my University EF TUL

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RPOSPECTUS

Faculty of Economics



FE TUL

www.ef.tul.cz/myuniversity admissions.ef@tul.cz


Welcome... You could have studied anywhere in the world. But you are here with us and I am very happy you have chosen the Faculty of Economics at the Technical University of Liberec. The university was founded in 1953 and now consists of seven faculties and one research institute. We teach sciences and humanities to thousands of Czech and international students. It is a dynamic learning community that offers a wide range of courses and specializations as well as plenty of leisure time activities. It supports the development of new opportunities inside and outside the classroom. At the Faculty of Economics, we focus on research activities and cooperation with prominent academic, scientific, and business institutions not only in the Czech Republic but also abroad. We are working hard to constantly expand our international cooperation and make the best out of fit. Our main objective is to turn our students into creative, highly employable, successful, and happy graduates. Our mission is to give our students the access to global opportunities that widen their horizons and deepen their skills and knowledge at the same time.

This brochure sums up the most useful information on the study at our faculty, on the university as a whole, on the accommodation possibilities, students’ life, as well as on the beauties of the city of Liberec. I hope it addresses most of the questions you might be asking yourself before coming here. If you need any further details, do not hesitate to contact our International Office who are ready to assist you. I believe we can offer you the study experience that exceeds your personal expectations and helps you to achieve your career plans.

Ing. AleĹĄ Kocourek, Ph.D.

Dean of the Faculty of Economics Technical University of Liberec


Ještěd

the highest mountain peak (1,012 m) of the Ještěd-Kozákov Ridge near Liberec

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Table of contents Welcome to the Czech Republic and Liberec Welcome to the Technical University of Liberec Welcome to the Faculty of Economics

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Introduction of the Faculty of Economics

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Academic Aspects

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Semester Dates Bachelor Study Programmes Master Study Programmes Doctoral Study Programmes Important University Documents in English Study Fees Study Materials for the Courses Credit and Examination System

22 22 23 23 20 24 25 26

Important Contacts

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Erasmus + at TUL

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Faculty Management Study Office International Studies Staff at FE TUL International Office of the Technical University of Liberec

Partner Universities Erasmus Student Network (ESN)

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Accredited study programmes

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Study Plans

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Bachelor study programmes: Courses Description

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Bachelor Study Programmes Master Study Programmes Doctoral Study Programmes Ĺ koda Auto Ph.D. Programme

Management of Services Production Management Information and Communication Management Management of Business Processes Marketing and International Trade Business Economics and Management Managerial Informatics

Accounting I Accounting II Accounting of Selected Subjects Providing Services Application Software (MS Access) Basics of Insurance Industry Business Administration Business and Enterprises Insurance Business Ethics in the European Context Business Logistics Business Processes Consumer Behaviour Corporate Finance and Taxes

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52 56 60 65 69 73 77

84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 91 92 92 93


Decision-Making Based on Data 94 Economic Geography 95 Economic Policy I 96 Economics and Business in Services 97 Economics of Public Sector Services 98 Family Business 99 Financial Accounting 100 Financial Mathematics 101 Financial Services for Enterprises 102 Guided Internship 103 Hardware and Computer Architecture 103 Informatics I 104 Informatics II 105 Information Marketing 106 Information Technology in Services 106 Insurance of Persons 107 Introduction to Law I 108 Introduction to Law II 109 Introduction to Management 110 Introduction to Scientific Work 111 IS for Production Planning and Management 111 Macroeconomics I 112 Maintenance Management 113 Managing Small Business 114 Marketing 115 Marketing Communication 116 Marketing of Industrial Enterprises 117 Mathematical Foundations 1 118 Mathematical Foundations 2 119 Mathematics I 120 Mathematics II 121 Microeconomics I 122 Operating Systems 123


Personnel Management Programming I Programming II Property Insurance Retail Management Selected Financial Services Service Marketing Social Entrepreneurship Statistics for Economist I Statistics for Economist II Strategic Marketing Work System Management World Economy

Master Study Programmes: Courses Description

124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 132 133 134 135

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Accounting on PC 138 Advertising 139 Audit 140 Brand Marketing 141 Business Financial Management 142 Business Intelligence 143 Business Planning and Controlling 144 Comparison of EU Economics 145 Corporate Communication 146 Corporate Social Responsibility 147 Customer Value 148 Economic policy II 149 Entrepreunerial Environment 150 Environmental Economics and Management 151 EU and International Trade 152 European Commercial Law 153


History of Economic Theories Human Resources Management in Business Environment Information Systems and Services Innovation Management Innovative Marketing International Accounting Systems International Business Law International Trade Environment Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Introduction to Multimedia Technologies Macroeconomics II Marketing Research and Data Analysis Managerial Accounting Mathematical Applications in Economics MIcroeconomics II Online Marketing and Social Networks Project Management Public Finance Regional Marketing Securing of Business Information Selected Accounting Issues for Entrepreneurs in Theory and Practice Statistical Analysis of the Data Strategic Management Taxes and Taxe Practice Topical Law Issues Quality Management Quantitative Methods of Management

How to Apply?

How to apply for Bachelor Study Programmes How to apply for Master Study Programmes How to apply for Doctoral Study Programmes

154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182

186 186 189 191


Practical Information

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Liberec Top Attractions

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Bits and Pieces of Liberec

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Accommodation 198 Coming to Liberec 199 Health Care at the University 200 Dining on the Campus 200 TUL Library 200 Building H 201 Map of University Buildings 202

Jeťtěd 204 Town Hall 204 Liberec ZOO 206 Botanical Garden 206 Museum of North Bohemia 206 Regional Art Gallery 206 iQLANDIA 207 Babylon Centre 207

Summer in Liberec Winter in Liberec Average Weather in Liberec

Frequently Asked Questions Patners of the Faculty of Economics

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212 220


The Czech Republic is located in Central Europe. It is surrounded by Germany to the northwest, Poland to the northeast, Slovakia to the southeast and Austria to the south. It has no coastline. The Czech Republic consists of three main parts: Czech Lands (or Bohemia) to the west, Moravia to the southeast and Silesia to the northeast. The capital, Prague, is located slightly to the northwest. The Technical University in Liberec is about 100 kilometres to the north of Prague.

There is perhaps only one place in the world where it takes only 15 minutes by tram to transport yourself from a natural ski resort to a magnificent, traditional theatre. A city where it takes just a few moments to swap a unique mountain hotel for a tropical glasshouse filled with orchids. A city that gave the world one of the most famous car constructors in history. A city on the outskirts of which a traditional crosscountry skiing race is held, one of the biggest in Europe. This is Liberec, our town.

the Wenceslas Square

one of the main squares of Prague

Welcome to the Czech Republic and Liberec


Welcome to the Technical University of Liberec The Technical University of Liberec is a Czech public university with an international environment. We welcome more than 500 international students each academic year, and our international students are an important aspect of our campus life and a valuable addition to the internationalization of TUL’s own academic environment. TUL has become involved in the world universities evaluation process and has succeeded very well. For 2019, we are among the 1001+ best universities in the world according to Times Higher Education Supplement Ranking (THE).

According to the Rating QS University Ranking, the TUL ranks 118th among the top 300 universities in Emerging Europe and Central Asia. The total number of 450 universities was evaluated. This rating evaluates: academic reputation, the reputation of the employer, ratio employees / students, the number of PhD employees, the number of publications and the number of citations, the number of foreign employees and students, the impact of websites.

Technical University of Liberec Information Centre

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Welcome to the Faculty of Economics

The Faculty of Economics of the Technical University of Liberec offers what companies and organisations need at the beginning of the 3rd millennium: top-quality education, research, knowledge, experience, and cooperation. During its existence, the faculty has been transformed into a prestigious, respected institution providing a complete education, i.e. bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees, in these programmes of study: Business Administration, Economic Policy in Global Environment, Business Economics and Management, and Economics and Informatics.

The 2019 Times Higher Education World University Rankings table for business and economics subjects uses the same rigorous and balanced range of 13 performance indicators as the overall World University Rankings, but the methodology has been recalibrated to suit the individual fields. It highlights the universities that are leading across business and management, accounting and finance, and economics and econometrics subjects. In October 2018, a score for economic studies was published. The Faculty of Economics has ranked 501+.


Graduation ceremony

at the Faculty of Economics

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INTRODUCTION OF THE FACULTY OF ECONOMICS


Introduction of the Faculty of Economics History

Awards

The Faculty of Economics at the Technical University of Liberec was officially established in 1992 by the decision of the Accreditation Commission of the Czech Government. However, the tradition of economic courses taught at the Technical University of Liberec (established 1953) is much older. The courses were part of the programmes taught at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and the Faculty of Textile Engineering.

During the existence of the Faculty of Economics, a number of academic staff at the faculty has been awarded for their significant work.

The Faculty of Economics is located in the H building of the Technical University of Liberec Campus. Within its 26 year existence, the faculty has become a prestigious and respected institution which provides bachelor, master and doctoral degrees in study programmes such Business Administration, Economic Policy in Global Environment, Business Economics and Management, and Economics and Informatics.

Prof. Ing. Jan Ehleman, CSc., RNDr. Pavel Satrapa, Ph.D. and doc. Ing. Jan Skrbek, Dr. were awarded a medal of 1st rank by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. Doc. Dr. Ing. Olga Hasprová, prof. Ing. Jan Ehleman, CSc., doc. Ing. Josef Sixta, CSc., prof. Ing. Jiří Kraft, CSc., prof. Ing. Ivan Jáč, CSc. and prof. Ing. Lubomír Cyhelský, DrSc. were also awarded for their work by a number of notable institutions. Prof. Norbert Reetz from the University of St. Gallen, who is an eminent specialist in the field of theoretical economics and has cooperated with the Faculty of Economics for many years, has been awarded the doctorate HONORIS CAUSA.


Education At present, the Faculty of Economics of the Technical University has accredited study programmes at Bachelor, Master and Doctoral levels, which are conducted in the form of fulltime courses, with a selected number available as part-time courses. Six foreign languages are taught by both Czech and native-speaking lecturers. The faculty enables its students to acquire in-depth experience in economics and management, finance and accounting, legislation, marketing, international trade, services, tourism and applied information technology. The Faculty of Economics in Liberec is a dynamic faculty which adapts to real conditions and introduces innovative courses according to the needs of the entrepreneurial environment and the trends of economic progress. In doing so, the faculty creates preconditions for the flexibility of its graduates in terms of their future jobs and their fast professional growth. Graduates are able to find work in economics, specifically in the fields of business administration, banking and financial services, public administration, informatics and managerial informatics, for both corporate and non-profit organizations.

The faculty cooperates with dozens of institutions and some of them have become its partners. The Department of External Relations organizes many events, lectures and presentations by external lecturers, which are very popular among students and staff members of the Faculty of Economics.

Faculty of Economics offers 26 years of experience

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Scientific and Research Activities The scientific and research activities of the faculty are of great importance. Significant findings of scientific work are regularly presented at international conferences and published in scientific journals. The range of scientific and research activities is growing and, with increasing acquisition of resources, the faculty is also able to finance its activities. For their projects, members of the faculty actively

acquire and use resources from the Czech Science Foundation, the Ministry for Regional Development, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports grants and European resources like the Operational Programme of Education for Competitiveness (ECOP). Scientific and research projects are being developed at all levels, i.e. international, national and regional.

Illustration of the recent successful projects and grants at the Faculty of Economics: The use of BigData for socio-economical position of inhabitants in region types defined by the Strategy of the Regional Development 2021+ (TL01000303, solved by Ing. Aleš Kocourek, Ph.D., 2018) The empirical study of the impact of the presence of clusters on the performance of member companies (GA18-01144S, solved by prof. Ing. Miroslav Žižka, Ph.D., 2018) New start – co-operation between TUL (FE) and NTNU (FE) (7F16033, solved by Ing. Jaroslav Demel, Ph.D., 2017) Family business - solutions to social and economic disparities of municipalities (TD03000035, solved by prof. Ing. Ivan Jáč, CSc., 2016) The impact of the lobbying transparency on democratization and its consequences (GA16-08786S, solved by doc. Ing. Šárka Laboutková, Ph.D., 2016) Regional price index as an indicator of real social and economic disparities (TD020047, solved by prof. Ing. Jiří Kraft, CSc., 2014)

•• •• •• •• •• ••

The Faculty of Economics has been the initiator and one of the founders of the prestigious E+M Economics and Management scientific journal registered in the Social Sciences Citation Index of Thompson Reuters. At the same time the faculty is the main administrator and the seat of the editorial staff of the journal.

For more information see www.ekonomie-management.cz. The Faculty of Economics organizes several international scientific conferences and seminars. The international conference called Liberec Economic Forum is one of the most significant events and takes place biannually.


International Cooperation Thanks to a broad range of international contacts and the support of Erasmus+, a lot of students get the chance to take part in courses for one or more semesters at leading European universities, such as St Gallen, Switzerland, Wrexham, the UK, Firenze, Italy, Nice, France and over thirty more universities all over Europe. Lecturers at the Faculty of Economics are widely supported by the faculty, which provides them short lecture stays abroad on the one hand and organizes lectures by leading experts from foreign universities for the faculty’s students on the other.

Another possibility for students is a one year study placement at the University of Huddersfield Business School in the UK. It has been available for a long time on the basis of bilateral agreements between the universities.

Over 100 Erasmus students yearly Some stay for one semester, others for two.

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ACADEMIC ASPECTS


Academic Aspects

Semester Dates The academic year comprises of two semesters, a winter semester and a summer semester. There is an examination period after each semester. The length of each semester is approximately fourteen weeks. For general semester dates and holidays, please refer to the Academic Calendar. The latest version of the Calendar is available on: http://www.ef.tul.cz/en/students/calendar-of-the-academic-year

Bachelor Study Programmes (3 years) The title of Bachelor (Bc.) is awarded after three years of study of this course. The objective of this study programme is for students to acquire analytical, conceptual and social skills, enabling them to become efficient in the business environment, services or in computer programming and managing business information. The knowledge gained from the subjects will allow students to take posts in manufacturing,

human resources, finances, marketing and other areas of the business environment as well as in governmental or regional agencies. The optional subjects provide students with an in-depth knowledge of economic issues so that the graduates can become effective and efficient managers in various types of enterprises (industrial, trade, infrastructure, insurance, informatics and others).


Master Study Programmes (2 years) The Master title (Ing.) is obtained after two years of subsequent study following the completion of the Bachelor course. The objective of this study programme is for students to deepen their skills in management of business processes, marketing and international trade,

or information technologies dealing with economic issues. It will enable them to become efficient in the business environment or in computer programmes and managing business information.

Doctoral Study Programmes (4 years) The highest level of university education (Ph.D.) provides deep and systematic knowledge of economics, the methodology of scientific work, quantitative and statistical methods processing empirical data and, foremost, it equips the students with expertise knowledge in business administration and management, which focuses on behaviour and management of enterprises in a global environment in terms of innovation and new tools of corporate finance, or in information

systems for analysis specialisation, projecting optimised conception of information systems and their running with regard to their users. The graduates gain a prerequisite for succeeding in economic and managerial positions at the highest level of corporate and other institutions management. Further, the graduates will be employable at universities, science and research institutions.

To read at least TUL Statuses and Study and Examination Regulations is a must!

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Important University Documents in English The Act No. 111/1998 Coll. is the University’s principal governing document. More information on the rules and practical framework within which the University conducts its business is set out in the following internal documents of the University:

•• •• •• •• •• •• ••

TUL Statutes Study and Examination Regulations Disciplinary Code Scholarship Regulations Rules of the Quality Assurance and Internal Quality Evaluation System of the Technical University of Liberec Ethics Code for Employees and Students Rules for Use of the LIANE Computer Network

All of those documents you can find here: https://www.tul.cz/en/international-office/importantuniversity-documents-in-english. For important faculty documents in English, please see: http://www. ef.tul.cz/en/students.

Study Fees The fee of 3,500 USD is set for one academic year for Bachelor and Master Degree programmes; and 1,200 USD for one academic year for Doctoral Degree programmes. All payments between the student and TUL have to be conducted only by bank transfer. You should add your banking account number into IS STAG. The study-related fees have the due date within 30 days after the receipt of the decision on the fee.

Important Documents and fees


Study Materials for the Courses Study Materials for the Courses Some of your teachers may have sets of study materials available to view or download. There are several ways how they share the materials with students. You should be informed about this possibility by each teacher in introduction to the course. Recently, e-learning support was prepared for most of the courses taught at the Faculty of Economics. It is more complex and interactive than basic storage sites. How to register into the selected course in e-learning?

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go to web page: https://elearning.tul.cz/login/index.php?lang=en use your LIANE username and password to login into the course in section navigation -> My profile ->Registration of the courses (Registrace/odregistrace kurzů

STAG) you will choose the courses you want (version 201x) - you can see the course here, only

if you have the course registred in STAG!

•• ••

than you have click to Save changes! now you should see your desired course in the section My courses

Multiedu represents a simple storage space of study materials. You don’t need to register or login, you only have to select the name of your teacher, find the abbreviation of your subject and then you can simply download desired materials. Some materials are protected with password. https://multiedu.tul.cz/

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Credit and Examination System Studies in Bachelor, Master and doctoral programme programmes are realized by means of a credit system. Each subject included in the study programme is assigned a certain number of credits. A student obtains credits after passing the subject; i.e. in the case of subjects concluded by a credit after passing the credit, in the case of subjects concluded by an examination (or by a credit and an examination) after passing the examination. At the same time, the student must complete the subject in the academic year in which s/ he has registered for it, and at the latest within

the deadline set in the given academic year’s Calendar. According to the study programme, a student must obtain the number of credits equal to at least the standard number of years of studies multiplied by sixty (180 credits in Bachelor’s, 120 credits in Master’s, 240 credits in Doctoral study programme). The credits must be obtained for subjects required by the study programme and the study plan. According to the Study and Examination Regulations of TUL, the student must acquire 15 credits during the 1st semester of studies; and 40 credits during the first year of studies.

Examinations and Grading Examinations and remedial examinations are usually organized during the lesson-free (exam) period specified by the Calendar of the given academic year. With the teacher´s approval, examinations can be taken also during the holidays or during the semester, but at the latest by the deadline specified by the Calendar of the given academic year. The teacher will inform you in advance about the requirements for each grade. Each examination can be resit twice.


The examiner evaluates an examination by the following grades: Czech Grade

ECTS Grade

Grade

1

A

Excellent

1-

B

Excellent minus

2

C

Very good

2-

D

Very good minus

3

E

Good

4

F

Failed

The exam period may be harsh. Make sure you study throughout the semester

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IMPORTANT CONTACTS


Important Contacts Address Faculty of Economics Voroněžská 13 461 17 Liberec Czech Republic

phone: + 420 485 351 111 website: www.ef.tul.cz/en, www.ef.tul.cz/myuniversity e-mail: admissions.ef@tul.cz

Faculty Management Dean of Faculty Ing. Aleš Kocourek, Ph.D. ales.kocourek@tul.cz Vice-Dean for Research doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D. klara.antlova@tul.cz Vice-Dean for Study Affairs Ing. Otakar Ungerman, Ph.D. otakar.ungerman@tul.cz Vice-Dean for Foreign Affairs Ing. Lenka Strýčková, Ph.D. lenka.stryckova@tul.cz Vice-Dean for External Relations Ing. Jaroslav Demel, Ph.D. jaroslav.demel@tul.cz Vice-Dean for Studying Conception and Development Ing. Jana Šimanová, Ph.D. jana.simanova@tul.cz Chief Secretary of the Faculty Ing. Jarmila Hawlová jarmila.hawlova@tul.cz Ing. Josef Drápalík josef.drapalik@tul.cz Secretary of the Dean Tereza Marková tereza.markova@tul.cz


Study Office Head of study office Lenka Mráčková

lenka.mrackova@tul.cz

General study assistant: Ing. Iveta Honzáková Martina Chvojková

iveta.honzakova@tul.cz martina.chvojkova@tul.cz

International Studies Staff at FE TUL Martina Chvojková Study Office at the Faculty of Economics H building, 5th floor Faculty Erasmus+ Administrator e-mail: martina.chvojkova@tul.cz, admissions.ef@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 352 418

Ing. Lenka Strýčková, Ph.D. Vice-Dean for Study Affairs (foreign studies), University NEISSE Coordinator e-mail: lenka.stryckova@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 352 379

Ing. Jaroslav Demel, Ph.D. Vice-Dean for External Relations & Faculty Erasmus+ Coordinator e-mail: jaroslav.demel@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 352 203

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International Office of the Technical University of Liberec Building IC, 3rd floor

PhDr. Lucie Koutkovรก, PhD. Head of the International Office email: lucie.koutkova@tul.cz, international@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 353 927

PhDr. Ivana Pekaล ovรก, M. A. Deputy Head of the International Office email: ivana.pekarova@tul.cz, international@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 353 612

Mgr. Hana Krรกlovรก International Admissions and Recognition of International Education, International Office email: hana.kralova@tul.cz, international@tul.cz phone: + 420 485 353 541


International Office of the Technical University of Liberec Building G, 5th floor

Daria MlejnkovĂĄ International students studying in Czech programmes Building G, 5th floor email: daria.mlejnkova@tul.cz phone.: + 420 485 353 122

Don’t hesitate to contact us!

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ERASMUS+ AT TUL


Being a regular student at the Technical University of Liberec, one has a chance to participate in the Erasmus+ programme and spend some part of the studies abroad and to be financially supported by the European Union at the same time.

in one study level. Months covered under the previous Lifelong learning Erasmus program in the same study level are included into this limit. For multi-year (eg. five-year) master programs, the maximum grant for a study/practical internship is 24 months.

The student can complete a study stay or a practical internship abroad for a maximum of 12 months for a bachelor, master or doctoral level. For example, he/she may have completed 6 months of study stay and 6 months of practical internship or 12 months of practical internship. However, a 12-month limit applies

The Faculty of Economics started the Erasmus+ Programme in the winter semester of the academic year 2006/2007. The programme was designed as a general business study programme, in order to be able to involve students studying different specializations.

You may spend 24 months on Erasmus! Choose from a study stay or a practical internship.

Erasmus+ at TUL


More than 30 partner universities The faculty has: More than 30 bilateral agreements with partner universities, Approximately 30 foreign students per semester, Approximately 80 Czech students on foreign placements per year.

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Study stay – study abroad at a partner university: The basis is the inter-institutional agreement. Success in the process of selection. Language skills (minimum B1). Full-time study in the foreign university. There is no tuition fee and students receive a scholarship in order to cover part of the cost. Duration from 3 up to 12 months. Recognition benefits after returning (30 credits/semester, but at least 18).

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Internship - gaining work experience in a foreign organization: Success in the process of selection. Language training. Full time job in a foreign company/organization. Scholarship to cover part of the cost. Duration from 2 to 12 months. Recognition of practice after returning.

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Erasmus Student Network (ESN) Orientation Week Usually one week prior to the semester beginning there is an Orientation Week planned for new incoming students. The International Office staff members together with the Erasmus+ Office always look forward to welcome the new group of international and Erasmus+ students.

The programme of the Orientation Week planned for the particular academic year is available in advance on the website. The ESN Club members always prepare numerous exciting activities to make their new friends feel at home in Liberec.

Erasmus Student Network (ESN) ESN Liberec is a non-profit student organization at the Technical University of Liberec. ESN Liberec is part of Europe’s largest student organization, the Erasmus Student Network. ESN aims to enrich the local culture with the help of foreign students and, at the same time, make the stay of foreign students in the country more pleasant. It seeks to provide opportunities for cultural understanding and personal development on the principle of SHS - Students Helping Students. The organisation in Liberec was founded in 2008. In 2011, it became an official member of the Erasmus Student Network.

The active team includes 20 students, and the buddy program consists of 50 Czech buddies. A key project of ESN Liberec is the buddy program. In this project, Czech students choose a foreign student and become his/her „buddy“. In the first days after the arrival of foreign students, they act as support and lend a helping hand. They help the foreign student to settle in the dormitory accommodation and also arrange other necessary documents. http://liberec.esn-cz.cz/erasmus-students


Don’t miss any trips with the ESN Liberec. Follow their Facebook page and stay tuned for upcoming events.

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ACCREDITED STUDY PROGRAMMES


Bachelor Study Programmes

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Production Management (in Czech & English) BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Economics and Management of Services (in Czech & English) ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE (in Czech) SYSTEM ENGINEERING AND INFORMATICS – Managerial Informatics (in Czech) DOES NOT ACCEPT APPLICATIONS FOR 2019/2020 SYSTEM ENGINEERING AND INFORMATICS – Information and Communication Management Neisse University (in English)

Follow-up Master Study Programmes

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Management of Business Processes (in Czech & English) BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Marketing and International Trade (in Czech & English) SYSTEM ENGINEERING AND INFORMATICS – Managerial Informatics (in Czech) ECONOMIC POLICY IN GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT (in Czech)

We reserve the right not to open all specializations if there are less than 8 admitted students in a specialization. Bachelor and Master study programmes are only full-time.

Doctoral Study Programmes

•• ••

BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT – Business Economics and Management (in Czech & English) ECONOMICS AND INFORMATICS – Managerial Informatics (in Czech & English)

Doctoral study programmes can be studied full-time or part-time.

