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Thrive U N I V E R S I T Y O F S A S K AT C H E W A N    E D W A R D S S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S M A G A Z I N E    2 0 1 8

ENTREPRENEURSHIP ISSUE


What’s the Edwards Network?

It’s a networking platform exclusive to Edwards Alumni. Now our alumni can stay in touch with each other and with us from anywhere and at any time!

faculty as soon as you join! You’ll stay current on professional opportunities, social events, advances in education, and news about your classmates. It’s all these things in one place.

Why should I join?

How do I join?

It’s an easy way to stay connected and network online with thousands of Edwards alumni, faculty and graduating students. Just like traditional networking, the Edwards Network can help you find top recruits for your company, advance your career, keep in touch with your classmates and professors, and learn of upcoming alumni events.

How is it different from LinkedIn?

The Edwards Network is an open-door platform, where you’re connected to participating Edwards alumni and

It’s simple:

1. Go to www.edwardsalumni.com. 2. Click on the LinkedIn, Facebook or Email button and follow the prompts. 3. Explore the site, check out what fellow alumni have to offer and be part of the community.

Need help? Contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7539.


Here for you. At Federated Co-operatives Limited, we help to feed, fuel, grow and build Western Canada. We’re here to grow industries on a national scale and to support communities at the local level. But most importantly, we’re here for anyone who hopes to find an exciting, challenging and meaningful career.

WWW.FCL.CRS

®CO-OP and design trademark are registered trademarks of TMC Distributing Ltd., Saskatoon S7K 3M9.


N. MURRAY EDWARDS

Alumnus, friend, namesake Mr. Edwards has had a long-standing relationship with the University of Saskatchewan’s business school as a student, alumnus and donor. He believes strongly in the value of a business education. Over the years, he has given back to his alma mater so students today continue to receive an outstanding business education at the University of Saskatchewan. In June 2000, when the PotashCorp Centre addition was opened, the N. Murray Edwards Case Room was unveiled. One of several smart rooms in the centre, the case room seats 75 students, is equipped with up-to-date educational technologies and is used by faculty and students across campus. Throughout his university years in Saskatoon, Mr. Edwards had a keen interest in investing. On October 3, 2002 he rang the official bell and the N. Murray Edwards MarketWatch went live. This stock ticker board, installed on the main floor of the Nutrien Centre, still provides continuous stock and commodity information, bringing the business world to the halls of the business school. Faculty, staff and especially students benefit from the direct link to the investment industry.

EDUCATION BACHELOR OF COMMERCE GREAT DISTINCTION UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN BACHELOR OF LAWS HONOURS UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO HONORARY DEGREES LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

At the university’s Spring Convocation ceremony on June 2, 2011, Mr. Edwards was presented with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree, the highest honour the University of Saskatchewan can bestow.

CREDENTIALS LEADING INVESTOR AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN: • CANADIAN NATURAL RESOURCES LTD. • ENSIGN ENERGY SERVICES INC. • MAGELLAN AEROSPACE CORPORATION

The students, faculty and staff of the Edwards School are grateful for Mr. Edwards’ continued support. n

Thrive

RESIDENCE LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

On July 24, 2007, the University of Saskatchewan very proudly acknowledged Mr. Edwards’ continued relationship with the business school by transforming the College of Commerce to the N. Murray Edwards School of Business. Mr. Edwards’ investment in the business school allows us to gain recognition with our new brand and helps to position the business school as one of the top five in Canada.

Mr. Edwards continues to remain truly engaged in the activities of the business school, supporting the George S. Dembroski Student-Managed Portfolio Trust and acting as judge and keynote speaker at the 2013 National Mining Competition. He also gives his time and knowledge by serving on the Edwards School of Business Dean’s Advisory Council, and is a member of the Edwards Dean’s Circle.

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BIRTHPLACE REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN

2018

OCCUPATION CORPORATE DIRECTOR/INVESTOR

CHAIRMAN AND CO-OWNER: • CALGARY FLAMES HOCKEY CLUB OF THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE RECOGNITION • MEMBER OF THE ORDER OF CANADA • SASKATCHEWAN OIL PATCH HALL OF FAME • INTERNATIONAL HORATIO ALGER AWARD • COMPANION OF THE ORDER OF THE CANADIAN BUSINESS HALL OF FAME


PM#40013048

Thrive (thrīv) verb

1 to make steady progress; to

prosper; be fortunate or successful.

2 to grow vigorously; flourish.

