larger format white and off-white tiles. While all the advantages these tiles have been promoted as offering are true — making the room feel larger, more grand, slightly luxurious — the question is whether this is really the right time for boosting those qualities. It's worth remembering that

modern bathroom design, while it has developed into something uniquely Australian, owes a lot to overseas influences. In fact, the story about how that influence came about, and continued to grow is worth looking into. It all began with the development of higher-end hotels and resort hotels in Asia and South-East Asia during the 1990s. The hotel industry grew in the region through the 1980s, but not as much as tourism operators had hoped. That was largely because of the strong contrasts, which mingled first-world facilities in hotels with a third-world external environment. Turn a corner in 1990s Kuala Lumpur, and you could, in the space of 10 metres, go from a super-modernist

environment to the Malaysia of the 1950s. The resort hotel solved this problem. As the hotel was itself the destination and the purpose of the journey, it could be equipped as a selfcontained area, with its own rules and regulations, delivering an environment in which inexperienced travellers would feel safe. Economically, it was the closest thing to magic these economies could develop. The hotels attracted investment from overseas, provided work in their construction, and ongoing employment for large numbers of staff. The income was, of course, the equivalent of export income, helping to boost the balance of trade for countries increasingly dependent on the 34

LIVING ETC., OCTOBER 2020. The emerald green marble tiles of this bathroom contrast with a house decorated in mostly muted shades. The contrast with the white marble tiles, and the wood panelling of the vanity, create a rich environment that makes the experience of the bathroom unique in the house

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 33


BATHROOMS import of technologies and facing difficult export commodity markets. For the hotel operators, there were considerable advantages as well. Reliably hot weather provided a resort atmosphere. Wages, a prime cost for all hospitality industries, were very low. Staff were loyal and highly motivated — within certain cultural bounds. Government support was high, providing opportunities for building and expansion. However, what ended up spoiling all this to some extent was a series of crises. The first of these was the general economic crisis of the late 1990s. This crisis was followed shortly thereafter by two others: the terrorism attacks in New York on 11 September 2001, and the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), which began in 2008. As Soultana Kapiki writing in the Central European Review of Economics and Finance, describes the situation in her paper entitled "The Impact of Economic Crisis on Tourism and Hospitality": “As with most industries, the

34 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

hospitality and tourism sector is experiencing numerous challenges as a result of the global economic crisis. The industry is feeling the impact of a shrinking capital market and decreased spending by both corporate and individual consumers. Businesses have reported a downturn in sales of lodging, foodservice, events and other hospitality products and some have closed their doors forever. The decline resulted not only from fewer customers in hotels, restaurants, conference and convention centres, etc., but also from a significant decline in the average expenditure per guest. “The recession caused serious problems for luxury hotels in particular. However,

many hotels in certain global markets, especially those catering to leisure travellers,were less affected. And the popularity and growth of the luxury hotel segment in recent years suggests that a strong rebound may not be unrealistic.” From “The Impact of Economic Crisis on Tourism and Hospitality”: https://goo.gl/QKeIhH From the Australian perspective, these crises had one key effect: the cost of holidays to these "exclusive", very high luxury hotels in Asian destinations fell dramatically. The Australian market was targeted with a wide range of packages, and the trade was boosted by a similar reduction in airfares. The result was that a

LIVING ETC., OCTOBER 2020. An eclectic collection of surfaces — tile, wood and metal — create a set of changing textures that give what could have been a cold, clinical bathroom, a sense of jumble and comfort. Note the soft grey tiles of the shower wall, and how the strong white grout lines render this into a homey cheequerboard pattern, while matching up with the wall behind the bathtub.


wide band of the Australian demographic experienced truly luxurious hotel accommodation for the first time in their lives. This had a profound effect on design sensibilities. As Emily Becker writes in "The Proximity Hotel": “Although hotels originated to meet the needs that were born from increased mobility worldwide, the luxury hotel industry has progressed as an outlet for travellers to dreams of and fantasise about other lifestyles. It is for this reason that the luxury hotel industry places a large focus on the guest experience along with their satisfaction and guests have high expectations. Satisfying luxury hotel consumers can be a challenge because a luxury experience varies for each individual and is highly subjective.” From “The Proximity Hotel”: https://goo.gl/CY5XLF One reason that bathrooms are such a focus of this kind of hotel design is that studies show guests typically spend around 25% of the time in their rooms in the bathroom. Particularly in the warmer climates, it can become

a strong focus for activity. Returning to their own houses, the Australian tourists brought with them a sense of their home architecture that was often quite changed. From being a place where interesting things happened, it began to seem more like an experience in itself. Jamie Gold, writing in the industry journal "Kitchen & Bath Design News" lays out this connection between the commercial and the domestic bathroom, quoting from Sandra Vivas, general manager for San Diego's Gaslamp District boutique hotel, The Keating: “While it’s true that hotel managers are buying hundreds of fixtures, faucets and vanities, and acres of floor and wall

tile for a project, the attributes they seek are seeping into the residential market, especially as local building and remodelling codes continue to toughen: Hightech, low-maintenance, resourcesaving, durable, timeless and safe for users are all crucial criteria for hospitality designers. But they also need to excite the senses and deliver a resort-like ambiance for guests. "At the Keating, we think of everything as an experience," shares Vivas. Homeowners want their master baths to have that same "experience" effect, so that they feel like they’re on vacation when they use them. Fixtures like rain showers and separate handsets, mood lighting and jetted 36

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN, MARCH 2021. This is a good illustration of taking what could be a very stark pallette of white and silver, then making it really inviting and warm through a thoughtful use of tiling. The inlaid dark grout lines between the hexagonal tiles of the bathroom gives the floor interesting perspective lines. While this is a very “high-end” treatment, it’s easy to see how well it would work with simpler materials as well.

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BATHROOMS tubs with aromatherapy — as the Keating and other boutique hotels offer — contribute to that effect.”

POST-PANDEMIC BATHROOMS For Australians trying to survive the earlier long-term and current "sprint" pandemic lockdowns they've been subjected to, the idea of a bathroom that can "excite the senses and deliver a resort-like ambiance for guests" is not what we might call exactly top-of-the-mind. With everybody at home seemingly just about all of the time, bathrooms that have a high utility factor are increasing in demand. Those features that relied on a degree of loitering and lengthy relaxation are a little less soothing when someone is banging on the door asking how much longer the "guest" is going to be. Which is not to say that bathrooms have become purely utilitarian. Even if they offer only 10 or 15 minutes of seclusion instead of 30 minutes, they still do provide a bit of refuge and "self" time, a gap in the demands

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of work-from-home, teaching and parenting. What we seem to be seeing is a split in how to approach that brief break, through either offering an intensity of colour and design, or providing more muted, pale tones and soothing textural differences. However, it does seem that the larger format tiles, and those general design schemes, have fallen a little out of favour. In part that is because the designs based on larger tiles move in the opposite direction to more recent, "homey" designs — the movement is away from "statement" towards comfort — but it's also that older bathrooms are more of a referential design element. They overtly reference those luxury spa hotels and resorts that, for at least the next two or three years, most Australians are unlikely to visit.

Better, designers seem to think, to focus on where we are now, today, at home, managing as best we can. If Tile Today were to speculate on where design goes as the effects of COVID-19 on our culture, we would suggest that we'll see the "natural" bathroom become more common in homes. We're already seeing this in some award-winning and very high-end installations, with the outdoors brought inside through skylights, greenery, and earthy, rough textures. It's an opening up again which we all can certainly look forward to, but we would guess it will be 2024 before we start to see that trend take off in more affordable suburban homes.

AUSTRALIAN HOME BEAUTIFUL, MARCH 2021. The soft hues of the tiles behind the bathroom vanity shift the focus of the bathroom from the more clinical shower, while the fittings — with a lovely aged patina — unite the space. There is a general sense of the amorphous in the round basin, the oval mirror, and changing hues of the wall ties.


BATHROOMS

BATHROOMWARE THAT MIXES FORM, FUNCTION AND STYLE The Huntingwood line of selfcleaning showers integrates the beauty of first-rate design and durable construction. Combining both square and curved design elements, the Huntingwood range can add a luxury detail to bathrooms, along with the performance of “Absolute Full Flow” that enriches showering experiences. Its main features include a patent self-cleaning mechanism; three function hand piece; simultaneous use of bush and hand shower; adjustable top

Linkware’s trigger spray in chrome

rail pillar to suit some retrofit applications; and a high grade chrome finish. The Loui range has six shower variations, each offering elegant styles with a full body shower experience. With classic chrome and modern matte black finishes available, the Loui showers can add a level of sophistication to bathrooms. Other features include a three function hand piece and simultaneous use of bush and hand shower. Both the Huntingwood and Loui showers are designed and manufactured by Linkware Australia. The Linkware range of trigger sprays are engineered with precision and have quality fittings. Suitable for many applications with dual backflow prevention and a 1200mm anti-burst hose, they are a standard above any other product being considered for bidet spray applications (subject to Australian Standards being met for installation). These trigger sprays are available in chrome, 304 grade stainless steel, PVD gold and matte black finishes.

The Huntingwood twin shower in chrome

The Loui twin shower in matte black

THE WAVE VANITY: A BATHROOM BEAUTY Boasting Australian craftsmanship and a distinctive, contemporary take on retro vintage design, the Wave range of vanities has been added to Beaumont Tiles’ collection of bathroom ware and cabinetry. As the name implies, the Wave vanity has a fluted timber facade that is wave-like in appearance and takes its cue from nature and

Beaumont Tiles worked with Marquis to develop the Wave vanity. Marquis is a familyowned business that has been providing bathroom solutions for over 40 years. First established in 1979 in the NSW Hunter Valley, the name Marquis has become known for its design, quality and manufacturing technology.


the rippling effect that naturally occurs in disrupted water. Utilising the latest thermolaminating technologies, the Wave vanity is made from moisture resistant medium-density fibreboard coated in fluted timber grain. This technology creates a durable and low maintenance vanity that will be the cornerstone of any bathroom project for years to come. Available in five stylish cabinet finishes with three bench top options to choose from, the Wave has designs ranging from Classic Traditional, Retro Vintage and Eclectic Bohemian to Global Fusion. In addition to matching a number of diverse styles, this vanity offers 12 different sizes from 600mm to 1800mm to suit a variety of bathroom sizes and configurations. This includes powder rooms, ensuites and main family bathrooms looking to add architectural elements. “To really make your bathroom

Inside the Wave vanity for a closer look

pop, try using the Wave vanity in Coastal Oak framed by some classic white subways in a vertical stack, as the lines from the Wave will continue up through the tiles to give the illusion of high ceilings – great for smaller spaces”, said Christie Wood, Beaumont Tiles design specialist. “The Wave vanity was developed with storage in mind making the large draw a place

to hide away all the bathroom necessities… “Something really special about Wave is its versatility. With a range of colours and the unique fluted timber, this vanity is gorgeous in any setting. Pair the Florentine Walnut colour with gold tapware for a really luxe classic traditional look or go for the Costal Oak with silver tapware for a casual Scandi design”, suggests Wood.

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BATHROOMS

DESIGN PROJECTS IN VIVID COLOUR The Turkish made ProColor range from VitrA Tiles has a rich colour palette for creating unique spaces in residences and commercial projects. VitrA specialises in bathroomware and tiles to suit these rooms. The ProColor ceramic tile collection has contemporary colour options for designers and specifiers. This range is suited to the architectural specification market because it contains 38 RAL colours of fully vitrified tiles, providing modularity and consistency. The RAL system is often used in the architecture and construction industries, so its use in this range allows for standardisation of colour, including coordination and contrast where required. More importantly, RAL colours in tiling allow architects and designers to coordinate colours throughout their residential and commercial projects, and to have creative use of colour into their designs right through to implementation. ProColor includes all the most commonly used colours from white through different shades of green, red, greige, blue, lilac, brown and black. Tiles are available in a choice of modular sizes from 2.5 x 2.5 through to 30 x 60. All sizes, except 30 x 30 and 30 x 60, come in gloss, as well as a matte finish, and are in a non-slip format. Ken Aston, UK & Ireland sales manager at VitrA Tiles recently said, “Our competence to produce RAL colours is a big advantage that we can offer to…specifiers. RAL colours on a 38-strong range of fully-vitrified tiles in a choice of nine different size options – that is the ProColor proposition…” The range is available in Australia from Distinctive Tile Imports based in Zillmere (QLD).

ABOUT VITRA VitrA is the flagship brand of Eczacıbası, a leading Turkish industrial group. The Eczacıbası Group is mainly involved in the building products, healthcare and consumer products sectors. It is also active in information 40 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

VitrA Arkitekt tiles in a hotel restroom

technology, natural resources, and property development. VitrA offers every component of a bathroom as well as its extensive range of ceramic and porcelain tiles. Globally, Eczacıbası has established itself as a leading supplier bathroom and tiling solutions with its VitrA, Burgbad, Villeroy & Boch (tiles), and Engers brands. It is also a major exporter of tissue paper, electronic smart cards and industrial raw materials such as clay and feldspar. As part of Turkey’s millenniaold ceramic art tradition, VitrA is steeped in the culture that gave birth to the Turkish hamam (steam bath or a place of public bathing) experience. A precursor to the brand started in a small workshop back 1942 as a way to supply the country with a variety of earthenware products when imports were curtailed during World War II. The post-war economic revival, accompanied by a construction boom, led Eczacıbası to pioneer the domestic production of ceramic sanitaryware. Contemporary in style and

Th

considered more hygienic than traditional marble products, ceramic proved enormously popular with consumers. In 1958, Eczacıbası opened its first modern ceramic sanitaryware plant in response to growing demand. By 1968, VitrA was adopted as the brand name for Eczacıbası sanitaryware. A tap production plant was opened in 1979 as way to diversify into complementary bathroom products.