Accredited Study Programmes


Bachelor Study Programmes Business Administration The aim of Bachelor’s study of Business Administration is to prepare students to master a broad professional agenda in the field of business economics and management, including accounting and financing for enterprises operating in both manufacturing and service sectors. Students get a basic overview of corporate management, business management, marketing, finance and accounting, tax issues including legal awareness in the field of business and public services. The specialization of Production Management provides graduates with a strong foundation with knowledge in process management in manufacturing organizations, including the acquisition of specific IT tools used for production planning and management. The graduates are also introduced with specific knowledge on tools and methods for managing modern logistics chains as well as with maintenance management and marketing of manufacturing companies. The specialization of Economics and Management of Services is designed for graduates who find employment in the field of services, for example in the business sphere, information and communication services, finance, insurance, public administration, educational as well as health and cultural institutions. They gain insight into the functions and features of the various commercial and public service sectors, public sector financing, and marketing and accounting features in service organizations. Besides, they get acquainted with information technologies used in services.

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System Engineering and Informatics The aim of Bachelor’s study programme of System Engineering and Informatics is to prepare students to master a broad professional agenda in the field of information technologies in combination with economic and managerial theories. This professionally oriented study program is designed to respond to current market needs in the area of ICT knowledge employees. Students get a basic overview of in the field of creating and managing information systems, programming, multimedia training, marketing and also knowledge from the area of management and business processes, enabling them to design and manage information structures with respect to the needs of individual departments of the organization. Graduates of the specialization of Managerial Informatics will acquire knowledge and skills to analyze, design optimal concepts of information systems and ensure their operation with regard to the users. (THIS STUDY PROGRAMME DOES NOT ACCEPT APPLICATIONS FOR 2019/2020). The English language three-year Bachelor course under specialization Information and Communication Management is a three-national “joint degree programme”. The students stay at a total of three different sites during their studies: the Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic, the Wrocław University of Technology, Poland, and the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz, Germany. The specific feature of the study course is its proven international as well as its interdisciplinary character reflected by the combination of computer science with business management and psychology from the angle of communication in an intercultural context. The curricular focus of study is on computer science (50 %). One of the primary goals is the training of specialists for an international assignment in the field of business communication. Four pillars make up the contents of the Bachelor’s programme: Information Technology Business Studies Communication Psychology Languages and Intercultural Education

•• •• •• ••


Master Study Programmes Business Administration The study programme of Business Administration prepares graduates to solve economic situations in enterprises at the middle and upper management level. Graduates become acquainted with managing the processes of strategic and innovative management in the area of business economics, financial management, marketing operations and managerial decision-making using selected quantitative methods. The specialization of Management of Business Process provides graduates with the knowledge of corporate project management, using support software tools. Moreover, graduates acquire the principles of environmental management, auditing, controlling and modern tools and quality management systems. The specialization of Marketing and International Trade familiarizes graduates with the concept of customer value as a tool of competitive advantage of companies and marketing strategic management of the company, knowledge of brand marketing, forms and instruments of marketing communication of the company, functions and features of the single internal European market and EU external economic relations, business and orientation in the international business environment.

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Doctoral Study Programmes Business Economics and Management specialization: Business Economics and Management

Economics and Informatics specialization: Managerial Informatics

The highest level of university education provides deep and systematic knowledge of microeconomics, the methodology of scientific work, quantitative and statistical methods processing empirical data and, foremost, it equips the students with expertise knowledge in business administration and management, which focuses on behaviour and management of enterprises in a global environment in terms of innovation and new tools of corporate finance. The graduates gain a prerequisite for succeeding in economic and managerial positions at the highest level of corporate and other institutions management. Further, the graduates will be employable at universities, science and research institutions.

Specialization and offer of possible topics of Dissertation Theses of individual supervisors for the specialisation Business Economics and Management you can find below (subject to change): doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D. Knowledge network in organization Optimalization of project management in organization

•• ••

doc. PhDr. Ing. Pavla Bednářová, Ph.D. Multinational Corporations in the World Economy Corporate Competitiveness in the International Environment Growth and Development with International Trade

•• •• ••


doc. Ing. Šárka Laboutková, Ph.D. The Tasks and Strategies of Inhouse Lobbyists Business environment and company performance (comparative studies) Evaluation of External Business Factors With an Emphasis on Economic and Institutional Factors

•• •• ••

doc. Ing. Kateřina Maršíková, Ph.D. Intercultural aspect of Human Resource Management HR marketing and employer branding Digitalization in human resource management Investment in human capital in business environment

•• •• •• •• ••

doc. Ing. Zuzana Pěničková, Ph.D. Internationalization of the selected company - aspects of technological transfer Doing business within the single market of the EU

•• ••

doc. Ing. Jozefína Simová, Ph.D Attributes of customer value Customer satisfaction Online shopping Marketing online communication Customer relationship management (CRM)

•• •• •• •• ••

prof. Ing. Miroslav Žižka, Ph.D. Performance measurement models for industrial clusters Industry cluster research and economic performance

•• ••

Topics of the dissertation theses for the specialisation Managerial informatics: doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D. System of Knowledge management Strategic management of information systems Information systems in small and medium enterprises

•• •• ••

49


Ĺ koda Auto offers many opportunities for personnal and professional development!


Škoda Auto PhD Programme PhD candidates at the TUL are eligible to apply for participation in the Škoda Auto PhD Programme or they can write their thesis on a topic offered by the company. For selected doctoral students, Škoda Auto PhD Programme represents unique opportunity to work on their doctoral thesis in cooperation with ŠKODA AUTO professionals. The admissions process has several stages. First, you will present and discuss the topic of your dissertation with your lecturer at your university and with a ŠKODA AUTO representative. A successful interview is followed by participation in the Assessment Centre, and if that is successful, a casual work contract awaits you. If you are not selected in the Assessment Centre, you may also supplement your dissertation with ŠKODA AUTO in the form of an internship. https://www.skoda-career.com/students-and-graduates/universities-doctorate-program

Cooperate with a major automotive player during your PH.D. studies!

51



STUDY PLANS


Business Administration (bachelor) Management of Services Compulsory courses: Common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Microeconomics I

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/1

Mathematics I

2/2

zp.

5

1/1

Informatics I

1/2

zp.

4

1/1

Business Administration

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/1

Introduction to Law I

2/0

zk.

3

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

1/1

Macroeconomics I

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/2

Mathematics II

2/2

zp./zk.

7

1/2

Informatics II

2/2

zp./zk.

5

1/2

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/2

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

1/2

Accounting I

2/2

zp.

3

2/3

Introduction to Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Statistics I

2/2

zp.

3

2/3

Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

2/3

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

2/3


Compulsory courses: Common Lecture/ exercise

Name of the course

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Statistics II

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Accounting II

1/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Introduction to Scientific Work

0/1

zp.

1

2/4

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

2/4

Language II

0/4

zp./zk.

3

2/4

6 týdnů

zp.

8

3/5

Strategic Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/5

Corporate Finance and Taxes

3/2

zp./zk.

5

3/5

Introduction to Law II

2/0

zk.

3

3/5

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

3/5

Bachelor Thesis I

0/2

zp.

3

3/5

Human Resource Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Small and Medium-sized Entrepreneurship

2/1

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Language I

0/2

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Bachelor Thesis II

0/4

zp.

4

3/6

Guided Internship

Compulsory courses: Specialized Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Economics and Business in Services

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/2

Economics of Public Sector Services

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/3

Marketing of Services

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/4

Selected Financial Services

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Accounting of Selected Service Providers

3/0

zk.

4

3/5


Compulsory optional courses type B - specialization courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Insurance of Persons

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Information Technologies in Services

1/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Property Insurance

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/5

Retail management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits.

Compulsory optional courses type A - common courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Family Business

1/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Fundamentals of Insurance

2/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Financial and Insurance Mathematics

2/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Basics of Sociology

2/0

zk.

3

2/3

Economic Geography

2/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Social Business

2/0

zk.

3

3/5

Marketing Communications

2/1

zp./zk.

3

3/5

Economic Policy I

3/0

zk.

3

3/6

Consumer Behavior

2/2

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Business Ethics in the European Context

1/1

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits.


Optional courses - common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Data-Based Decision Making

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

World Economy

3/0

zk.

3

3/6

zp.

10

Internship Abroad

The final state bachelor exam The final state exam consists in the defense of a bachelor thesis and a discussion of the following topics: Compulsory common courses: - Business Administration (Business Administration, Corporate Finance and Taxes, Small and Medium-sized Entrepreneurship) - Accounting (Accounting I, Accounting II) - Management (Introduction to Management, Human Resource Management) - Marketing (Marketing, Strategic Marketing) Compulsory specialzed courses: - Management of Services (Economics and Business in Services, Economics of Public Sector Services)

Other duties Students have to pass a compulsory supervised internship in a company or institution on the territory of the Czech Republic or abroad in accordance with the profile of the study program and in relation to the chosen specialization.

57


Business Administration (bachelor) Production Management Compulsory courses: Common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Microeconomics I

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/1

Mathematics I

2/2

zp.

5

1/1

Informatics I

1/2

zp.

4

1/1

Business Administration

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/1

Introduction to Law I

2/0

zk.

3

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

1/1

Macroeconomics I

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/2

Mathematics II

2/2

zp./zk.

7

1/2

Informatics II

2/2

zp./zk.

5

1/2

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/2

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

1/2

Accounting I

2/2

zp.

3

2/3

Introduction to Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Statistics I

2/2

zp.

3

2/3

Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

2/3

Language II

0/4

zp.

3

2/3


Compulsory courses: Common Lecture/ exercise

Name of the course

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Statistics II

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Accounting II

1/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Introduction to Scientific Work

0/1

zp.

1

2/4

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

2/4

Language II

0/4

zp./zk.

3

2/4

6 týdnů

zp.

8

3/5

Strategic Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/5

Corporate Finance and Taxes

3/2

zp./zk.

5

3/5

Introduction to Law II

2/0

zk.

3

3/5

Language I

0/4

zp.

3

3/5

Bachelor Thesis I

0/2

zp.

3

3/5

Human Resource Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Small and Medium-sized Entrepreneurship

2/1

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Language I

0/2

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Bachelor Thesis II

0/4

zp.

4

3/6

Guided Internship

Compulsory courses: Specialized Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Business Processes Management

2/2

zp./zk.

6

1/2

Maintenance Management

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/3

Marketing of Manufacturing Companies

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/4

IS for Production Planning and Management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Business Logistics

2/1

zp./zk.

4

3/5


Compulsory optional courses type B - specialization courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Financial Services for Industry

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/4

MS Access

1/2

zp./zk.

4

3/5

Work System Management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Business and Enterprises Insurance

2/2

zp./zk.

4

3/6

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits.

Compulsory optional courses type A - common courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Family Business

1/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Fundamentals of Insurance

2/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Financial and Insurance Mathematics

2/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Basics of Sociology

2/0

zk.

3

2/3

Economic Geography

2/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Social Business

2/0

zk.

3

3/5

Marketing Communications

2/1

zp./zk.

3

3/5

Economic Policy I

3/0

zk.

3

3/6

Consumer Behavior

2/2

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Business Ethics in the European Context

1/1

zp./zk.

3

3/6

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits.


Optional courses - common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Data-Based Decision Making

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

World Economy

3/0

zk.

3

3/6

zp.

10

Internship Abroad

The final state bachelor exam The final state exam consists in the defense of a bachelor thesis and a discussion of the following topics: Compulsory common courses: - Business Administration (Business Administration, Corporate Finance and Taxes, Small and Medium-sized Entrepreneurship) - Accounting (Accounting I, Accounting II) - Management (Introduction to Management, Human Resource Management) - Marketing (Marketing, Strategic Marketing) Compulsory specialzed courses: Business Processes Management (Business Processes Management, Business Logistics)

Other duties Students have to pass a compulsory supervised internship in a company or institution on the territory of the Czech Republic or abroad in accordance with the profile of the study program and in relation to the chosen specialization.

61


Information and Communication Management (bachelor) University Neisse 1ST YEAR - at the Technical University of Liberec Course is Credits completed with

Abrev.

Week hours

Matematické základy I Mathematical Foundations I

MZ1-N

3/3

6

zp./zk.

1st semester

Národní jazyk National Language

NJ1-N

0/4

2

zk.

1st semester

Mikroekonomie I Microeconomics I

MI1-N

2/0

3

zk.

1st semester

Hardware a architektura počítačů Hardware and Computer Architecture

HAP-N

2/2

5

zp./zk.

1st semester

Operační systémy Operating systems

OSN-N

0/2

2

zp./zk.

1st semester

Programování I Programming I

PG1-N

2/2

5

zp./zk.

1st semester

Úvod do psychologie Introduction to Psychology

UPY-N

2/0

2

zp./zk.

1st semester

Nauka o podniku Business Administration

NOA-N

2/2

5

zp./zk.

1st semester

Matematické základy II Mathematical Foundations II

MZ2-N

2/2

4

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Course Title

Enrolment


1ST YEAR - at the Technical University of Liberec Course is Credits completed with

Abrev.

Week hours

Makroekonomie I Macroeconomics I

MK1-N

2/0

3

zk.

2nd semester

Národní jazyk a kulturní paradigmata National Language and Cultural Paradigms

NJP-N

2/2

3

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Základy vědecké práce – Rozhodování na základě dat Introduction to Scientific Work - Data Based Decision Making

DBM-N

1/1

3

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Programování II Programming II

PG2-N

2/2

5

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Finanční účetnictví Financial Accounting

FIU-N

2/2

4

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Informační marketing Information Marketing

INM-N

4/0

5

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Psychologie komunikace Psychology of Communication

PSK-N

2/0

2

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Argumentace a rétorika Argumentation and Rhetoric

ARE-N

20

3

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Národní jazyk National Language (elective)

NJ2-N

0/2

2

zp./zk.

2nd semester

Course Title

Enrolment

Note: zp. = non graded - “zápočet” - acquiring credits does not depend on grading, (acquisition of credits is confirmed by the expression) „započteno“ („credited“), the date of obtaining a credit and the lecturer‘s signature into the Student’s book of his/her studies). zk. = examination (graded) - “zkouška” - acquiring credits depends on grading (an awarded grade, date and lecturer‘s signature are entered into the “exam” column of the Student’s book of his/her studies).

63


2nd YEAR - at the Wroclaw University of Technology Week hours

Credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

Národní jazyk National Language

0/3

2

zk.

3rd semester

Ochrana duševního vlastnictví Intellectual Property Protection

2/0

2

zk.

3rd semester

Informační management Information Management

2/0

2

zk.

3rd semester

Softwarové inženýrství I Software Engineering I

2/2

5

zk.

3rd semester

Nákladové účetnictví, controlling Costs, Controlling

1/1

3

zk.

3rd semester

Právo EU European Law

2/2

5

zk.

3rd semester

Zpracování dat Distributed Data Process

2/2

4

zk.

3rd semester

Databáze I Databases I

2/2

5

zk.

3rd semester

Organizational Science Organizational Science

2/2

6

zk.

3rd semester

Tělesná výchova Sport Activities

0/2

1

zk.

3rd semester

Národní jazyk a kulturní paradigmata National Language and Cultural Paradigms

0/4

2

zk.

4th semester

Komunikace v podnikovém kontextu Contemporary Corporate Communication in Enterprises

0/2

2

zk.

4th semester

Moderování a vedení diskusí Negotiations

0/2

2

zk.

4th semester

Algoritmy a komplexita Algorithm and Complexity

2/2

4

zk.

4th semester

Course Title


2nd YEAR - at the Wroclaw University of Technology Week hours

Credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

2/2

5

zk.

4th semester

4/2/2

9

zk.

4th semester

Řízení projektu I Project Management I

0/2

2

zk.

4th semester

Tělesná výchova Sport Activities

0/2

1

zk.

4th semester

Course Title Softwarové inženýrství II Software Engineering II Modelování včetně projektů Business Modelling

3rd YEAR - at the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz Course Title

Week hours

Credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

Národní jazyk a kulturní paradigmata National Language and Cultural Paradigms

2 weeks

2

zk.

5th semester

Multimédia Multimedia

2/2

4

zk.

5th semester

Úvod do Data Mining Introduction to Data Mining

2/1

3

zk.

5th semester

Ochrana a zabezpečení dat Data Protection and Data Security

2/0

2

zk.

5th semester

Řízení projektů II Project Management II

2/0

2

zk.

5th semester

Volitelný předmět Elective Subject (Web Scientific Publishing)

2/2

4

zk.

5th semester


3rd YEAR - at the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz Week hours

Credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

1/2

3

zk.

5th semester

2 weeks

2

zk.

6th semester

12 weeks

20

zk.

6th semester

Zpráva z praxe Internship Supervision

0/8

8

zk.

6th semester

Bakalářský seminář Bachelor Seminar

0/4

4

zk.

6th semester

Course Title Volitelný předmět Elective Subject (Computer Network) Národní jazyk a kulturní paradigmata National Language and Cultural Paradigms Řízená praxe Internship

BA Thesis

6

We offer three bachelor programmes that are taught in English.

66

6th semester


Business Administration (master) Management of business processes Compulsory courses: Common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Microeconomics II

2/2

zp./zk.

5

1/1

Strategic Management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Managerial Accounting

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Macroeconomics II

2/2

kzp.

5

1/2

Quantitative Methods in Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Innovative Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Marketing Research and Data Analysis

3/3

zp./zk.

5

1/2

Financial Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Innovation Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Taxes and Tax Practice

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Diploma Seminar I

0/2

zp.

1

2/3

Diploma Thesis I

0/3

zp.

6

2/3

Topical Legal Issues

2/0

zk.

3

2/4

Business Environment

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Diploma Seminar II

0/2

zp.

1

2/4

Diploma Thesis II

0/6

zp.

12

2/4


Compulsory courses: Specialized Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Project Management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Auditing

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Environmental Management

2/1

zk.

4

1/2

Business Planning and Controlling

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Quality Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Compulsory optional courses - specialization courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering

2/1

zk.

3

1/1

Accounting on PC

0/3

zp.

4

1/1

Selected Accounting and Tax Issues

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Information Systems and Services

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/3

International Accounting Systems

2/0

zk.

4

2/4

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits. Compulsory optional courses - common courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Corporate Social Responsibility

2/1

zp./zk

4

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Language II

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Securing of Business Information

2/0

zk.

4

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/2


Compulsory optional courses - common courses Lecture/ exercise

Name of the course

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Language II

0/2

zp.

3

1/2

History of Economic Theories

2/1

zk.

4

1/2

European Business Law

2/0

zk.

4

1/2

Introduction to Multimedia Technologies

0/3

zp.

4

1/2

Language I

0/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Language II

0/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Business Intelligence

1/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Public Finance

2/0

zk.

4

2/3

Globalization and Integration Processes

3/0

zk.

6

2/3

Human Resource Management in Business Environment

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/4

Applied Mathematics in Economics

0/2

zp.

4

1/1

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 10 credits Common compulsory courses Name of the course Economic Policy II Internship Abroad

Lecture/ exercise 3/0

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits zk.

6

zp.

10

Year/ Semester 2/3

69


The final state master exam The final state exam consists in the defense of a masterr thesis and a discussion of the following topics: - Economics (Macroeconomics II, Microeconomics II), - Management (Strategic Management, Innovation Management, Financial Management), - Marketing (Innovative Marketing, Marketing Research and Data Analysis). Compulsory specialzed courses: - Project Management, - Environmental Management, - Business Planning and Controlling.

Other study duties Students can take a one or two semester long foreign study stay at a selected university while respecting the composition of subjects taught at the Faculty of Economics, TU in Liberec.

Our Master Students get accointed with advanced methods of business management

70


Business Administration (master) Marketing and International Trade Compulsory courses: Common Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Microeconomics II

2/2

zp./zk.

5

1/1

Strategic Management

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Managerial Accounting

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Macroeconomics II

2/2

kzp.

5

1/2

Quantitative Methods in Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Innovative Marketing

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Marketing Research and Data Analysis

3/3

zp./zk.

5

1/2

Financial Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Innovation Management

2/2

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Taxes and Tax Practice

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/3

Diploma Seminar I

0/2

zp.

1

2/3

Diploma Thesis I

0/3

zp.

6

2/3

Topical Legal Issues

2/0

zk.

3

2/4

Business Environment

2/1

zp./zk.

4

2/4

Diploma Seminar II

0/2

zp.

1

2/4

Diploma Thesis II

0/6

zp.

12

2/4


Compulsory courses: Specialized Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Customer Value

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

EU and International Trade

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Corporate Communications

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Brand Marketing

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/3

International Trade Enviroment

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/4

Compulsory optional courses - specialization courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Online Marketing and Social Networks

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/1

Law in International Business

2/0

zk.

4

1/1

Regional Marketing

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/2

Advertising

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/4

Comparison of the EU Economies

2/1

zp./zk.

4

1/4

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 12 credits. Compulsory optional courses - common courses Name of the course

Lecture/ exercise

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Corporate Social Responsibility

2/1

zp./zk

4

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Language II

0/2

zp.

3

1/1

Securing of Business Information

2/0

zk.

4

1/1

Language I

0/2

zp.

3

1/2


Compulsory optional courses - common courses Lecture/ exercise

Name of the course

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits

Year/ Semester

Language II

0/2

zp.

3

1/2

History of Economic Theories

2/1

zk.

4

1/2

European Business Law

2/0

zk.

4

1/2

Introduction to Multimedia Technologies

0/3

zp.

4

1/2

Language I

0/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Language II

0/2

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Business Intelligence

1/1

zp./zk.

3

2/3

Public Finance

2/0

zk.

4

2/3

Globalization and Integration Processes

3/0

zk.

6

2/3

Human Resource Management in Business Environment

2/2

zp./zk.

5

2/4

Applied Mathematics in Economics

0/2

zp.

4

1/1

Requirement to finish this group of subjects: minimum 10 credits Common compulsory courses Name of the course Economic Policy II

Lecture/ exercise 3/0

Internship Abroad Applied Mathematics in Economics

0/2

Pretest (zp.) Number of Exam (zk.) credits zk.

6

zp.

10

zp.

4

Year/ Semester 2/3

1/1

73


The final state master exam The final state exam consists in the defense of a masterr thesis and a discussion of the following topics: - Economics (Macroeconomics II, Microeconomics II), - Management (Strategic Management, Innovation Management, Financial Management), - Marketing (Innovative Marketing, Marketing Research and Data Analysis). Compulsory specialzed courses: - Customer Value, - Brand Marketing, - EU and International Trade.

Other study duties Students can take a one or two semester long foreign study stay at a selected university while respecting the composition of subjects taught at the Faculty of Economics, TU in Liberec.

The Faculty of Economics facilitates the contat between students and companies

74


Economics and Management (Ph.D.) Business Economics and Management Compulsory Courses Abrev.

Classes

No. of credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

Economics III prof. Ing. Jiří Kraft, CSc.

EK3-D

40

15

zk.

1st - 2nd semester

Statistics and Data Analysis prof. RNDr. Jan Picek, CSc.

SAD-D

40

15

zk.

1st - 2nd semester

Economics and Organizations Management prof. Ing. Ivan Jáč, CSc. doc. Ing. Petra Rydvalová, Ph.D. prof. Ing. Miroslav Žižka, Ph.D.

ERO-D

40

15

sdz

2nd - 3rd semester

Methodology of Science prof. Ing. Miroslav Žižka, Ph.D.

MEV-D

30

10

zp.

2nd semester

Colloquium

KOL-D

8

10

zp.

3rd semester

Pedagogical Activity I

PP1-D

0/4

5

zp.

1st semester

Pedagogical Activity II

PP2-D

0/4

5

zp.

2nd semester

Pedagogical Activity III

PP3-D

0/4

5

zp.

3rd semester

Pedagogical Activity IV

PP4-D

0/4

5

zp.

4th semester

Research Activities I

VV1-D

40

15

zp.

4th semester

Course title Lecturers


Compulsory Courses Abrev.

Classes

No. of credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

Research Activities II

VV2-D

50

25

zp.

5th semester

Pedagogical Activity V

PP5-D

0/4

5

zp.

5th semester

Pedagogical Activity VI

PP6-D

0/4

5

zp.

6th semester

Research Activities III

VV3-D

50

25

zp.

6th semester

Internship Abroad

ZAS-D

3 month

30

zp.

7th semester

Research Activities IV

VV4-D

80

30

zp.

8th semester

Course title Lecturers

Compulsory subjects Economics III and Statistics and Data Analysis are completed with a partial doctoral examination. The subject Economicsand Organizations Management is an essential part of the state doctoral examination. Note: * Pedagogical Activity is completed with a credit (zápočet), which is awarded by the head of the department where the doctoral student carries out his/her pedagogical activity. ** Research Activities are completed with a credit, which is awarded based on the annual study evaluation (especially publications) by the Vice Dean for Science and Research zp. = non graded - “zápočet” - acquiring credits does not depend on grading, (acquisition of credits is confirmed by the expression „započteno“ („credited“), the date of obtaining a credit and the lecturer‘s signature into the Student’s transcript of records booklet). zk. = examination (graded) - “zkouška” - acquiring credits depends on grading (an awarded grade, date and lecturer’s signature is entered into the student’s transcript of records booklet). sdz. = state doctoral examination

76


Optional Courses Course title Lecturers

Abrev.

Classes

No. of credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

Institutional Environment for Business doc. Ing. Šárka Laboutková, Ph.D.