STRATEGIC DIRECTOR Keith Willoughby EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Natasha Katchuk CREATIVE CONSULTANTS Shawna Jardine Christina Dolan WRITER & COPY EDITOR Jessica Stewart WRITERS Julie Barnes Natasha Katchuk Jasmine Liska Keith Willoughby PHOTOGRAPHY Artistic Expressions Photography Helen Fritz Dax Justin Natasha Katchuk Stobbe Photo Dawn Stranden Photography Nation Wong PUBLISHER Edwards School of Business 25 Campus Drive Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 5A7 PRODUCTION Mister Print / Printwest 619 8th Street East Saskatoon, SK S7H 0R1 ADVERTISING SALES thrive@edwards.usask.ca

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DEAN’S MESSAGE EDWARDS AT A GLANCE EDWARDS WINS BIG AT JDC WEST

Students brought home two coveted titles at the 2018 competition

STUDY SMART, STUDY LOCAL

Effective Executive Leadership Program wins international award

HOW UKRAINIAN DANCE INSPIRED COMMUNITY IN THE CLASSROOM

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5 PEOPLE, 5 JOBS BUILDING ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPACITY IN EDWARDS

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INVENTURE: ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

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LIVING SKIES CANNABIS

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New Edwards alumna among the first to open a recreational cannabis dispensary

SOME LIKE IT HAUTE

Edwards alumna pursues passion for fashion

PREFER DIGITAL? If you no longer wish to receive a printed copy, please email alumni@edwards.usask.ca or call 306-966-7539 and we’ll sign you up to receive only a digital version. Cover photos by David Stobbe

Murad Al-Katib (B.Comm. '94)

Kelly Lendsay (MBA '93)

Cierra Sieben-Chuback (B.Comm. '18)

Gord Haddock (B.Comm. '72)

Gabrielle Scrimshaw (B.Comm. '10)


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NOT YOUR ORDINARY ACCOUNTING FIRM

Eight Edwards alumni create dynamic corporate culture

LESSONS FROM A LIFELONG ENTREPRENEUR

Alumnus shares his journey

SPOTLIGHT ON FACULTY RESEARCH 57 YEARS AND COUNTING

Goldstein’s tale from a long stint teaching business law

EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS EARNS PRESTIGIOUS AACSB INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION PHOTO RECAP OF CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS DEAN’S SPEAKER SYMPOSIUM HIGHLIGHTS THE THEME OF CITIZENSHIP RECONCILIATION AND THE BUSINESS WORLD

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CENTENNIAL CITIZENSHIP CHALLENGE RESULTS DONOR ROLL STUDENTS MAKE BUSINESS EDUCATION AN ADVENTURE A LEADER LISTENS

EBSS president makes changes for the Edwards student body

BY THE NUMBERS

Faculty member Fred Phillips retires

THE COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF AN MBA

The MBA program celebrates 50 years

ALUMNI UPDATES

RETIREMENTS

IN MEMORIAM

INTRODUCING THE INAUGURAL PINNING CEREMONY

Edwards closes out centennial with a new tradition

Throughout this issue of Thrive you will see the Edwards Network icon at the end of some of our alumni articles. It’s a networking platform exclusive to Edwards alumni. Just like traditional networking, the Edwards Network can help you find top recruits for your company, advance your career, keep in touch with your classmates and professors, and learn about upcoming alumni events. Sign-up today by going to edwardsalumni.com.

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THE DEAN’S ADVISORY COUNCIL The DAC is comprised of business and community leaders from across Canada, and we are extremely fortunate to be able to engage their wisdom and experience. On a yearly basis, they provide advice and guidance on our strategic direction, and help increase our connectivity with alumni and friends.

Keith Willoughby

Murray Edwards

Dean and Chair of the DAC Edwards School of Business

Executive Chairman Canadian Natural Resources Limited

Shelley Brown

Wayne Brownlee

L. David DubĂŠ

James Estey

Tim Gitzel

Retired Partner Deloitte LLP

Executive VP and CFO Nutrien

President and CEO Concorde Group Corp.

Chairman PrairieSky Royalty/Gibson Energy

President and CEO Cameco

Gerald W. Grandey

Daniel Halyk

A. Stewart Hanlon

Russel Marcoux

George Marlatte

Retired President and CEO Cameco

President and CEO Total Energy Services Inc.

Board Director Gibson Energy Inc.

President and CEO Marcoux Bros. Trucking Ltd.

President Marlatte International Inc.

Keith Martell

R. Scott McCreath

Neil McMillan

Larry Moeller

Gordon Rawlinson

President and CEO First Nations Bank of Canada

Senior Investment Advisor BMO Nesbitt Burns Edwards Executive in Residence

Retired Chairman Cameco

President Kimball Capital Corp.

CEO Rawlco Radio Ltd.

Tracy Robinson

Marvin Romanow

Karen Stewart

W. Brett Wilson

Greg Yuel

Executive Vice-President, Canadian Natural Gas Pipelines TransCanada Corporation

Retired CEO Nexen Edwards Executive in Residence

Founder and CEO Fairway Divorce Solutions

Chairman Prairie Merchant Corp.