INVESTMENT IN GROWTH In 2019, VitrA has made a GBP35 million investment in expanding its manufacturing plant in Bozüyük, Turkey. The additional production line has increased its sanitaryware manufacturing capacity by 1.1 million units, adding to a total of over 5.6 million units a year. Growth from European countries, including the UK, was a key factor for its investment in the Bozüyük complex. The project was completed in two phases and has added 40 thousand square meters of new production space, creating close to 500 new jobs. Thanks to its increased capacity, which makes


The VitrA Arkitekt range can also be used for floors

extensive use of robotic systems, VitrA aims to increase its exports by 40 million euros in the period ahead. The VitrA brand already accounts for more than half of all ceramic sanitaryware exported from Turkey. VitrA was the first brand in Turkey to establish a modern ceramics plant, the first to export ceramics, and the first to create an R&D centre for bathroom research, according to the company. In his speech at the opening ceremony of the plant, group chairman Bülent Eczacıbası noted that the domestic share of value-add created by Turkey's ceramics exports was at a record high of 82 per cent. "We've created a whole new production infrastructure at a facility that blends technology and human labour. VitrA's growth in international markets contributed to our decision to make this investment. “VitrA is one of the leaders in Europe's ceramics industry, with expertise acquired from over 60 years in the business. We're very

The VitrA Arkitekt range features in a café

proud of our powerful position and the fact that VitrA contributes to more than half of Turkey's ceramic sanitary ware exports”, he said. Ali Aköz, Eczacıbası group vice president said at the time, "As always, one of our top priorities in this investment was occupational health and safety, in line with our principle of ‘people first’. The robotic systems we're using here increases both our productivity and enhances the working conditions for our employees. “Robotics has allowed us to increase the number of women working on our production lines — a priority for us — and one that reflects the Eczacıbası Group's commitment to providing equal opportunities for women”. Today 70% of VitrA’s production is sold to other countries through an international distribution network. It supplies millions of pieces of ceramic sanitaryware each year to over 75 countries on five continents, along with a series of bathroom furniture, bathtubs, taps and accessories.

VitrA ProColor range used in an airport bathroom

VitrA Arkitekt tiles come in neutrals too

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 41


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FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

WATERPROOFING IN INTERNAL WET AREAS — UPDATES AND GUIDELINES The most recent update of the Australian Standard: Waterproofing for Domestic Wet Areas (AS3740) is not a major overhaul, according to Tim Christopher

T

he purpose of the standard is to provide the minimum requirements for the materials, design, and installation of waterproofing for domestic wet areas. These domestic wet areas are in the Building Code of Australia 2019. Specifically, these are Class 1, Class 2 and Class 4 buildings as defined in the NCC. The standard also applies to wet areas within Class 3 to 9 buildings as if it were a Class 2 or 4 part of a building. Many users of guidance documents such as the Australian Standards are unaware how the standards and Building Code are interrelated. These documents refer to each other in their guidance and are written to satisfy specific legal and bureaucratic requirements. As such, this update of the waterproofing standard does not have free reign to prescribe an unrestricted scope of changes for waterproofing of wet areas. As the Building Code of Australia is referenced in legislation of the various states and territories, it overrides the waterproofing standard from a legal perspective. This in turn restricts an Australian standard from prescribing a more stringent or conflicting methodology than what is in the Building Code. The

version of the Building Code version that currently applies is the 2019 edition and is the overriding document which governs the scope of the update of AS3740. The standard AS3740 provides guidance on “how to” implement requirements of the Building Code. Many users of the standard seem to use it as an instruction document or a bible of sorts, which is adhered to in an exact way, often without any variation. The other aspect that is overlooked is that it is the minimum requirement. I often hear contractors say, “The standard say I have to do it this way”. A degree of assessment is required by the individual contractor of different situations on a building site. It is not possible to account for every possible scenario and include those details in AS3740. However, there is sometimes a disconnect between the development of industry rules and overarching documents, and the contractor on site who is attempting to bring all the requirements together to waterproof a wet area in an effective manner. From my perspective as consultant, the standards and codes must be understood and implemented 44 www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 43


FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

Callipers can be used to measure the membrane to ensure adequate thickness when applied

The waterproofing process in a bathroom

Installation of bond breaking sealant which is compatible with the membrane to be used

correctly. From my perspective as a waterproofing/ tiling contractor, the regulations provide an information pathway that is not necessarily simple to follow. The waterproofing/tiling contractor should remain up to date with aspects of waterproofing from the update of the AS3740 standard, and other problematic issues that are developing in the construction industry. The following are a selection of public comment topics regarding the AS3740 update and other common issues that should be considered when approaching the waterproofing process of domestic internal wet areas.

Determining this detail prior to waterproofing is critical. From the waterproofer or tiler’s point of view, if there is any doubt in the water retention of a shower screen, it would be wise to assume it will not retain water and take precautions in the waterproofing design. This may mean application of the waterproofing system to the entire bathroom floor and more extensive coverage on the walls. Attention to placement of waters stops in the floors should also be considered to retain water where possible.

Design considerations It is important to know that the layout of each bathroom is different when approaching the waterproofing process. Placement of waters tops, the type of shower screen to be used and bat/shower configuration will all impact on the waterproofing process. Knowing the type of shower screen that you are dealing with on a job is crucial. Some screens retain water within the shower areas, some do this partially, while others are a decoration, at best. 44 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

Extent of waterproofing The guidance of a document suggests the extent of waterproofing in a particular scenario may be limited to a flashing between two adjoining walls or limited coverage on a floor. The reality may be that it is safer to apply a membrane to entire wall or floor areas. The extent of applying a membrane should be aimed with a precautionary attitude rather than simply satisfying minimum requirements. The thickness of the membrane is also critical and should be measured to check compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions. 46


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FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

Bond breakers Bond breaker sealants which are used in floor wall junctions, for example, are often the incorrect product. Many contractors head down the local hardware shop to buy a tube of “poly” (polyurethane) to use as a bond breaker under their membrane. Usually, a cheap price is an attractive way to save a few dollars. The bond breaker requirements for each membrane type and manufacturer varies. The guidance on the correct sealant should be sought from the product manufacturer of the waterproofing system being used. Using the wrong sealant as a bond breaker can engineer failure into the membrane at the time of application. Not all sealants are compatible with all membranes. The classification of bond breakers and membranes is often misunderstood. Currently there are three classes of bond breakers, class 1, 2 and 3. Class 3 is the most flexible, descending to class 1 which has the least flexibility. Many building industry professionals fixate on the class of flexibility, assuming higher flexibility means it is better. The membrane should have a compatible degree of flexibility with the bond breaker used for it. Failure may occur if they are mis-matched and movement is present. The membrane and the bond breaker system must be compatible. Another often mis-interpreted aspect of the bond breaker/membrane flexibility class is that flexibility does not equal strength. There are times when a membrane may need to be strengthened with a bandage. The bandage might reduce the flexibility but increase the

Bond breakers can be a tape system in some instances

48

Manufacturers can provide guidance on the correct sealant

46 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

Moisture testing of the substrate with a moisture meter


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FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

strength of the waterproof joint. There are also times where an alternative bandage may be required to provide both strength and flexibility. These requirements vary between manufacturers and this information is not always detailed in a waterproofing standard.

Substrate falls The presence of falls on the substrate prior to waterproofing is an important consideration. Many membranes require application onto a surface which has fall to a drainage point. Not all substrates provide for this so allowance must be made. If there is an absence of fall on the substrate, this issue can be addressed by providing falls through use of a levelling screed. It is critical this is addressed in conjunction with manufacturer’s recommendations. In some instances, concrete slabs can be graded with falls to wastes at the time of installation.

Waterproofing where polished concrete floors are installed It is not uncommon for a tiler/waterproofer to arrive onsite to find a newly laid polished concrete slab installed as a bathroom floor, and be asked to waterproof the room and install tiles on the walls. This is an extremely difficult application, to be able to install a waterproofing system in a warrantable and compliant way. Termination of a membrane into a finished floor surface within a shower where it cannot return onto the floor surface is likely to leak.

A bond breaker sealant applied to shower niche to accommodate movement

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Waterproofing around a bathtub with bandage detail

Creating falls in the substrate for the waterproofing membrane


FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

The correct method is to accommodate a waterproofing system under the polished slab and return it up the walls as is the practice when tiles are to be installed. Builders will need to accommodate this process in the design phase. The waterproofer/tiler should not attempt to waterproof a bathroom where the proper allowance for a waterproofing system has not been made.

Bath installation detail The junction where a bath is installed to adjacent walls is a complex area. There are various types of baths available, and all have different construction at the edges. Some baths have lips or upturns while others are flat, and some designed to be freestanding. The presence of a shower rose will increase the pressure placed on a wall/bath junction. This junction needs attention to specific details such as if it is checked in the wall or if a flat ledge is present. Some of the possible configurations will retain water and leak if care is not taken when waterproofing. Free standing baths means attention should be paid to the extent of the floor and wall that are to be waterproofed.

Water stops These are usually L profile angles which terminate at the finished floor height. When they are installed in conjunction with a waterproofing system, their function is to retain moisture within the waterproofed area

Installation of a water stop in the shower recess on a continuous piece of angle

and limit its spread. Water stops are often incorrectly installed or omitted altogether but are essential for a functioning waterproofing system. The installation of the water stops is required to be compatible with configurations such as the type and location of the shower screen, and the termination point of the doorway into the wet area. Vertical water stops are something which may need integration into the waterproofing design. Utilising perforated tile angles is not advisable.

Risk categories Basic guidance can be obtained from the determination of risk categories within the wet area. There are three risk categories which apply,

50

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(Agent for Central & North Coast NSW, Hunter & New England) www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 49


FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

for example, category 1 risk area is a shower recess and category 3 may be a laundry. This will give an indication to the extent a wet area will be impacted by water. The waterproofing system should be designed with these levels of risk in mind.

Moisture content of the substrate There are problems created when a waterproofing system is applied to a substrate where the moisture content is too high. A leveling screed will have a high moisture content for a period after it is installed. The readiness of a substrate is often left to a best guess scenario. Climatic conditions for example, will affect the level of moisture in the substrate. The contractor is required to be certain that the substrate is ready for application of the waterproofing system. The way this is best established is by measuring the level of moisture within the substrate. There are various ways and tools used to achieve this and implementing moisture measurement should become an integral part of the waterproofing process.

Flood testing More builders are requiring flood testing of the waterproofing system to take place. Conducting a flood test gives a more accurate idea of the effectiveness of the waterproofing system’s function to prevent leakage. This is a step which

TOP TIPS FOR TILERS, CONTRACTORS AND INSTALLERS • For the tile installer, every bathroom layout must be assessed to determine its waterproofing requirements. For example, shower screens might totally block water, partially block water, or be essentially decorative only. If performance is unknown, the tile installer should assume the worst case, and waterproof a larger area outside the shower as well. • While guidelines may indicate it is necessary to waterproof only a limited area, it is frequently safer to consider waterproofing an entire floor or wall area. • Take care in selecting bond breakers. The cheap “poly” on sale at the local hardware store may not work with a specific membrane. Read the instructions/specifications for the membrane and use the recommended bond breaker. • The flexibility of the bond breaker is important, and this must match the membrane. The most flexible bond breaker cannot be used universally with all membranes. • It is not possible to reliably waterproof a pre-laid polished concrete slab used as a bathroom floor. The waterproofing has to be applied prior to the slab installation. • The area that a bath abuts a wall is an area that requires particular attention in waterproofing. • Tile installers should check the moisture content of the substrate (especially a levelling screed) prior to installing a waterproofing membrane. • If in doubt, always contact the waterproofing supplier.

The Fattamano collection by Sartoria used for bathroom flooring here. Sartoria is part of the Terratinta Group.

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The Betongrays collection from the Terratinta Group uses the 2021 Pantone colours of grey and yellow

can be implemented as part of the waterproofing process along with substrate moisture testing. The waterproofing system must be cured before flood testing is carried out to prevent compromising any setting or drying of waterproofing components.

Other waterproofing systems Technology has progressed to the point where a waterproofing membrane is not the only method of waterproofing a bathroom or laundry. There are sheet membranes and waterproof board systems available which now provide alternative solutions for contractors. These products are likely to become more common place in the future as they can address issues such as drying times or substrate difficulties. These systems may be accommodated into the new standard to provide for future industry development.

knowledge which should be used by waterproofing/ tiling contactors to keep up to date and assure the methods and products that are being used are the best solution. Creating a good working relationship with waterproofing manufacturers will help protect the contractor from failures through product negligence, the value of which, cannot be overstated. Having a good relationship with the waterproofing manufacturer complements the regulatory documents such as the Building Code and Australian Standards AS3740. It should be remembered that the waterproofing/tiling contractor’s primary task and priority is to protect the wet area against moisture degradation and prevent leaks.