INP-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

International Trade and their Application in the Business Environment doc. Ing. Zuzana Pěničková, Ph.D.

ITP-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Logistics Management Systems Ing. František Koblasa, Ph.D.

LSR-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Innovation Management doc. Ing. Petra Rydvalová, Ph.D. doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D

INM-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Management of Information Security doc. RNDr. Jaroslav Mlýnek, CSc.

MBI-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Selected Items of Information Systems doc. Ing. Jan Skrbek, Dr.

SIS-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Marketing and Customer Relationship Management doc. Ing. Jozefína Simová, Ph.D.

MRV-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

World Economy prof. Ing. Jiří Fárek, CSc.

SVE-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Project Management to Implement Innovations doc. Ing. Petra Rydvalová, Ph.D. doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D

PRI-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

MUS-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

International Accounting Standards doc. Dr. Ing. Olga Hasprová


Optional Courses Course title Lecturers Quantitative Methods in Management Decision Making prof. Ing. Miroslav Žižka, Ph.D. Selected Problems of Company Theory and Market Structures prof. Ing. Jiří Kraft, CSc. Knowledge-based Management doc. Ing. Klára Antlová, Ph.D.

Abrev.

Classes

No. of credits

Course is completed with

Enrolment

KMR-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

VPF-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

ZNM-D

20

10

zk.

1st - 4th semester

Students select optional courses to attain a minimum of 240 credits in their study programme. Each student selects at least two of the listed optional courses. A doctoral student who graduated from a study programme or finished a part thereof, or has been studying in a different programme at another university in the Czech Republic or abroad, may apply in writing for recognition of a previous part of his/her studies or for separate exams. To recognize the application, the field of completed study or a part thereof is considered, as well as the study results, the results of creative activities and the time elapsed since the previous studies. The supervisor submits the proposal for recognition of part of the studies and the decision is made by the Dean of the doctoral student’s faculty after a hearing is held by the Council for Doctoral Studies.

78


System Engineering and Informatics (Ph.D.) Managerial informatics Compulsory Courses The Student has to pass 4 compulsory courses, 20 ECTS credits each: Selected Issues of Economic Theory Methodology of Science Statistical and Mathematical Methods in Management General Systems Theory

Compulsory optional courses The Student chooses at least two courses, 10 ECTS creditcs each: Quantitative Methods in Management Decision Making Project IS Implementation Management Selected Items of Information Systems Management of Information Security

Optional courses The student chooses as many optional courses (5 ECTS credits each) as he needs to achieve at least 180 ETCS credits needed to apply for a state doctoral exam and a minimum of 240 ECTS credits for the entire study period. The credits from other activities are included in this count. Selected Chapters from Marketing Selected Issues of Innovation Management


Optional courses The student chooses as many optional courses (5 ECTS credits each) as he needs to achieve at least 180 ETCS credits needed to apply for a state doctoral exam and a minimum of 240 ECTS credits for the entire study period. The credits from other activities are included in this count. Commercialization and Research Results Selected Problems of Knowledge Management Econometry Modern Technologies for Decision Making Support Ambient Intelligence Fuzzy Methods and their Applications Advanced Methods of Data Mining Geographic Information Systems Usability of Software Products Expert Systems

State doctoral exam The state doctoral examination and the defense of the dissertation are governed by the study and examination rules of the university at whose faculty the student is enrolled. Specifically: at the Faculty of Economics of the Technical University of Liberec, the state doctoral exam is held in accordance with Article 20 and the defense of the dissertation in accordance with Article 23 of the Study and Examination Regulations of the Technical University of Liberec; the Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove state doctoral examination takes place in accordance with Articles 41 to 44 of the Study and Examination Rules of the University of Hradec Kralove; the dissertation defense is held in accordance with Articles 51 and 52 of the Study and Examination Regulations of the University of Hradec Králové; at the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of Pardubice, the State Doctoral Examination is held in accordance with Article 14 of the Study and Examination Regulations of the University of Pardubice; the defense of the dissertation is in accordance with Articles 15 and 16 of the Study and Examination Regulations of the University of Pardubice. Subjects of the state doctoral exam in the specialization Managerial Informatics: Managerial Informatics Economics

•• ••


Required scientific activity The student is involved in the research activity of his departement under the supervision of his supervisor and publishes the results of his research activities. The outputs of the publication activity are evaluated as follows: Publishing in a journal with a recognized IF in Q1 and Q2 (indexed in WoK)

40

Book monographic publication (published outside the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic)

30

Publishing in a journal with IF v Q3 a Q4 (indexed in WoK)

30

Publishing in a Scopus indexed journal with SJR in Q1 and Q2

25

Publishing in a ESCI WoK journal

25

Publishing in a Scopus journal with SJR in Q3 and Q4

20

Book monographic publication (ÄŒR or SR)

20

Publishing in indexed proceedings (WoK, Scopus)

15

Textbook

10

Publishing in a non-indexed peer-reviewed journal

8

Other scientific publications, presentations, performances (conferences without indexing in the Scopus or WoK database, professional magazines, etc.)

5

Internship requirements During the first three years of his / her studies, the student enters an internship at a selected foreign university or research institution for a minimum of one month. The length of the internship can be divided into several parts with a minimum duration of one week. The traineeship can take forms of exits to institutions, participation in a European research project or the realization of direct participation in international cooperation in another form. For this activity, he / she will gain at least 20 ECTS credits, but not more than 60 ECTS credits. The total credit score will be made once before the state doctoral exam on the basis of the submission of the relevant documents substantiating the quality of the achieved outputs. The relevant Vice-Dean decides on the number of credits awarded.


Other study duties From the full-time students, pedagogical activity is required in the range of 2-4 classes per week per semester during two semesters, usually during the first two years of study. The specific scope will be determined by the supervisor in co-ordination with the supervisor of the workplace in dependence on his / her needs. For students of the combined form, this activity is optional. The student‘s pedagogical activities are evaluated with 5 ECTS credits per 2 hours per week per semester. The prerequisite for participation in the dissertation defense is a list of publishing activities, which contains at least one whole-author publication in a journal with a non-zero impact factor, or two whole-author publications with non-zero value of the SJR; in the case of co-authorship, the shares add up. In this case, the student‘s entire publication is also considered as a publication created by the student with his supervisor. The student will receive 40 credits for submitting the final version of the dissertation for the final defense at the study department.

Dissertation theses topics Suggestions for Doctoral Thesis Topics in the Managerial Informatics Specialization:

•• •• •• •• ••

Modelling of Knowledge Network in Organization Optimization of Innovation Processes Modern Approaches in Implementation of Information Systems Information Management during Unexpected Situation Communication Model for Mitigation of Information System during Failover


Students may also engage in many business oriented activities, lectures and competitions.

83



BACHELOR STUDY PROGRAMMES: COURSES

DESCRIPTION


Bachelor study programmes Accounting I The aim of this course is to acquaint students with functions, object of accounting and the method of double - entry bookkeeping, with structure of information that serves their users. Syllabus: 1. Accounting in the historical context - history of accounting, its milestones and future development. 2. Introduction to the current process of harmonisation and convergence of accounting systems. 3. Enterprise characteristics, internal and external flows of an enterprise. The economic resource cycle, economic and financial commentary of the cycle. 4. Accounting representation of the economic recourse cycle. Double-entry bookkeeping system - its principle. An account, its role, account operations, and their classification. 5. Objectives and content of accounting in financial and managerial accounting. Users of accounting information. 6. Accounting - assets, liabilities, and equity. 7. Basic methodology in accounting. Bookkeeping, journals and ledgers. Accounts and their classification. 8. Financial statements and relationships between them. 9. The principle of valuation in accounting and its impact on accounting information. 10. Harmonisation of financial accounting. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). 11. Inventory accounting, its definition, principles of valuation, and valuation techniques. 12. Inventory accounting methods. 13. Long-term assets, definition and classification of long-term assets, valuation, depreciation, accounting for acquisition and depreciation accounting.


Accounting II The aim of this course is to acquaint students with functions, object, and methods of double - entry bookkeeping, and with the structure of information that is provided to their users. Syllabus: 1. Accounting - class 2, its definition, accounts description, measurement and records. 2. Accounting - class 3, receivables and payables, definition, measurement and records. 3. Equity and its presentation in accounting. Equity definition and structure. Principles of measurement and its specific variants. 4. Long-term other liabilities, their presentation in accounting. The concept of provisions. Principles of debt and liabilities measurement. 5. Expenses, revenues. Expenses and revenues in terms of accrual and cash basis.

You can also take part in the Student Formula project!

87


Accounting of Selected Subjects Providing Services The course follows the courses Accounting I and II. Students will broaden their knowledge in accounting of subjects providing financial and insurance services (banks, insurance companies). Further, they will obtain information on accounting systems of subjects providing services which are not primarily set up to generate profit and do business ( e.g. clubs, charitable foundations, public benefit corporations, public administration departments). Syllabus: I. Introduction. II. Accounting for subjects providing financial services. 1. Characteristic features of accounting in banks and financial institutions (the definition of a financial institution and its activities, accounting legislation, bank equity measurement, accounting classes, aspects of analytic accounts creation, chart of accounts). 2. Individual financial statements of financial institutions - bank accounting statements specifications. 3. Consolidated financial statement - consolidation methods, consolidated balance sheet, consolidated income statement, a content specification of the financial statement attachment. 4. Money operation, interbank clearing, active and passive trades and their projection in accounting records. 5. Securities - their definition and accounting records (securities for sale, trading, holding; and issued securities). III. Accounting for subject providing insurance services. 6. Concepts definition (tasks of insurance companies, basic terminology, accounting legislation, insurance equity measurement, accounting classes, aspects of analytic accounts creation, chart of accounts, drafting a chart of accounts). 7. Individual and consolidated financial statements of an insurance company (financial statements, consolidation of financial statements). 8. Technical and non-technical accounts in insurance companies accounting (the system of tracking costs and profits, profit and loss statements). 9. Investment in insurance (definition, valuation and accounting tracking of entries v accounting class 1). 10. Selected operations in insurance and guarantee activities. Technical provision.


IV. Accounting for non-governmental organisations. 11. Classification of non-profit organisations, characteristics, legislation governing their accounting. 12. Public benefit corporations - specific features of accounting journal entries. Specific features of the public sector organisations accounting statements. State accounting. 13. Selected issues on NGO’s financial statements.

Application Software (MS Access) After completing this course students will be able to: creating objects like tables and relations, queries, forms and sub forms, graphs, reports, macros and modules. Essentials of Visual Basic. Integration MS Access with others programs. Outputs to Internet and Intranet. Syllabus: 1. MS Access: Basic objects, tables, relations, referential integrity. 2. MS Access: Relation N:N, management and analysis of database, import and tables linking. 3. MS Access: Questions. 4. MS Access: Forms. 5. MS Access: Reports. 6. MS Access: Macros, modules. 7. MS Access: Internet.

The offer of courses isn’t strictly limited to economics and business.

89


Basics of Insurance Industry Introduction to the issues of insurance, familiarisation with the basic concepts used in insurance, with the fundamental principles of insurance acting as an economic category and financial service, with the basic insurance classification, especially with private insurance. Syllabus: 1. Risk - pure and purpose risks; subjective and objective risks, risks in the life of people and in economics. 2. Risk management - its concept, phases, solving the existence of risks, ISO 31000 and ISO 31010. 3. Insurance - the concept, a financial category, a financial service, a part of the financial market. 4. Social insurance - basic concepts, the role of social insurance, financing social insurance, the organization, and financing individual components of social insurance in the Czech Republic, health insurance. 5. Private insurance - basic concepts, classification, parties in the insurance relations, insurance policy and insurance clauses, terms of insurance, the period of insurance, premium, insurance benefit, hazard insurance and reserve making insurance. 6. Insurable interest, forms of insurance - amounting insurance and indemnity bonds, supplementing forms of insurance, their applications, insurance policy claims calculations. 7. Premium - parts in the structure of premium, a general approach to fixing the amount of net premium, bonuses and extra premiums, administrative expenses of an insurance company their structure and importance. 8. Life insurance - basic characteristics, the construction of the basic forms of life insurance. 9. Approach to fixing the amount of net premium in life insurance. 10. Additional pension insurance - the importance and construction of pension additional insurance in the Czech Republic. 11. Non-life insurance - basic characteristics, the construction of the basic forms (accident insurance, property insurance, liability insurance, etc.). 12. Approach to fixing the amount of risk net premium in non-life insurance. 13. Fundamental characteristics of an insurance company economics - actuarial reserves, reinsurance, insurance technical risk. 14. Insurance industry - the structure, fundamental approaches to the regulation of the insurance industry by the state, trends on the insurance markets.


Business Administration The Business Administration module introduces basic topic and terms in business activities. It includes lectures and seminars where the students can acquire information about how to start the business, how to run and terminate the business. It includes topics as legal forms of businesses according to the business corporation act and their comparison in selected countries, organizational structures, assets and liabilities, depreciation, methods of valuation of inventories (LIFO, FIFO), break-even analysis, financing of an enterprise, investment activities, human resources management, marketing, CSR logistics etc. Syllabus: 1. Enterprise - company structure, state task. 2. Firm establishment, legal forms of enterprises. 3. Organisational structures of companies. 4. Assets and capital structure of company, depreciations, balance sheet. 5. Revenues, costs, economic results, cost functions, variable and fixed costs, calculation, and profit. 6. Financial management, types and methods of firm´s financing. Firm´s financing. Cash flow. Financial analysis. 7. Prices, goals, company price policy. 8. Marketing. Marketing mix. Theory of innovations. Supplying. Sale, distribution channels. 9. Investment activities in company, financing and planning of investments, valuation of investments effectiveness by static and dynamic methods, investing risk, portfolio. 10. Firm´s strategy, basic terms. Top, tactic and operative management. 11. Personal management, target. Motivation, wages, salaries. 12. Cooperation, concentration, merger. 13. Crisis development. Liquidation, gross estate. 14. Analysis of firm´s activities, systems of indicators, comparison among companies.

91


Business and Enterprises Insurance The aim of the course is to introduce students to the possibilities of managing risks not only in SMEs, but also in big corporations. Students should be able to analyse risk situations in an enterprise and should suggest possible solutions for decreasing or eliminating the risks. Syllabus: 1. Global problems and their risk. 2. Czech insurance market. Institutions. 3. Risk - definition, classification, different concepts. 4. Risk management as a specific science discipline. 5. Qualitative approach to dealing with risks. 6. Quantitative approach to dealing with risks I. 7. Quantitative approach to dealing with risks II. 8. Property insurance products for business and enterprises. 9. Technical risks. Related specific products of business and enterprises insurance. 10. Specific insurance products of industry and business risks II. 11. Business interruption insurance. Credit insurance. 12. Fundamentals of insurance law. 13. The role of the state in covering business and enterprises risks.

Our Faculty organizes visits and excursions in our parnter companies.


Business Ethics in the European Context The aim of the course is to highlight the importance of ethics in management and business, to introduce students to the history and content of business ethics, to introduce them to the basic concepts, the history of ethics and theories, to stimulate students to think about ethical issues, to develop their knowledge and skills in decision-making and problem-solving in relation to ethical criteria, and to form ethical values of an individual. Syllabus: 1. Introduction, the relationship between ethics and morals, basic categories and terms of ethics. 2. Ethical thoughts development, ethical theories. 3. Business ethics. 4. Models of ethical decision making process. 5. Corporate social responsibility. 6. Ethics and corporate culture. 7. Code of ethics.

Business Logistics The aim of the course is to introduce students to the dynamically developing discipline which plays an important role in the management of production, business, and sales organisations. The subject introduces the basic concepts and draws attention to the context which should be understood by undergraduates. The subject explains the principle and utilisation of individual method used in business logistics. Supporting computer resources will be presented within the subject framework as well as practical case studies from industrial projects. Syllabus: 8. Modern business management principles, business process and logistics requirement. 9. Logistics as an integrated system - goals of logistics, basic terminology, logistic chains, logistics division. 10. Basic methods and techniques for solving logistics problems (Pareto/ABC analysis). 11. Basics of designing material flow in an enterprise (principles, methods and techniques - e.g. Spaghetti, VSM). 12. Stock management, inventory management.

93


Business Processes Students will get acquainted with fundamental knowledge necessary for further study of business courses (such as Business Logistics, Introduction to Management, Managed Practice). Syllabus: 1. Manufacturing enterprises: Characteristics and specifications of manufacturing enterprises and their classification. 2. Industrial enterprises: Historical development of the industry. Basic terminology related to industrial enterprises. The internal organisation of industrial enterprises and production. 3. Production and production processes: Manufacturing activities of an enterprise. The role and goals of production management in an enterprise. Manufacturing and its typology. 4. Business process management: A definition of a process in an enterprise. Improving processes. 5. Lean production: Historical milestones to lean production. Case study - Toyota etc. Means and principles of lean production. Basic lean production terminology. Waste and its types. 6. Manufacturing enterprise and the environment: The relationship of an enterprise to the environment. Law requirements. Sustainability. 7. Business process standardisation: The role of standardisation in production. Benefits of activities standardisation in the production process 8. Supply chain: Supplier - consumer relations. Value for the customer.

Consumer Behaviour The course Consumer Behaviour characterizes basic model of consumer´s behaviour. It is specialized in knowledge consumers, identification of cultural, social and psychology factors. Syllabus: 1. Consumer, customer, approaches to consumer behaviour, explanation of the basic concepts. 2. The cultural framework of consumers’ behaviour. Signs of culture and parts of cultural environment. 3. Social behaviour, the closest environment - the family as a source of consumer behaviour, children as consumers. 4. Customer decision making process. 5. Consumer segmentations, customer typologies. 6. Consumer protection in the European Union, consumer protection in the Czech Republic. 7. Psychology and consumer behaviour. 8. Issues of buying and selling in terms of consumers. 9. Principles of the CRM, the CRM and the role of a customer. The CRM tools and customer policy. 10. Influence of the Internet on consumer’s behaviour - e-shopping.


Corporate Finance and Taxes The aim of the course is to introduce student to the principles of corporate finance and to deepen their theoretical knowledge needed for their further studies. An important part of this issue is the knowledge of the Czech tax system, and the ability to analyse the impact of selected taxes on corporate financial management. In addition, students will be able to apply their theoretical knowledge on practical examples introduced during the seminars. Syllabus: 1. Characteristics of corporate finance. 2. Basic financial statements as a source of information for corporate finance, cash flow, relations in financial statements. 3. Basic legal forms of business in relation to finance. Time value of money and its role in the financial management. 4. Risks in financial decision making process. 5. Enterprise and financial market - context, valuation of shares and bonds, securities issues. 6. Fundamentals of a financial analysis. Circulating assets of an enterprise and its management. 7. Short-term corporate financing. Payments. 8. Capital planning and investment decision making. 9. Long-term corporate financing. 10. Tax system in the Czech Republic. 11. Income tax of private and legal persons and common provisions of the Act. 12. Property taxes. 13. VAT - related issues.

We encourage teamwork during our classes.

95


Decision-Making Based on Data The aim of the course is to introduce students to the issues of decision making based on different types of data. Individual steps of the knowledge gaining process will be demonstrated on practical tasks. Students will get acquainted with techniques, tools and algorithms which are used during the process. At the seminars, students will get acquainted with the IBM SPSS Modeller and other open source tools, which are used to solve a wide range of managerial decision-making tasks based on a lot of data. Data mining procedures and algorithms, as well as the CRISP-DM methodology, will be introduced. Syllabus: 1. Data and their processing, data collection. Data import and export. 2. Division of data mining tasks, introduction of typical tasks. 3. he process of acquiring knowledge from large data structures, the CRISP-DM methodology. 4. Data preparation, data comprehension, dataset description, data matrix preparation, data selection and cleaning, data source design and integration, type homogeneity, data formatting. 5. Current tools used for advanced data analysis and data mining. 6. Basics of data mining models. 7. Using association rules to predict customer behaviour. 8. Classification and typical classification tasks. 9. Prediction and segmentation. 10. Models evaluation and assessment.


Economic Geography The aim of the course is to provide students with the concept of economic geography, its relations to other economic disciplines as well as with options available for setting up economic activities. In addition, the subject focuses on the main trends and problems in the world globalisation, and the importance of integration tendencies and clusters in the world economy. Syllabus: 1. Genesis, subject and other factors defining the concept of the scientific discipline. 2. Interpretation of the political map of the world. 3. Interpretation of the economic map of the world. 4. Characteristics of the population geography. 5. Importance and function of industrial production. 6. Importance and function of agricultural production. 7. Importance and function of transport infrastructure. 8. Importance of the tertiary sector. 9. Economic characteristics of selected Asian countries. 10. Economic characteristics of the EU member countries.

When your classes are over there are many lovely places you can visit.

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Economic Policy I The aim of the course is to enable students to understand the role of the state in the market economy, and to create basic prerequisites for mastering both the theory of economic policy and for analysing and solving practical problems of economics. The main emphasis is put on students’ ability to estimate the implications and effects of specific economic policy measures on the economy. The course also allows for a deeper understanding of the context of Bachelor’s degree programmes, especially Microeconomics I and Macroeconomics I, but the course also provides basic prerequisites for master’s degree studies. Syllabus: 1. The concept of the economic policy and its position in the market economy. 2. The interventional stage in the development of the modern economic policy. Application in the practical economic policy after the World War II. The Keynesian crisis in the 1970s. 3. The non-conservative stage in the development of the modern economic policy. Application in the practical economic policy and appreciation. 4. Economic objectives and instruments of the economic policy. Magic quadrangle. Relationships between objectives and instruments. 5. Economic policy makers. 6. Fiscal policy. Fiscal policy instruments. Budgetary policy. Public revenue and expenditure. Methods of funding expenditure, financing deficit, public debt. 7. Monetary policy. The position of the central bank, the Czech National Bank, the European Central Bank. The objectives and instruments of the CB. Practical monetary policy in the Czech Republic and the EMU. 8. External economic policy. The openness of the economic policy its measurement and consequences. Instruments and types of the external economic policy. The relation of the external and internal equilibrium and possibilities to solve imbalances. 9. Competition policy - theoretical background and practical competition policy. Causes and forms of competition restrictions, microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects. The situation in the Czech Republic and the EU. 10. Structural policy. Structural changes and their causes. Structural crisis. Conservative and new approaches to structural policy. Problems related to the implementation of structural policy. 11. Regional policy and solutions to regional disparities. The motives for the existence of the regional policy. Theoretical background, traditional and new approaches to regional policy. Regional Policy in the Czech Republic and the EU. 12. Social policy. Solidarity, the concept of social policy and the role of the state and public institutions. Practical economic policy - social market economy, welfare state.


13. Employment policy. Passive and active approach. Practical employment policy in the Czech Republic and the EU. 14. Environmental policy. Economic approach. Environmental protection in the Czech Republic and the EU - situation. 15. The importance of the economic policy in the 21st century. Integration and globalisation. 16. Development of the Czechoslovak/ Czech economy and its reforms. Transformation.

Economics and Business in Services The aim of the course is to provide students with structural changes in national economies of developed countries with an emphasis on the growing importance of services. In addition, introduction to the basic typology of services, their characteristics and identification of particular services sectors. Syllabus: 1. Importance of services in national economy, characteristics of the services, basic typology of services. 2. Management of the process of providing services. Integrated concept of services. 3. Customer relationship management in services. 4. Pricing in the service sector, distribution of services, marketing communication across the services. 5. The concept of quality management in services. 6. Human resources management in services. 7. Innovation processes in services. 8. Operations management in organizations of services. 9. Characteristics and specifics of distribution services. 10. Characteristics and specifics of network services. 11. Characteristics and specifics of financial services. 12. Characteristics and specifics of commercial services. 13. Characteristics and specifics of public services.

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Economics of Public Sector Services The course deals with the modern economic theory of public sector services. In particular parts of the course, different theoretical approaches and practical methods of the services in public sector are discussed. The attention is also paid to general issues of public sector economics which are important for the services in the public sector - market failures, public goods, public choice, public deficit and sovereign debt, etc. Syllabus: 1. 1. Public economics as a part of economic science. 2. 2. Mixed economy and reasons for public sector. Public sector - its definition, arguments for public sector. Characteristics of public sector. Public and non-profit sectors. Public sector functions. Non-profit sector and private non-profit sector. 3. 3. Public goods - analysis of modern economic theories. Public and private goods. Taxation. Free rider problem. 4. 4. Public goods and externalities. The mechanism of resources allocation. Ownership rights. Externalities. Mixed public goods. Publicly provided private goods. Efficient provision of public goods. 5. 5. Public choice. Public choice theory: methodology and assumptions. Politicians and political competition. Election systems. Bureaucracy. Principal-agent problem. 6. 6. Public expenditures. Effectiveness of public expenditures. Evaluation of public projects. 7. 7. Public services - administration, public administration, the judiciary. 8. 8. Public services - education, culture. 9. 9. Public services - regional development, tourism. 10. 10. Public services - health care. 11. 11. Public services - national defence, police. 12. 12. Public expenditures and public services. Government budget revenues from public services. Government expenditures for public services. Government deficit and debt. 13. 13. Current public services in the Czech Republic.