President and CEO PIC Investment Group

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WELCO THRIV #10! This annual edition brilliantly captures the essence of Edwards. Student case competition success, teacher-scholar triumphs, astounding alumni accolades, executive education excellence and so very much more. I am delighted with this issue’s final product and trust that you will relish the memories and moments as you peruse the pages. This past year has provided another superb opportunity for Edwards to deliver business education excellence and meaningful alumni engagement. Allow me to highlight four items (of many) that make me proud to be part of the Edwards School of Business. For starters, this year’s issue recognizes the vibrant importance of entrepreneurship. Beginning in this academic year, our COMM 447 entrepreneurship course—the class which has helped inspire ideas for such companies as 3twenty Modular, Prairie Proud Apparel and Living Skies Cannabis—has become a core academic offering. Student demand for this course has intensified. Today’s entrepreneurship programming inspiring tomorrow’s business leaders – what a wonderful concept! This entrepreneurship initiative—also known as InVenture—will support student learning in Edwards entrepreneurship classes. It will entrench our school as a valued component of the Saskatchewan entrepreneurship community. Ultimately, it will promote positive outcomes for students, companies and our province.

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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

OME TO VE ISSUE I also note that Edwards is cultivating a culture of intrapreneurship. This enables our graduates to act entrepreneurially, regardless of the industry in which they work. I encourage you to read our alumni stories in this year’s Thrive magazine. They highlight self-motivated business professionals who are pursuing their passions in a variety of endeavors. Secondly, allow me to give a shoutout to our Dembroski Student Managed Portfolio Trust (SMPT), a remarkably effective student-run investment portfolio in Edwards. This trust was launched in 2011 with a $1-million donation. In the first three years of its operation, the portfolio ballooned to $1.4 million. Recently, the trust fund eclipsed the $2-million mark! Although the superb investment returns demonstrate decision-making success, perhaps the better metric to assess SMPT’s imprint is the significant experiential learning opportunities provided to our students. They put their core knowledge into practice. They multiply their skill-set. Indeed, a portion of the investment income provides scholarships for students to participate annually in a Wall Street portfolio trust conference. Congratulations to our donors, students, alumni and professors for contributing to this superlative example of business school excellence. Next, a few words about our fabulous centennial reunion.

The three-day set of festivities kicked off with a Thursday golf tournament and networking reception. Notwithstanding my horrid golf game, the tournament was a smashing success (although my golf mates are campaigning to replace me in a future event). Friday featured a stupendous Dean’s Speaker Symposium. Five guest speakers captivated the audience. A noon-hour Lunch and Learn panel—comprised of Indigenous business and university leaders—addressed the timely topic of “Reconciliation and the Business World”. Class parties went into the wee hours of Friday evening (or was it Saturday AM?) with many alumni attendees viewing the U of S Huskies dismantling of our provincial football rivals. Saturday offered college and campus tours, a lunch-time BBQ in the Bowl and the inaugural (and fittingly phenomenal!) pinning ceremony. The reunion culminated with a centennial gala and cabaret. Jason Hastie—a B.Comm. and MPAcc alumnus— and his group (“Jason Hastie & The Alibi”) provided the evening’s musical entertainment. Murray Edwards led the attendees with a resounding “TOAST” as part of his centennial gala remarks. Three days of celebrating, communicating, commemorating and commiserating. Finally, permit me to provide some glowing remarks on our earning accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business

(AACSB). Synonymous with the highest standards of quality, AACSB accreditation inspires new ways of thinking within business education globally and, as a result, places Edwards among the top five per cent of business schools worldwide. Accreditation demonstrates the tremendous quality and impressive impact of our program curriculum and faculty research. It enables our school to measure success, carve plans for the pursuit of ongoing improvement, and continue to deliver excellent business education. At the end of the day, what does it mean for us to deliver excellent business education? It means developing professionals to build nations.

business

Using the language of our First Nations Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers, it means “nikanitan manacihitowinihk” (“Let us lead with respect”). It means students and alumni who volunteer to be a note taker for a student with a disability, or devote time and enthusiasm in building homes for Habitat for Humanity. It means each and every one of you who contribute to your companies and communities, who build your neighborhood or your nation, who give back but never give up, who truly stand up and stand out. It is who we are. It was what we do. Thank you for being part of our story! n

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DEAN’S SENDOFF Daphne Taras, our Edwards School of Business dean from 20102016, has been appointed dean of the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University. Her contributions to Edwards are impressive. Using a profound ability to cultivate relationships, she facilitated the launch of the Dean’s Circle, a group of alumni and business people who help us enhance the student experience. She navigated our school through the process of obtaining AACSB accreditation.