Further guidance For contractors who require specific information, one of the best sources of information is the supplier of the waterproofing system. Reputable waterproofing manufacturers will provide guidance and are typically happy to provide help over the phone. Many manufacturers also have YouTube channels which can be a good source of additional instruction. Waterproofing manufacturers have a wealth of

About the author: Tim Christopher from Consultile is a current member of the Technical Committee on both the Australian Standards AS3958 (Guide to Ceramic Tiling) and Australian Standards AS3740 (Waterproofing). He also serves as the vice president of TTIAA (Tiles and Tiling Industry Association of Australia), and is a technical advisor for TANZ (Tilers Association of New Zealand). For more information about Consultile, please go to the website: https://www.consultile.com.au www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 51


FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

Market driven innovation Roberts Designs safeguards the toughest waterproofing tasks with its range of Maxisil products There are few subjects that trouble both tile installers and builders equally as that of waterproofing. What would seem at first to be a relatively simple matter (keep water out) turns out to not only be involved and complex, but fundamental to any great and lasting build. The two areas that receive the most attention are the waterproofing membrane itself (naturally) and also the preparation of the substrate to that membrane. If there is one lesson that every professional waterproofing consultant would like builders and tile installers involved with wet area builds (in particular) to understand, it's that if the substrate has not been prepared up to a specific standard, then the membrane itself will be compromised, either on installation or when subject to wear. As it turns out, however, there is a third area that deserves just as much attention as the waterproofing membrane and substrate preparation; that's the area between the membrane and substrate, a vital juncture where various kinds of failure can originate. It is this crucial area where Roberts Designs and its premium Maxisil range, truly excels.

The story of Roberts Designs and Maxisil Roberts Designs was established in 1996, with its first products consisting of ceramic soap holders and other accessories. The company began to develop and distribute sealant products in 2006, which coincided with the acquisition of Maxisil. The distribution of Maxisil sealants grew exponentially across the 52 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

Roberts Designs managing director Paul Hayes

country and in 2008 Roberts Designs introduced the range to New Zealand. Roberts Designs was purchased by Paul Hayes in 2015 and at the time consisted of a single small warehouse in Rosebud, Victoria. Today, the company has three warehouses and is headquartered in Carrum Downs, Victoria. Paul is proud to have grown the business with the same commitment to quality as its predecessors, as he explains: “We continue to build on the foundations from the guys that started the business: We remain focused on providing exceptional customer service and finding innovative products and solutions that reduce time and costs, aligned to market

trends. The Maxisil recipe is the envy of all our competitors. It is what sets us apart, providing the best end result for our customers."

The Maxisil range Maxisil offers a range of silicone-based products which provide unique advantages in terms of flexibility and fungal protection. The brand boasts a colour range of over 80 specialist products for specific applications. The renowned Maxisil M Membrane is a unique product specifically designed to seal and create a movement/ expansion joint area between two substrates underneath the waterproofing membrane that do not stick together. In addition


to Maxisil M, the range includes: • Maxisil A for wet areas • Maxisil N for natural stone; and • Maxisil P for pools In addition to its anti-fungal properties, Maxisil is also engineered to save time on the construction site. Unlike other membranes that require three to seven hours of curing time, Maxisil Membrane allows the applicator to immediately apply the waterproofing membrane coating over the top of the sealed joint area, saving both time and money for waterproofers. Maxisil Membrane is a neutral cure product that will not burn through any coating applied directly on it. Without using Maxisil, the applicator runs the risk of a membrane coating ripping and ultimately causing water leaks and extensive damage to a bathroom. According to Paul: “Our Maxisil products are highly recommended for both domestic and commercial use. We always say, if you want to be the best, you have to use the best, and our products greatly reduce the need for future maintenance as there will be minimal defect issues, if any. Bathrooms are often a bit of a nightmare for builders. Professionals prefer Maxisil, as its quality is consistent, tube after tube, allowing the tradesperson to get the job done quickly and economically”.

Fungal/mould protection One particular area where Maxisil excels is in the prevention of mould in wet area installations. There are many causes of mould forming within a home, especially in hard-toreach places such as wet-areas. High air humidity with little air movement, warmth and residues from body care materials such as shower gels are just a few of the conditions that encourage the growth of mould, and since elastic silicone joints have low thermal conductivity, they are

the warmest part of a tiled surface, where mould is likely to thrive. The detrimental effects of mould on health and wellbeing are well researched and documented, as Paul notes: “The health effects of mould are far-reaching. In a lot of cases, it results in prolonged health effects in not only adults, but children too. No one likes to see mould in their shower or bath, but unfortunately, a lot of houses have this problem. Whilst aesthetically it looks unpleasant, mould spores can travel in steam vapour produced by the shower, so that it is ingested into our lungs. "We are passionate about eliminating this issue for every bathroom/wet area in Australia and New Zealand. If your silicone is mouldy, cut it out and replace it with Maxisil, the best in the market to reduce the likelihood of it reoccurring”. With a complete range of silicones and a system of accessories, Maxisil provides a holistic mould prevention solution: • Use Maxisil Cleaner to clean the joint before applying the silicone • Apply the appropriate Maxisil silicone — Maxisil A contains high-quality fungicides, allowing it to resist mould for longer than any other • Use the Maxisil Smoothtex and Applicator Brush for a smooth finish

Ongoing development and innovation As Maxisil continues to grow, it has remained responsive to its customer base. As Paul explains: “We are always looking at the latest tile and colour trends and we’ll continue to make sure we stay in tune with the latest fashion. With that said, we trust our customers, constantly asking them what they need. “At Maxisil we support the trade and everyone in our industry with our online Colour Matcher. We have spent a lot of time generating as large a

colour range as possible for our silicones, and we've created the tools that allow both DIYs and our tradespeople the ability to match them perfectly with grouts”. That development is set to accelerate in the future, according to Paul. "We are currently working on two new exciting products that will further solidify our position in the market. We will have more information about all of that in the near future". www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 53


FEATURE

WATERPROOFING

Under-tile waterproofing solution Ideal for the tiling trade, Crommelin® Pro-500 WP is a commercial-grade, heavy duty liquid applied waterproofing membrane, formulated to permanently waterproof wet areas prior to tiling. It is reinforced for maximum strength, whilst delivering high flexibility and elongation. The PRO-500 WP is readily available from Bunnings Warehouse, in the Building Supplies section, at the trade price point of just $129 (GST included). A 15kg pail produces coverage of 12.5sqm after two coats, saving tilers time and money. It is Australian made and Class III polyurethane modified for fast re-coating and easy film build. The product is suitable for use in conjunction with all cement-based tile adhesives that conform to AS2358. Pro-500 WP also offers seamless application for a leak free performance. It has excellent substrate adhesion and dries to a keyed finish to promote direct tile adhesion. Developed for multi-purpose use, it can be used for all under tile applications. It complies with the following: • AS 3740 – Waterproofing wet areas • AS 4654 – Waterproofing external above ground building elements

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• AS 4020 – Products for use with drinking water The Crommelin system offers everything required to waterproof wet areas, such as bathrooms, showers, laundries or balconies. It includes: • Membrane - PRO-500 WP • Primer - PRO-500 WP (diluted 50:50 with water) • Bond breaker – Crommelin Hybris MS Polyurethane Sealant or Crommelin Silicone WP Plus • Joint strengthening – Crommelin Reinforcing Fabric • Brush – Crommelin Contractor Membrane Applicator Brush • Moisture reading – Crommelin Moisture Meter For tilers who need more information, Crommelin has a 7-day helpline on 1800 655 711.

Using the pink for tiles WP-1 “The Pink One” is a Class III waterborne flexible SBR under tile membrane designed for use under tiled finishes and is capable of accommodating structural movement. In most cases, priming is not required as WP-1 has Infused Primer Technology (IPT). WP-1 is a two-coat system for both floor and wall applications with the second coat being applied after just two hours. It is ready to tile or apply screed after only 24 hours of application of the second coat. The product is suitable for waterproofing directly over waterproof boards such as Scyon Secura and Cemintel Constructafloor. It will not be easily damaged even if other trades are working on top of the finished floor surface before it’s tiled over. Both neutral cure silicone or PU sealant are the recommended bond breaking systems for WP-1 applications. Available in 4-litre, 12-litre and 20-litre drums, WP-1 will cover 1sqm per litre after two coats. It can be used can be used under ACT brand cement-based tile adhesives ADH-55, ADH-44, ADH-33, ADH-31 and ADH-22. WP-1 is 100% Australian owned and made.


Compliance membranes and testing Millions of dollars are spent each year by the Australian construction industry on remedial building repairs. Much of that cost is the result of using non-compliant building products during initial construction.

P

roducts that do not meet the established standards introduce flaws into buildings. A high percentage of those failures are down to introducing vulnerabilities to dampness, moisture, and mould. That has created more focus for the industry on the quality of the products used, and their suitability to different construction applications. It was identified back in 2017 that CSIRO labs were no longer NATA accredited for testing products to waterproofing standards AS4858 and AS4654.1. This finding left the Australian construction industry with no independent National Association of Testing Authorities — Australia (NATA) testing body to assess waterproof membranes, damp-proofing products and moisture inhibitors to those Australian Standards. These standards are critical for the construction industry in its selection of compliant products that support mandated best building practice. The XTecGen Materials Testing facility, based in South Australia, was established in 2019 to fill this void and provide industry with independent NATA Accredited testing services for liquid and sheet membranes, surface coatings and adhesives. The facility can evaluate and assess products to the relevant standards. As the only NATA accredited lab service in Australia for testing to AS4858 and AS4654.1, XTecGen also provides a large number of other independent testing services for surface coatings, paints, adhesives, and sealants. XTecGen has seen an increase in demand for their services by Australian and foreign manufacturers, as they seek to test waterproofing membranes for local compliance to meet the demands of building certifiers and specifiers. In addition, XTecGen has also commenced a customised lab service offering to support product development, and help identify product limitations for suppliers and manufacturers to make more informed decisions on their respective products. Without the expense of full-scale testing to standards, XTecGen provides customised material testing services that allow clients to bundle relevant product tests required for their specific needs. This comes at a fraction of the cost, as compared to employing

Mark Grivell heads up the XTecGen laboratory

experienced laboratory technicians, or investing in their own accredited laboratory facilities. The customised lab service offered by XTecGen enables the client to select specific tests they require for individual product needs. Some of these tests include: • accelerated weathering and UV resistance; • adhesion to substrates; • cyclic movement; • abrasion resistance; • flood testing; • rain resistance; • elongation and tensile strength; • product compatibility; • and hydrostatic resistance. There is also a range of other tests that will help clients understand the physical and performance properties of their products. The XTecGen laboratory, headed by Mark Grivell, is made up of chemists and lab technicians with extensive industry testing experience in Australia and overseas markets. They operate in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025. Client enquiries are offered with a consultation from XTecGen lab management to discuss testing needs and requirements. For more details, please contact info@xtecgen.com or 1300 152 298. NATA Certification for XTecGen Materials Testing facility can be found at: https://www.nata.com.au/entity_scope/?AccNo=20678&q1=j4o&str=E96&


CAU LKING

Common mistakes: Movement joints and caulking Caulking can be very important in preserving waterproofing over the long-term. A critical feature of caulking is the use of the backing rod, according to Ben Burdett.

A

waterproofing installation is only complete once a tiling system has been caulked thoroughly and correctly. However, caulking is seldom given the attention it deserves.

What is a backing rod/backer rod? Most people have probably heard of a backing rod, but don’t really understand its function. Most situations that require a caulked joint probably should have one, but seldom will you see backing rod sitting on the shelf next to your favourite sealant at the hardware store. Even if you’re a diligent person who reads the technical data sheet of the sealant you’re using, rarely is a backing rod specifically mentioned in the application instructions. A backing rod is typically a round Polyethylene extrusion (like a miniature pool noodle) and is sold in different diameters to suit different joint widths.

Setting the depth A backing rod should be tucked

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into a joint at a depth to suit the width. On advice, the ratio should be 1:1 for joints under 10mm wide, then the depth ratio changes to half the width for joints equal to and exceeding 10mm. The round section of a backing rod creates a convex “formwork” for the base of the sealant joint, and once the sealant is tooled off to a concave shape, the sealant ends up with a section resembling an hourglass on its side.

The end result provides maximum adhesion on the two sides and ends up thin in the middle to allow stretch and compression without detaching from either side of the joint. The prevention of three-way adhesion with the bottom of the movement joint is also an important function of backing rod. You might not see it, but water will find it. If it’s not seen, do you need


to worry about it? You do with caulking! You need to be thinking about your caulking plan before you lay tiles. The first step is keeping tile adhesive clear of the joints that are going to be movement joints (i.e. around posts, perimeters that meet walls and hobs) and ensuring your intermediate joints are spaced at maximum 4.5m centres. But planning needs to go even further. If, for example, there are skirting tiles to be installed on a balcony, your backing rod and caulking needs to go into the movement gap before you apply skirting tiles on to the wall. This way, your caulking ends up nicely protected from UV and the caulking is able to function properly. In practice, a fillet joint of sealant is usually applied to the internal junction between the floor and skirting, and it fails as soon as floor tiles slip beneath the skirting, with expansion and contraction. The movement gap under door sills is a spot that usually falls into the “too hard basket”, or else it accidentally gets forgotten. Another forgotten spot is beneath the drop-down cover rings around posts or spigots, which are major water entry points. Worst still, these places are sometimes grouted, which prevents the tile system from being able to move independently.