Family Business The aim of the course is to specify the competence and training of family business. The acquired skills will include: knowledge of the requirements of the relevant legal standards, skills in communication techniques in conflict resolution, the ability to set a goal, a vision, a mission of a family business, to propose a system of internal processes across a family business, to understand the sequence of procedures for the exchange of management in relation to generational development of a family businesses. Syllabus: 1. 1. Characteristics and definition of a family business. 2. 2. Legal aspects of a family business. 3. 3. Strategies and management of a family business. 4. 4. Internal processes in a family business (financial, personnel, information, communication, production, and controlling) 5. 5. Planning and the effects of generational change in a family business.

During the semester we also invite hosting speakers from partner universities.

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Financial Accounting The course aims to get knowledge of basic accounting concepts, methods and tools of double-entry accounting. Students are acquainted with cycle of economic resources and its records in the doubleentry accounting framework - accounting procedures in the classes of the accounts. Students get knowledge of the importance of financial accounting as a basis of the enterprise practice information, of accounting statement ability, of bookkeeping and accounting systems. Introduction to the process of the international accounting harmonization and to national accounting system is also included. Syllabus: 1. 1. The need for information (types of information); definition of accounting, history of accounting, accounting as a language. Definition of the subject of accounting, users of accounting information. 2. 2. Definition and detailed structure of assets. 3. 3. Fixed assets. Inventories. 4. 4. Definition and detailed structure of liabilities. Temporary accounts of assets and liabilities. 5. Introduction to the balance sheet. Basic structure of the balance sheet. The basic concept of the balance sheet as the financial statements. 6. Development of the balance sheet (balance sheet changes). Practical examples. 7. Basic accounting concepts (money measurement, entity, going concern, historical cost, dualaspect, accounting period, conservatism, realization, matching, consistency, materiality, accruals). 8. Subject (object) of accounting and methodical tools for its evidence. Proceeding of accounting works performed within accounting period (accounting period, definition of double-entry, double-entry accounting system, accounting documents, books of account, process of keeping accounts and types of accounts, accounting entries and records, accounts in use). Practical examples. 9. Profit and loss account, income statement (types of expenditures, definition of expense, revenue, profit and loss; vertical structure of the income statement report form according to nature of expenses and revenues). Relations between financial statements. Practical examples. 10. Trial balance (substantiality, form of it, types of errors revealed and not revealed by trial balance, differences between trial balance and balance sheet). Practical examples. 11. Valuation methods (valuation methods based on historical cost and their application, depreciation, its substance and application as an balance sheet item and as an profit and loss account item). 12. Selected problems of closing-the-books. Process of inventory-taking. 13. European accounting and national accounting system of Germany, Poland, and Czech Republic. American accounting system.


Financial Mathematics The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basics of financial and actuarial mathematics. The issues of basic financial mathematics, mathematical methods, tools and applications in the financial sector are discussed in the section devoted to financial mathematics. The basics of actuarial mathematics, namely the concepts and principles of life and non-life insurance in the Czech Republic and the world are dealt with in the section devoted to actuarial mathematics. Syllabus: Modules 0 - IV (1st - 7th lecture) are devoted to the basics of financial mathematics. Modules V. and VI. are devoted to the basics of actuarial mathematics. 0. Mathematical support: 1. Percentage, an overview of elementary functions, sequences, series, limits, averages. I. Overview of different types of interest and their practical use. 2. Simple interest, present and future capital value, decursive and anticipative interest. Equivalence interest rate. 3. Compound interest. Interest multiplier. Present and future value. Effective interest rate and interest intensity. II. Application of different types of interest and discounting: 4. Application of simple anticipative interest, application of simple discounting, investment decision-making. III. Recurring payments and their use: 5. Saving: short-term, long-term, decursive and anticipative saving, a combination of short-term and long-term saving. 6. Pensions - temporary annuity: immediate decursive and anticipative annuity, immediate decursive and anticipative pension with more frequent pay than annual, perpetuity annuity, deferred annuity. IV. Amortisation and its practical use: 7. Paying off with equal instalments, paying off with the same loan, mortgage credit, APR. V. Life insurance: 8. Modelling mortality, mortality tables. 9. Basic kinds of life insurance and their valuation. 10. Life insurance premium calculation. VI. Non-life insurance: 11. Tariff groups and fundamental indicators in non-life insurance. 12. Non-life insurance premiums calculation. 13. Technical provisions and mathematical modelling in non-life insurance.

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Financial Services for Enterprises The aim of the course is to introduce students to the principles of the financial market, its institutions and main financial intermediaries and services which are used by enterprises. Syllabus: 1. Financial services and financial markets - basic terms. 2. Financial system - money, money circulation, financial industry, financial institutions, financial tools. 3. The Central Bank and monetary policy, the Central Bank’s role in the financial system, the Czech Central Bank. 4. Bank as a financial services provider, the status of the commercial bank in the economy, the banking sector, the banking system in the Czech Republic. 5. Systematisation of banking services focusing on banking services used by enterprises. 6. Active banking operations, types of credits. 7. Passive banking operations, types of deposits. 8. Alternative financing tools for financing industrial companies via financial intermediaries, factoring, forfaiting, leasing, etc. 9. Payments tools used by enterprises. Payments. 10. Smooth and documentary payments. 11. Securing loans, bank guarantees. Export financing of enterprises. 12. Financial services of other financial intermediaries. 13. Corporate securities on the financial market.

If you’re interested in technologies you may take one of our IT classes.


Guided Internship Guided internship has to take place in any technical economic activity in compliance with the profile of the study programme and in connection to the chosen specialisation in the Czech Republic or abroad. Students have to arrange the internship themselves; in addition, they have to negotiate the internship guarantor in the given institution in 4th semester of their studies. Moreover, they have to arrange the agreement on guided internship (between the faculty and the company). The organisation of the guided internship is governed by the Directive of the Dean of the Faculty of Economics, TUL as amended. Based on the internship, students write a final report and provide a confirmation of the internship complementation.

Hardware and Computer Architecture Goal of this course is to introduce personal computer hardware fundamentals based on x86 architecture. Students learn how to identify individual hardware components of personal computer and how they interact with each other. Also, some basic technologies used during hardware production and manufacturing are covered. Hardware topics include CPUs, motherboards, memory types, hard drives, floppy drives and media, CD-ROM and DVD drives and appropriate media, video adapters, monitors and LCD panels. Syllabus: 1. Microprocessor. 2. Motherboard. 3. Chipset. 4. Memory. 5. Hard disk. 6. Floppy. 7. CDROM. 8. DVD. 9. VGA. 10. Monitor, LCD.

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Informatics I The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the basics of application of informatics in practice, suggesting possibilities of computer usage in office and management, the most important use of a PC. The course focuses on understanding the nature of information, the impact of ICT on dynamic changes in the social and economic environment. In the field of practical applications, students familiarize with wider possibilities of using personal computers in detail during exercises. The course emphasis is on matters associated with the use with operating systems for personal computers, integrated software package Office and computer communications. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to study: Information society and information. 2. Definitions of information, information barriers, information overload. 3. Information levels, signals, codes, data. 4. Sense of information, value of information, competence, information and knowledge. 5. Data-processing and data-transmission, transmission channel. 6. Modulation, characters, codes. 7. Codes and coding, numerical systems and codes, redundancy, compression.

Lear how to make databases, websites, and professional videos.


Informatics II The aim of the course is to make students understand the basic principles of ICT and computer technologies, especially focusing on personal computers. The theoretical part focuses on the introduction to information sources, selected information services, and security issues, namely the data and computer system protections. In the practical part, students get acquainted with further possibilities of how to use PCs. They will learn how to use the SW Office, further they will focus on the advanced usage of Excel, Access, Power Point, and creating Webpages. Syllabus: 1. PCs, classification, parameters, basic features, von Neumann architecture, modularity. 2. Processors (RISC/CISC, characteristics), memories (RAM/ROM, static/dynamic), cache. 3. External memory (magnetic, optical, semiconductor) - principles, functions, usage. 4. Communication in PCs signal transmission, bus systems, interfaces. 5. Digitizing input multimedia data, selected V/V devices, printing technology. 6. PC software, classification, licences, methods of acquisition, application. 7. Information system and data. 8. Basics of computer communication, computer networks e.g. PAN, LAN, MAN, WAN, transmission media. 9. Communication protocols, elements of computer networks. Security and protection of transmission networks. 10. Internet characteristics and development, addressing, basic services, WWW, searching for information. 11. Internet, intranet, extranet. 12. Introduction to electronic commerce, selected e-services. 13. Security threats data protection and information security principles. 14. Enterprise information systems 15. Trends in technical devices.

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Information Marketing The course is based primarily on the effective integration of marketing concepts and applications. Marketing concepts are introduced in a process approach in which marketing is described as a series of processes – market segmentation, new product development, marketing research, and so forth. The process of obtaining data and information for decision making is a key point of a course. Students will be also faced with modern trends of marketing based on IT influences into business life. They will be introduced to modern multimedia technologies and their application for marketing purposes. Syllabus: 1. Marketing – a philosophy of a business. 2. Marketing in business organizations. 3. Marketing planning. 4. Marketing opportunity through competitive advantage. 5. Information and research for marketing decisions. 6. Consumer behaviour. 7. Promotional mix, sales promotions, and publicity. 8. Advertising. 9. Personal selling and sales management. 10. Information aspects e-economy. 11. Introduction to media and multimedia space. 12. Representation of multimedia information. 13. Multimedia application.

Information Technology in Services Students will acquaint with essentials of technologies applied in the frame of information support of selected services. Special focused are multimedia and database technologies, fundamentals of information and reservation systems and internet based technologies of providers and consumers of information services. In the frame of practical applications are students familiarized with creation of audio-visual data and their presentation especially through Internet.

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Syllabus: 1. Information in services, information services and information providers. 2. Information and communication technologies in particular services applications. 3. Multimedia technologies basic principles, utilisation in services. 4. Visual style and corporate identity of a company in services. 5. Information and reservation system in terms of data and processes. 6. Information services in critical situations. 7. Development, trends, and possible employment of information and communication technologies in services.

Insurance of Persons The aim of the course is to familiarize students not only with the basic characteristics of individual types of life insurance, but also to specify the role of private life insurance at present (the importance of life insurance in the financial, insurance and pensions market), and to outline the future development. Syllabus: 1. The overall structure of life insurance in the Czech Republic. 2. General characteristics of life insurance, life risks and ways to protect against them; the role of life insurance in the financial market and the role of life insurance vs. state social policy. 3. Trends of the Czech and world life insurance market, traditional and new types of life insurance products. 4. Accident insurance. 5. Sickness insurance. 6. Term life insurance. 7. Endowment insurance (the main features of the mixed insurance, types of endowment). 8. Universal life insurance. 9. Unit-linked life insurance. 10. Pension insurance. 11. Pension insurance with a state contribution (the importance of pension insurance in the Czech Republic pension system; differences from the national pension insurance, legislation and other documents regulating pension insurance, pension fund, function, types of pension scheme benefits). 12. Pension pillars, pension system reforms in the Czech Republic in connection with the use of private insurance products (vs. social insurance). 13. Insurance to life insurance. Life insurance indexation (developmental changes in the life insurance dynamics). Shares on premium surpluses. Surrenders and loans. Current problems of the Czech personal insurance market.


Introduction to Law I The aim of the course is to create students’ legal consciousness based on the knowledge of legal concepts necessary for understanding law, its aim, development and organization, and its proper application in practice. Students will become knowledgeable in the Czech legal system and be able to work with legal sources. The Constitution of the Czech Republic, European Union, civil law, private and legal persons, property rights, contract law, commercial law, entrepreneur, commercial companies and cooperatives, commercial commitments. Syllabus: (A) Theory of rights. 1. The right, legal standard, the sources of law. (B) Constitutional law. 2. Constitutional law, the Constitution of the Czech Republic. 3. Fundamental rights and freedoms. (C) European Union. 4. European Union. (D) Civil law 5. Recodification in private law. The transitional provisions of the new civil code. 6. Private law: the concept, the binding legal norms, fundamental principles, legal fact. 7. Persons: concept, of a private person, juridical person, the consumer, the entrepreneur, the representation. 8. Things: concept, distribution, part of things, securities. 9. Absolute property rights: concept, rem, tenure, ownership, co-ownership. 10. Legal interests: concept, law of construction, easements, the lien, withholding right. 11. Relative economic rights: the concept, the emergence of obligations, the Treaty, the content of the obligations, consumer contracts, joint debts and claims, change in obligation, the determination of obligation, security and reinforce of debt. 12. Obligations of legal negotiations. 13. Obligations from tort and other legal reasons. 14. Legal adjustment of civil and commercial obligations before the effect of the new civil code.

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Introduction to Law II The aim of the course is to build students’ awareness of law based on the knowledge of necessary legal concepts which are essential for understanding the law, its aim and its correct application in practice. Students will be able to understand the Czech Law, and work with legal standards in the field of corporate law, labour law, and civil procedure. Syllabus: 1. Business corporation: Transitional provisions of the law on commercial corporations. Definition, founding, capital, share, authorities, cancellation, and termination. Individual legal forms of commercial companies and cooperatives. 2. Labour law: Definition, legal standards, labour relations, basic principles, subjects. Employment relationship, agreement on the work held outside the employment relationship. Working hours, break time, obstacles at work, vocation. Workers’ remuneration, reimbursement of expenses, employee care. Liability for damage, safety and health protection at work. 3. Civil procedure: Definition, legal standards, subjects in civil procedure. Types of lawsuits, burden of proof. Writs and legal remedies, proceeding costs.

The Faculty of Economics organizes regular scientific conferences.


Introduction to Management The aim of the course is to teach students to analyse processes taking place in enterprises in terms of fundamental managerial activities. To make students understand the use of functional, human, financial and material resources in enterprises. To discuss personal attributes which are relevant to the activities of executives in enterprises and teams. To acquaint students with the characteristics of groups which are important for an organisation and the work of a manager. To lay out the basics of organisation theory. To introduce students to the techniques and procedures used by HR managers in modern organisations. Syllabus: 1. Definition of managerial work. Fundamentals of managerial thinking and practice, the historical development of management. 2. Manager - personality, competence, interpersonal role, aspects of managerial work. 3. Organisational environment, organisation dimension and its formation. 4. Strategic planning. Planning in action, mission, vision, goals. 5. Managerial decision making, methods, tools. 6. Organising, forms of organisations. New trends in organisation structures. 7. Human resources management from the manager’s point of view. 8. Communication, process of communication, communication barriers, assertiveness. 9. Motivation - fundamental motivation theories, stimulation, use of approaches in managing an enterprise. 10. Leading, coaching, delegating. 11. Quality management. Basic control items. 12. Management information systems. 13. Troubleshooting and risk management. Crisis management. Basics of crisis management. 14. New trends in management.

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Introduction to Scientific Work The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the principles of writing a bachelor’s thesis, the structure of the bachelor’s thesis, the structure of a professional text, rules for quotations and references to literature, the basics of typography and ethics of professional work. Syllabus: 1. Principles of bachelor’s thesis processing at the TUL. Thesis assignment, formal layout. 2. Principles of writing professional texts. The structure of a technical text. Methods of scientific work. 3. Rules for literature search. Quotations - direct and indirect. Literature citation methods. Common mistakes in quoting. 4. Structuring bibliographic records. Specifics of working with electronic documents. 5. Typographic principles. 6. Ethics of professional work. Plagiarism issues. 7. Preparation of a bachelor thesis presentation.

IS for Production Planning and Management The aim of the course is to introduce students to soft system principles, methodology, designing, implementing and running information systems in a company, in addition, to the methods which are used within corporate information systems (MRP II, Theory and limitations, and JIT). Case studies are discussed during the seminars. These are simple conceptual designs of information systems with the help of the data flow diagram and the ERA diagram for a specific project, students will work in teams. Syllabus: 1. Process view of an enterprise and IS. 2. Information resources for the ERP. 3. Models of corporate information systems (strategic, management and transaction). 4. ERP - the structure (function, data, application, technology). 5. Methods applied within corporate information systems (MRP, MRP II, Limitation Theory, Just in Time). 6. Methods of a process analysis. 7. Principles of the ERP design (the ERP’s life cycle). 8. Current trends in the ERP (eBusiness, CRM, SCM).


Macroeconomics I Macroeconomics is a set of theories that help to understand how the whole national economies develop and change under different circumstances. Macroeconomics can also offer optimal measures and instruments for the economic policy makers to achieve their goals. The lectures of Macroeconomics I focus on the fundamental concepts of modern macroeconomics, such as gross domestic product, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, and international trade. Syllabus: 1. Basic concepts: definition of economics, subject of economics, wealth sources, the scientific approach, the economic laws. 2. The market mechanism: market, supply, demand, the market mechanism, Cobweb model of supply and demand, effect of a shift in supply and demand curves. 3. Money and price: history of money, Fisher equation, the evolution of money, money’s functions, money market. 4. Measurement of macroeconomics output and income: gross domestic product, net domestic product, national product - measures and definition, net economic welfare. 5. Aggregate demand and aggregate supply: growth of GDP and investment, output determination: the multiplier model. 6. Unemployment: definition, measuring unemployment, three kinds of unemployment, economic interpretation of unemployment, causes and impacts of unemployment. 7. Inflation: definitions of inflation, price indexes, sources of inflation, costs and consequences of inflation. 8. Business cycle: essence and causes of business cycle, impact of multiplier and accelerator principle. 9. Monetary policy and Banking system: history, significance and functions of banking, demand for money, supply of money, monetary policy. 10. Fiscal policy: basic definitions, automatic vs. discretionary policy, multiplier effects (tax, expenditure multiplier), modern public finance (government budget). 11. World economy: international trade, European integration, integration of Central and Eastern Europe countries into the EU.

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Maintenance Management The course describes maintenance as an interdisciplinary process in which technical, technological, managerial, economic, and administrative activities are combined. Students will get acquainted with the issues of company maintenance (strategies, management, working with people, technical information, norms, legal measures, equipment, external capacities, financial resources, software, etc.). Maintenance management will be introduced as an important process for increasing competitiveness and excellence in asset management. Syllabus: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Maintenance management and organisation. Economy and maintenance performance evaluation. Quality management in maintenance. Occupational safety and health (OPH) in maintenance. Operational reliability of machines and equipment. Risk management in maintenance. Technical diagnostics. Machinery maintenance. Computer support for maintenance management. Asset management. An excursion to a maintenance department in a selected manufacturing enterprise. Lecture by an expert.

Leading Czech Economists have been helding lectures at our faculty.


Managing Small Business The aim of the course is to introduce students to the particularities of managing small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Students will learn how to set up and run a business, what legal forms of business they should choose; how to choose a strategy, innovation, organisational structure and divide labour. Further, they will get acquainted with the equity and capital structures, managing and financing an SME. It is a practical course; students will prepare and present a business plan. Syllabus: 1. Introduction lecture, characteristics and the definition of a small and medium enterprise. 2. Business plan and causes of failure of SME. 3. Setting up a business - legal forms, other conditions. 4. SME strategy (specific business forms, strategic alliances, etc.). 5. Production factors, organisation, and outsourcing. 6. Human resources in SME. 7. Financing innovation activities of SMEs from public funds in the EU. 8. Small and medium enterprise economy. 9. Risks and its managements in SME. 10. Termination a business.

Business management training and both online and offline marketing


Marketing Marketing is a course that provides students with basic marketing principles needed for companies to succeed in a highly competitive market. It helps students to understand consumer needs and wants, market segmentation and consumer targeting. The course covers the basic elements of the marketing mix, ways of building the relationship with customers and developing a customer value proposition by which the company can attract, keep and grow targeted customers. Students will learn how to develop marketing strategy and create a marketing plan. The course takes a practical marketing approach and is well suited to beginning marketing students. Syllabus: 1. 1. Introduction to marketing, the importance of marketing, guiding principles and basic concepts of marketing. 2. 2. The concept of the market and its division, market segmentation, the benefits of segmentation, segmentation conditions. 3. 3. Tools of marketing mix, ingredients and their description, the product. 4. 4. Product - product life cycles, new product development process - individual stages. 5. 5. Pricing - the importance of an affiliate marketer, price targets, the process of pricing, pricing methods. 6. 6. Distribution, distribution channels for consumer and industrial products. 7. 7. Marketing communication - its forms: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, personal selling, and tools used in different forms. 8. 8. Strategic planning, types of planning, the content of a marketing plan. 9. 9. Data acquisition for marketing resolutions, secondary and primary sources. 10. 10. Customer behaviour, the factors influencing the customer, the customer´s decisionmaking process. 11. 11. Marketing environment and its influence on the company’s activities, the effects of microand macro- environment. 12. 12. The role of marketing in the company - organizational division of marketing departments. 13. 13. New trends in marketing. 14. 14. Specifics of marketing applications in the non-profit sector.

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Marketing Communication The course informs students in a more detailed way about different forms of marketing communication, advertising, personal selling, public relations, sales support, an exhibitioning and sponsorship. Syllabus: 1. Marketing communication and the marketing mix, basic concepts and terminology. 2. Communication process, theoretical background, methods and models. 3. Designing an enterprise communication strategy. 4. Marketing communication budget. 5. Advertising. 6. Personal sales. 7. Sales support. 8. Trade fairs and exhibitions. 9. Public relations. 10. Sponsoring. 11. Direct marketing, database marketing. 12. Direct sales - case study. 13. New trends in marketing communication - viral and guerrilla communication, electronic communication, communication of companies on social networks.

We try to merge both teoretical knowledge and practice.


Marketing of Industrial Enterprises The aim of the course is to introduce students to the issues of marketing in manufacturing enterprises and to point out the particularities of such marketing in relation to a customer as a purchaser and a consumer. Further, the course introduces students to relationship marketing, CRM, and other aspects of marketing in terms of manufacturing enterprises Syllabus: 1. Particularities of marketing in manufacturing enterprises, industrial marketing, B-2-B and B-2-C marketing. 2. Marketing concepts and strategies in manufacturing enterprises, relationship, holistic, and ecologic marketing, and marketing 4.0. 3. The value offered to customers, its creation in manufacturing enterprises, a customer as a purchaser and a consumer. 4. An enterprise perspective on customer value. 5. Database marketing, the RFM analysis. 6. Differentiated customer relationship management (CRM). 7. Product marketing, quality and branding, brand building. 8. Innovation, new products design and development. 9. Supply chain-customer relationships and forms of cooperation, relationship marketing and distribution channels. 10. Corporate communication. 11. Internet, social network and manufacturing enterprises. 12. Manufacturing enterprises and services. 13. Personal marketing.

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Mathematical Foundations 1 The course Mathematical Foundations 1 introduces basic mathematical concepts. Syllabus: Analysis 1. Limit of a function. Continuity. Properties of limits; remarkable limits pi, e; infinite limits; limits at infinity; asymptotes; concept of one-sided continuity and limits; continuity of a composite function. Derivative, geometric applications. Basic rules for calculation; the chain rule; tangent to the graph of a function. Derivative of higher order, L’Hospital’s rule; evaluation of “indeterminate expressions”, derivative of parametrically and implicit given functions. Relative and absolute extrema. Applications of derivatives to examining functions: local extrema, concavity, convexity, inflection points, absolute extrema. 2.

Antiderivatives and indefinite integral, basic formulas, substitution method. Integration by parts; integration of simple rational functions by partial fractions. The definition of Riemann integral; basic properties, integration by parts and substitution method for the definite integral; applications: area of a plane figure, volume of a body of revolution, length of a curve.

3.

Differential equations. General and particular solution. Separable differential equations. Differential equations of the first order (homogeneous and non-homogeneous). Applications of differential equations: exponential growth and decay, retail prices, the spread of an epidemic, corruption in government, population growth with immigration.

Algebra 4. Linear algebra (esp. for n = 2). Solving of systems by elimination method, pivots. Matrix operations, properties. Linear (in) dependence of a system of vectors. Rank, Frobenius theorem of compatibility of Slaes. Unit matrix, inverse matrix. Determinants, basic properties and calculation. Dets of order 2 and 3. Cramer’s rule. 5.

Modular arithmetic. Properties of congruencies. Finite fields/rings Z2, Z6, Z7, spaces (Zm)r, esp. for m = 2 and small r. Small systems in finite fields. Boolean algebra. Boolean functions, complete system of B-functions. Disjunctive and conjunctive forms. Minimization of B-functions.


6.

(Un) directed graphs, geometric model, vertices, edges. Complete graph, regular graph. Isomorphism of graphs, operations with graphs. Degree of a vertex. Walk, trail, path, cycle. Sub graph, factor. Connectedness and components. Tree and spanning tree. Incidence and adjacency matrices. Relationship between matrices, graphs and binary relations.

Mathematical Foundations 2 An introductory course to statistical data analysis, with relevant parts of basic theory of probability. The most practical and frequently used statistical methods, as the descriptive statistics, exploratory and graphical methods of data analysis, definition (classical and modern) of probability as a measure of chance, basic probability distributions and their use, estimation of its parameters and shapes, methods of correlation and regression, method of least squares, basic statistical tests. Connected parts of discrete mathematics (e.g. combinatorics) and analytic and numerical methods (optimization, numerical solutions). Use of random generators for problems solving. Syllabus: I. Elements of probability theory. 1. Probability as a measure of chance, classical and modern definitions. 2. Probability distribution, random variable. 3. Some types of discrete and continuous distributions. 4. Dependence, conditional probability, Bayes rule. 5. Law of large numbers, central limit theorems, use of Gauss distribution. II. Mathematical statistics. 6. Descriptive statistics, exploratory and graphical methods of data displaying. 7. Use of software for data analysis. 8. Estimation of parameters and of shape of distribution, testing the distribution fit. 9. Correlation and trend analysis, method of least squares. 10. Selected problems and practical studies. 11. Use of random generators. Monte Carlo methods.