NATION WONG

She worked tirelessly on the creation of the LabourManagement Relations Certificate, an intensive five-day program intended for university representatives, as well as human resource and labour relations managers. Daphne’s words ring true, “I will be forever grateful for my experiences with the Edwards School of Business, and I have a big piece of my heart in Saskatchewan.” All of us congratulate and acknowledge Daphne on her tremendous work at Edwards. n

EDWARDS CELEBRATES HONORARY DEGREE RECIPIENT During the university’s 2018 Spring Convocation ceremonies Merlis M.R. Belsher was presented with an Honorary Doctorate of Law degree, the highest honour the University of Saskatchewan can bestow. Belsher grew up on a farm near McCord, a village in southern Saskatchewan named after his pioneer grandfather. He completed high school at Luther College in Regina then enrolled at the U of S where he graduated from both commerce (1957) and law (1963). Between degrees, he earned his chartered accountant designation (1960) and in 1964 he was admitted to the Law Society of Saskatchewan. Belsher was president/owner of Weldon’s Concrete Products in Saskatoon for 43 years where he grew the manufacturing company and earned

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the reputation as a wellrespected employer and philanthropist in the business community. Over his career he has received numerous major awards including a U of S Alumni Achievement Award, the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, a Fellow Chartered Professional Accountant designation from CPA Saskatchewan and Senior Life Membership from the Law Society of Saskatchewan. He has been inducted into the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce SABEX Hall of Fame and the Junior Achievement of Saskatchewan Business Hall of Fame. Belsher is also an avid volunteer in the Saskatoon community and has served on several boards and committees of athletic and non-profit organizations.

DAVID STOBBE

He is currently a member of the Edwards School Dean’s Circle, the disciplinary committee of CPA Saskatchewan and the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan. He has not only been generous with his time but he has also provided the opportunity for Edwards students to attend numerous networking events from organizations like NSBA, CPA Saskatchewan and SABEX. Our MPAcc students have also directly benefited from Belsher’s expertise in business and law through hands-on case study analysis in the classroom. n


AT A GLANCE

(2017-18 ACADEMIC YEAR)

OUR STUDENTS

1,912 10 17 87 144

2,170 TOTAL STUDENTS PLUS 100’S IN CERTIFICATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

ALUMNI

B.COMM. M.SC. MARKETING M.SC. FINANCE MBA MPACC

B.COMM. EMPLOYMENT RATE

EDWARDS HAS GRANTED MORE THAN 27,000 DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES

16,776 B.COMM. 1,145 MPACC 1,429 MBA 140

MASTER OF SCIENCE & DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

7,673 CERTIFICATES ___________________________ TOTAL

27,163

B.COMM. EMPLOYMENT RATE

CO-OP EMPLOYMENT RATE

92.9 % 98.6 % *

*

(76% RESPONSE RATE)

(95% RESPONSE RATE)

* of those looking for work

WHERE OUR GRADUATES LIVE *based on valid addresses in the university database as of August 2018

SCHOLARSHIPS REST OF CANADA: 7% SASKATOON: 39% REGINA: 6% REST OF SK: 17% ALBERTA: 20% BC: 7%

$1,300,000

UNDERGRADUATE

$317,000 GRADUATE

USA/INTL: 3%

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EDWARDS WINS AT JDC WEST JESSICA STEWART

Our JDC West team had an amazing experience at the 2018 competition and brought home the awards to prove it. “It was an absolutely surreal experience for all 52 members of our team,” said cocaptain Tanner Gattinger. “Eight months of weekly practices, lectures, early mornings, late nights and many hours of volunteer work paid off with the much-deserved School of the Year and Academic School of the Year awards.” “Our team’s commitment to attacking cases every week, understanding real-world business issues, and providing structured and thorough recommendations set them apart,” said cocaptain Ryan Nieman. JDC West is Western Canada’s largest undergraduate business student competition, bringing together over 600 students to gain real-world experience in academics, debate, athletics, community involvement, and an out-of-the-box social competition. The 2018 competition was held at the University of Calgary. “JDC West is like no other experience you can be a part of at the Edwards School of Business,” said Nieman. “The opportunity to compete against 12 top business schools allows students to develop networking skills, critical thinking abilities and leadership qualities.” “This type of experiential learning forces you to push yourself in a highly stressful, emotional and pressure-filled weekend,” said Gattinger. “It is truly

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amazing what you can accomplish when everyone buys into a vision and does their best to see that vision out.” What the team accomplished was truly inspiring: seven first-place awards, and one second place and three third-place finishes. The Edwards team also raised over $14,500 for Habitat for Humanity Saskatoon, and logged more than 1,500 volunteer hours. The students gave their time to charities like Habitat for Humanity, the Royal University Hospital Foundation, the Ronald McDonald House, the Friendship Inn, Junior Achievement and Parkinson Canada. “These results are an impressive accomplishment,” said Keith Willoughby, dean of the Edwards school. “Our mission is to develop business professionals to build nations and the entire Edwards team embodied this quality in their performance. The win marks the first time Edwards has won both prestigious School of the Year and Academic titles.” Special thanks go to faculty advisor Nathalie Johnstone, as well as sponsors CPA Saskatchewan, CPHR, the Edwards Business Students’ Society, Federated Co-op, MNP LLP, Virtus Group and the University of Saskatchewan. n Congratulations to the Edwards JDC West team!