Typical 30mm thick stone tread Fall

Coved caulking

Concrete riser sealed with Efflock Tile adhesive with Efflock

Mortar bed with Efflock

Scabbled and slurry bonded

Typical 20mm thick stone riser

Backing rod

Caulking

Mortar bed with Efflock

Sealant selection Five things to think about when selecting your sealant for caulking: 1. UV stability. Polyurethane, from my observations, has very poor UV resistance — contrary to the claims of manufacturers. It tends to break down in sunlight in a few short years.

2. Trafficabilty. Sealant needs to be flexible, but durable underneath foot traffic. A trafficable caulking should have a “Shore A” hardness of 35. 3. Acid or neutral cure. If using a silicone sealant, acid cure silicone should never be used on natural stone.

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4. Adhesion. A sealant may require a primer to promote adhesion to certain materials. Polyurethane sealants usually recommend a primer. 5. Toxicity. Polyurethane sealants contain isocyanates, which are a known carcinogen.

Other problems A caulked sealant joint with a backing rod is excellent at absorbing lateral compressive and tensile movement perpendicular to the joint. What it is not so good at, are forces that “slip” or “shear” in a direction that is parallel with the joint. An example of where a shear force might be present in a tiled balcony situation, is when you have different materials that expand at a different rate to ceramic tiles, such as metal tile trims, or metal strip drains. For example (according to an online thermal expansion coefficient calculator), an aluminium trim that measures exactly 6000mm when it’s installed on a 20°C day, can expand to 6004mm when the balcony heats to 50°C. As you can imagine, a narrow caulking joint is very likely to shear/tear or detach with 4mm of movement. A suggestion to counteract that kind of movement, is to consider cutting trims and fabricating strip drains into shorter lengths, with their own caulked movement joints at regularly spaced butt joints. On a final note, as a key piece of advice, keeping water out of a tiling system at every opportunity minimises the potential of waterproofing failure and helps to prevent problems such as leaching/efflorescence, which can save time and cost through the prevention of remedial repairs.

Ben Burdett is a carpenter and licenced builder by trade, with experience in the remedial building industry and in heritage work. In 2012, he launched Efflock, an advanced concrete additive to repel damp and lock efflorescence in many kinds of applications. www.efflock.com.au 58 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


MOSAICS

MOSAICS: A PLEASING PUZZLE MOSAICS CONTINUE TO EVOLVE, PROVIDING VERSATILITY AND A DASH OF COLOUR IN THE MOST UTILITARIAN OF KITCHEN SPACES AS BACKSPLASHES While mosaic tiles are a very modern choices homeowners can make for their homes, it is a type of tile that draws on one of the more coherent and

lengthy traditions in the tile world. The history is so rich, in fact, it's impossible to be comprehensive in discussing it. The consensus is that some of

the greatest mosaic works were produced by the Byzantine Empire, which, while its borders and power were in an almost 60

Lamb of God mosaic in presbytery of Basilica of San Vitale (built A.D. 547) Ravenna, Italy. UNESCO World heritage site. Photograph by Petar Miloševic, used under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. Image available at: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/

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MOSAICS constant state of flux, was one of the dominant influences on civilisation from the 4th to the 15th Century. The Byzantine Empire was really the eastern half of the Roman Empire, though its cultural influences were more Hellenic than Latin after the 5th Century. By the time of the 20th Century, when serious efforts were made to preserve its rich past, many of its greatest mosaic tile works had been lost. One significant remnant of its mosaic tile works is located in the north-east Italian city of Ravenna. The city has managed to preserve many works of late Roman and Byzantine architecture, including eight buildings which comprise the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Early Christian Monuments of Ravenna”. Hand-crafted, many of these early mosaics feature smaller panels of very fine detail set within larger mosaics, which make use of small square tiles around 4mm in size, making for very detailed and expressive works.

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MODERN WORKS One reason why the Byzantine Empire survived for so long was that it was run by rulers who in today's language might be described as participating in "Real Politik". Where other empires perished when "barbarian" invaders overtook them, the Byzantine Empire would typically, instead, reach a deal with them, and agree to pay tribute in exchange for being left alone. The Empire could do that because in large part it had a successful economy, at least for the 8th to the 13th Centuries. That ended in the early 1204 with the sack of the Empire's seat of power, Constantinople (modern day Istanbul), an event which itself was an unfortunate consequence of the 4th Crusade. (That crusade itself ended, a little farcically, after all the Crusaders found themselves excommunicated by Pope

Innocent III for their sack of the Catholic city of Zadar.) Mosaic tiles themselves seem to have some of that Byzantine adaptability built into them. While other forms of tiles (such as Delft) have suffered setbacks in popularity, especially in the manufacturing-centric age of the late 20th Century, mosaics keep on changing, improving and finding uses in new areas of the home. Today we're all familiar with the “sheets” of mosaics, which make laying this type of tile easier and faster with high quality results. That's also been aided by new developments in tile adhesives. Not to mention the range of specialist adhesive options as well, including tiles backed by adhesive “dots”, or making use of thermal-based adhesives, easing installation in trickier areas. (Read more about this in the mosaics installation article by Tim Christopher.) 62

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN, MARCH 2021. Fishscale mosaics create a structured background to a brightly coloured kitchen.


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MOSAICS In the 21st Century we've seen the type and variety of mosaics continue to multiply, even as the uses of this type of tile expand. The basic main types are ceramic (which includes porcelain, of course), metal and glass.

CERAMIC MOSAIC TILES These tiles can themselves be broken down into three groups: unglazed ceramic, glazed ceramic and their heavyduty sister, porcelain. As with every type of tile there is, each production process adds some pluses as well as some minuses.

Unglazed For designs that require texture, unglazed ceramic mosaics offer something unique. They were commonly used from the 1890s through to the 1950s as floor tiles — in large part because, being unglazed, they offer great slip resistance. In modern usage, they are more commonly found on outdoor areas that will frequently get rained on, and

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These tiles can themselves be broken down into three groups: unglazed ceramic, glazed ceramic and their heavy-duty sister, porcelain.

where the gentle, interesting weathering they undergo will be seen as a definite plus. The downside of these tiles is that they do become easily stained. That means they are nearly always sealed after installation and will usually need to be resealed over time.

Glazed As the name suggests, these are the unglazed tiles with a thin layer of glass added. The tiles are coated with glass-forming minerals, and then heated in a high-temperature furnace to fuse them. These tiles come in three finishes: matte, semi-gloss

and high gloss. Impervious to most stains, some of these tiles are also impervious to liquid penetration as well. As you might expect, they are not as slip-resistant as the unglazed version.

Porcelain While porcelain tiles are made by much the same process as standard ceramic tiles, the materials used are more refined and the kiln temperatures are higher and applied for longer. The result is a very hard, very durable tile that is scratch resistant, non-porous and can undergo high temperatures

AUSTRALIAN HOME BEAUTIFUL, MARCH 2021. The bold emerald green tiles help to create a sense of depth and freshness.


without significant change or damage. The downside is that they are also significantly heavier than plain ceramic tiles. In the past, that has led to them being used more for floors than walls, though advances in tile adhesives have brought more flexibility to their use.

METAL MOSAICS Most metal tiles consist of a ceramic base tile with a metal surface applied. The type of metal and the surface finish is one key to how these tiles can be used. Obviously, metal is metal, so tiles with, say, a copper surface will acquire a patina over time. Other materials, such as aluminium, might resist surface oxidation if a polished surface is used and the tile is in an area where exposure to moisture is limited. Using something like a combination of brushed and polished surface aluminium tiles in a kitchen, while attractive, can create difficulties. Not only would exposure to moisture lead to oxidation in the longer

run, but the brushed and polished surfaces can require different cleaning treatments. Overly abrasive cleaners can scratch polished surfaces, for example. Those detriments have led to the increased popularity of stainless steel mosaic tiles. These are even used, with alternating brushed and polished surfaces, in places such as showers. It's important, of course, to make sure the stainless steel is the “real thing” and not just a "stainless steel look" tile.

GLASS MOSAICS As with ceramic tiles, there are really three types of glass mosaics available: cast, fused and coated. If you are looking at brightly coloured tiles, these are likely made through the coated process. The coating is

applied to the back of treated sheet glass, allowing the colour to show through, while protecting it from exposure, wear and cleaning products. Fused glass mosaics are also made from sheet glass but undergo a heat treatment. Different kinds of glaze and texture-producing materials are added during their production, providing a more individual and complex appearance. Cast glass mosaics are made from liquid glass at high temperatures. They are usually highly textured, with bubbles, folds and waves in the material, along with colour additions. In general, glass tiles are not suited to uses such as floors, as the glass can scratch and tend to be less resistant to certain kinds of stress, such as heavy objects dropped from 64

INSIDE/OUT, FEBRUARY 2021. The fitted honed marble backsplash extends up the wall, providing a subtle blue matte finish, which brings elegance and depth to the kitchen.

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MOSAICS

TURNING TILES INTO BACKSPLASHES ExoTiles specialises in premium stainless steel, glass, copper and marble mosaic tiles with some being made into kitchen backsplashes. The business is based in Newcastle (NSW) and sells online, direct to consumers and commercial buyers. Martin Jackson is the person behind ExoTiles which was established in 2010 after he posted a buying request on Alibaba (a very popular Chineseowned ecommerce platform) looking for glass pebbles used in swimming pools. He said, “One of the replies was unrelated for swimming pool mosaic tiles but it caught my interest more than my original plan. Upon researching the rest of their products, I found no one else in Australia seemed to be selling stainless steel or copper tiles on the internet so I created a website ExoTiles (short for exotic tiles) and decided to order four pallets to get started. “Approximately three quarters of my customers are the end consumer who orders directly through the

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website and the remaining customers want commercial orders. The commercial orders are usually custom design hand-cut mosaic art”. Jackson also describes the process of creating the work. “To create the tiles, a customer will provide an image or a drawing of what they want to be made before selecting from glass, ceramic or stone as the material. Then the artists will reproduce the image in mosaic and send photos back for the customer to approve. If no changes need to be made, they will pack and ship the order. Custom mosaic usually takes around six weeks from ordering to delivery. “Although the bulk of business comes from copper and stainless steel sales, ceramic tiles supplied by the wholesaler Pacific Greenwood in Sydney are also offered on the website as a more budget-friendly option.” For more information, visit the ExoTiles website: www.exotiles.com.au


a height, which can chip the surface. They are, however, as imperious as all glass is, and can be easily cleaned with a range of cleaning solutions.

MOSAICS IN THE MODERN HOME Looking back through the last 60 years of interior design, you will find mosaics cropping up for a wide range of uses, from table tops to decorating columns. At the current time, one of their most popular uses is as backsplashes in kitchens. Though “backsplashes” doesn't really quite describe their use. The typical backsplash 20 years ago was a layer of tiles from 30cm to 60cm high applied behind stoves and kitchen counters. This served as a protection for painted walls from the heat of the stove and accidental splashes that are inevitable in food preparation. The tiles could be easily wiped down and cleaned in a way a painted plasterboard wall could not. Over the past five to 10 years, however, the backsplash has continued to grow, so that now it is not uncommon to find most of one wall of the kitchen covered in tiles, which are frequently mosaics. It's easy to see how that has come about. As kitchens have become more modular, with highend designs making it all the way down to the cheaper particle board constructions, people are increasing cutting costs on cabinets, and even surfaces, but looking for that extra special dash of creativity.

and worksurfaces — though even with these, there is a trend to stronger, bolder colours. Others go in the other direction entirely, and dominate the walls of the kitchen, sketching in the surfaces around the cabinets. Still others are used to instil a sense of soft luxury, using exotic surfaces of stone and marble to add a sculptural element.

FUTURE BACKSPLASH TRENDS Metal is making a definite return to kitchens as a key design element, and it is likely there will be an increase in the use of stainless steel and other metal mosaics through 2021 and 2022. There also seems to be an uptick in the use of hexagonal mosaics, with a strong contrast in the grout to bring out the tile shapes.

CURRENT BACKSPLASH TRENDS As evidenced by the layouts in the latest design magazines, backsplashes are used in a wide range of ways. Some backsplashes remain quite “traditional” confined to a narrow band above stoves

Emperor Justinian and his retinue. Detail of the mosaic in the Basilica of San Vitale. Ravena, Italy. Photograph credit: Creative Commons 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia. org/wiki/File:Emperor_Justinian_and_his_retinue._Detail_of_the_mosaic_in_the_ Basilica_of_San_Vitale._Ravena,_Italy.jpg www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 65


MOSAICS

INSTALLATION AND SELECTION TIPS FOR MOSAICS THE CONTINUED USE OF MOSAIC TILES AND IMPROVEMENTS IN TECHNOLOGY HAVE LED TO NEW TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS It's important to take a number of factors into consideration when setting about the installation of mosaic tiles. The tiles themselves can be made from a wide variety of materials, including stone, glass, ceramic (including porcelain), as well as metal. The substrates over which they are installed vary widely as well. This means the installer has to carefully consider the materials used to correctly install these tiles. That includes adhesives, grouts and — particularly in the case of certain stone mosaics — sealants. Some mosaics present unique challenges, especially when it comes to those that are vulnerable to scratching. At the extreme end of that spectrum, it is possible to purchase mosaics made from Mother of Pearl which require a lot of care to install without causing damage through scratching. Even tiles made from more common substances, such as glass, are nearly as vulnerable. In particular using some grouts — such as those with a sand filler — can cause scratching during installation.