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Mathematics I Basic mathematical concepts. Foundations of the differential calculus, finite and infinite limits in finite and infinite points, including left-hand and right-hand limits. Derivation and its applications, especially to continuity of a function. Basis of integral calculus and Riemann integral. Number progressions. All items regarding to economic applications. Syllabus: A. Definitions of mapping and function: 1. Introduction - used symbols, notations. Basic terms of sententional calculus. Number sets. 2. Mapping, basic terms (domain of definition, image of mapping, types of mapping). Real function, basic properties of functions (monotony, bounded functions, even, odd). 3. Inverse function. Basic elementary functions (including cyclometric). 4. Other functions (absolute value, signum, entire function, Dirichlet’s function). Real sequences. B. Differential calculus: 5. Limit of sequence (finite, infinite), theorems about limit, calculation of limit, number e. 6. Limit function, one-sided limits, limits at infinite points. Continuity, properties of continuous functions. 7. Derivative, geometric applications, tangent line to a function. Calculation of derivative, derivative of a composite function, derivative of an inverse function. 8. L’Hospital’s rule. Monotony, local and global extreme of a function. 9. Convexity, concavity, point of inflexion. Applications of derivatives to studying of graph of a function. 10. Differential of a function. Taylor’s formula. C. Integral calculus: 11. Primitive function and indefinite integral. Basic rules, method per partes, substitution method. 12. Integration by partial fractions. 13. Riemann definite integral, Newton-Leibniz’s theorem. Infinite integral. 14. Number series, criterions of convergence, absolute convergence.


Mathematics II Basis of the linear algebra. Solving of systems of linear algebraic equations. Inverse matrix and their usage, calculation of determinant. Basis of differential calculus for functions of more variables, especially the investigation of extremes of functions of two variables. Differential equations, basic methods for their solving. Syllabus: A. Linear algebra: 1. Arithmetic vectors, linear (in) dependence of vectors. 2. Vector space, dimension and basis of a space. 3. Norm of a vector, inner product of vectors. Matrix, operations with matrixes. Rank of a matrix. Gaussian elimination. 4. System of linear algebraic equations, solutions a system of linear algebraic equations. 5. Inverse matrix, properties, calculation of an inverse matrix. 6. Matrix equations, use inverse matrixes to solution matrix equations. 7. Determinant, properties, calculation of determinant. Use: Cramer’s rule, calculation of inverse matrix. 8. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix. 9. Quadratic forms, properties, Sylvester’s criterion. B. Functions of more variables: 10. Euclidean n-space, properties of sets of En. Functions of more variables, domain of definition. 11. Partial derivatives, extremes of functions of more real variables. 12. Constrained and global extremes of functions of two variables. C. Differential and difference equations: 13. Differential equations of order 1, basic terms. Separation of variable method. 14. Linear differential equations of order 1, variation of constant method. Homogeneous linear equation of order n with constant coefficients (characteristic equation, fundamental system). 15. Heterogeneous linear differential equations with special right side. 16. Difference equations, solution of linear difference equations with constant coefficients.

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Microeconomics I Microeconomics is a set of theories that help to understand how the scarce resources are used to generate the desired outcome. Microeconomics explains the role of prices and markets in this process and clarifies the behaviour of economic agents. The lectures of Microeconomics I focus on the elementary market analysis, theory of elasticity, basics of consumer’s behaviour and principles of corporate decisionmaking under different levels of competition. Syllabus: 1. Market, demand and supply. 2. Elasticity of demand and elasticity of supply. 3. Market equilibrium and mechanism of its establishing. 4. Consumer’s preferences and consumer’s optimization behaviour. 5. Theory of production, total, average, and marginal product. 6. Cost analysis. 7. Revenues, profit, firm’s optimization behaviour. 8. Perfect competition, equilibrium of market under perfect competition. 9. Imperfect competition and decision-making in a firm under imperfect competition. 10. Monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolist competition. 11. Factors of production and their specific markets, price on the market of production factors. 12. Labour market and trade unions. 13. Capital market and market of land.

Our students get familiar up-close with production processes.


Operating Systems This course introduces general operating systems principles, OS types, basic computer components and hardware requirements. It explains also basic terminology: program, process, multitasking OS, process scheduling, inter-process communication, process synchronisation, resource allocation, race condition, deadlock, memory management, virtual memory, device management, file systems, multiprocessor and distributed systems. Syllabus: 1. Introduction, von Neumann computer architecture, history of computers and operating systems. 2. Hardware resources used by operating system, interrupts, i/o interfaces, DMA channels, privileged instructions. 3. Multitasking systems. Program and process. Parallelism and pseudo parallelism. Lifecycle of process. Process scheduling, context switch. 4. Process interaction, message passing, shared memory. Race condition. Process synchronisation. Test and Set Lock, Semaphores. Busy waiting. 5. Deadlock. Memory hierarchy. Memory management, allocation of all available memory. 6. Memory management - static and dynamic partitioning, memory protection. 7. Memory management, paging, paging on demand, segmentation. Memory management of intel x86 platform. 8. Resource management. Device driver structure. Device in file system. 9. Disks types, construction and usage. Sector interleaving. 10. File system, file rights (Unix, Novell).

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Personnel Management The course introduces current approach and trends in Human Resources Management (HRM), legislative framework of HRM, labour market and HRM, planning in HRM, recruitment and selection, competency based model in SMEs, induction process in SMEs, employee retention in SMEs (talent management, training and development, evaluation, remuneration, motivation and engagement), dismissal of employees and risk of employee turnover, outplacement, also all topics defining specifics of HRM in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), employer branding, HR marketing and corporate culture. Syllabus: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Introduction in HRM (key terms, trends). Planning of HRM, HRM strategy. Job analysis and description. Labour market and recruitment, trends. Employee selection. Induction process. Training and development of employees. Employee evaluation. Remuneration system and labour code, motivation. HR marketing, employer branding, employee satisfaction and engagement. Safety, employee protection and the labour code. Employee dismissal.


Programming I The module focuses on basic skills in creating web pages and sites. It is built around two essential specifications: HTML and CSS. Core of the course contains the most common and frequently used constructs of both languages. To be future-proof, current development in the domain (i.e., HTML5, CSS3) is also covered. Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to be able to create and/or maintain presentations for the web. Syllabus: 1. Basic terms, introduction to Pascal, essential commands. 2. Integer and real data types, expressions, Boolean type. 3. Char type, Pascal typology, interval, enumerated type. 4. Array type and its processing. 5. String and subprograms for their processing. 6. Input and output. 7. Subprograms, parameter passing. 8. Recursion, rules for identifier validity and type compatibility. 9. Structured programming fundamentals. 10. Record type and its processing. 11. Files, binary and text.

We can help you to get more comfortable with the iT world.

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Programming II This course provides the overview of advanced or unusual programming paradigms. Evolution of the imperative paradigm is introduced in opening lessons - modular programming, basic principles of object oriented programming (encapsulation, inheritance, plymorphism), and event driven programming. The logical paradigm follows, demonstrated on the Prolog programming language. The most widely covered topic is the functional paradigm and corresponding Scheme programming language. Its data types, list processing, user defined functions, recursive data, structures, and local definitions are explained. The seminars are focused on practical program creation and task solving. Syllabus: 1. Modules a modular programming. 2. Object oriented programming - encapsulation, inheritance. 3. Object oriented programming - polymorphism. 4. Event driven programming, GUI. 5. Logical programming, introduction to Prolog. 6. Resolution mechanism, derivation tree and its control. 7. Functional programming, introduction to Scheme. 8. Lists, user-defined functions and constants. 9. Conditions, recursion, data structures. 10. Lists of structures, sorting. 11. Recursive data structures, combined data types. 12. Multiple lists processing, local definitions. 13. Functional arguments. 14. Function-creating functions, lambda expressions, functional abstraction.

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Property Insurance The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic characteristics of individual types of life insurance, and to specify the role of the private life insurance at present (importance of life insurance in the financial, insurance and pensions market) and outline the expected development. Syllabus: 1. History of non-life insurance and its legal framework, general principles of property insurance 2. Calculation of premiums in non-life insurance. 3. Household and building insurance. 4. Insurance of technical risks. 5. Travel insurance, travel agent insurance. 6. Liability insurance. 7. Employer’s liability insurance. 8. Liability car insurance. 9. Liability for motor vehicle accidents. 10. Consignment insurance. 11. Agricultural insurance. 12. Legal protection insurance. 13. Credit insurance. 14. Insurance of enterprises and entrepreneurs.

We can help you to get student organizations Many more comfortable withrecrute the iT world. every year new members


Retail Management The aim of the course is to introduce students to the particular features of retailing, to introduce basic approaches to developing and maintaining the competitive advantage of retailing in the international environment, to point out the importance and function of business, to outline future tendencies in retailing, to introduce the concepts of business management, territorial layout of the units, CRM, and pricing in retail. Syllabus: 1. Business characteristics - management, activities, functions. 2. Retail and wholesale - history, importance, categories. 3. Tendencies in business - integration, cooperation, E-commerce. 4. Business management - financial, project, risk. 5. Pricing strategy in retail, purchasing goods and managing the business assortment. 6. Merchandise management - types, activities. 7. Creating a business strategy, locating a retail network, and retail network opportunities. 8. Consumer purchasing behaviour, consumer market criteria. 9. CRM = customer relationship management - building loyalty, loyalty systems. 10. Brand management, new approaches and innovations in retail, the current situation on the market.

Preparation is the key! Make sure you don’t leave everything at the last minute.


Selected Financial Services Banks play in modern monetary economies and financial markets very important role. The aim of the course is to introduce students to selected topics focused on the banking sector, types of banks, banking services, other financial institutions, payment systems, monetary policy of central banks, etc. The course includes issues arising from bank regulation, the role of banks in financial intermediation, financial investing, and the significance of bank behaviour in monetary policy. The aim of the course is to introduce students to selected financial services especially those focusing on the banking sector and other financial institutions (insurance companies, leasing companies, factoring and forfaiting companies, building societies, pension companies, collective investment funds and others). Syllabus: 1. Introduction to financial services and financial markets. Definition of the basic concepts. 2. Money. Currency. Evolution of money. 3. Banking services in the Czech Republic. Commercial banking. 4. Active (Credit) banking operations. Types of loans, the loan process. 5. Passive (Deposit) banking operations. Classification of deposit products, insurance of deposits. 6. Off-balance sheet operations. Payment system, instruments of the payment system. 7. Financial market supervision. Central banking. 8. Other financial institutions and their services (savings and credit associations, leasing companies, factoring and forfaiting companies, insurance companies, non-banking lenders, etc.). 9. Securities, capital markets, stock exchanges in the Czech Republic. 10. Collective investment, classification of investment funds.

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Service Marketing The course provides the basic information about the marketing of services to the students. The main goal of the course is to describe services problems, to clear up the basic terms and relations connected with services and to point out to the influence of services qualities on the marketing activities in the companies. Syllabus: 1. Defining service market. 2. Marketing in the service sector. 3. Marketing planning for services. 4. Target marketing. 5. Services marketing mix. 6. A service as a product. 7. Pricing in the service sector. 8. Services distribution options. 9. Marketing communication in the service sector. 10. Material environment. 11. Human factors in the service sector. 12. Processes in the service sector. 13. Marketing information system. 14. Aspects of consumer behaviour.

There are many lovely coffee shops around the campus.


Social Entrepreneurship The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the principles and foundations which the social economy is built on, not only in the Czech Republic but within the European Union in general. The subject should help undergraduates orientate themselves in particular forms of the social enterprises and diversities related to the foundation of enterprises on the basis of social economy, further, students should gain an overview of financing a social enterprise and the use of profit generated by such a social enterprise. Syllabus: 1. The concept of the social economy in the Czech Republic and the European Union. 2. Various definitions of the social economy. 3. Social entrepreneurship and social business in the Czech Republic and the European Union. 4. Social enterprise principles and standards. 5. Forms of social enterprises in the Czech Republic and in the European Union. 6. Non-governmental non-profit organisations. 7. Community sector. 8. The role of municipal authorities in the development of social entrepreneurship. 9. The future of social entrepreneurship in the Czech Republic. 10. Financing social enterprise activities. 11. Social enterprise management. 12. Accounting in a social enterprise. 13. The impact of taxation on a social enterprise. 14. Employees of a social enterprise.

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Statistics for Economist I The aim of this module is to familiarize students with the basics of the descriptive statistics, probability theory, probability distributions and their application in hypotheses testing. Starting with elementary terms of probability and random variables properties, the course continues with the main types of probability distributions and their use in hypothesis testing and parametric testing. The course also includes an introduction to the statistical software Statgraphics. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to descriptive statistics, basic statistical terms and concepts. 2. Elementary methods of data processing. 3. Descriptive measures. 4. Introduction to probability, basic terms. 5. Random event and its probability. 6. Random variable, its typology and characteristics. 7. Discrete random variables - typology. 8. Continuous random variables - typology. 9. Introduction to mathematical statistics, point estimations. 10. Interval estimations. 11. Hypotheses testing, basic terms. 12. Parametric tests. 13. Nonparametric tests.

Statistics for Economist II The course includes an elementary approach to a dependence research and methods of analysing of numeric and categorical data, methods of time-series analysis and forecasting, index numbers. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to dependency analysis, one-way analysis of variance. 2. Measurement depending categorical data. 3. Numeric variables dependence, correlation chart. 4. Introduction to regression analysis. 5. Capturing the dependence using linear regression functions in parameters.


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Capturing the dependence using non-linear regression functions in parameters. Correlation analysis. Multiple correlations, serial correlation. Introduction to time series analysis and characteristics of time series. Methods of describing the trend component of time series. Description of seasonal and random component of time series. Methods of extrapolation of time series. Introduction to index analysis, simple individual indices. Index analysis - individual composite indices and aggregate indices.

Strategic Marketing The aim of the course is to teach students how to solve problems connected with creating and implementing strategic plans. The individual steps in planning such as the initial analysis, types of strategies, implementation, and control systems are explained and discussed. Syllabus: 1. Basic terms and concepts, strategic marketing development, strategic management process. 2. Marketing goals, marketing planning. 3. Strategic analysis, interpretation of collected data. 4. Marketing planning. 5. Overview of strategies. 6. Competition strategies. 7. Marketing strategies - product, service, offer. 8. Price strategies. 9. Distribution strategies. 10. Communication strategies. 11. Various markets strategies. 12. Evaluation of strategies. 13. Implementation of strategies. 14. Strategy marketing control.

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Work System Management The aim of the course is to clarify the importance of ergonomics and basic principles which are applicable in business when arranging working conditions and workplace in order to ensure working comfort and human safety. Students will learn how to prevent unnecessary fatigue or even health-related harm. Syllabus: 1. Ergonomic approach to work system solution: Introduction to the issues of ergonomic. Historical development of ergonomics. Economic and social impact of ergonomics, benefits and utilisation of ergonomics. Related legislation. The human - machines - environment. 2.

Man in the work system: Anthropometry and its impact on forming a workplace. A man’s performance capacity. Adaptation to working conditions. Biorhythms and their impact on work performance. The influence of age and gender on the performance capacity.

3.

Organisation of work and work regimes: The most convenient work regime and breaks during a work shift. Working pace, forced working pace. Dynamic and static work, monotony. Organisation of work and fatigue.

4.

Workload issues: The concept of workload. Major stressors. The effects of workload on health. Workload and stress prevention.

5.

Working environment: Microclimatic conditions at the workplace. Workplace lightning. Noise in the workplace. Workplace and colour adjustments. Workplace layout. Working conditions: employer’s responsibilities.

6.

Workplace ergonomics: Fundamental requirements. Spatial layout requirements and procedure when creating a workplace. Principles for an optimal application of functional features. Workplace typology. Workplace ergonomic analysis. Ergonomic tools.

7.

Working positions: Requirements for working in sitting, standing and other specific positions.

8.

Ergonomic principles when handling loads: Proper posture during manual work and safe lifting of loads. Burden of load. Good handling principles. Precautions for handling load.

9.

Using ergonometrics when working on a computer: How to organise a computer workspace in terms of ergonomics. Risk factors in offices. Proper seating and visual conditions for working on a computer.

10. Safe enterprise: OSH legislation, liabilities of the state, companies, trade unions, workers. Prevention, personal protective equipment. The most common causes of mistakes and human failures in work systems. Occupational accidents, occupational diseases.


World Economy The aim of the course is to introduce the issues of international economic links in the context of globalization of both economic activities and world economy, and to provide an overview of factors and trends in international division of labour as well as international business, financial, monetary, and capital relationships. Syllabus: 1. Subject of world economy and its position in the system of economic science. 2. Theory of world economy, theory of absolute and comparative advantages, prices in international trade. 3. International movement of production factors, international financial and capital relations, international migration. 4. International monetary and trade organisations. 5. Main features and trends in the globalised world economy. 6. Importance of the national state, transnational corporations and international organisations in the world economy. 7. Socioeconomic characteristics of the contemporary world economy, its differentiation and problems. 8. Economic integration theory, the functional and institutional concept of integration. 9. Regionalism in the world economy. 10. Characteristics of the U.S. economy, USA and NAFTA. 11. Economic development of Japan, Japan and APEC. 12. Formation of the European economic centre. 13. Formation of the European economic and monetary union, current development. 14. Developing countries in the world economy. 15. The BRICS countries in the world economy. 16. World economic centres - comparison. 17. Position of the Czech Republic in the world economy. 18. World economic outlook.

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MASTER STUDY PROGRAMMES: COURSES

DESCRIPTION


Master study programmes Accounting on PC The main goal of this course is to present how the bookkeeping by double entry and tax evidence are used in company. Education of this course is mainly concerned in the practical usage of bookkeeping by double entry and tax evidence in small and medium enterprises and in firms of individual entrepreneur. The used software Money S3 is being analysed and there are highlighted weak points that can make problems to its users. Syllabus: 1. Introduction, familiarization with the software Money - agenda, accounting, setting up their own businesses. 2. Address book - list of suppliers and customers, preparation of documents for billing, backup. 3. Introduction of initial states into journals, print reports - balance sheet, projection of accounting operations into the journal, recovery of data from backup. 4. Issuing invoices to customers, analysing print reports, correction and cancelling invoices issued. 5. Payment of customer´s invoice, invoice received from supplier, payment of supplier´s invoice. 6. Supplier´s invoice for purchase of goods, payment of customer´s and supplier´s invoice, stock records. 7. Self-processing of a given exercise, check of recorded operations. 8. Recording of a manufacturing process within an accounting entity - purchase of material, its consumption, increases and decreases of work in progress and self-manufactured finished goods. 9. Self-processing of a given complex exercise, check of recorded operations, correction of mistakes. 10. Recording of fixed assets - purchase, depreciation. 11. Recording of tangible assets - sale, donation, exclusion from accounting evidence. 12. Recording of intangible assets - sale, donation, exclusion from accounting evidence. 13. Recording of leasing - with and without down payment.


Advertising The course acquaints students with basic advertising strategies, creating of advertising budget, media and a work of advertising agencies. Planning, setting goals, methods of selection of advertising media, determining the budget and evaluating of advertising efficiency. Syllabus: 1. The role of advertising in the marketing communication. 2. Regulation of advertising. 3. Psychological methods of advertising. 4. Strategy of advertising campaign, advertising agencies. 5. Media planning, media agencies, media buyers, media representatives, advertising cost. 6. Television advertisement, TV commercials. 7. Press advertisement, print media. 8. Radio and out of home advertisement. 9. On-line advertising.

The weather isn’t always nice, but when it is, it’s worth it.

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Audit Graduate of the course will acquire the essential knowledge about the auditor activity on the level of auditor assistant. Participation in the course presupposes excellent knowledge of the financial and management accounting, knowledge of the financial analysis and tax legislation. Syllabus: 1. The need for information (types of information); definition of accounting, history of accounting, accounting as a language. Definition of the subject of accounting. 2. Definition and detailed structure of assets. 3. Fixed assets. Inventories. 4. Definition and detailed structure of liabilities. Temporary accounts of assets and liabilities. 5. Introduction to the balance sheet. Basic structure of the balance sheet. The basic concept of the balance sheet as the financial statement. 6. evelopment of the balance sheet (balance sheet changes). 7. Subject (object) of accounting and methodical tools for its evidence. Proceeding of accounting works performed within accounting period (accounting period, definition of double-entry, double-entry accounting system, accounting documents, books of account, process of keeping accounts and types of accounts, accounting entries and records, accounts in use). 8. Basic accounting concepts (money measurement, entity, going concern, cost, dual-aspect, accounting period, conservatism, realization, matching, consistency, materiality, accruals).

You will find lots of foreign and Czech students who wil be happy to help you!


Brand Marketing The course acquaints students with the importance of brand building in the marketing strategy of the company. The methods of measuring the value of the brand and the strategy of its successful building are introduced. Syllabus: 1. Brand history, definition of basic concepts, difference between product and brand, luxury and premium brand. 2. Basic attributes of the brand - identity. 3. Basic attributes of the brand - brand association, brand personality. 4. Logo, name, colours, slogan, brand leaders, packaging, corporate philosophy as a part of the brand. 5. Legal protection - logo, trademark, Industrial Property Office. 6. Brand equity by Aaker and Keller, basic attributes of brand equity - brand awareness, quality in relation to the price. 7. Methods of measuring brand equity - an estimate of the assets of the brand, measure customer loyalty, measure of association, measure of brand awareness, the world’s most valuable brands. 8. Methods of measuring brand equity based on customer opinion - qualitative methods (free association, projective methods, brand personality and value), quantitative methods (brand awareness, image, reaction to the brand, brand relationship). 9. Satisfaction and loyalty to the brand - concepts of building satisfaction and loyalty, relationship among satisfaction and loyalty, benefit for the enterprise. 10. Strategic brand management - consistency/change, width and depth of the brand, brand strategy. 11. Luxury brand building - strategy, key attributes, story of luxury brand building. 12. Brand in the fashion industry - brand position in the fashion industry, categories of fashion brands by price and quality. 13. Brand in the food industry: restaurant, fast food, shops, food retail, food - specification, example, case study.

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Business Financial Management The course of Business Financial Management is more advanced finance class which is based on general knowledge of basic principles of corporate finance (time value of money, valuation of assets, risk and return relationship), however those basic principles are shortly reviewed at the beginning of the course. The course will then introduce the general aspects of short-term and long-term financial decisions, and company performance management, not only using the traditional financial methods and models, but also various modern conceptions of the value based management including factors affecting performance of the company. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to Business Financial Management (introduction to financial management, basic terminology, review of financial statements, and risk in corporate financing decisions. 2. Capital budgeting: long-term decisions (capital budgeting, short-term and long-term budgeting decisions, discounted payback period, equivalent annual annuity, internal rate of return (IRR), modified internal rate of return (MIRR), net present value (NPV), payback period, profitability index (PI). 3. The cost of capital (debt financing, equity financing, and hybrid equity financing, debt and equity components of the weighted average cost of capital (WACC), the tax implications on debt financing and the adjustment to the WACC). 4. Financial planning and short-term financing (short-term finance, short-lived assets and liabilities, net working capital, working capital management). 5. Analysis of financial statements (financial ratios: liquidity ratios, asset management ratios, debt management ratios, profitability ratios, market value ratios, DuPont analysis). 6. Raising capital (life cycle of a business, different sources of capital available to a start-up business and a growing business, special forms of financing). 7. Capital structure (capital structure, optimal capital structure, benefits of debt, theories of capital structure, debt and tax shield). 8. Bankruptcy and credibility models (multicriterial financial analysis, Beaver model, Altman model, the IN model, Taffler model, credibility index, Kralicek Quicktest). 9. Measuring company’s performance (discounted cash flow, market value added (MVA), Economic Value Added (EVA), shareholder value added (SVA), benchmarking, balanced scorecard (BSC). 10. Company valuation (asset methods of company valuation, revenue methods of company valuation, combined methods of company valuation, methods based on market analysis).


Business Intelligence Business Intelligence systems are the modern software database solutions which enable the efficient and rapid decision making in enterprises, organizations and the industry. Contrary to operational database systems, BI data warehouses permit the efficient storage of big data volume, variety and velocity. Data is extracted from various internal and external data sources and transformed into the appropriate format for its better processing before loaded to a data warehouse. Then, high and low level data analysis is possible with OLAP tools and prediction of future results via data mining techniques is achievable. The course examines business intelligence solutions from a managerial perspective, and is offered for students with informatics and business administration background. Syllabus: 1. Business Intelligence (BI). Introduction. Conception of BI. Information, data, knowledge. Information and communication. 2. Organizational goals and information needs. BI and IS/ICT. External and internal information resources. 3. BI as parts of IS/ICT. Components BI, architecture. 4. Data warehouse (DW). OLAP analysis, data mining, data warehouse data resources. DW design. 5. BI as intelligence process. Specifics of BI in organization. Human resources. 6. Competitive and defensive intelligence. Lobbing. Morals, ethics. 7. Companies dealing with BI - professional presentations. New trends in BI.