1ST PLACE ACADEMIC SCHOOL OF THE YEAR SCHOOL OF THE YEAR PARTICIPATION INTRODUCTION VIDEO HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Team members: Riley Stefaniuk, Meghan Johnson and Thomas Stanzeleit Coaches: Shelby McLeod, Bre Chaben, and Trevor Maber TAXATION Team members: Andrea Landstad, Amy Ottmann and Taylor Reich Coach: Nathalie Johnstone ATHLETICS Team members: Kira Barr, Abbie Reich, Carly Spooner, Tyler Wagner, Matthew Baker, Trent Walker, Rhett Kappel and Donovan Smith Coach: Mark Nieman

2ND PLACE BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY Team members: Davis Fader, Emily Martell and Zachary Yuzdepski Coaches: Shan Wang, Tanner Assie, Preston Campbell and Dustin Wagner

3RD PLACE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Team members: Eric Turcotte, Naina Nicodemus and Jordan Sinclair Coaches: David Zhang, Romeo Nkunzimana and Jason Tran MARKETING Team members: Benjamin Petruk, Emily Sweeney and Erica Chessall Coaches: Marjorie Delbaere and Adam Slobodzian NOT-FOR-PROFIT Team members: Dani Nicols, Mathea Mitchell and Kendra Vanstone Coaches: Jared Fingler, Kara Leftley and Nathalie Johnstone


Study Smart, Study Local:

EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP PROGRAM WINS INTERNATIONAL AWARD “The most important insight I took from the program was that there is a real and tangible skill set to leadership that can be learned and that I have continued to pursue.” SUSAN ROSS PRESIDENT, WATER SECURITY AGENCY EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP PROGRAM ALUMNA DAVID STOBBE

JESSICA STEWART

Shared win with York University Edwards Executive also shared a win with the Schulich School of Business at York University. Our Master Certificate in Project Management was awarded Best Partnership Program.

“When the local economy took a drastic down turn, RMD chose to upgrade with Edwards Executive Education. We have had six people take the Masters Certificate in Project Management (MCPM) over the last six years and so far three have attained their PMP certification. It is no surprise that this is an awardwinning program.” JIM BOIRE OWNER, RMD ENGINEERING MASTER CERTIFICATE IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT ALUMNUS SPRING 2014

We’ve always been proud of our Effective Executive Leadership Program. This flagship, retreat-style program covers six core areas—personal growth, working with others, performance measurement, strategic management, organizational culture and ethical decision making—in beautiful Waskesiu, Saskatchewan. Still, it’s very exciting to have the excellence of our program recognized, especially at the premiere international conference for executive and continuing education. This past November, at the 40th Annual Conference on Management & Executive Development (CMED), our Effective Executive Leadership Program received the Best Legacy Program Award. The top three nominees, including programs from Boise State University and University of Ontario Institute of Technology, prepared presentations for the conference. Then the delegates voted for the winner. “This award validates what we are doing with this program, the fact that over 150 of our university peers voted for Effective Executive made receiving this award very special. They know what makes a good program last and chose EE based on its own merits, which is exciting!” says

Executive Education Manager Christina Dolan. The win is a great reminder that professionals don’t have to look far for high-quality executive education. Our leadership training is competitive on an international scale. Now in its 37th year, Effective Executive is a finely-tuned program. The training starts with sessions on personal growth including a fitness component, then moves to topics dealing with work groups, change and conflict, to issues at the organizational level. Sessions are facilitated by expert practitioners and faculty whom participants are able to book one-on-one consultations with, and networking and social events are built into the schedule. “Effective Executive provides a rich learning experience for senior managers and prospective executives,” Dolan says. “We always receive positive feedback from our alumni, and our rate of repeat registrations from the same company is around 85 per cent.” Now more professionals will discover that it’s truly smart to study local. n

Visit edwards.usask.ca/execed for more information.

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Master Teacher Chelsea Willness

HOW UKRAINIAN DANCE INSPIRED COMMUNITY IN THE CLASSROOM JESSICA STEWART DAWN STRANDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

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HOW UKRAINIAN DANCE INSPIRED COMMUNITY IN THE CLASSROOM

Willness performing at the Vesna Festival with the Pavlychenko Folklorique Ensemble.

With students in the Governance and Leadership Development Practicum.

SUPPLIED

The Master Teacher Award recognizes faculty members at the University of Saskatchewan who make outstanding contributions to the learning and working environments of the university. Associate Professor Chelsea Willness received this award in 2017 in large part for being a champion of community-engaged education.

already part of my network, I’ll make a cold call to see if they’re interested in a partnership. The response is usually an enthusiastic ‘yes!’”