IMMERSED TILE INSTALLATION Beyond the materials used in installation, the very versatility of mosaics means that some installations will present special problems. For example, installing glass 66 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

The Shah Mosque in Iran, completed in 1639, is one of the best examples of mosaic work in the world

mosaics in a pool requires a high degree of skill and knowledge to get right. Waterproofing should also be considered as part of the installation. The tiles must be kept level and straight on the datum line

to avoid unsightly alignment faults which may be visible at the waterline. Splayed cuts at the internal corners which often incorporate a curve require a high degree of patience and accuracy to execute.


In such an immersed environment, adhesive coverage on the back of the tile is critical and should be at least 90% coverage when used in an application such as a swimming pool. This is also a requirement of the Australian Standards “Guide to the installation of ceramic tiles” (AS3958.1 2007) section 5.6.4.2 which specifies adhesive coverage for tiles. It is also important to consider the mounting system when selecting a mosaic for use in pool installations. Some manufacturing processes use one or two layers of mesh on the back. Some mesh systems and multiple layers of mesh can restrict the area of the tile available for adhesive contact. This may mean some products are not suitable for fully immersed conditions such as pools. Further, some mounting methods utilise systems

that react with water and either dissolve or swell when continuously immersed. The tile supplier or manufacturer should be able to provide advice on suitability for use in immersed conditions. If there is any doubt, this advice should be obtained in writing so there is no dispute over manufacturing details or suitability. While this is a particular concern for pool installations, it might be advisable to consider whether shower installation is sufficiently impacted by moisture to degrade some mounting systems as well. The choice of adhesive is another important consideration. An adhesive which is recommended for use in a pool type environment, including chemical exposure, should be used.

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A mosaics installation project underway

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MOSAICS GENERAL ADHESIVE SELECTION While immersed installations present an extreme situation, thoughtful adhesive selection is critical to achieving success with all mosaic installations. Glass and light-coloured stone mosaic tiles will be darkened in their appearance when using dark grey adhesives, so white adhesive should be considered when installing these types of mosaics. Excess adhesive protruding through the grout joints can create an extra leaning step in the installation process. The grout will require correct depth in the joint to achieve optimal performance. Removing excess adhesive can be avoided if a careful installation process is implemented. Many adhesive manufacturers have grouts which can be used as adhesive when mixed with specific

A marble mosaic installation 68 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

Marble mosaic tiles mounted with a mesh backed system


additives. This provides an option for the installer to create a grout and adhesive in one mixture. Time can then be saved by avoiding mis-matched adhesives and grout colours. The performance of the grout is also greatly improved using this method.

MOUNTING SYSTEMS The mosaic sheet manufacturing process utilises various systems to mount the tiles into the sheet configuration. Some examples of these mounting systems are: - mesh used on the back of the tiles - polyurethane dots, which join each tile at the centre of each side - face mounted sheets Face mounted mosaic sheets can be clear plastic which facilitates better vision of the tiles beneath. The older face mounting system consists of paper which is held in place with a water-soluble adhesive. This adhesive is wetted with a sponge to remove the paper when required.

POSITIONING Offsetting each row of mosaic sheets during installation can prevent the grid-like appearance of the tiling, which accentuates the outline of the sheets when viewed from a distance. The datum line should be maintained but each row can be offset to the previous one to create a more uniform appearance. A wood float or similar implement can be used to beat the tiles into the adhesive bed and create a uniform surface and minimise lips between any tiles that may not be sitting flat. Substrate preparation is critical to achieve a flat appearance which avoids accentuating the visibility of undulations. The filling of depressions for example, with

A completed shower using mosaics

suitable products is an essential step in the installation process. The better the substrate, the more aesthetically pleasing the surface will look.

MOSAIC CUTTING Cutting of mosaics can be problematic if the correct tools are not used. Glass and stone often require specifically designed tools. There are tile nippers which have special cutting edges for glass. Attempting to cut glass tile with regular tools often results in the tile shattering. Neat cuts are essential to make neat joins such as in an internal corner of a pool for example. There are various discs available for angle grinders which are specifically designed to cut glass and stone. In terms of stone tile, an electroplated blade will provide a superior clean-cut edge on a soft and brittle stone such as marble. Another technique which may

be useful for installers to use a template for applications such as splashbacks. The dimensions of the area can be duplicated and made into a template made from thin MDF sheet. The template can be laid out across the tiles which can then be marked to create the exact lines for the cuts to be made. This prevents the need to measure and cut each tile individually and will provide a more seamless cut edge.

About the author: Tim Christopher from Consultile is a current member of the Technical Committee on both the Australian Standards AS3958 (Guide to Ceramic Tiling) and Australian Standards AS3740 (Waterproofing). He also serves as the vice president of TTIAA (Tiles and Tiling Industry Association of Australia), and is a technical advisor for TANZ (Tilers Association of New Zealand). For more information about Consultile, please go to the website: https://www.consultile.com.au www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 69


MOSAICS

EZARRI MOSAICS COVER OCEAN FRONT HOME A spectacular private home in New Zealand has its integrated swimming pool and jacuzzi covered with Fior di Bosco mosaics from Ezarri’s Zen collection Ezarri‘s Fior di Bosco is a matte mosaic in grey tones with marble effect. It is an option specifically suitable for cladding interiors, swimming pools, spas, saunas and wellness areas because it is a nonslip mosaic. For the pool in this New Zealand residence, the architect created an infinity edge that merges with the ocean. It is a design solution that adapts to the vegetation planted around the perimeter of this home. In another bold decision, the architect designed the swimming pool so that it would be placed in one of the lower modules of the home. As a result, the choice of surface was very important to balance the entire design. Sydney-based Europe Imports are the exclusive importers and distributors of Ezarri glass mosaic tiles.

This eye-catching, modern ocean front home located in New Zealand has Ezarri’s Fior di Bosco mosaics covering its integrated swimming pool and jacuzzi

A

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MOSAICS BY TREND GROUP ITALIAN TRADITION MEETS MODERN DESIGN IN TREND’S MOSAICS PRODUCTS. THE COMPANY IS AT THE FOREFRONT OF SURFACE STYLE AND FASHION WHILE MAINTAINING ITS CENTURIES-OLD HERITAGE.

Above: Blue Satin Pool

Below: Sideral Satin

Since its establishment in 2000, TREND Group has earned a reputation as a leader in material design and composition, new product development and sustainable techniques in glass mosaic and agglomerate surfaces. It is one of the world’s leading producers of coloured glass tiles, Venetian enamel, gold leaf tesserae and agglomerate slab. TREND Group has managed to fuse the 19th Century alchemy of its Angelo Orsoni furnace in Venice with the 21st Century innovations of its state-of-the-art agglomerate manufacturing plant in Sebring, Florida (USA). (Orsoni is the historical Venetian furnace in Italy that has used the same techniques since 1888 to produce 24K gold leaf mosaics, coloured gold and Venetian smalti in more than 3,500 colours.) The company has also worked hard to ensure that its commercial approach is shaped by a commitment to environmental concerns. It moved early to reduce the ecological impact of its processes and products. As a result, production is now designed to consume fewer raw materials and energy resources, to recycle otherwise wasted materials, and increase the natural durability of its products. Tile Today recently asked TREND Blue Orchids

Group in Australia about the current state of the market and how it got started. Responses were provided by managing director John Grigg and sales manager Manuele Rinaldi. (Some responses have been edited for clarity and space.) 1. Tell us about how TREND Group got established in the Australian market. Dr. Pino Bisazza and Andrea Di Giuseppe brought together a team of passionate colleagues to create TREND Group in 2000. Dr Bisazza is best known as one of the founders — along with his two brothers — of Bisazza Mosaico, the Vicenza based firm that manufactures glass mosaics for floors and panelling. He left at the end of 1999 and started TREND the following year. Di Giuseppe is the global CEO of the company. As visionary business leaders, they have built a company with more than 700 employees around the world. They are working together to create a legacy that meshes Italian artistic tradition, respect for the earth’s resources, and innovative technologies. TREND has been active in 72


Orchids

Australia for almost 20 years and is seen as one of the leading suppliers of decorative glass mosaic and engineered stones. Currently located in Sydney’s Seven Hills, TREND is able to offer over 300 varieties of glass mosaics for any application including decorative hand-cut mosaics, swimming pool mosaics, wallpaper mosaics as well as customised products. Thanks to our network of distributors, TREND Group has a presence in all capital and regional cities of Australia.

2. How would you describe the point of difference that TREND Group offers? In addition to our unique experience and Italian design, as well as quality of the service, TREND can offer endless possibilities of customisation. TREND is the only mosaic wholesaler in Australia that is able to supply a customised item within two weeks (although conditions might apply). We are also able to offer consultation to help put together a custom mix or design and produce it at our facility in

Blue Tropic

Above: Coral Satin Pool Below: Gold Streaks

Gold Orchids

Terracotta Tropic


s

Seven Hills. TREND has the benefit of being vertically integrated and owning its entire process, from manufacturing to distribution. This enables us to manage our quality control and create the designs and mosaic artworks to the highest standards. 3. How do you see mosaic tile trends developing in the current and upcoming seasons in 2021-22? Mosaic has always been a decorative item since the Roman times. Although we are facing more challenging times, we are confident the market will rely on this beautiful way to decorate in the coming years. Swimming pools, bathrooms and other areas will always be the most elegant representation of themselves when finished with mosaic. We are seeing a trend towards high-end interior designs that have a bespoke finish. We have just released a new set of designs (https://trendgroup.com/download-area/ catalog-downloads/) inspired by the latest local and international trends that result in these sophisticated finishes. 4. How as COVID-19 affected the business, and how are you helping customers during these challenging times? Like many businesses, it had a short-term effect during the first stages of the pandemic. However, TREND was able to implement online conferences and limit face-

Tropical Night

to-face meetings. We maintained a Covid safe approach in 2020 and will maintain these standards throughout 2021 and beyond. TREND has supported its network of distributors with a number of promotions to stimulate buying and commercial activities. We recently launched a new, exclusive range of engineered stone Etherium® in partnership with Microban®, a cutting-edge antimicrobial technology that is built into

The TREND Group crew in the Sydney suburb of Seven Hills

Etherium® By E-Stone products during the manufacturing process. The collection offers safe and effective benefits that last for the lifetime of the product.

(l&r) Managing director John Grigg and sales manager Manuele Rinaldi

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MOSAICS

GLASS MOSAIC IMPORTS 2020 PETER HALLIDAY LOOKS AT THE LATEST DATA FROM THE AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS FOR GLASS MOSAICS COVERING THE 2020 CALENDAR YEAR The latest data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) covering the 2020 calendar year shows that the import value of items classified as “Glass cubes and other glass smallware, whether or not on a backing for mosaics or similar decorative purposes”, which covers glass mosaics, fell by 8.1 per cent. The total import value for Australian Customs purposes was AUD10,893,030. The annual import value had been rising but fell in the September quarter 2020. Regrettably, only the declared value for Australian Customs purposes is collected by the ABS; there is no data available on volume or square metres imported. The foreign exchange value of the Australian dollar fell during 2020, making imports more expensive, although this has since recovered.

The full table of the value of glass mosaic import by state and country of origin for 2020 is shown in Fig.1. The country supplying the largest value of mosaics is still China, however imports from China continued to decline when compared with previous years, a trend that is evident in Fig.2. While the Chinese share of total import value from China has fallen from 52 per cent at the end of 2018 to 37.6 per cent in 2020, there has been a corresponding dramatic increase in the value of imports from Spain from 12 per cent in 2018 to 34.6 per cent in 2020. A breakdown of import value by state and percentage share of the national value over the last five years is shown in Fig.3. New South Wales imported 62 per cent of the national total in 2019 and

2020. It is interesting to note the increased concentration of glass mosaic imports into New South Wales while imports to other states have declined. It must be assumed that glass mosaics imported into New South Wales are being more widely distributed to other states. Queensland and Victoria imported only 17 and 16 per cent of the national total respectively. Western Australia made up just under 3 per cent of the national total and the remaining states less than 1 per cent.

Peter Halliday has a long involvement in the design, manufacture, import, sale and distribution of ceramic tile, stone and glass mosaic. He researches and writes on industry related topics.