Who sais, that you have to study inside?

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Business Planning and Controlling The main objective of the course is to present the planning and controlling as management subsystems that in mutual interconnection support achieving business goals and the long-term prosperity of a company. The course extends the theoretical and practical knowledge of students and explains the principles of planning processes at all hierarchical levels of the business entity, including the adherence to linkages between individual plans. Students are further acquainted with controlling as a comprehensive approach to cost management of a company. Syllabus: 1. The nature and importance of controlling in business management. The role of a controller. 2. Presumptions for enforcement of efficient departmental control (company organizational and economic structure). 3. Information support of controlling (reporting as a basic tool). 4. The meaning of planning for the business management (feedback and feedforward). 5. Financial analysis, budgets and costing as resource data for planning process. 6. Methods and principles of financial planning. 7. Strategic and long-term financial planning. 8. Short-term financial planning. 9. Preparation of plans for production, investments, labour, costs and revenues. 10. Cost controlling and performance management (break-even point analysis, linear model, variable costing, ABC - Activity Based Costing, target costing, life cycle calculation). 11. Cost controlling as a tool for management of departments - departmental budgets, transfer prices.

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Comparison of EU Economics The subject focuses on the essential economic issues in the EU, its economic and socioeconomic disparities within the particular Member States (MS). Syllabus: 1. Introduction into the economic policy. 2. Economic policy. 3. Economic development: Germany, Austria. 4. Economic development: France, Italy. 5. Economic development: Ireland, Britain. 6. Economic development: Benelux. 7. Economic development: Scandinavia. 8. Economic development: south of the EU. 9. ompetitiveness of the EU economies in the world.

Individual approach is guaranteed.


Corporate Communication The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the concept of marketing communication on the corporate level. In a detail it informs students about strategy, internal corporate communication tools, corporate identity and image, corporate culture. It also covers various communication tools (advertising, personal selling, public relations, sponsorship, direct marketing, sales promotion including new forms of communication) and their application on the corporate level. Basic knowledge of marketing is needed to understand the course. Syllabus: 1. Strategy of corporate communication. 2. Corporate identity and image. 3. Internal communication. 4. Corporate culture. 5. Brand management and evaluation. 6. Communications with stakeholders and target market segments. 7. Public relations. 8. International advertising and promotion. 9. B2B sector communications, external corporate communications.

If you want socialize with locals, you can take Czech language classes.


Corporate Social Responsibility This course is designed to introduce the student to how non-economic factors in the corporate environment influence business operations and decision-making. Three basic pillars will be discussed: a social policy of a company, an environmental management and an economical pillar. Students will be introduced to an implementation of CSR into the world of business. Theoretical part of the course will be backed up with practical examples not only from the Czech Republic but also from other countries as well. Syllabus: 1. The basic terminology of CSR. 2. The historical and current overview. 3. The implementation of CSR. 4. The social pillar. 5. The economical pillar. 6. The environmental pillar. 7. The norms of CSR. 8. The equal opportunities, diversity management. 9. Social entrepreneurship. 10. The benefits and measuring of CSR. 11. CSR in the Czech Republic and abroad. 12. The economics and CSR. 13. CSR in small and medium businesses. 14. CSR - yes or no?

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Customer Value The aim of the course is to introduce the concept of customer value as an instrument of competitive advantage and marketing strategic management to students, to stress the benefits and application of customer value in the service sector, to present concepts, models and the main attributes of customer value, to explain the ways of measuring customer value and its impact on customers´ satisfaction and loyalty as well as demonstrate the role of customer value in customer relationship management in the service sector. Syllabus: 1. Introduction. The base and specific aspects of services as a product in the process of marketing management. 2. New trends in marketing, concepts of marketing development, customer orientation, value of customer relationship. 3. Customer value as a part of differentiated customer relationship marketing (CRM). 4. Customer value definition: customer life time value and perceived customer value, different approaches in customer value concepts and their definitions. 5. Models and attributes of customer value. 6. Analysis and methods of measuring customer value, RFM analysis, customer life cycle and segmentation based on customer value, profitability of customers. 7. Customer value and customer satisfaction (loyalty), methods of customer satisfaction analysis, customers´ expectations and needs. 8. Customer value as a competitive advantage, market positioning based on perceived customer value. 9. Customer value as a part of marketing strategy, building customer relationship and differentiated competitive advantage. 10. The ways of customer value creation, customer value and product. 11. Customer value and price. 12. Customer value and communication. 13. Customer value and distribution. 14. Customer value and internet.

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Economic Policy II The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the theory and practice of economic policy in the broader framework of the functioning of the economic and political ties and connections. The main emphasis is on linking knowledge from bachelor programmes, mastering advanced terminology and substance of economic policy related to the practice of selected countries. Course Economic Policy II is designed as a compulsory course for students of the master’s degree in Regional Studies. Optional course Economic Policy II is designed for students of master’s degree all economic sectors by providing them with the necessary knowledge base for better managing mandatory and compulsory elective specialized courses. Syllabus: Theory of economic policy: 1. Institutional environment of economic policy. 2. Theoretical starting points of EP and economic-political concepts. 3. EP creation process and HP information. 4. Subjects, tools and goals. 5. Capabilities of EP. 6. Expectations, time inconsistencies. Goals and conceptual approaches to EP: 7. Basic social goals. 8. Economic objectives of economic policy and relations between internal goals. 9. Context of the political and economic cycle. 10. Conceptual approaches to economic policy (stabilization and growth). Economic policy in the global environment: 11. Relationship between the internal and external objectives of economic policy. 12. EP’s alternative goals (institutional quality indicators). 13. EU economic policy, current strategy. Typical model concepts of practical economic policy: 14. Keynes’ economic policy interventionist stop & go approach (UK x USA), new economics. 15. Indicative planning of France, Japan, the Netherlands. 16. Swedish welfare state (Scandinavian model). 17. Concepts of the social-market economy and ordoliberalism (Germany). 18. Market-conforming economic policy (Reaganomics, Thatcherism). Basic models of capitalism. State capitalism.


Entrepreneurial Environment The aim of the course is to acquaint students with possible influences of the business environment on the development of economic subjects. The business environment interacts with a globalizing word economy and is allocated to specific regional dimensions that can be evaluated at this level and given to potential investors. A high-quality business environment and support for its development at regional, national and transnational levels can then create optimal conditions for the absorption of innovative business processes. Students will become acquainted with the possibilities and tools for measuring the quality of the business environment. Syllabus: 1. Defining terms, theoretical approaches and models to define the quality of the business environment. 2. Business environment in the context of global, European, national and regional level. 3. Regional evaluation of the quality of the business environment, preferences of entrepreneurial subjects. 4. Development of business environment driven by investment preferences. 5. Promoting the business environment – industrial zones, cluster initiatives, poles of excellence. 6. Development of a business environment based on the knowledge economy as a prioritized development trajectory of the Czech Republic. 7. Determination of factors for the quality assessment of the business environment. 8. Characteristics of the group of factors - business, working, infrastructure, local, price, environmental. 9. Regional development strategy of the Czech Republic in the context of the EU. 10. Regional competitiveness measurement on examples from the Czech Republic. 11. Regional concept of competitiveness, supporting tools. 12. Promoting competitiveness in the context of identified regional disparities. 13. Business environment in selected EU countries. 14. Regional disparities - an opportunity for developing a business environment. Complex assessment of the quality of the business environment.


Environmental Economics and Management The course intends to introduce students to the general theoretical findings in environmental economics and policy and their practical applications. The course is classified as compulsory for students of the follow-up Master’s specialisation “Regional Studies”, and as facultative for other interested students. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to environmental economics issues. Environmental economics. Ecological economics. Global environmental problems of mankind and their economic context. 2. The relationship of economics and the environment. Goods theory. Consumers´ decision on goods consumption of environment. Market failure. Public goods and natural goods. Theory of externalities. Environmental externalities and the role of the state. 3. Environmental capital and its components. Theory of welfare. Sustainable development and its dimensions. Sustainability assessment. Sustainable development indicators. Composite indicators of sustainable development. Environmental adjusted indicators of economic performance. 4. The concept of valuing environment. Valuation methods. 5. Environmental policy and its principles. Institutions and strategic documents in the Czech Republic. 6. Normative instruments of environmental policy. International treaties and agreements. Voluntary tools of environment protection. Market based-instruments of environmental policy. Levy system to protect the environment. Tax and ecological tax reform. Grants and environmental fiscal reform. Tradable rights and permits. 7. Component of environmental policy - in the Czech Republic and in the EU. 8. Environmental Management: Management of the organization, process approaches. Environmental aspects of management, planning, implementation, operation and control. 9. Definitions and concepts of quality control. Management of environment protection. Environmental management according to the criteria EMAS and ISO. 10. Selected chapters of voluntary instruments at the corporate level.

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EU and International Trade The basic aim of this course is to introduce some economic issues related to EU, mainly in the area of the single market and external economic relations. A special attention is paid also to the individual integration stages in Europe, their reasons and effects. Moreover, the four freedoms (free movement of goods, services, capital and labour) guaranteed by the European Single Market as well as the effects of the single market are introduced in more detail. Syllabus: 1. EU History - phases, new EU members. 2. EU Institutions - European Commission, European Parliament, European Council. 3. Integration stages, legal acts. 4. Free movement of goods. 5. Free movement of services and capital. 6. Free movement of people, asylum policy. 7. Effects of the single market. 8. Competition policy of the EU. 9. Monetary union, theory of the optimal currency area. 10. Common trade policy of the EU. 11. WTO. 12. External trade relations of the EU.

All the books you are going to need for your studies are avilable in our library.


European Commercial Law The aim of this course is to obtain a basic knowledge of commercial law in the European context. Syllabus: 1. European law - the concept, object, system. 2. External trade relations with the EU. 3. Commercial law in the system of European law. 4. European international private law. 5. Sources of European commercial law and their relationship to the national law. 6. The bodies of commercial law in European law. Free movement of persons. 7. Freedom of business and professions. 8. Trading companies in European law. 9. Commercial representation in European law. 10. Terms and EU law. 11. Public procurement in EU law. 12. International sale contract. Free movement of goods. 13. Liability in legal relations in European business law. 14. Free movement of services. 15. Free movement of capital and payments. 16. Competition law in the EU. Protection of Competition. Unfair competition. 17. Intellectual property rights. 18. Procedural law in the EU. Resolution of legal disputes in international trade. 19. Bankruptcy and insolvency proceedings.

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History of Economic Theories The aim of the course is to introduce to the students the formation and development of economics as a scientific discipline. The course monitors particular economic schools falling into so called main stream of economics, explains methodology and conclusions, eventually recommendations for economic praxis. Some attention is laid upon important theories from so called alternative streams arising from different premises in comparison to the main stream theories and leading in to nonstandard results and recommendations for economic policy. Syllabus: From economic thought to economic science: 1. Mercantilism. 2. The eighteen-century predecessors, physiocrasy. 3. Classical political economy. Origin and development of modern microeconomics: 4. Marginalistic revolution. 5. Swiss school. 6. Cambridge school. 7. Austrian school. Origin and development of modern macroeconomics: 8. Classical theory. 9. Keynesian macroeconomics. 10. Neo Keynesian macroeconomics, post Keynesian macroeconomics. 11. Neoclassical macroeconomics (Friedman’s model, Chicago school). 12. New classical macroeconomics (Rational Expectation, Theory of Real Business Cycle). 13. New Keynesian macroeconomics.

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Human Resources Management in Business Environment The subject will be taught in 3 modules: Module I - Specifics of HRM in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) Specifics of planning in HRM, recruitment and selection, competency based model in SMEs. Induction process in SMEs. Employee retention in SMEs (talent management, training and development, evaluation, remuneration, motivation and engagement). Dismissal of employees, risk of employee turnover, outplacement from the perspective of SMEs, including case studies. Module II - Specifics of HRM in corporations HRM processes in large corporations (Specifics of recruitment and selection, employee retention, evaluation of employees, social media in HRM). Module III - Specifics of HRM in the international environment Syllabus: 1. Current approach in HRM, strategic HRM, trend from the perspective of globalisation and digitalisation. 2. Legislative Framework of HRM, labour market and HRM 3. Module I - Specifics of HRM in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) 4. Specifics of planning in HRM, recruitment and selection, competency based model in SMEs. 5. Induction process in SMEs. 6. Employee retention in SMEs (talent management, training and development, evaluation, remuneration, motivation and engagement). Dismissal of employees, risk of employee turnover, outplacement. Module II Specifics of HRM in corporations 7. HRM processes in corporations (Specifics of recruitment and selection, employee retention, evaluation of employees, social media in HRM) Module III - Specifics of HRM in international environment 8. Employer branding, HR marketing and corporate culture.


Information Systems and Services The aim of the course is to introduce students to computer-based information systems and information services focused on non-standard situations. The basics of system analysis and design of an information system with regard to process management, basic forms of information services and their provision in specific situations are presented. Students will be acquainted with the basic principles of development, implementation, operation and security of information systems and information services based on modern information technologies. Syllabus: 1. Man and technique. 2. Information and knowledge from the point of view of needs. 3. Information society and change in management - strategic concept. 4. Organizations and organizational structures. 5. Fundamentals of system methodology, system definition, overall concept of an organization’s information system. 6. Business processes, modelling, evaluation, information system architecture. 7. Forms of development and operation of information systems, outsourcing and insourcing. 8. Informational support of straight processes - SCM, CRM. 9. Status and analysis of the IS/IT market. 10. Electronic data exchange and electronic trading - options and limitations. 11. Information needs and information services - possibilities of utilization. 12. Risks of information services and their management. 13. Reality and agile approaches to providing information services in non-standard situations. 14. Efficiency of information systems and information services.


Innovation Management The intention of the course Innovation Management is to introduce students to the wide issue of innovation in an enterprise. The particular topics of the course are society and science, innovation models, structure of innovation processes and basic approaches for creating innovative organization. The aim of the course is to acquire knowledge and skills to formulate innovation strategies of an organization, creation and management of innovation projects of economic subjects including possibilities and methods of their financing. Syllabus: 1. Society, science and innovations (innovations and competitive advantage, types of innovations, basic terminology). 2. Innovation stimulus, innovation models, knowledge management. 3. Structure of innovation processes. 4. Protection of intellectual property in an innovation process. 5. Approaches to an innovation strategies creation. 6. Basic elements of business innovation strategy (competitive and national position; technological methods; organization and managerial processes). 7. Financial evaluation of R&D results. 8. External cooperation in development of new technologies and products. 9. Evaluation of an innovation potential of a company. 10. Management of a company internal processes. 11. Management and administration of (innovation) projects. 12. How to create a progressive organization. 13. Evaluation of results of research and development in the Czech Republic.

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Innovative Marketing The course broadens the basic perception of marketing about current and future trends. Innovative marketing captures the changes associated with the Industrial revolution 4.0. Lectures present digitization in marketing. Syllabus: 1. Historical marketing development: transition from marketing 3.0 to marketing 4.0. 2. Basic trends in current marketing in the Industrial revolution 4.0: Innovation, Digitization, Virtual Environment. 3. Targeted marketing. From market segmentation to individual marketing. 4. Product: additive product, product life cycle change, product strategy and the Internet of Things (IoT). 5. Price: pricing strategies associated with the use of virtual peer-to-peer network cryptomain (client-client). 6. Distribution: use of autonomous robotics in online shopping on B2B and B2C markets. 7. Marketing communication: innovative approaches: Guerilla Marketing, Buzz Marketing, Ambush Marketing, Content Marketing, Engagement Marketing. 8. Media digitization: enhanced reality - real-world view and subsequent visual information added. 9. Mobile marketing: advertising, applications and their optimization (ASO - App Store Optimization). 10. Support behaviour: use of neuro marketing, 5A buying behaviour analysis (awareness, appeal, ask, act, advocate). 11. Integration of marketing: synergy of online and offline environments, measurement of marketing activities: PUR (purchase action ratio) BUR (brand action ratio) 12. Use of Big Data and Cloud Storage for marketing research and marketing planning. 13. Corporate social responsibility: green marketing, the role of corporate stakeholders.


International Accounting Systems The course provides information about evolutionary trends in accounting from the world-wide perspective. Syllabus: 1. Classification of accounting systems, regulation and harmonization of accounting systems, importance, historical development of IFRS, structure. 2. Conceptual framework of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for preparation and presentation of financial statements, basis of IFRS. 3. Measurement approaches used in IFRS, measurement of assets and liabilities at the time of acquisition, holding and disposal, measurement principles, measurement bases, fair value measurement (IFRS 13), effects of changes in foreign exchange rates (IAS 21). 4. Forms and structure of financial statements according to a IFRS, European and Czech accounting legislation. Preparation and presentation of financial statements according to IAS 1, objectives of the standard, basis for the preparation of a balance sheet, revenues (IAS 18), definition and recognition of revenues, preparation of the statement of comprehensive income, preparation of the statement of cash flows. 5. Equity, statement of changes in equity. Definition of equity and its structure, presented information about equity. 6. Intangible assets (IAS 38), definition, recognition, measurement, presentation and disposal of intangible assets. 7. Tangible assets used by an entity - property, plant, equipment (IAS 16), definition, measurement, depreciation and impairment (IAS 36), investment property (IAS 40). 8. Inventories (IAS 2), subject of the standard, measurement at the time of acquisition, writedown of inventory, cost formulas when consuming inventories. 9. Net profit or loss of a period, significant errors and changes in accounting policy (IAS 8).

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International Business Law The aim of this course is to introduce to students circumstances of commercial law in the international context. Syllabus: 1. International trade law - the concept, object 2. Private international law - the concept, object. 3. Applicable law - choice of law, conflict and object standards. Connecting factors. 4. Sources of international trade law. International agreements and their relationship to national law. Lex mercatoria. 5. Subjects of international trade law - domestic and foreign bodies. Business of foreign people in the Czech Republic. 6. Conclusion of contracts. Entrepreneurs in international trade. 7. Command type of contract. The contract on commercial representation. 8. International sale contract - regulation characteristics. The rights and obligations of the seller and buyer. Agreement relating to the purchase agreement and contracts in connection with the contract. 9. Liability of legal relations. Responsibility for delays and defects in the purchase contract. Liability for damages - general characteristics. Liability for damages in contract. 10. Contract for work. The rights and obligations of the contractor and client. Liability for breach of contract. 11. Withdraw of the contract and contract for work. Other methods of termination of the contract. 12. Treaty for international travel. International agreements on international transport of goods - basic characteristics. The rights and obligations of the consignor, carrier and consignee. Carrier’s liability for damages. 13. Agreement relating to the implementation of international business operations. Storage contracts and imposing things. Treaty inspections. Leases. Leasing contract. Unspecified contracts. 14. International procedural law. Dispute settlement in international trade. Proceedings. Arbitration. Recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments.


International Trade Environment The basic aim of this course is to introduce some issues related to international trade including its theoretical and historical context. It explains the circumstances of origin and purpose of international trade. The course is also focused on the link between international trade and trade policy. Another aim is to inform students about the possible impacts of trade policy instruments on the business environment. It also gives an overview of organizations engaged in international trade. Syllabus: 1. The theory of internationalization. 2. Internationalization of products. 3. Internationalization of processes. 4. Specifics of international trade in individual sectors (A, I, S). 5. Commercial and Investment Policy. 6. Internationalization of human resources. 7. Financial aspects of internationalization. 8. Legal aspects of international trade - international treaties and EU acts. 9. Internationalization of innovations. 10. Regionalism in the international trade. 11. Development assistance in the international trade. 12. The current development of the foreign trade of the Czech Republic. 13. Current aspects in the development of international trade.

We offer courses in both international and Czech law.

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Introduction to Mechanical Engineering The course is focused on fundamental disciplines of the mechanical engineering. The course introduces students with technologies and production procedures used in the engineering production, both in the job and the batch productions as well as in the mass production. A separate part is devoted to basis of the engineering metrology. In addition there are presented the basic types of machine components, mechanisms, engines and work machines. Syllabus: 1. Introduction. The development of technology. Development of technical schools. Engineering production. The process of industrial manufacture. Types of production. Technical standardization. 2. Technical materials. The mechanical properties of materials. Test methods. Ferrous metals: iron material (production, properties), steel (production, properties and types), iron (production, properties and types). 3. Heavy non-ferrous metals: copper, lead, tin, zinc (production, properties and application of alloys). 4. Non-ferrous light metals: aluminium, magnesium, titanium (production, properties and application of alloys). Non-metallic materials: inorganic, organic. Plastics: thermoplastics, thermosets. 5. Engineering Technology. Casting. Models. Moulds - impermanent, semi-permanent, permanent. Melting and casting material. Fusion welding and pressure. Soldering. Bonding. 6. Forming - hot forming: rolling, extension, extruding, forging and forging machines. 7. Cold forming: bending, cutting, extension sheets, stamping, extrusion and special methods of forming. Basic methods of processing plastics: injection moulding, transfer moulding, extrusion, blow moulding hollow bodies and foil forming. 8. Heat treatment: annealing, hardening, tempering, tempering, nitrating, cementation. Surface treatment - metallic and non-metallic coatings and layers. 9. Machining: turning, milling, drilling, roughing, reaming, countersinking, boring, broaching and extrusion, chipping and shaping, separation material. Grinding, honing, lapping, finishing. 10. Electro erosion machining, electrochemical machining, ultrasonic, electron beam machining, machining beam of photons, plasma machining, water jet machining.


11. Assembly. Assembly activities. Stationary and non-stationary kinds of assembly. Assembly workplaces. Measurement and control. Length measurement, angle measurement, geometric shape measurement, surface roughness measurement. 12. Parts of machines. Connecting components (screws, nuts, washers, etc.) supporting and bearing components (springs, bearings); components for transmitting motion (shafts coupling). Mechanical gears (friction, belts, chains, gears sprockets) mechanisms. Pipes and components (pipes, valves). 13. Engines: water engine (turbine), heat engine (piston steam engines, steam turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines and internal combustion turbines). 14. Industrial machines: pumps (piston, membrane, wing, gear, etc.), compressors (piston, vane, blade), lifting and transport machines (jacks, winches, hoists, cranes, conveyors, elevators, lifts).

UNI.Lab Created by Ĺ koda Auto and the Technical University of Liberec

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Introduction to Multimedia Technologies The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the problems of preparation, processing and presentation of digital multimedia. Within the course the students will acquire the specifics and ways of using the different types of multimedia and will acquire the basic skills for working with the software for their creation and use. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to the topic of multimedia - overview of applications, getting awareness of the classroom facilities. 2. Multimedia, polymedia, hypermedia, multimedia dimensions. 3. Raster graphics - basic functions for creating bitmap graphics, global raster graphics and their principles, creative use of effects in bitmap editors. 4. Vector graphics - getting to know the functions of applications for creating vector graphics, comparison with raster graphics, practical examples of vector graphics usage. 5. Graphics - export formats, acquisition techniques. 6. Animation - principles, common attributes, and bitmap and vector animation differences. 7. 3D graphics – animation of 3D graphics, rendering. 8. Sound - characteristics, formats, historical development, wave editors and sequencers, input and output formats, basic acquisition techniques, editing options, mastering, export formats. 9. Digital video - video principles and formats, historical development, acquisition techniques and presentation techniques, practical examples of video editing, applications, codecs, practical examples of video work. 10. Multimedia - interactive elements, animation, assignment of a semester project. 11. Conceptualization of multimedia products and applications. 12. Design and implementation of multimedia products.


Macroeconomics II The aim of the course is to broaden the theoretical knowledge of students acquired in the Bachelor’s course (Macroeconomics I), to familiarize students with the economic theories of major macroeconomic schools and to deepen the macroeconomic thinking. Emphasis is focused on the understanding of the links and consequences in the approaches of discussed economic schools. Syllabus: 1. Economic theories and models. Classical theory: general classical model. Money markets in the classic sense. Classical AD. 2. Keynesian theory: effective demand, consumption and investment. Keynes’s theory of consumption in comparison with other selected approaches to consumption: model of intertemporal choice, life cycle theory and the theory of permanent income. Income expenditure model. Liquidity preference theory. Determination of equilibrium production in the IS-LM model in closed and open economy. 3. The model IS-LM. Fiscal and monetary policy. 4. AD-AS model. Total Keynesian model - neoclassical synthesis. Past investments and liquidity trap. 5. Expectations in economics. Basic models of aggregate supply (models of the business cycle): monetarism, new classical theory, the new Keynesian theory. 6. Governmental sector and the state budget, curve BS and ways to cover budget deficits, public debt. 7. Monetary policy regime, the concept of trinity unattainable, inflation targeting, quantitative easing. 8. Effects of fiscal and monetary policy in the AD-AS. 9. Open economy. Exchange rate - nominal and real. Balance of payments. Determination of the exchange rate. 10. The model IS-LM-BP. Mundell-Fleming model, fiscal and monetary policy. 11. Labour market and unemployment. Phillips curve and aggregate supply. Inflation 12. Supply and demand inflation. Curves SP and DG. Methods of inflation cure. 13. Economic growth. Selected theories of economic growth.