Willness designs and teaches multiple courses in the Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour incorporating topics like leadership, corporate social responsibility and governance. She has integrated community-based experiential learning into her courses for most of her career, connecting students with local non-profit organizations, but Willness’s own experience with Saskatoon’s Ukrainian dance group Pavlychenko Folklorique Ensemble (PFE) inspired her to take community engagement to the next level in the last few years.

Partner organizations for the GLDP course have ranged from Habitat for Humanity to the Broadway Theatre to Bridge City Bike Co-op. Students sit on the board of their partner organization, participate in events and join committees under the mentorship of an experienced board mentor. Each student also produces a report, analysis or another deliverable that’s of real value to the non-profit partner at the end of the course.

AN EARLY EXPERIENCE OF AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP

In addition to dancing with PFE for many years, Willness was president of the board at age 20, which was a formative experience for her. “Many people involved with non-profits and volunteering are drawn to it because of the mission of the organization. I cared about performing arts, culture and dance,” she said. “I was very engaged in PFE, both as a dancer and with the governance of this small non-profit.” In Willness’s Governance and Leadership Development Practicum (GLDP) course, she works to connect students with the issues and organizations they’re drawn to, harnessing that existing passion. Students who get into the course fill out a survey to identify which aspects of the sector they’re most passionate about. “I also ask them to list any organizations that they’re particularly interested in,” Willness said. “If the organization isn’t

Willness said the key to a meaningful learning experience is to have students connect with the mission of the organization. “Students really care about the work of the organization. There’s a passion project element to it,” she said. “I’ve carried my experience on the PFE board with me throughout my life and as an educator. Now I get to guide and mentor students of similar ages engaging in leadership activities in the community.”

“The course arose not only from the desire to provide students with a high-quality experiential learning opportunity but also to contribute to leadership sustainability and growth in the nonprofit sector,” Willness explained. “There was a time when I couldn’t imagine what my life would be like if I didn’t dance,” Willness said. “Of course, we all evolve and become passionate about other things as well.” For Willness, the passion for creating authentic learning communities has extended her reach outward through dozens of diverse non-profit organizations and hundreds of students. And her passion for dance remains today, as Willness notes she has returned to the studio over the last couple of years in flamenco, Ukrainian and ballet. n

Edwards thanks Associate Professor Chelsea Willness for her dedication to communityengaged learning. Congratulations on your well-deserved Master Teacher Award!

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55 PEOPLE

JOBS

What can you do with a business education?

Five outstanding Edwards graduates tell us what they love about being an entrepreneur.

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JEFF FRIESEN

MADELINE CONN

PRESIDENT NORTHPAW NUTRITION INC. NORTHPAWNUTRITION.COM B.COMM. '07

FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT HIGH KEY BREWING CO. HKBREW.CA MBA '12

I am passionate about innovating in an ever-changing and competitive industry with a constantly moving target. The product research and development stage is demanding, from formulating recipes with the nutritionist to packaging; it’s a puzzle with many moving parts that must come together perfectly. It’s a rewarding experience to see your ideas, which my degree helped develop, transform into natural products being sold across the country and internationally. Receiving feedback on how a NorthPaw product enhanced the life of a pet makes all the hard work worthwhile.

I have the greatest job! I spend my days meeting and working with amazing people who appreciate quality craft beer. Without the MBA program, I don’t think that I would have the skills or confidence to pursue my dream in such an all-ornothing business. It’s been a long road filled with many highs and some lows, but worth every moment. I appreciate the opportunity to support and work with other local entrepreneurs and producers in an industry that is focused on building the local community. Plus, the odd pint always makes any work day a little easier!


AMANDA BRINDLEY

DUSTIN MAKI

NOLIN VEILLARD

OWNER & INSTRUCTOR FITBUMP FITBUMP.CA B.COMM. '03

CEO/FOUNDER CREATE CAFE INC. CREATECAFE.CA B.COMM. '16

FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR TRAK OUTDOORS LTD. TRAKKAYAKS.COM B.COMM. '95

My passion is creating a supportive community for women, helping them feel strong while educating and empowering them about their bodies. My degree has helped me with the business side of running a prenatal and postnatal fitness studio—especially connecting with my audience and creating a strong brand. I love spending time with these amazing women every day! Moms are so strong and continually inspire me. Plus I love the flexibility; my daughter comes to work with me and gets to see her mom living her dream and supporting other women.

Create Cafe gives me an opportunity to share my passion with anyone who has the desire to create. The 3D print technology essentially unhinges the limits of creativity. My degree was foundational in understanding and anticipating many of the aspects entrepreneurs face in starting up a business. I love that 3D printing is multi-industry because it allows us to span medicine, aviation, manufacturing and beyond. Bringing the technology to schools is the next step, and I’m excited to work with the next generation and see what the future could look like.