FIG.1 GLASS MOSAIC IMPORT VALUE 2020 VALUES SHOWN IN AUSTRALIAN DOLLARS

DECLARED DESTINATION STATE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN Argentina China Germany Hong Kong (SAR of China)

New South Wales*

Northern Territory

Queensland

South Australia

Victoria

Western Australia

$22,290 $951,449

$8,162

$1,485,739

$92,967

$1,493,766

India

$1,209,045

Italy

$445,381

$16,337

0.2%

$4,094,982

37.6%

$12,994

0.1%

$33,816

0.3%

$3,652

$1,212,697

11.1%

$53,047

$582,601

5.3%

$62,898

$10,490

$15,661

$68,512

Share of Total

$22,290

$12,994 $6,989

Australian Customs Value (AUD)

Mexico

$36,811

$36,811

0.3%

Netherlands

$24,962

$24,962

0.2%

$20,863

0.2%

$3,766,712

34.6%

Norway Spain

$20,863 $3,318,600

$86,705

Thailand

$42,074

$171,917

Tunisia

$3,812

Turkey

$630,795

United States of America

$131,323

Taiwan

$209,047

$152,360

$15,484

$15,484

0.1%

$257,204

2.4%

$3,812

0.0%

$2,266

$671,034

6.2%

$4,249

$136,767

1.3% 100.0%

$43,213

$37,973 $1,196

Grand Total

$6,836,525

$8,162

$1,793,039

$113,830

$1,863,001

$278,472

$10,893,030

State Share

62.8%

0.1%

16.5%

1.0%

17.1%

2.6%

100%

Based on ABS data

74 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


FIG.2 GLASS MOSAIC TOP SOURCES AND IMPORT VALUE

Based on ABS data

While the Chinese share of total import value from China has fallen from 52 per cent at the end of 2018 to 37.6 per cent in 2020, there has been a corresponding dramatic increase in the value of imports from Spain from 12 per cent in 2018 to 34.6 per cent in 2020.

FIG.3 GLASS MOSAIC IMPORTS - AUSTRALIAN CUSTOMS VALUE ALL VALUES SHOWN IN AUSTRALIAN DOLLARS

Declared Destination State

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

5,793,460

4,922,823

4,930,278

7,419,645

6,836,525

52.7%

53.9%

52.6%

62.6%

62.8%

23,960

20,641

7,230

8,162

0.2%

0.2%

0.0%

0.1%

0.1%

Queensland % of annual total

1,675,359

1,609,115

1,717,322

1,934,565

1,793,039

15.2%

17.6%

18.3%

16.3%

16.5%

South Australia % of annual total

104,231

33,632

69,557

58,425

113,830

0.9%

0.4%

0.7%

0.5%

1.0%

2,696

4,968

New South Wales % of annual total Northern Territory % of annual total

Tasmania % of annual total Victoria % of annual total Western Australia % of annual total Grand Total Value (AUD)

0.0%

0.0%

0.1%

0.0%

0.0%

2,952,993

2,060,556

2,378,996

2,069,064

1,863,001

26.9%

22.6%

25.4%

17.4%

17.1%

442,327

481,338

275,775

369,324

278,472

4.0%

5.3%

2.9%

3.1%

2.6%

10,992,330

9,130,800

9,376,896

11,858,253

10,893,030

Based on ABS data

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 75


R ETAI L FOCUS

Tile and Bath Co offers a modern tile buying experience Tile and Bath Co is meeting (and many times exceeding) its customers’ expectations through its curated products, great service and national reach

I

f you can imagine the new future of tile retailing, Tile and Bath Co would be a very good exemplar. It has an excellent and active online presence through its website and on social media that helps it to communicate directly to today’s discerning tile customer, who often starts their purchases by researching on the internet. Founder and director Stuart Leverett has put together a team of professionals that looks to consistently provide its savvy customers with high quality, designfocused products at an affordable price. Tile Today recently asked him about Tile and Bath Co and what makes it stand out from its competitors.

interior designer, we have been able to deliver on that mission. (Dream, Design, Deliver is the company’s tagline.)

Tell us about your time in the tile industry. How did you become involved in it? What other professional experiences do you bring to the business?

Please provide some details about the history of being an online tile retailer.

Stuart Leverett is the founder and director of Tile and Bath Co

We have always believed in being “online”. There's no point trying to sell to a “hyper-local market”. Tile and Bath Co is a young company in comparison to some of our competitors. The dream was to create a designer bathroom and tile store that is accessible nationally. Tile and Bath Co has always had an emphasis on design and giving

as much value to our customers as possible. I knew that would come from having an interior designer rather than a salesperson on the showroom floor and looking after product selection. Noah Ricci (head designer) has been with Tile and Bath Co almost from the beginning, and with his passion for the industry as well as being an

Tile and Bath Co has a strong online presence across social media channels, especially Instagram

76 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

I have been in the tile Industry now for over 17 years. I started as a wall and floor tiler, completing my apprenticeship and starting my own business. The company I worked for through my apprenticeship was a predominantly commercial tiling business so I was exposed to the commercial world early on. I took that approach into my own business, SDL Tiling Services Pty Ltd and grew my team to keep up with demand. Over the years we have been lucky enough to work with some incredible clients in a number of iconic places around Australia. Tile and Bath Co was started in my home office (spare room) doing supply and install for commercial tiling and waterproofing work. It has since grown and evolved into what we know it to be today. My passion is in design and what tiles and bathware can bring


Tile and Bath Co has developed branding that is striking in its simplicity

to someone's home or space. I am also a very experienced bathroom renovator and have owned and operated renovation companies so I know what our customers need and expect when it comes to their own renovations.

Tile and Bath Co offers free consultations through its in-house interior designers because it understands that renovations are big decision for most people. It works hard to turning customer’s ideas into reality. Its trade store allows tilers and tradies to purchase all their materials directly from the website and offers Australia wide delivery. How would you describe your point of difference from other tile retailers, and how has it helped? Our core values are about customer service and guarantee. We give our customers exceptional service

throughout the entire process, from concept and design through to how the tiles are delivered. This approach combined with our quality product sets us apart from the competition. We make it easy to get products delivered nationally without any fuss.

Describe your target market. What is the percentage split between professional end-users and DIY consumers? We have a very broad target market [and appeal to] anyone looking to buy tapware or tiles.

What are your strongest departments/core ranges? Do you specialise in any niche categories? Our market is flooded with so many options and this creates confusion. We have carefully selected ranges of tiles and bathware that can

meet the needs of our customers. We pride ourselves on being at the forefront of the industry in design.

A lot of attention has been paid to making Tile and Bath Co’s online store easy to navigate. Stuart and his team know that for many people taking on a renovation can be daunting, so they want to ensure the “journey to be as smooth as possible”. This insight has led to the website to make it easy for people to perusing either by colour, material, style or shape, the main reasons that drive tile decisions. Could you describe what your experience working with Shopify has been like? Moving any store online is not for the faint of heart. Platforms like Shopify make it easier but it's

78

Wholesale Suppliers of • Floor Wastes – Stainless Steel and Brass Based with Electroplated Finish

AusTile VIC, SA, NT and TAS Damien 0437 223 669

• Floor Grates – 304 and 316 Stainless Steel

WMK 26223

damien@austileimports.com.au

• Pop Wastes – Brass Based with Electroplated Finish For a Brochure please email

TDSE NSW Denis 0418 422 858 tdse60@gmail.com WMK 26223


more about having the right team behind you as that can make all the difference. It's fast paced and continually evolving. I like to push the boundaries with what is possible in the industry and our team makes it happen!

You seem to have a particular focus on Instagram as a marketing channel. Could you describe how well that has worked for you, and how you manage social media? Social media has been a strong performer for us because we focused on consistency and design. We believe a lot of people continue to find our content appealing and useful. Managing these platforms is a full-time position and again, it's our team that makes all the difference.

Who do you consider your main competitors? I think anyone selling tiles and bathware is our competitor because it's such an open market these days.

Can you tell us some of reasons why you choose to deal with your current suppliers? For example, is it price, quality, service or a combination of everything? The suppliers we choose to work with are reliable and dependable. We have built strong relationships with our suppliers over a number of years.

How has trading for your store been for the last quarter period been? How does it compare to the same time last year? We are always growing and evolving, we set high KPIs (key performance indicators) for every quarter so that we can continue to grow.

What online promotions have worked well for you? We have found that any online promotion is a great use of budget and resources as it gives us great market and customer feedback and in return gives great ROI. There is no “silver bullet”, as there are many platforms and channels that we reach our audience through.

Do you provide training for your staff? We are constantly working closely with our staff to enhance their skills and train them while also growing our team and offering. Our 78 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

designers are constantly studying the market and its changes. Where we can, we have bought in external professionals to upskill in different departments of the business. Employing a BDM (business development manager) has been a great asset to our supply chain and

daily operations. A small business is nothing without a great team. It is something I am very proud of. We are a team first and a business second. This interview has been edited for clarity and space.


PRO F I L E

A new offer for the tile market from two industry loyalists Denis Suess OAM from TDSE and Damien Costello from Austile Imports have come together to bring a range of floor wastes, grates and accessories for the local industry

T

he tile industry is full of independently minded people who’ve spent most of their lives learning how tile really works and as they mature, they do more and more interesting things. Denis Suess and Damien Costello and are a case in point. Both have spent most of the career in other companies before going out on their own. Damien’s background is heavily influenced by the 18-plus years he spent at Gasparre Holdings, with 17 of those years establishing then operating its regional office in Victoria. He set up this office after just 12 months at the company. As he tells it: “At 21, I was given the opportunity to move down here (Melbourne) with my then girlfriend, Angela, who's now my wife and we started Gasparre Holdings in Victoria from the garage of our townhouse. My wife processed the orders in the back bedroom and packed all the feature tiles in the garage. And I used to pack the orders at a service warehouse and then go off and do my repping. So we started Gasparre in 1997 in Victoria, from our garage, and we grew that into one of the leading Victorian tile wholesalers until they closed the business”. Denis, by contrast was a tile shop owner — Indent the Tile People — in Wollongong (NSW) for 24 years. That didn’t end as well as he would have liked, and afterwards he went to work for ARDEX as a key account manager for eight years, before starting his own company, TDSE (and there’s a bit of a story behind that name, but we’ll get to that). Prior to being a tile retailer, Denis worked as a sales rep for Hubert Stokes Tile Wholesalers. Not surprisingly, Denis has seen a lot of tile styles come after spending more than 40 years in the

The Austile warehouse is well stocked with NCIA products

Damien Costello started Austile Imports in mid-2019

tile industry. He said, “I remember when the 200mm by 200mm floor tile came in. Tilers were very upset because they had to do a little bit more work in terms of getting the floors to fit in with the showers and all that. They wanted to get away from that. They were not happy getting away from mosaic tiles, the 50mm by 50mms. Now they rejoice when a 200mm by 200mm comes up. “It's a lot easier getting the falls, putting in showers. That was the main issue. It wasn't actually the tile, it was just working out how they'd get falls to the floor waste, that would pass the Australian Standards”.

Meanwhile Damien had left Gasparre, did something else for a time, and then started his own company Austile Imports, in mid-2019. Denis and Damien have known each other for around 25 years. In fact, Damien said they became friends when Denis took him to a soccer match featuring the Wollongong Wolves. So, naturally they decided to see what their businesses could do together. Denis, through his overseas contacts is importing floor wastes and grates, and the two have teamed up to sell those in Australia. Denis said, “It was just by accident we went and had a beer one day in Melbourne and I was telling him about what I was doing, that type of thing, and he said, ‘Well I could sell some’”. And that was how they agreed to sell the range of products from TDSE. The range that is available includes floor wastes and pop up wastes with a brass base and electro plated finish, as well as floor grates and drains manufactured from 304 or 316 stainless steel.

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Through TDSE, Denis said he can also source for clients: natural stone, tiles, pavers and cladding from Turkey, Egypt, China, India and Vietnam; ceramic tiles; waterproofing accessories; specialised tools and accessories; tile adhesive and render products; and bathware that is soundproof.

Entrepreneurship Both Denis and Damien tapped into their entrepreneurial skills to start their own businesses after working in other companies. For Damien, his time at Gasparre is major inspiration for Austile Imports. He explains: “Austile Imports is a tile wholesaling company and we're modelling ourselves on the early Gasparre days in Victoria. Good products, good design, and ontrend colours. Our customers say to us that we have a very good eye for colour, that we're very good picking products that are relevant. But we are also trying to [bring products to market] as cost effectively as possible. “[We are a] cost-effective, efficient, boutique wholesaler, without the expense. After nearly 19 years with Cosimo, I know what to choose. I know what I like…We're fast to react to market trends so if my clients request something, we can go and find it and get it [for them]. We respond to our customers’ design, tile or product requests”. Damien started work at Gasparre in 1996 (after a recommendation from Geoff Gauci from Japan Ceramics) and is clearly inspired by how the owner, Cosimo Gasparre managed the business. He said: “It was a young, growing, fast-paced place to work. Cosimo did everything fast and innovated a lot. I was the junior rep and I used to look after Canberra and Griffith and Wagga and Wollongong and Sydney… “I learned a lot. I ran the business as my own [when he set up the Victorian office] and Cosimo Gasparre taught me a lot. As I said, he was an innovator in the tile industry, for sure”. Most of the products from Austile are split between the Australian made NCIA products, 80 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

Austile distributes the Kempsey range made by Australian tile manufacturer NCIA

Denis Suess travels in his mobile showroom/truck throughout regional News South Wales

Inside the mobile showroom/van


Chrome no over flow outlet

Wire insert grate made from stainless steel 304 Tile insert grate made from stainless steel 304

Tile insert slim electro plated ancient brass outlet Universal 2-in-1 grate outlet

a range it has designed called Ozcrete and products sourced overseas. Damien explains, “We currently have two great products from NCIA called Kempsey and Galaxy. And then we've created our own design called Auscrete, which we are releasing now, with NCIA. And then we source the rest of our products from China and Italy. “The Italian product would be about five percent of our range. And the other products would

be divided between supporting NCIA and our overseas Chinese factories”. When Denis decided to establish TDSE, he decided he wanted to focus on specific areas, mainly regional New South Wales, for his floor waste and grate products. He travels throughout these areas and services them driving his mobile showroom which is fitted out with everything that is needed to show his retail customers.