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Marketing Research and Data Analysis Marketing Research provides a systematic introduction to the principles and practice of marketing research. The aim of the course is to introduce the role and need of market research, to define types and concepts of marketing research, data sources, to describe the market research process, research methodology, and methods of data collection, questionnaire design, sampling methods and methods of data analysis. Students will learn marketing research in an applied and practical way. The course also introduces the procedure and the statistical methods of data evaluation. Syllabus: 1. Marketing research, its role, use and importance in marketing management. 2. Marketing information system. 3. Types of marketing research (primary, secondary, exploratory, descriptive, explanatory and prognostic research, longitudinal and ad hoc research, panel research, quantitative and qualitative research. Data sources: primary and secondary, internal and external. 4. Marketing research design, positivistic and phenomenological approach. 5. Marketing research process and methodology (problem definition, objectives). 6. Methods of data collection. 7. Questionnaire design. 8. Types of questions, scales. 9. Sampling methods, probability and nonprobability sampling, representative sampling, size of sample. 10. Research report. 11. Basic terms of statistical data analysis, processing of various types of scales with the help of tables, graphs and descriptive statistics. 12. Multivariate answers principles. Missing values and factors influencing work with them. 13. Statistical inference Estimation theory. Sample size determination. 14. Statistical inference Hypotheses testing (parametric tests for independent and paired samples). 15. Statistical inference - Hypotheses testing (non-parametric tests). 16. Exploratory data analysis data samples preparation. 17. Relationship among variables Analysis of variance (One-Way ANOVA, MANOVA), the ChiSquare test for independence, measurement of association, 2x2 tables.


18. Relationship among variables Regression and correlation analysis. The conditions of the classic linear model use. 19. Exploratory factor analysis (latent variables and their identification, factors influencing the correlation matrix, rotation, analysis and interpretation of the factors), confirmatory factor analysis. 20. Cluster analysis (hierarchical clustering, decomposition methods). 21. Other multivariate statistical methods (Discriminant analysis, correspondence analysis, conjoint analysis, multidimensional scaling).

The University has it’s first humanoid robot called Matylda.

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Managerial Accounting The course of Managerial Accounting provides students with the understanding and appreciation of the strengths and limitations of the organization’s internal accounting system. Students will understand the importance of internal accounting information in the company in relation to planning and control processes. Students will obtain knowledge about the managerial classification of costs and costing systems from different perspectives of their definition, use, planning, management and control, and at the same time knowledge of budgeting and responsibility accounting, of setting standards of costs and quantities and subsequent variance analysis. Syllabus: 1. Accounting as an information management system - the relationship of financial, cost and managerial accounting. Differences in the content, details, scope and time orientation. Circled accounting system. 2. Controlling. Circled accounting system. 3. 3Definition of basic concepts. Costs-costs concept in financial, cost and management accounting. The economy and effectiveness, their interaction and forms. 4. Classification of costs from different perspectives and its significance for internal management. 5. Breakdown of costs in relation to the volume of activity and the changes in the conditions of the manufacturing process, the incremental cost. Practical options and limitations of calculating the variable and fixed cost components. Exploited and unexploited fixed costs and their information capability. 6. Break-even point analysis. 7. Costing system and its use in management. Preliminary costings - estimate costings, norm costings. The actual costing. 8. Costing techniques. Methods of the actual costing according to the conjugate manufacturing process. 9. Total and differential methods of costing. Norm method. 10. Absorption costing. Costing structures - development. 11. Variable costing. Comparison of absorption costing and variable costing. 12. Internal management - basic characteristics, principles and tools. 13. Budgeting as one of the enterprise management systems. Overhead costs budgets of internal departments, their functions and usage in the management. Relationship between costing and budgets of internal departments. Types of budgets, method of their elaboration and control.


Mathematical Applications in Economics The aim of the course is to repeat the stated topics and extend students’ knowledge concerning applications of the mentioned mathematical methods in economics, finance, insurance etc. and show the solutions of selected problems with a special software (Excel, Mathematica, sCalc, LINDO etc.). Syllabus: 1. Function - basic properties. Limit. Asymptotes. Application in theoretical economics. 2. Derivative and its practical use - extremes, monotony, curvature. Graphs of functions. Application in theoretical economics. 3. Primitives. Integrals - geometric interpretation, practical use. Application in theoretical economics. 4. Numerical methods for equations solving. Function of several variables - partial derivatives, extremes. Application in theoretical economics. 5. Vectors, matrices - their applications for solving of linear equations systems. 6. Mathematical programming - linear. Mathematical programming - non-linear. Applications in optimization of production. 7. Series - types, conditions of convergence. 8. Probability theory - random variable, probability function, density function. Matrix algebra and integral to solve probability problems. 9. Stochastic processes - transition matrix, steady state vector. Simulations. 10. Financial and insurance mathematics.

Over 100 Erasmus students yearly Some stay for one semester, others for two.

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Microeconomics II Microeconomics is a set of theories that help to understand how the scarce resources are used to generate the desired outcome. Microeconomics explains the role of prices and markets in this process and clarifies the behaviour of economic agents. The lectures of Microeconomics II focus on the detailed analysis of consumer’s behaviour, corporate decision-making, analysis of labour market and capital market, and theory of general equilibrium. Syllabus: 1. Demand, supply, market equilibrium. 2. Theory of utility and consumer behaviour. 3. Firm and its position in economy. 4. Production and cost. 5. Income, profit and equilibrium of firm. 6. Perfectly competitive market. 7. Imperfect competition and behaviour of firm under imperfect competition. 8. Factor markets. 9. Labour market and labour union. 10. Capital market and land market. 11. Stock exchange and their functions. 12. Income distribution. 13. General equilibrium.

Student Idea Competition Take place every year in may.


Online Marketing and Social Networks The aim of the course is to familiarize students with online marketing tools, online marketing, web pages, web search engine and social medias which can be used for marketing reason, and with online marketing communication strategy and methods which is measuring satisfaction and loyalty on the internet. Syllabus: 1. Internet history, internet environment and marketing, e-commerce, internet marketing, e-marketing, digital marketing, online marketing and online customer. 2. Web pages: design, clarity, credibility, select the correct URL, SEO, copywriting, content marketing. 3. Web search engine, price comparison website, online catalogue, Google AdWords. 4. Online marketing strategy: See, Think, Do, Care, effective online communication models. 5. Online marketing communication tools: online direct marketing, online PR, online WOM. 6. Internet advertising: backlinks, banner advertising, viral marketing, PPC systems. 7. Online marketing research: qualitative and quantitative research in the online environment. 8. Online purchase and sale, e-shops: online and offline sale, Customers value when shopping online, online purchase in B2B, B2C and B2G. 9. Google analytics: tools, important metric, conversion. 10. Marketing via social media: definition of social media, category of social media, users of social media, social marketing, social sites - differences between communication on the social media and in the real life. 11. Facebook: history, fan pages, groups, paid advertising. 12. Facebook: PR, sales promotion, WOM, direct marketing, loyalty and factors that influence it, metric and optimization. 13. Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Blogs, discussion forums. 14. Satisfaction and customer loyalty in the online environment: factors that influence satisfaction and loyalty, online satisfaction and loyalty, benefit for offline satisfaction and loyalty.

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Project Management Project Management is a tool for planning and organizing changes in organization or implementing new information systems, applications and platforms. It includes managing the implementation of the project plan, along with operating regular ‘controls’ to ensure that project milestones and deadlines are followed. Goals, objectives, human resources, budget determination and time estimation should be in balance with quality of the project output. At the same time, potential risks which may cause significant project delays must be analysed, quantified and faced when they occur. Important issues discussed during the semester are project management phases, approaches, decision making tools project planning tools (GANTT, PERT), software project management, risk management, communication among team members and stakeholders, feasibility analysis, agile project management, quality management, analysis of requirements and decision making during project implementation. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to course. 2. Project planning. 3. Time planning and Gant diagram. 4. Financial planning of projects. 5. Human resource of projects. 6. Management of projects. 7. Evaluation of projects.

Presentation is key. Lear how to defend your ideas.


Public Finance The aim of the course is to introduce students to the reasons of existence of public finances in a mixed economy, as well as to provide them with knowledge of the system of public budgets, public revenues and public expenditures. Attention is also paid to the balanced budgets, surpluses and state budget deficits, with so closely related topics to these issues such as public debt, fiscal federalism and budget and fiscal policy. Last but not least, the aim is to deepen the knowledge about current trends in this area. Syllabus: 1. Public finance - basic concepts, relationships and aspects; relationship with the public sector economics, reasons for development of public finance, arguments, functions and principles. Micro- and macroeconomic connections, fiscal theory development. 2. Public choice - premises of public choice (public and private interests), basic processes of public choice, selected problems, public choice in public sector. 3. Economic analysis of public goods - economic specificity and characteristics of public goods, typology, effective provision of public goods in partial and general equilibrium conditions. 4. Public expenditures, public projects and public expenditure programmes - introduction to analysis, basic concepts, types of public expenditures and classification. Analysis of effectiveness of public expenditures, of public projects and programmes, methods of effectiveness analysis. 5. Public revenues. Taxes - basic concepts, tax authority and tax assignation, classification, history of taxes. 6. Introduction to the tax theory - tax principles, equity and justice of taxation, effectiveness of tax (tax burden, administrative costs), tax shift and tax incidence. 7. Social protection - reasons of creation, tools of realisation, social insurance. 8. Budgetary system and budgetary process. State budget, methods of budgeting. 9. Spatial aspects of public finance, fiscal federalism, fiscal decentralization, local finances. 10. Budgetary and fiscal policies - basic concepts, relationships between budgetary and fiscal policy, various influences. 11. Short term and long term fiscal imbalance - consequences and possible solutions. 12. Present trends in public finances - classification, selected problems of public finances in consequence with the EU membership.

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Regional Marketing The aim of the course is to explain the possibilities of marketing for regional development. The course explains the marketing environment of towns and villages and defines the basic tools of marketing analysis. It explains how to use the marketing mix, provides procedures and methods for developing a strategy for municipalities and their communication with the consumers of product municipalities. Syllabus: 1. Development and application of marketing concept of towns and villages. 2. Knowledge of marketing environment of village. 3. Searching of community position and customer segmentation. 4. Marketing mix of municipality and region, support for competitive advantage. 5. Product of municipality. 6. Price and distribution. 7. Communication mix in regional marketing. 8. People. 9. Material environment. 10. Processes and partnerships, joint marketing for region presentation. 11. Marketing research. 12. Marketing strategy of municipality, plans in the region. 13. Entrepreneurial culture of community. 14. Practical experience with marketing of community and region.

Looking for fun? There are many cultural actions you can visit during the year.


Securing of Business Information The aim of the course is to inform students about the principles, rules and practical realisation of management of electronic information security in a business company. The subject offers basic information about methods of realisation of information system risk analysis including possible approaches to information evaluation, choosing adequate safeguards to secure confidentiality, integrity and availability of important business information. The stress is put on the usage of cryptographic methods (hash functions, checksums, symmetric and asymmetric cryptosystems, digital signature, activities of certificate authority). The connection of cryptography methods with present legislative system of the Czech Republic and the European Union will be explained as well. Syllabus: 1. Importance of information for a business company (electronic information is a part of the most important company assets, company dependence on the processing of electronic information, necessity of information securing from the point of view of confidentiality, integrity and availability). 2. Main reasons of information securing (obligations arisen from valid legislation, commitments to other companies, own business interests of a company). 3. Procedure of securing information realisation (risk analysis of IS, determination of information owners, security policy of IS, realization of the information protection). 4. The methods of risk analysis (detailed methods, basic approach, informal approach, using of concrete methods: CRAMM - CCTA Risk Analysis Management Method, IPAK, FRAP). 5. Security policy (security policy of IS, system security policies, security documentation). 6. Realisation of safeguards (areas of realisation, concrete safeguards). 7. Introduction to cryptography. 8. One-way function, hash function (SHA-1), checksums. 9. Symmetric cryptosystems (AES, DES, Triple DES). 10. Asymmetric cryptosystems (RSA). 11. Digital signature, certification authority (CA). 12. The principle of elliptic curves. 13. Cryptography and legislation (Czech Republic and the European Union).

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Selected Accounting Issues for Entrepreneurs in Theory and Practice The goal of this course is to make students of MA Programme acquainted with accounting procedures in chosen spheres of business on advanced level; to learn students to use accounting procedures based on accounting methodology and assigned processes for decision-making and management; to interpret information obtained from accountancy in broader relationship to law, finance and taxes; to equip students with theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for making decision in practice. Syllabus: 1. Review of basic accountancy principles, methods and procedures for entrepreneurs. 2. Sequence of accounting and tax system in the sphere of income tax - introduction into problems. 3. Loan, credits and deposits in business. 4. Depreciations of tangible and intangible assets - view of accountancy and taxes. 5. Financial leasing - legal and methodological frame, accountancy procedures, effectiveness. 6. Payables and liabilities - valuation, rectifying items, writing-off, assignment of claims, accession to a liabilities - view of accountancy and taxes. 7. Purchase of an enterprise, purchase of a part of enterprise, valuation, accounting procedures, effectiveness. 8. Business in a form of association without legal personality - legal, accountancy and tax standpoints. 9. Stocks and bonds and shares in business. 10. Projection of income from operations during fiscal period. 11. Projection of tax basis and amount of income tax from accounting data. 12. Questions and answers related to lectured theme.


Statistical Analysis of the Data The course focuses on the coherent system of the data processing where the data comes from the questionnaire survey. All phases of the questionnaire survey are described in detail and the content of the course is mostly concerned with the methods of data processing and further the interpretation of outputs. Students acquaint a handling questionnaire survey data. After finishing of the course they should be able to create a questionnaire, then perform a correct survey and process the obtained information by appropriate statistical methods. Syllabus: 1. Introduction to biostatistics and descriptive statistics. 2. Descriptive statistics, graphical presentation of data. 3. Probability: types of distribution, characteristics of random variables, percentiles. 4. Hypotheses testing: parametric tests, non-parametric tests. 5. Hypotheses testing: non-parametric tests, goodness-of-fit tests. 6. Contingency tables, tests of independence (Chi-square test of independence). 7. Analysis of variance. 8. Correlation and regression: t-tests, F-tests. 9. Regression models.

When everything fails, you can always count on pizza.

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Strategic Management This is an integrated course developing abilities to identify, analyse and solve the problems of formulation and implementation of a corporate strategy. Students will be able to formulate the future strategic goals, evaluate internal and external consequences and know how to implement the chosen strategy through concepts and methods of strategic management. They will also be able to give the best alternative solution and evaluation of the selected strategic methods, and will understand the difference between the structural and resource-based strategy approaches. Graduates will apply models of strategic management and will understand varied models of international managing, particularly the role and importance of strategic alliances in contemporary business operations. Syllabus: 1. Overview of strategic management: the nature of strategic management, key terms in strategic management, key strategic management topics, strategic-management case analysis – framework. 2. Strategy formulation: the business vision and mission - vision versus mission, the process of developing vision and mission statements; importance of vision and mission statements. 3. The external assessment, key external forces, competitive forces, competitive analysis: Porter´s five forces model, EFE Matrix, CP Matrix. 4. The internal assessment, internal audit, resource-based view, strategy and culture, IFE Matrix. 5. Strategies in action: types of strategies, integration strategies, intensive strategies, diversification strategies, defensive strategies, Porter´s five generic strategies; Mintzberg´s deliberate and emergent strategy, cooperation strategies, types of alliances, Blue Ocean strategy. 6. trategy analysis and choice: the process of generating and selecting strategies, strategy formulation framework, SPACE Matrix, the Internal-External (IE) Matrix, Grand Strategy Matrix, the Quantitative Strategic Planning (QSP) Matrix. 7. Implementing strategies: management and operations issues, matching structure with strategy, SBU structure, restructuring, reengineering. 8. Implementing strategies: marketing, finance, accounting, R&D and MIS issues. 9. Strategy review, evaluation and control: the process of evaluating strategies, a strategy evaluation framework, the Balanced Scorecard, effective evaluation system. 10. Business ethics, social responsibility, environmental sustainability.


11. Global issues, international companies and management: multinational organizations, advantages and disadvantages of international operations, globalization. 12. Strategic management in non-profit and governmental organizations, strategic management in small and medium enterprises. 13. Strategic-management case analysis sample case framework.

Taxes and Tax Practice The main objective of the course is to present the taxation as one of the key issues a company can come across during its operation. The course extends the theoretical and practical knowledge and explains the principles of taxation. Students will understand the classification of taxes as well as the economic effects of taxation. Students are further acquainted with harmonization of taxes and international cooperation in this area. Subsequently, individual tax problems which students come across in the business environment are discussed. Syllabus: 1. Introduction, history of taxation. 2. Basic concepts of tax legislation. 3. Tax system in the Czech Republic. 4. Personal income tax. 5. Corporate income tax. 6. Property tax. 7. Transfer tax. 8. Road tax. 9. Value added tax. 10. Excise duties, environmental taxes. 11. Treaties on avoidance of double taxation, tax harmonisation. 12. Current problems of lectured topics.

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Topical Law Issues The course reassumes on subjects Basics of Law I and II. Changes in law regulation are described in this course. Syllabus: 1. Constitutional law, Constitution of the Czech Republic, fundamental rights and freedoms. European Union. 2. Private law, fundamental principles, legal fact. Persons, things, the absolute property rights, relative economic rights. 3. Business corporation, establishment of a corporation, capital investment, stated capital, market share, authorities, corporate group, cancellation and demise, various legal forms of commercial company and the team, transitional provisions of the law on commercial corporations. 4. Labour law, bodies, relationships, working hours, the remuneration of the workers, liability for damage. 5. Family law - marriage, relation, guardianship and other forms of child care. 6. Civil procedural law, the bodies of civil proceedings, the types of civil proceedings, the taking of evidence, decisions and appeals. 7. Administrative law, public administration, trade licenses administration, administrative procedure, administrative criminal law. 8. Social security law, social insurance, health insurance, state social support, social services. 9. Criminal law, basic principles, criminal liability, sanctions, offences, criminal proceedings.


Quality Management The course focuses on modern quality management systems, progressive quality management tools including statistical methods and ISO 9000 standards. Students will get an overview of approaches to assuring and enhancing complex quality standards in Czech and European enterprises. Part of the seminars is an introduction of the practical use of individual tools for quality assurance. An expert on quality management from a manufacturing company visits the seminar to discuss how the individual systems and tools are applied in practice. Syllabus: 1. Introduction into quality management. 2. Development of the approaches to quality management. 3. Quality management tools I. 4. Quality management tools II. 5. Other statistic tools within quality management. 6. Statistical inspection. 7. System of quality management on principle norms No. 9000. 8. Norm ISO 9004. 9. System of quality management on principles TQM. 10. Economic aspects of quality. 11. Quality management in company.

Traveling around Liberec is easy! You can get almost anywere by train or bus.

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Quantitative Methods of Management The aim of the course is to get knowledge of theoretical background and practical applications of selected quantitative methods. The methods are used to support the decision making of managers at different levels of management. Syllabus: 1. Introduction into quantitative methods. Characteristics of quantitative methods for decisionmaking. Fundamental classification of quantitative methods in management. 2. Linear programming. Formulation of linear programming tasks. Classification of linear programming models. Primary and dual problems. 3. Production, transportation and allocation tasks of linear programming. Fundamental numerical procedures for the models. Geometrical and graphical solution of linear programming tasks. 4. Simplex method. Solution of linear programming tasks in the MS Excel environment. Postoptimization analysis, duality of linear programming tasks. 5. Inventory theory. Deterministic and stochastic models of inventory management. 6. Economic order quantity model. Production quantity model. Quantity discount model. Model of partnership cooperation. 7. Inventory management in uncertainty conditions. Safety stock optimization methods. 8. Queuing theory. Characteristics and structure of bulk service systems. Simple system of bulk service. 9. Multiple channels and multiple phases queuing models. Costs optimization in queuing theory. 10. Renewal theory. Optimal renewal cycle of equipment from the point of view: costs. 11. Group and extended renewal models. 12. Graph theory. Basic terminology. Typical tasks solved through graphs. 13. Multi-criteria decision making. Criteria weights assessment methods. Methods of multicriteria evaluation. 14. Simulation models. Steps for solving of problems through simulation. Classification of simulation methods.


When all the hard work is done, it’s time to celebrate.

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HOW TO APPLY?


How to Apply for Bachelor Study Programmes? The deadlines for applications at the Technical University of Liberec are as follows: 31 March 2019 for the first round 30 August 2019 for the second round (not suitable for applicant who need a visa and/or nostrification)

•• ••

Application for Bachelor Study Programmes 1) What you have to do first, is to submit your Application for study at the Technical University of Liberec. The application is online available via the website of our study information system STAG: https://stag.tul.cz/portal/studium/uchazec?pc_lang=en You may also like to check the tutorial on completing the application form: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/completing-the-application-form Then you have to make a payment for the application fee (2,000 CZK or USD 100) to the bank account of the Technical University of Liberec. It is possible to send the payment using your credit/debit card during the application process in Stag which is the fasted payment method. Until the application fee is paid, we do not take any further steps. 2) You should prepare your curriculum vitæ (including your recent photo), and send it to: admission.ef@tul.cz. Please send also your diploma and transcript of your previous education. Please send all documents in PDF form, and name them according this rule:

•• ••

Your CV: Surname Name (CV).pdf Diploma and transcript: Surname Name (transcript). pdf


3) There will be the admission interview using Skype. Please provide us your Skype ID. You will be informed ahead on the details. During the interview the commission will assess the candidate’s prerequisites and abilities for studies (professional focus of previous studies, study results of previous studies, language skills and expertise). 4) As you applied to Bachelor’s degree, you will need nostrification of your secondary (high school) education. General instructions for recognition of the secondary education you may find here: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/recognition-of-previous-education Nostrification is a process, when the Czech state (or any of its representatives) officially approves that your previous education is comparable and compatible with the Czech education system. We recommend to start the nostrification process as soon as possible, because without this document we cannot issue official Resolution on acceptance and other documents!!!

There is an admission interview using SKype.

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5) In some cases, according to your country of origin, you have to get your study visa. In case you are admitted to studies at our faculty, we will issue a letter of acceptance and a resolution and we will send them to you as originals which you will need for the visa process. To support your visa application you will also need a letter of accommodation which is issued by our Accommodation Office and it is send electronically via wire transfer to the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs which should forward it to the Embassy in your country. It should be taken into account that to get the study visa can be a lengthy process, so it is advisable to start soonest possible. You should check up the situation at the Czech Embassy or Consulate in your home country and try to find out how long it generally takes to issue a student visa. You should also probably book an appointment there well in advance. https://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/applying-for-visa For students from specified countries (Iran, Ghana, India, Russia (Moscow, Petrograd and Yekaterinburg), Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine (Lvov, Kiev), Serbia, Philippines, Vietnam, Egypt, Pakistan, China, Turkey and Nigeria), there is a possibility to apply for visa to the Czech Republic with our assistance. There is a special visa regime called “STUDENT” for your country if you apply via our university. This special regime could be used only in case that you have not yet applied for a visa in your country and that you do not have an appointment there!!! Duplicate requests are not allowed. 6) The tuition fee is USD 3.500 per year. We do not provide any scholarship for our non-EU students. The tuition fee has to be paid within 30 days after the receipt of the Decision on study-related fees for study programmes carried out in a foreign language. 7) If you wish to stay at the student’s halls of residence of the Technical University of Liberec, the monthly rent starts from USD 110. You may also find the cost-of-living structure at the website of the Technical University in Liberec. http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/fee-structure-and-costs-of-living If you have any other questions related to the Faculty of Economics, please do not hesitate to contact us. Should you have any questions concerning practical matters, nostrification or visa process, please contact our International Department – international@tul.cz. https://www.tul.cz/en/international-office


How to Apply for Master Study Programmes? Application for Master Study Programmes 1) What you have to do first, is to submit your Application for study at the Technical University of Liberec. The application is online available via the website of our study information system STAG: https://stag.tul.cz/portal/studium/uchazec?pc_lang=en You may also like to check the tutorial on completing the application form: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/completing-the-application-form Then you have to make a payment for the application fee (2,000 CZK or USD 100) to the bank account of the Technical University of Liberec. It is possible to send the payment using your credit/debit card during the application process in Stag which is the fasted payment method. Until the application fee is paid, we do not take any further steps. 2) You should prepare your curriculum vitæ (including your recent photo), and send it to: admission.ef@tul.cz. Please send also your diploma and transcript of your previous education. Please send all documents in PDF form, and name them according this rule:

•• ••

Your CV: Surname Name (CV).pdf Diploma and transcript: Surname Name (transcript). pdf

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3) There will be the admission interview using Skype. Please provide us your Skype ID. You will be informed ahead on the details. During the interview the commission will assess the candidate’s prerequisites and abilities for studies (professional focus of previous studies, study results of previous studies, language skills and expertise). 4) As you applied to Master’s degree, you will need a nostrification of your bachelor’s university education. General instructions for recognition of the tertiary education you may find here: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/recognition-of-previous-education Nostrification is a process, when the Czech state (or any of its representatives) officially approves that your previous education is comparable and compatible with the Czech education system. We recommend to start the nostrification process as soon as you receive a positive result of the admission procedure, because without this document we cannot enrol you into studies at the university. 5) You have to get your study visa. In case you are admitted to studies at our faculty, we will issue a letter of acceptance and a resolution and we will send them to you as originals which you will need for the visa process. To support your visa application you will also need a letter of accommodation which is issued by our Accommodation Office and it is send electronically via wire transfer to the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs which should forward it to the Embassy in your country. It should be taken into account that to get the study visa can be a lengthy process, so it is advisable to start soonest possible. You should check up the situation at the Czech Embassy or Consulate in your home country and try to find out how long it generally takes to issue a student visa. You should also probably book an appointment there well in advance. https://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/applying-for-visa For students from specified countries (Iran, Ghana, India, Russia (Moscow, Petrograd and Yekaterinburg), Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine (Lvov, Kiev), Serbia, Philippines, Vietnam, Egypt, Pakistan, China, Turkey and Nigeria), there is a possibility to apply for visa to the Czech Republic with our assistance. There is a special visa regime called “STUDENT” for your country if you apply via our university. This special regime could be used only in case that you have not yet applied for a visa in your country and that you do not have an appointment there!!! Duplicate requests are not allowed.