Wow, what a ride! It takes deep roots to grow strong, and my upbringing and education in Saskatchewan helped nourish my entrepreneurial spirit. When I set out on my career over 20 years ago, I wouldn’t have dreamed that I’d build an international kayak company, enabling thousands of people to have unleashed experiences paddling their bucket lists. Our revolutionary portable kayaks have allowed us to build a global group of water adventurers. This path is rewarding, but it is not easy. My background in finance and business have been invaluable in navigating the waters of entrepreneurship.

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BUILDING ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPACITY IN EDWARDS NATASHA KATCHUK This fall, associate professor Lee Swanson formally embarked on something he is very passionate about. For the last year and a half, as the director of InVenture: Entrepreneurship in Action, he has been working on starting up this new Edwards strategic initiative. While entrepreneurship has been part of the student experience in Edwards for many years through events like business plan competitions, the Gordon & Maureen Haddock Entrepreneurial Speaker Series, and more recently a partnership with Square One on a video production project to support entrepreneurs, student feedback suggested there was an appetite for more.

“This course will be a culminating experience for students in their degree, combining core business knowledge and strengthening written and oral communications skills,” said Swanson. “We are also engaging the business and not-for-profit communities as part of our academic mission by providing the opportunity for students to write business plans with and for clients.”

“COMM 447 is an inside look at what it takes to become an entrepreneur through the creation of a plan for a new venture or an expansion of an existing business,” explained Swanson. “The course will help students become entrepreneurial thinkers to provide better service in their future industries and disciplines.”

“Previously COMM 447 was a core requirement for students pursuing a management major and an elective for students in other majors,” said Swanson. “The demand and popularity for the course only grew as we began adding more sections and exploring new partnerships.”

For some students, it will be their first exposure to entrepreneurship. Swanson explained while not everyone’s career path will focus on entrepreneurship, COMM 447 is an opportunity to learn about the full spectrum of business. He likens it to a spider web.

Through a series of workshops and deliverables in COMM 447, students will develop a comprehensive business plan for a startup, expansion or succession. In doing so, students integrate their knowledge from the disciplines of finance, marketing, accounting, operations management, human resources and business strategy.

“When you use a business plan lens you start to see how the courses blend and how changing things, like pulling strings, causes shifts in the web,” said Swanson. “When product design changes, the promotions plan needs to change, which causes you to shift the strings somewhere else. If you add another person to your team, the whole web shifts again, and you may have to generate sales. There are so many scenarios that require strategic thinking.”

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DAWN STRANDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Business classes usually focus on operating processes for ventures that are beyond the start-up phase, which left a need for students to learn about the time between becoming a start-up and an ongoing business.

As the enthusiasm for entrepreneurship has unfolded, a foundational aspect is ensuring all Edwards students are exposed to entrepreneurship through the inclusion of COMM 447: Entrepreneurship and Venture Development as a core class for all students in the Bachelor of Commerce curriculum.

Students will also have access to an online platform that matches business buyers and sellers through a partnership with SuccessionMatching. Their service provides an opportunity for students and alumni who pre-qualify to match with businesses wishing to transition to new

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ownership.

Swanson sums up the experience students will gain in COMM 447 as truly embodying entrepreneurship in action. n

Business Showcase An inaugural event is slated for June 2019 where students are invited to enter their business plan and test their ideas with experienced entrepreneurs, meet potential investors and raise seed funding. The winning team will receive startup cash and prizes will also be awarded to the second, and third place teams. For more information or to get involved in COMM 447, please visit edwards.usask.ca/entrepreneur.

What is an entrepreneurial collision? When two or more people get together, and the new connection results in the emergence of a business idea or opportunity.


The recent rollout of COMM 447 as a core class, for example, also helps our community thrive. The course acts as a channel for clients who have an idea and need to develop a business plan, and it adds diversity to our classroom projects. It goes beyond that though, because when clients and students create new ideas together, expand a business or build succession plans, it is an incredibly valuable experience. In some case, clients might end up with more than just a business plan. They may be working with their new partner or employee. Why is InVenture important? InVenture gives students an enhanced understanding of their B.Comm. coursework. It also allows Edwards School of Business to engage the community in our academic mission by providing an opportunity for students to partner with, contribute to, and learn from the business community. But it is about so much more than learning to start a business. The process students go through in our entrepreneurship classes is equally as beneficial in building capacity for a different way of thinking. The entrepreneurial skills that students will acquire gives students the tools and experience they need to succeed in their future endeavors as entrepreneurs or employees.

INVENTURE:

Entrepreneurship in Action Q&A with Dr. Lee Swanson In your own words, what is InVenture? InVenture is the Edwards School of Business entrepreneurship initiative. Our vision is to be recognized as an essential component of Saskatchewan’s entrepreneurship community.

entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Our mission comprises three elements including supporting student learning, creating opportunities across campus for entrepreneurial collisions and integrating Edwards into the provincial

We seek to build capacity for entrepreneurial learning at Edwards as well as provide opportunities for collaboration between students and community partners. How will InVenture accomplish this? InVenture exists to support student learning in entrepreneurship classes. We are in a unique position because there is an opportunity for connections and entrepreneurial collisions with over 22,000 students and hundreds of researchers on campus.