It’s difficult to finish the story without letting Denis to explain where he got the name of his business. He said, “It stands for The Denis Suess Experience. My daughter actually came up with that name, because my wife's name is Colleen and we were going to set up a business called C&B Consulting but we got knocked back on that name. Then my daughter suggested TDSE. It probably describes me to a ‘T’”.


STAT ISTICS

Ceramic tile imports in a turbulent 2020

Peter Halliday writes that 2020 was an extraordinary year but despite COVID-19 restrictions, the building and construction industry was able to function, ensuring the ongoing need for ceramic tiles.

S

upply chains were severely tested as overseas manufacturing plants shut down and shipping lines cut capacity on all routes including by around 12,000 20foot containers per week into Australia. Capacity shortage was compounded by a shortage of shipping containers with availability reaching record low levels in December which sent global shipping costs skyrocketing to their highest level since the global financial crisis. Building approval numbers

bottomed out in June 2020 but have risen ever since, due in part to government stimulus and record low interest rates. The total number of dwellings approved in 2020 was 4.8 per cent higher than those approved in 2019 which is a positive sign for the future. While ceramic tile imports to Australia fell by 12.1 per cent in 2019, the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) figures show an increase of 2.7 per cent in 2020. Australia imported 41,125,823 square metres (SQM)

of ceramic tiles in 2020. The total Australian Customs value was AUD436,951,517, an increase of 1 per cent over 2019. The history of import volume and value can be seen in Fig.1. Fig.2 shows imports by country and the declared destination state. The top five source countries for ceramic tile imports are shown in Fig.3. China increased exports to Australia by 5 per cent or 1.4 million SQM in 2020 and now supplies 72.3 per cent of all

While the European Union, USA, South Korea, Mexico, India, and Pakistan maintain anti-dumping duties on ceramic tiles manufactured in China, Australia remains a small but attractive market for Chinese manufacturers.

FIG.1 CERAMIC TILE IMPORTS 2010 - 2020

Based on ABS data 82 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

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FIG.2 CERAMIC TILE IMPORTS 2020 DECLARED DESTINATION STATE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN Australia (Re-imports)

New South Wales

Northern Territory

4,399

Brazil

Chile China (excludes SARs and Taiwan) Croatia

16,478

3,056 173

18,861 367

557

220,636

6,313,122

1,543,333

140,006

10,020

2,272

89,965

16,490

Greece

0.0%

$71,845

0.3%

$1,658,607

675

0.0%

$8,879

0.0%

$73,150

735

0.0%

$49,912

7,847,201

2,288,604

29,738,468

72.3%

$252,513,348

92

0.0%

$22,885

6,464

22,711

0.1%

$227,506

7,604

0.0%

$89,254

2,108

17,665

33,111

0.1%

$735,040

36,491

4,465

147,410

0.4%

$4,665,392

297

0.0%

$10,488

3,079

9,626

0.0%

$222,880

65,465

1,828

91,352

93,132

766,860

1.9%

$6,257,744

93,504

5,823

89,504

12,682

9,477

40,301

33,031

284,322

0.7%

$3,025,305

2,045

0.0%

$26,242

1,380,558

Japan

115,248

Korea, Republic of (South)

149,972

Malaysia

432,576

5,804

1,203 7,458

863,216

134,364

39,183

5,828

19,860

911,971

555,857

3,892,607

9.5%

$88,622,833

134,594

1,181

256,851

0.6%

$3,536,765

2,107

1,875

153,953

0.4%

$1,430,358

545,272

188,595

991,704

85,313

2,263,319

5.5%

$16,885,857

252

57

25,790

0.1%

$139,492

77

3,060

48

10,893

0.0%

$827,647

9,706

0.0%

$294,239

831

0.0%

$36,840

2,534

0.0%

$12,808

4,201

0.0%

$52,358

81,602

0.2%

$1,716,958

1,248

0.0%

$133,280

Mexico

25,316

165

Morocco

6,647

1,061

Netherlands

3,813

88

New Zealand

116

5,806 635

Oman

80

2,534

Poland

4,201

Portugal

22,023

975

18,209

597

1,109

24,727

13,961

1,248 116

Singapore

Sri Lanka

1,325 108,984

76,932

Italy

Spain

$27,509

451

841

Serbia

$90,716

0.0%

437,700

Iran

Russian Federation

0.0%

1,545

297 743

5,719 15,035

200

540 3,171

Total Aus. Customs Value AUD

135

6,228

7,896

SQM Market Share

% Total SQM

788

92

7,063

Indonesia

10,747

735 11,385,565

France

India

Western Australia

83 1,115

Egypt

Hong Kong (SAR of China)

Victoria 214

1,242 58,728

Czechia

Germany

Tasmania

15,035

Bulgaria Canada

South Australia 1,106

Bangladesh Belgium

Queensland

1,244 878,880

390,774

51,398

91,367

22,252

27,276

116

0.0%

$5,722

1,244

0.0%

$8,680

467,952

148,378

1,935,512

4.7%

$40,579,278

24,298

161,737

328,800

0.8%

$2,995,069

Taiwan

2,341

7,632

4,765

1,290

16,028

0.0%

$176,878

Thailand

74,439

33,858

6,299

60,255

42,023

216,874

0.5%

$2,238,339

30

0.0%

$1,429

110,006

9,361

60,822

25,925

273,212

0.7%

$3,137,201

197,412

0.5%

$2,970,526

1,191

0.0%

$181,469

Tunisia

30

Turkey

67,099

United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States of America Vietnam

145,856

7,732

485

43,339

450

504

4,771

19,138

87,144

2,875

21,354

5,201

Grand Total

15,543,274

276,945

8,640,391

2,014,403

State Share

37.8%

0.7%

21.0%

4.9%

Based on ABS data

84 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

238

701

260

24,870

0.1%

$141,188

149,767

14,092

280,432

0.7%

$1,049,598

219,246

10,924,894

3,506,669

41,125,823

100.0%

$436,951,517

0.5%

26.6%

8.5%

100.0%


ceramic tiles imported into Australia. While the European Union, USA, South Korea, Mexico, India, and Pakistan maintain anti-dumping duties on ceramic tiles manufactured in China, Australia remains a small but attractive market for Chinese manufacturers. Italy was again the second largest source country for imports to Australia in 2020. Imports from Italy exceeded 1 million SQM in both the September and December quarters, for the first time since the September quarter 2018. Italian tiles increased by 15 per cent or 498,378 SQM over 2019 figures and made up 9.5 per cent of total imports in 2020. The Customs value was 20.3 per cent of the total. The average customs value was AUD22.77 per square metre, a -12.9 per cent reduction on 2019. The volume of tiles imported from Malaysia continued to fall,

reducing -30 per cent or 972,631 SQM in 2020. The average Customs value per square metre was AUD$7.46. The fourth largest source for ceramic tiles, Spain, increased exports to Australia by 19 per cent. The average Customs value from Spain was AUD20.97 per square metre, down -3.7 per cent from the 2019 average. India was again the fifth biggest source of ceramic tiles imported to Australia in 2020, increasing by 25 per cent over 2019 figures. The average Customs value of tiles from India was AUD8.16. Fig.4 illustrates the declared destination state’s import quantity and share of the national total over previous years. Imports to New South Wales have declined by 18.2 per cent over the last 2 years but it is still the largest destination and represents 37.8 per cent of the national total.

Victoria was the second largest state for tile imports, accounting for 26.9 per cent of the national total. Imports to Victoria increased by 1.3 per cent in 2020. Imports into Queensland increased by 11.6 per cent in 2020 and made up 21 per cent of the national total. Western Australia reversed its long decline in imports, increasing for the first time in five years by 443,168 SQM or 14.4 per cent. South Australia and Tasmania declined by -3.7 and -3.4 per cent respectively while Northern Territory increased by 26 per cent.

86

Peter Halliday has a long involvement in the design, manufacture, import, sale and distribution of ceramic tile, stone and glass mosaic. He researches and writes on industry related topics.

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FIG.3 TOP CERAMIC TILE SOURCES 2016 - 2020

Based on ABS data

FIG.4 CERAMIC TILE IMPORTS - DESTINATION STATE 2010 - 2020

Based on ABS data 86 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au


I N DU ST RY RO U ND - U P

ATC forms technical committee The Australian Tile Council (ATC) has set up a technical sub-committee with the aim of providing more information for members. In forming the technical committee, the ATC has worked to have representation from across the industry including the viewpoint of merchants, adhesive manufacturers, contractors, and consultants. It has been seeking to expand the committee to include a tile manufacturer to its ranks. The ATC believes it is important to ensure the committee has members from a broad geographic footprint so that views can be representative of a national perspective. Peter Carter, president of the ATC said, “Members of the initial technical committee were nominated and selected by the state executives, from the members who were involved in the writing of the Tiles and Tiling Guide, as well as those who were actively involved in the council in their state. The inaugural committee has now given us a good mix from across the country and with skills and experience in a wide range of disciplines in relation to the product and installation.” Bryan Slavin has been elected as the inaugural chair of the technical committee, bringing 45 years of experience. Bryan contributed to the Tiles and Tiling Guide and is well respected in the industry. He is joined by Peter Bell (Newcastle Tile), Daniel Passey (DTA), Nick Collett

they would like more resource information. Some of the topics will be part of the revised Tiles and Tiling Guide, while others will stand alone as separate guides or brochures. The following topics are the ones that received the most requests for the committee to address: • Decoupling membranes • Under floor heating mats • Waterproofing systems • Liquid polymer additives • Pedestal paving for porcelain tiles • Efflorescence control • Definition regarding size variation of rectified tiles • Caulking and backing rods

Bryan Slavin has been elected as the inaugural chair of the ATC’s Technical Committee

• Strip drains and tile edges (thermal breaks)

(Davco-Sika), Royston Wells (Natural Tile), Fred Gray (consultant), and Aaron Genesin (Tectonic Tiling). “The plan for the Committee is quite simple,” said Bryan. “The first aim is to review and update the existing Tiles and Tiling Guide, and that process has already begun. We will then review all other existing documentation and published material on our website so that the information is not only brought up to date, but we can add any information that ATC members have requested should that information be appropriate to include in the existing technical collateral.” The ATC has composed a significant list of technical topics on which members have said

“Everything that members have raised as topics for the technical committee to look at has been noted,” said Bryan Vadas, administrator for the ATC. “Priorities are then given to the topics which have been requested the most, but we are working on ensuring that nothing slips through the cracks. With the technical committee being made up of volunteers, we are mindful of their time, yet want to deliver the greatest ‘bang for buck’ when it comes to delivering the information members have requested. It is all part of the ATC’s growing commitment to deliver greater value and improved communication to its members”.

Work from home (WFH) in elaborate style The global pandemic has led to many changes in the world we used to know and for many people, remote work is a new reality. This provides opportunities for designers to create a formal space within the informal boundaries of the home. For this reason, contemporary home brand BRABBU and Portuguese maker of rugs and covering solutions, Rug’Society have come together to show a number of products and ideas for the modern home office. BRABBU has a diverse range of furniture, casegoods, upholstery, lighting and rugs.

Products in this home office include an OKA Chair and CALLA Table Light by BRABBU

Home office featuring an Aurum II suspension light, CLERCK armchair, NOAKI stool and BARAKA desk

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 87


Organic, adaptable, and outdoor-friendly Legend Sandstone is an exclusive addition to Beaumont Tiles’ range of natural stone emulation tiles. Mirroring naturally formed, and intricate sandstone detailing, Beaumonts’ said the Legend Sandstone range is crafted from high-quality porcelain and comes in two malleable shade variations: Natural and Grey. The available sizes are 600 x 600 & 300 x 600. This range allows homeowners to choose from a range boasting 12 different faces. This means every room can be unique while remaining cohesive. The Natural shade specifically lends itself to warm colour schemes reminiscent of sandstone. In contrast, the Grey hue option can blend seamlessly into more contemporary or industrial spaces, making it a

versatile choice for main floors, patios, or poolside installations. “The highly textured Legend Sandstone range is my ‘go to’ choice for 2021 poolside installations as it ticks all the boxes for this year’s trend predictions”, said Christie Wood, Beaumont Tiles design specialist. “For areas that invite full sunlight, I recommend Legend Sandstone in Natural as a lighter shade retains less heat, making it kinder on exposed feet in the summer months. ”For the ultimate outdoor living experience, extend the Natural Legend Sandstone from the pool into your outdoor patio area. Then, add some wooden furniture and pillows with playful prints in blues and greens to play on the neutral, earthy tones of the Natural shade.”