6) The tuition fee is USD 3.500 per year. We do not provide any scholarship for our non-EU students. The tuition fee has to be paid within 30 days after the receipt of the Decision on study-related fees for study programmes carried out in a foreign language. 7) If you wish to stay at the student’s halls of residence of the Technical University of Liberec, the monthly rent starts from USD 110. You may also find the cost-of-living structure at the website of the Technical University in Liberec. http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/fee-structure-and-costs-of-living If you have any other questions related to the Faculty of Economics, please do not hesitate to contact us. Should you have any questions concerning practical matters, nostrification or visa process, please contact our International Department – international@tul.cz.

The tuition fee is 3.500 USD per year. You can check the cost-of-living structure at the FAQ section.

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How to Apply for Doctoral Study Programmes? Application for Doctoral Study Programmes What you have to do first, is to submit your Application for study at the Technical University of Liberec. The application is online available via the website of our study information system STAG: https://stag.tul.cz/portal/studium/uchazec?pc_lang=en You may also like to check the tutorial on completing the application form: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/completing-the-application-form We reserve the right not to include your application into the admission process if there is no available supervisor for your professional specialization. So next, we have to check whether there is a match in your scientific specialization. Please send to email: admissions.ef@tul.cz (all in PDF form):

•• •• ••

your curriculum vitæ (including your photo), proposal for the topic of your dissertation (5-10 pages) and a list of your published papers, if any, diploma and transcript of your previous education.

Please send all documents in PDF form, and name them according this rule: Your CV: Surname Name (CV).pdf Diploma and transcript: Surname Name (transcript). pdf Proposal for dissertation based on your professional specialization: Surname Name (proposal).pdf

•• •• ••


Specialization and offer of possible topics of individual supervisors you can find here: http://www.ef.tul.cz/en/document/755 On the basis of your dissertation proposal the Scientific Board will assess whether the proposed topic is in line with the research scope of the faculty. When there is a match you should make a payment for the application fee (2,000 CZK or USD 100) to the bank account of the Technical University of Liberec. It is possible to send the payment using your credit/debit card during the application process in Stag which is the fasted payment method. The admission process than follows: 1) There will be the admission interview using Skype. Please provide us your Skype ID. You will be informed ahead on the details. During the interview the commission will assess the candidate’s prerequisites and abilities for studies (professional focus of previous studies, study results of previous studies, language skills and expertise, proposal of topic for dissertation thesis, existing publishing activities, participation in projects, practice, etc.). 2) As you applied to Doctoral degree, you will need a nostrification of your Master’s university education. General instructions for recognition of the tertiary education you may find here: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/recognition-of-previous-education Nostrification is a process, when the Czech state (or any of its representatives) officially approves that your previous education is comparable and compatible with the Czech education system. We recommend to start the nostrification process as soon as you receive a positive result of the admission procedure, because without this document we cannot enrol you into studies at the university. 3) You have to get your study visa. In case you are admitted to studies at our faculty, we will issue a letter of acceptance and a resolution and we will send them to you as originals which you will need for the visa process.

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To support your visa application you will also need a letter of accommodation which is issued by our Accommodation Office and it is send electronically via wire transfer to the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs which should forward it to the Embassy in your country. It should be taken into account that to get the study visa can be a lengthy process, so it is advisable to start soonest possible. You should check up the situation at the Czech Embassy or Consulate in your home country and try to find out how long it generally takes to issue a student visa. You should also probably book an appointment there well in advance. https://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/applying-for-visa For students from specified countries (Iran, Ghana, India, Russia (Moscow, Petrograd and Yekaterinburg), Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Ukraine (Lvov, Kiev), Serbia, Philippines, Vietnam, Egypt, Pakistan, China, Turkey and Nigeria), there is a possibility to apply for visa to the Czech Republic with our assistance. There is a special visa regime called “STUDENT” for your country if you apply via our university. This special regime could be used only in case that you have not yet applied for a visa in your country and that you do not have an appointment there!!! Duplicate requests are not allowed. 4) The tuition fee is USD 1.200 per year. We do not provide any scholarship for our non-EU students. The tuition fee has to be paid within 30 days after the receipt of the Decision on study-related fees for study programmes carried out in a foreign language. 5) If you wish to stay at the student’s halls of residence of the Technical University of Liberec, the monthly rent starts from USD 110. You may also find the cost-of-living structure at the website of the Technical University in Liberec. http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/fee-structure-and-costs-of-living If you have any other questions related to the Faculty of Economics, please do not hesitate to contact us. Should you have any questions concerning practical matters, nostrification or visa process, please contact our International Department – international@tul.cz. https://www.tul.cz/en/international-office


Always with a smile. If you have any questions regarding the admission process, don’t hesistate to ask us at admissions.ef@tul.cz

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PRACTICAL INFORMATION


Practical Information Accommodation Accommodation is booked upon acceptance of the student at Harcov Residence Halls. The cost for students is 90 CZK/day for a single bed in a double room. A small kitchen and a bathroom are shared for each unit of two or three double rooms. There is no need to send a special application form or to register. A deposit of 5,000 CZK is required at arrival in cash and in Czech crowns. The student should announce the date and time of arrival by e-mail and pay accommodation from the beginning of the semester even if he/she arrives later. The address of Harcov Residence Halls: Koleje Harcov (pronounced [koleye hartsof ]), 17. listopadu 584, 46015 Liberec 15, Czech Republic (e-mail: us.koleje@tul.cz).

Harcov Residence Halls Now you know, where you are going to stay.


Coming to Liberec Liberec is easily accessible from Prague by coach or by car. The distance is approximately 100 km on the motorway. Having arrived in Prague (Vaclav Havel Airport), you need to make your way to the Prague bus station called Černý Most (which means “Black Bridge”). The easiest way is as follows:

•• First of all you need to buy the bus ticket in the bus office (transport information) situated

in the airport or in the machine situated at the bus stop. You can also buy a ticket by SMS from your mobile phone. Take the ticket which is available for 90 min, then you don’t need to buy another one for Metro. You need to take bus No.100. The bus stop is located in front of the airport.

•• Get off the bus 100 at Zličín (the last stop) and go to the Metro. This is indicated by an M sign. The journey to the terminal station Černý Most takes about 45 minutes.

•• In Černý Most head down, next to the platform number 6 (one floor below the metro) to take a yellow bus by Regio Jet (to Liberec – Fugnerova-Blazkova). Here you can find the Regio Jet (Student Agency) office where you can purchase the bus ticket from Prague to Liberec. The buses go quite frequently. But remember, the last bus from Prague to Liberec leaves at 9 pm (sometimes at 11 pm], later there is no connection till the next day!

•• You need to get off the bus at the bus station Fugnerova-Blazkova. It is the first stop of the bus (the journey from Prague takes about 60 minutes). This is a public transportation terminal of Liberec.

•• Before leaving your country check the departure of your coach at: www.regiojet.com. •• It is also possible to use the services of Flixbus (green buses). The buses leave from Černý Most as well, but also from Florenc bus station.

•• When you arrive to Prague by bus (Flixbus, Eurolines, or other), then it will most likely be at the bus station Florenc. Booking the tickets in advance is necessary: www.flixbus.com, www.eurolines.com.

•• To travel to your final destination – students’ halls - please take the bus no. 15 or 29 to “Univerzitní koleje” stop. Before you enter the bus or tram, you need to buy a ticket.

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Health Care at the University Services of the general practitioners and dentists are provided to all students directly on the campus and in the halls of residence of TUL. International students and staff are advised On campus (building F): GENERAL PRACTITIONER: DENTIST:

to ask a Czech speaking person for assistance when going to visit the physician for the first time. Don’t forget to take your insurance card with you!

MUDr. Dagmar Švorcová, MUDr. Alexander Pimakhin,

phone: +420 485 353 163 phone: +420 485 353 261

Halls of Residence in Harcov (block F): GENERAL PRACTITIONER: MUDr. Petra Lajžnerová, phone: +420 607 888 930 http://www.praktikliberec.cz/ DENTIST (block E): MDDr. Karin Tomehová phone: +420 734 218 288

Dining on the Campus The university campus provides a number of opportunities for finding the meal that suits you. Vegetarian and gluten-free options are available on a daily basis in the university canteens. The price of each meal is about EUR

1-3 and meals can be ordered up to one week in advance online. There are other dining options around the campus and in city centre in public restaurants.

TUL Library https://knihovna.tul.cz/en/ The University Library provides access to information through its book collection, journals, databases, e-books, theses and e-learning. The library is housed in the H building, it has a branch in E2. A maximum of 20 items can be borrowed at any one time. Textbooks can be borrowed for 2 months (60 days), books for 1 month (30 days). Magazines and games can be borrowed for up to

a week (7 days), the latest issue of the magazine is always available only as in-house loan. Nonbook documents such as CDs, DVDs, etc. have a borrowing period of 2 weeks (14 days). The same period applies to eBook readers. All borrowings can be extended twice (unless the information source is reserved by another user). Study rooms with university network computers are available.


Building H Building H is the main location of the Faculty of Economics. However, some lectures could be given in other buildings. You can recognize in which building the classroom is by the first letter, e.g. Hxx – building H, Pxx – building P. The second letter is the floor (this rule doesn’t apply to teachers’ offices; office No. H-841 is on the 7th floor, H-621 is on the 5th floor etc.).

ground floor

university canteen & cafeteria

access to TUL Library

1st and 2nd floors

UNIHOTEL

3rd floor

classrooms H31 – H39

4th floor

classrooms H41 – H47

5th floor Study Office

Dean & Secretary of the Faculty

classrooms H52 & H53 KMG – Department of Marketing and Trade KCJ – Department of Foreign Languages KSY – Department of Economic Statistics

6th floor

classrooms HI2, H61 & H62

KPE – Department of Business Administration and Management KCJ – Department of Foreign Languages 7th floor meeting room classroom HI1 KEK – Department of Economics KFU – Department of Finance and Accounting KIN – Department of Informatics

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street names

STREET NAMES

Map of University Buildings A

Hálkova

IC

Studentská

B, C, D

Čížkova

K

1. máje

E

Studentská

L

Bendlova

F

Husova

M

17. listopadu

G

Studentská

P

Komenského

H

Voroněžská

S

Sokolská

N

W

H

E S

S

K

P JnN


1

TOWN HALL

ZOO

Towards ZOO

2

F. X. Å ALDA THEATRE

JnN

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MUSEUM

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FORMER CITY BATHS - REGIONAL GALLERY

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REGIONAL LIBRARY LIBEREC

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Liberec Top Attractions Liberec, in the Northern Bohemian region not far from the borders with Poland and Germany, is a place that will nourish both body and mind. The city is on the fringe of the Jizera Mountains, with a bowl of soaring peaks and evergreen mountainsides all around. In winter Liberec is a prime snow sport destination and a fixture on

the ski jumping circuit, while in summer the opportunities for outdoor adventure are almost endless. Inside Liberec there’s a wealth of things to do for ages, but the city’s strong point is its “edutainment” attractions that everybody is sure to adore.

Ještěd It doesn’t matter where you are in the city, you’ll be able to spot a strange space-age building atop the city’s highest peak. This icon for Liberec is a combined television tower, hotel and restaurant dating to 1966. The structure is a hyperboloid, a kind of upside-down cone that was designed to enhance the outline of the

mountain. Go in for a closer look by road or via the cable-car at Horní Hanychov. If you’re up for the hike you could also walk the mountain trail, and at the peak you’ll be able to savour a view that extends out over most of Northern Bohemia as well as parts of Germany and Poland.

Town Hall Standing proud on Edvard Benes Square, this grand and intricately-decorated building is another symbol for Liberec and a reminder of the city’s Austro-Hungarian past. It was designed by the Viennese architect Franz Neumann in the alpine renaissance style at the end of the

19th century, and bears a striking resemblance to Vienna’s own town hall. The stained-glass windows are exceptionally complex, while the narrow ceremonial tower rises 62 metres above the square.


Liberec Town Hall Standing proud on Edvard Benes Square

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Liberec Zoo This animal attraction is the oldest in the country, but that isn’t to say that its standards are outdated. More than 130 species are kept in 13 spacious hectares of landscaped enclosures. Liberec Zoo has full European accreditation and takes part reintroduction programs for birds of prey. The big story for guests is the park’s numerous wild cats, among which are white Bengal tigers (the only ones to be found in the Czech Republic), lions, snow leopards and lynxes.

Botanical Garden Quieter than its neighbour the zoo, Liberec’s Botanical Garden is the senior attraction of the two, dating back 120 years. There are nine elegant metal and glass pavilions here sustaining a range of habitats. One pavilion that is sure to draw the curious is the fearsome display of carnivorous plants. Elsewhere there’s

a giant corpse plant, Europe’s oldest bonsai tree, which was present at the garden’s inception in 1882, and a wonderful collection of orchids from around the world. Two of the pavilions also boast aquariums, and include an underwater walkway where tropical fish swim over visitors’ heads.

Museum of North Bohemia Liberec has a long tradition for textile manufacturing, to the point where the city has been dubbed the “Manchester of Bohemia”. At this museum you can get to grips with this aspect of the city’s heritage and see models of traditional weaving workshops. There are interesting displays of local textiles and

tapestries, as well as decorative items such as furniture, glassware, jewellery, clocks, woodcarvings and ceramics. Other exhibits are devoted to the natural history and archaeology of Liberec and its surrounding region. Take time to admire the museum building, a lovely neogothic structure from the late-1800s.

Regional Art Gallery This fascinating cultural attraction includes permanent collections covering contemporary and 20th-century Czech art, 19th-century French impressionism, romantic German and Austrian works from the 1800s and Golden Age Dutch Paintings. Permanent exhibitions are combined with expertly-curated temporary

shows, that have included a huge range of topics, among them every phase of Czech art and design, as well numerous foreign movements, such as British 18th-century lithography. It’s well worth an afternoon of your time, whether you’re an art-lover or art-curious!


iQLANDIA Curious minds of all ages will adore this science centre where hundreds of interactive exhibits and hands-on experiments are at your fingertips. Educational entertainment is the name of the game at iQLANDIA, so you’ll be able to meet the Czech Republic’s first even humanoid robot or undergo authentic space training. You can also

suit-up and experience a simulated firestorm. Part of the same complex is iPARK, which is where little ones can get some answers to their big questions, and the Planetarium, where you can attend live screenings of the night sky, or watch HD movies about the cosmos and the natural world.

Babylon Centre The Babylon Centre is an entertainment, commercial and hotel complex under the roof of a regenerated textile factory. At more than 25,000 m2 it’s the largest attraction of its kind in the Czech Republic, and behind its doors is something for all comers. The littlest visitors can bounce around in soft play areas or zoom about

on traditional fairground rides. Teenagers and adults can try their hands at laser tag or bowling, and people of all ages can make a splash at the Aquapark with its themed pools and slides. If all that sounds like too much action, then book some “me-time” at the Wellness Centre for a bit of pampering and relaxation.

White Bengal tiger at the Liberec Zoo

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Bits and Pieces of Liberec Summer in Liberec From spring to autumn you’re free to set off into the glorious upland scenery that surrounds Liberec. The Jizera Mountains are to the northeast, and their soaring peaks and thick cloak of dark-green pine forest are almost Nordic in appearance. The warmer months are the time to pack your backpack and join a trail,

and paths marked in red are the longest or most challenging, often weaving along a mountain ridge. West of Liberec, straddling the German border, are the Lusatian Mountains. The peaks are smaller and the landscape is less forbidding, but the scenery is equally romantic, with rolling pasture dotted with farms and quaint villages.

Winter in Liberec When the snow starts to fall Liberec straps on its winter gear and welcomes high-profile competition. Every January the Ski Jumping World Cup comes to town, while in 2009 the prestigious FIS Nordic World Ski Championships were hosted by the city. If you’re a hockey fan then autumn to spring is when you can cheer on the local team, the Liberec Tigers, as they take to the ice in the Czech Extraliga.

If you want your own taste of the action then the picturesque village of Bedřichov is your gateway for downhill skiing and snowboarding, as well as more than 100 kilometres of crosscountry ski trails.


Average Weather in Liberec Liberec is part of the Czech Republic which mostly has a temperate continental climate and thus, has lower average temperatures throughout the year. The summers in Liberec are comfortable; the winters are freezing, dry, and windy; and it is partly cloudy year round.

Over the course of the year, the temperature typically varies from -5°C to 23°C and is rarely below -14°C or above 30°C. When you travel to Liberec in winter you can expect snow!

The winters can be cold about -5°C to -14°C

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Frequently Asked Questions Why should I apply for the Faculty of Economics of the TUL?

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Low prices compared to the rest of the Europe. Study in a beautiful mountain setting. Close proximity to Prague (60 minutes by bus). A family atmosphere at the faculty. Regular after-school activities such as sports and trips to the surrounding neighbourhoods and sights. Plentiful sports and activities such as cycling, skiing and hiking. Faculty of Economics is located in the centre of Liberec. International students are guaranteed accommodation in the university’s Halls of Residence in Harcov which were the winner of the Best University Halls of the Year Award in years 2014, 2013 and 2011. Health care at the university campus.

Where can I find more details about the Faculty of Economics and what it has to offer? Visit our websites: http://www.ef.tul.cz/en/ or http://www.ef.tul.cz/myuniversity/ where you will find many extra details not specified by this prospectus – and you can keep right up to date with any changes.

In which language can I study at the Faculty of Economics? All courses specified by this prospectus for incoming foreign student are taught in English.


How can I apply? Please visit website: https://stag.tul.cz/portal/studium/uchazec?pc_lang=en, where you can apply. You may also like to check the tutorial on completing the application form: http://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/completing-the-application-form

Why should I apply for the Faculty of Economics of the TUL?

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••

Low prices compared to the rest of the Europe. Study in a beautiful mountain setting. Close proximity to Prague (60 minutes by bus). A family atmosphere at the faculty. Regular after-school activities such as sports and trips to the surrounding neighbourhoods and sights. Plentiful sports and activities such as cycling, skiing and hiking. Faculty of Economics is located in the centre of Liberec. International students are guaranteed accommodation in the university’s Halls of Residence in Harcov which were the winner of the Best University Halls of the Year Award in years 2014, 2013 and 2011. Health care at the university campus.

No question is a stupid question! If you have some more, send us an e-mail or visit our websites.

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What is “nostrification” and why do I need it? “Nostrification” means the recognition of your previous education. Graduates of foreign schools, who have received a certificate confirming completion of primary, secondary or higher vocational education, may apply to the Regional Authority having jurisdiction for the place of residence of the applicant, to issue - a certificate recognising the equivalence of the foreign certificate in the Czech Republic in cases where the Czech Republic, on the basis of its international obligations, has committed to recognise a particular foreign certificate as equivalent to a certificate of education issued in the Czech Republic, or - a decision recognising the validity of a foreign certificate in the Czech Republic (nostrification), if the Czech Republic is not bound by an international treaty to recognise the foreign certificate as equivalent to a certificate of education issued in the Czech Republic. The following documents shall be attached to an application to recognise the equivalence of or to validate a foreign certificate: 1.

an original or certified copy of the foreign certificate,

2.

a document setting out the content and scope of the education completed in the foreign school,

3.

a document proving that the school is recognised by the state under whose legislation the foreign certificate was issued as part of its educational system, if this fact is not evident from the foreign certificate (in the case of nostrification),

4.

a certified copy of the documents referred to in Czech, executed by an interpreter registered in the Czech Republic in the list of official experts and interpreters (using the link www.justice. cz in the “Experts and Interpreters” section); documents prepared in Slovak do not need to be translated into Czech, or in English,

5.

the authenticity of signatures and stamps on the originals of foreign certificates and the fact that the school is recognised by the state under whose legislation the foreign certificate was issued must be verified by the relevant embassy/consulate of the Czech Republic and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the country under whose legislation the foreign certificate was issued, or a notary operating on the territory of such a state, unless stipulated otherwise in an international treaty binding on the Czech Republic (information on legalisation through a simplified certification form, the “apostille”, is available through the link: www.hcch.net/index_en.php?act=conventions.authorities&cid=41),


6.

a document attesting to the payment of an administrative fee for acceptance of the application amounting to CZK 3,000.

To download the application form please visit: https://www.tul.cz/en/admissions/recognition-ofprevious-education. The Regional Authority will only recognise a certificate confirming the level of education received at a foreign school if the content and scope of the studies completed correspond to studies at a primary school, secondary school or higher vocational school with a similar framework curriculum in the Czech Republic. In the nostrification proceedings, the Regional Authority compares the content and scope of the studies completed in the foreign school with studies under a similar framework curriculum in the Czech Republic. If the content and scope of the studies in the foreign school differs in part, the Regional Authority will order the applicant to take a nostrification examination. If the content and scope of the studies in the foreign school is substantially different, or the applicant does not pass the nostrification examination, the Regional Authority shall reject the application to recognise the education received abroad.

Diplomas from Germany, Poland, Hungary, Slovenia and Slovakia are recognized as equivalent, and nostrification is not needed!

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The nostrification examination is intended to verify that the knowledge and skills of the applicant correspond to the objectives and content of education provided under the relevant study programme. An applicant who is not a citizen of the Czech Republic is not required to take a nostrification examination in Czech language and literature. Nostrification examinations are generally given in Czech (pursuant to the provisions of Section 16 paragraph 3 of Act No. 500/2004 Coll., the Code of Administrative Procedure, as amended), and anyone who declares themselves unable to speak the language used in the proceedings has the right to an interpreter registered in the list of official interpreters, although this will be at his/her own expense. The deadline for processing the application is 30 days, provided all the necessary documentation has been submitted, or after completion of the nostrification examination; in more complex cases, this deadline may be extended.

Are there fees and other payments for studies? When applying for admission to the study programmes taught in English at the Technical University of Liberec in the academic year 2019/2020, you will be requested to pay three kinds of fees: 1. Application fee - 2000 CZK / 100 USD When you finish filling in the application form, you will need to complete the payment of the fee - use any of these options that is more convenient for you: Bank transfer Name of the account holder: Technicka univerzita v Liberci Name of the bank: CSOB (Ceskoslovenska obchodni banka Liberec Bank address: 1. maje 79/18, Liberec, 461 78, Czech Republic Swift (BIC-Bank Identifier code): CEKO CZ PP IBAN: CZ16 0300 0000 0006 8164 1013 Payment online To the right from the card symbols click on the button Zaplatit kartou. You will be redirected to Secure online payment website, that looks like the following printscreen.


Payment online The connection is secured, no need to worry.

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2. Fee for recognition/nostrification of previous higher education: 3,000 CZK 3. Tuition fees for programmes taught in English tuition fees for Bachelor and Master programmes (USD/Academic Year): 3,500 USD tuition fees for PhD. Programmes (USD/Academic Year): 1,200 USD

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There are no additional course fees, no charges for consumable materials or specialist equipment.

Can I get in contact with current students of the TUL? If you are interested in studying at the Technical University of Liberec and would like to speak to some current international students, ask them about their experience or advice, there are several International Student Ambassadors who have agreed to answer queries from abroad. We really appreciate their assistance done on a voluntary basis. https://www.tul.cz/en/international-office/prospective-students/international-student-ambassadors You can also follow the Technical University of Liberec and the Faculty of Economics on Facebook and Instagram, where you can join the group of International Students.

Can I get financial assistance while at the TUL? Financial assistance of the TUL is limited. Students from abroad can attempt at reaching one of the types of scholarships provided by the Czech Republic to international students:

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Scholarships of the Czech Government for Developing Countries Scholarships in Cooperation with Austria (AKTION) Scholarships from the Visegrad Fund Support for Compatriot Communities Abroad


What is the estimated cost of living? Apart from the above mentioned expenses, a future student should take into consideration the following living costs:

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Partners of the Faculty of Economics Main Partners

Partners


Equality and Diversity Promoting equality, fairness and diversity in the college is everybody’s responsibility.

Technical University in Liberec believes that: All people have a right to work or study at the university with an equal chance of success, free from fear of discrimination, harassment or intimidation.

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FE TUL

www.ef.tul.cz/myuniversity admissions.ef@tul.cz


Publisher:

Technical University of Liberec

Edited and produced by the Faculty of Economics, Technical University of Liberec: Lenka Strýčková. Designed by the creative team of the Faculty of Economics, Technical University of Liberec: Tereza Semerádová and Petr Weinlich. All information correct at time of publishing, December 2020.



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