Beaumont Tiles’ Grey Legend Sandstone paired with Promenado Charcoal on the floor

Pantone 2021 colours are influential on Italian-designed surfaces From tile to wood, from floors to walls, the Pantone Colours of 2021 — grey and yellow — form a strong aesthetic impact that can be seen in the work of Italian interior designs. Yellow and grey dominate wall tiles by Sartoria, a brand that is part of Modenese company Terratinta Group. The Fattamano collection offers coloured surfaces using the density of ochre and grey shades in geometric shapes. Terratinta also used the colours of Pantone 2021 in its Betongrays, Grained and Kos collections. The shades of the Vernici line from the Sartoria brand are linked to paint colours, bringing together the energy of yellow and the sober practicality of grey. Tile maker, Ceramiche Refin offers grey shades in its latest collection called Blended. The surfaces in Blended provide “delicate chromatic harmony” with a mixture of refined textures and skilful use of grey tonalities, according to the company. Ceramiche Refin references Mediterranean tones and patterns in its Riflessi tile range. These surfaces are closely linked to the sun, sea and earth shades. The grey in the Riflessi collection is soft and subtle. The company has also used grey in the Prestigio, Pietra di Cembra, Essence and Creos collections, as well as in Blue Emotion and Grecale.

88 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

The slat format of the Fattamano by Sartoria collection from Terratinta Group offers 10 dense colours, hand-glazed in matte and glossy finishes


On-trend terrazzo via Los Angeles LA-based interior designer Ryan Saghian has launched the Sensuale collection of terrazzo tiles. For this project, Saghian partnered with DOMVS Surfaces, a distributor of architectural surfaces — slabs, tiles, mosaics and engineered wood flooring — for hospitality, commercial and residential projects. “Terrazzo was hot in the mid-century modern era and has made such a comeback”, Saghian said. “For these tiles, I was inspired by the classic (sensual) female form as well as the artisanal Azulejo tile work of Portugal and Spain, all reinterpreted in blush and earth tone palettes.” Julie Sage, principal at DOMVS Surfaces, said, “We have always loved Ryan's effortless California modernism style with a twist of opulence. “With this collaboration, we wanted to bring to market a material that was both trending and was true to our respective core values. A modern tile that was a work of art and yet portrayed absolute luxury was just that! Having originated in Italy, terrazzo is an artisanal labour of love that offers an unlimited colour palette…” Sensuale features bold geometry; edgy, mix and match opportunities; and an urbane palette. The names of the patterns in this collection are inspired by iconic streets in London including Carnaby, Savile, Shaftsbury, and Strand. There is also a diagonal blush bone pattern. Solid colours include: Solid Blush, Solid Bone and Solid Squid. “I’ve become obsessed with this dusty rose pink”, Saghian explains as he articulates his vision. “I’m not a trend follower in terms of the earthy tones. I like to run things through a design filter…I love contrasting with black, such as the Solid Squid tile, for bold juxtaposition. The palette of the tile collection is a great way to create a look that is both current and will not get outdated, and also shows off what I’m known for — high contrast.” Saghian received his Bachelor of Science degree in interior architecture from the Art Institute

Carnaby tiles from the Sensuale collection of terrazzo tiles by LA-based interior designer Ryan Saghian in collaboration with distributor DOMVS Surfaces

of California’s CIDA design school before founding his interior design firm at the age of 21. According to his bio, he has become a go-to designer for a number of discerning clientele and stands out for his fluency in vintage, decadent Hollywood styles, furniture choices, and use of stone surfaces for bars, vanities, kitchens, and shower enclosures. He opened a flagship showroom,

Ryan Saghian Home, in 2016. He also introduced a line of couture furniture in 2014, a wallcoverings collection in 2018, a dinnerware line in 2020, and debuted a luxury rug collection in late 2020. Now at age 28, he is part of a wave of millennial designers with a large social media following. His Instagram handle is: @ryansaghian.

The Strand tile from the Sensuale collection of terrazzo tiles

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 89


The top instagrammable interior designs in 2021 – so far Instagram-worthy houses are increasing in popularity and OnlineMortgageAdvisor. co.uk has revealed the top ten Instagrammable styles to look out for in 2021. The top trend of 2021 is the rustic interior style with 3,186,331 Instagram hashtags. This aesthetic is about uniting natural elements (exposed wooden beams) with new furnishings such as comfortable, fluffy pillows. It is often referred to as rustic vogue. In second place is cottage core. The romantic interpretation of rural life has 1,471,555 Instagram hashtags. Spa interior designs rank third (690,872 hashtags). For a home-spa design style, wooden textures like reclaimed wood in bathrooms, big candles and low shelving are often featured. The home office interior style claims fourth place with 599,864 Instagram hashtags and became hugely popular in 2020. According to US data and media company Bloomberg, it is expected to continue to grow within the next few years. Feature walls, accent lamps and colourful storage are a few ways to bring a workspace at home to life. In fifth place is postmodernism with 210,704 Instagram hashtags. Postmodernism is a late 20thcentury style which plays on art and extravagance whilst embracing unconventional ideas. Inspiration for this style can be drawn from Willy Wonka’s factory with jeweltoned furniture, colour-popping décor, and a gallery wall. Other notable interior design trends for 2021 include the following: 6. Stone – 107,592 Instagram hashtags. 7. Japandi – 40,256 Instagram hashtags.

90 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

8. Refined curves – 40,136 Instagram hashtags. 9. Beach house – 16,037 Instagram hashtags. 10. Rustic minimalism – 5,068 Instagram hashtags. Methodology to gather this data involved OnlineMortgageAdvisor.co.uk collating pre-existing interior design articles and lists on the top 2021 design trends to

look out for. It then analysed each design on Instagram and totalled the hashtags to find out the ten most popular interior design trend. The data was collected on January 4, 2021 and is accurate as of then. Please see the blog for more information on the most Instagrammable interior designs for 2021: https://www. onlinemortgageadvisor.co.uk/ blog/top-ten-interior-designtrends-for-2021/


Hallways transformed by Dulux forecast colours Stylist Julia Green has given a classic hallway three looks using three different palettes from the Dulux Colour Forecast 2021. “There are many ways to style a space – these three palettes all look incredible here and each tell a story”, said Green. “For the first look, I chose colours from the Reset palette to create a cosy and contemporary feel. I ran deep, dusty pink (Dulux Wash&Wear in Terra Rose) up to the picture rails, and warm white (Dulux Wash&Wear in Snowy Mountains Half) on the upper section of walls and the ceiling. I used the same white to highlight the beautiful original mouldings and trims. “Choosing a darker colour

for the lower part of your walls can be a great way to disguise scuffs and marks, while a lighter colour above keeps your hallway feeling open and airy. “I wanted to give the second look a more luxurious feel whilst drawing attention to the home’s original features, so I selected timeless colours from the Retreat palette. Rich bottle green (Dulux Wash&Wear in Mangrove) on the walls picks up on the tones in the stainedglass window, and warm white (Dulux Wash&Wear in Whisper White) above the picture rail keeps the entrance light and inviting. “To provide a calm and comforting welcome, I chose soft, nature-inspired colours from the Nourish palette for

the third look. These tones are incredibly easy to work with as they sit comfortably alongside the whites many of us already have in our homes. Plus, they bring a sense of the outside in – which you can emphasise by styling with natural textures and greenery. “[In the third look] I used soft pistachio on the walls (Dulux Wash&Wear in Sedia), pale pink (Dulux Aquanamel in Skip To) on the front door, and cool white with a neutral undertone (Dulux Wash&Wear in White Exchange Half) on the trims and ceiling. “Each of these looks took less than a day to create – and turned a drab hallway fab”, she said.

Image Credit: Dulux Australia, Colour Forecast 2021. Stylist: Julia Green. Photographer: Armelle Habib. Colours: Dulux Terra Rose, Snowy Mountains Half. Suppliers: Happy Days and Muted Reflection artwork by Doulene Walker, vase – Greenhouse Interiors; console – Life Interiors; rug – Miss Amara; lamp – Few And Far; and pendant – Surrounding

Image Credit: Dulux Australia, Colour Forecast 2021. Stylist: Julia Green. Photographer: Armelle Habib. Colours: Dulux Mangrove, Whisper White. Suppliers: artwork by Castle and Things; rug – Miss Amara; lamp, case – Domo Australia; shelving – Life Interiors; bowl – Greenhouse Interiors; tray and cup – Foote Design; and planter – Lightly Design.

Image Credit: Dulux Australia, Colour Forecast 2021. Stylist: Julia Green. Photographer: Armelle Habib. Colours: Dulux Sedia, Skip To, White Exchange Half. Suppliers: Puzzle 3 artwork by Castle and Things; console – Domo Australia; hooks – Huset; bowl – Karen Morton; vase – Life Interiors; rug – Miss Amara; and pendant – Surrounding.

www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au | TILE TODAY #108 | 91


Outdoor spaces by Ceramiche Refin combine technical innovation and high end craft In the choice of materials for outdoor flooring, it is essential to take into account aesthetics as well as technical performance to deal with practicalities such as extreme weather conditions. This is why porcelain tiles, which are frost-resistant, resistant against sudden temperature changes and wear and tear, and will not be attacked by moulds or moss, are the ideal material for external use, both in a residential and public spaces. Ceramiche Refin’s porcelain tiles for outdoor use have different thicknesses and feature non-slip finishes. OUT2.0 is the range of 20mm thick tiles specifically designed by Refin for outdoor applications, available in a wide range of materials for floors of terraces, gardens, swimming pools, porches and pedestrian paths and roads. The result of Refin’s research, OUT2.0 has a high level of resistance to stresses and loads and can be used for raised installation on slabs, for traditional gluing to the screed or for installation dry on sand, gravel and grass. As part of OUT2.0, the Blended collection offers natural materials through hybrid surfaces characterised by signs, shades, balanced contrasts and sophisticated textures. Blended is available in 2cm thickness in two formats, the large slab 60x120cm size, and four chromatic shades: Beige, Dark, Grey and Natural. Other collections that added to

92 | TILE TODAY #108 | www.tiletodaymagazine.com.au

the OUT2.0 range are Fornace and Pietra di Cembra. Fornace revisits terracotta in a modern way and come in two warm shades, Rosato (rose-coloured) and Zafferano (saffron-yellow), in the square 90x90cm format. Porphyry copper effects are prevalent for the Pietra di Cembra series, in three colours, Grigio (grey), Naturale (natural) and Ruggine (rust), and two formats 90x90cm and 45x90cm size. The range is completed by "arch" and "peacock tail" decorative tiles that recreate the appearance and timeless elegance of natural porphyry with the functional advantages of stoneware. Ceramiche Refin was founded in 1962 and became part of Gruppo Concorde in 1998. With state-of-theart technologies and manufacturing expertise, the company aims to combine beauty, research,

innovation and tradition. Thanks to the use of top-quality raw materials and to extensive R&D in the field of ceramics, it has been expanding its product range to offer solutions that can meet any design needs.


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index ACT Australia

11, 81

Clear Software

85

Crommelin

47

Distinctive Tile Imports

39

DTA Australia

5

Efflock

49

Europe Imports

61

Flooring Magazine

93

HARMONiQ

7-9

Kerakoll

29

Laser Measure

83

Maxisil

45

National Ceramic Industries

3

Qualicer

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RLA Polymers

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SIKA

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Stormtech

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TDSE

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NZ tilers create automated quote app New Zealand-based tiler Josh Faraimo, co-founder of Kwotimation, which he started with mate Jarome Cavubati, has successfully raised NZD500,000 in a pre-seed capital round and attracted the attention of multiple angel investors. The Auckland pair’s technology that addresses the most common bugbear for tradies — creating a quote and securing the job — was designed with tilers in mind, but will be expanded further to cater for other tradespeople. Kwotimation raised NZD100,000 from lead investor Hillfarrance Venture Capital, along with NZD400,000 from Flying Kiwi Angels, Angel HQ, Humi Group and several individuals from the Edmund Hillary Fellowship. Faraimo, who has been a tiler for about 10 years, was running tiling.co.nz when he founded Kwotimation early last year, at a time when the business was growing and he found himself spending a large amount of time quoting jobs. He told New Zealand Media and Entertainment: “I always knew that quoting was something that was taking up

time, but I realised it more when I was growing my business. As soon as I had a few staff members doing multiple jobs and I was having to quote five to 10 times a week, I realised that if I could automate this process and put it online on our website it would really help me”, he said. “I created the online pricing system on tiling.co.nz to add value for my customers, it worked really successfully — we generated NZD370,000 of accepted quotes in the first two months, and that’s when we knew we were on to something. That’s when we decided we could either make this business big and take over the whole game in New Zealand but all we would be doing is crushing the little guy, our fellow tilers, or we could share this so we can all enjoy the software, and that’s what we decided to do”. Kwotimation was striving to “reinvent what quoting could be with the power of the internet”, for a sector in which approximately only 15 per cent of businesses have a website, Faraimo said. From New Zealand Media and Entertainment

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Tile Today Issue 108 | March 2021  

Fully endorsed by the Australian Tile Council, it is the only dedicated publication for the tiling industry, specifiers and allied trades in...

Tile Today Issue 108 | March 2021  

Fully endorsed by the Australian Tile Council, it is the only dedicated publication for the tiling industry, specifiers and allied trades in...