Even when you are working within an existing organization, entrepreneurial thinking changes the way you view and make decisions. Whether it is innovation, the function of the organization or opportunities that arise, your lens changes. How is Edwards preparing students to work with clients? Edwards will ensure students are provided with support so that they have professional-caliber interactions with clients. Professional development sessions will assist students to think strategically and finish the project to the quality that is required for the client. What is the formula for a good project? The client presents a scenario for a new idea or business expansion, and provides the students with an initial meeting and relevant information. The client then steps back, and the students take the case study and complete the project. The client might answer a couple of questions along the way, but they’re not directing too much of the end game. The students benefit from this learning environment, and in turn, the clients receive higher quality products as a result of creatively working towards a solution. How can alumni or community partners get involved with a client based project? Our entrepreneurship courses like COMM 447 provides for partner involvement and creates opportunities for students to use their skills, experience and resources to assist clients with project needs. The service is provided free of charge, but students choose who to work with, and not all projects might be picked up. We need clients who are going to be engaged with our students, and in turn, clients can expect the students will do a good job of connecting as part of their learning. If you would like a fourth-year Bachelor of Commerce or MBA student to create a plan for you, please submit a request through the InVenture website. n Visit edwards.usask.ca/entrepreneur for more information.

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Edwards School of Business

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LIVING SKIES CANNABIS

New Edwards alumna among the first to open a recreational cannabis dispensary JESSICA STEWART DAVID STOBBE

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Nearly five months after Cierra Sieben-Chuback graduated with her B.Comm. from Edwards, she will open the doors to her first business.

financial and operational qualifications and then was selected through a lottery draw.

October 17th is the first day marijuana became legal in Canada and Sieben-Chuback is one of the lucky few who get to sell it. Sieben-Chuback found out this past June that she had been awarded one of the 51 permits given out in Saskatchewan—and one of only seven in Saskatoon. It's also the only locally-owned and operated cannabis store in the city.

Sieben-Chuback also said the quick transition from business school to running an actual business has worked well for her. “It’s been a really smooth transition moving to this industry because everything’s fresh in my head and I don’t have to think back far to remember what I learned,” she said. “Edwards really helped me navigate the business world, having been thrown into it right after university.”

The licenses were granted by Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA) through a two-part request for proposal (RFP) process. Sieben-Chuback’s proposal first had to meet certain

She said she hopes to incorporate the shop local vibe to her advantage, being the only locally-owned dispensary in Saskatoon, competing with larger companies. “It’s a brand-new industry and

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Thankfully, she said, she’d recently created a business plan for a marijuana dispensary in Lee Swanson’s Entrepreneurship and Venture Development course. “COMM 447 allowed me to complete the application for the SLGA,” she said. “The single thing that helped me the most is the financial model that Lee Swanson made. It was also helpful to walk through the steps of making a business plan. It was a nice guide to follow.”


no one is better than anyone else yet. Everyone’s learning at the same time,” she said. “I don’t feel like I’m taking on more risk than the other marijuana retailers. I feel like we’re all in the same boat.” Instead Sieben-Chuback said she’ll use the distinction to set her apart. “Saskatoon is basically my favourite city in the world. I love being from here,” she said. “When you come into my business you’ll be able to tell. I went with a local vibe. There’s a real Saskatchewan theme.” In fact, her business, Living Skies Cannabis, is named for her favourite part of the city. “When I was coming up with a business name, I thought, what’s my favourite part about living here? There was no question. It’s the skies, especially at night and in the morning. You can travel the world and you won’t see skies like we have here.” Sieben-Chuback chose the downtown location for her store for a similar reason. “I really love downtown. You see people from so many different walks of life when you’re downtown and I think my store will cater to all those people,” she said. “It’s not a niche store. I believe there’s something for everyone, at every price

point.” To manage the business, Sieben-Chuback takes care of the operational duties, and she’s hired a full staff of budtenders. (Yes, budtender is the technical name for cannabis dispensary staff!) Her goal for her first year of business is to create a strong foundation. “I want to focus on getting off the ground, and doing what I set out to do, which is serving the people here in the best way possible and making Saskatoon proud.” She encourages the community to come out and support her local cannabis shop. “I know we support local in Saskatoon and I would love to see that,” she said. “I really want everyone to come down and see the store. I think they’re going to love it.” n

@livingskiescannabis @livingskiescannabis 208 Third Avenue South, Saskatoon

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Edwards School of Business

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SOME LIKE IT HAUTE

Edwards alumna pursues passion for fashion JULIE BARNES

NATASHA KATCHUK

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SOME LIKE IT HAUTE

When Mackenzie Firby launched Two Fifty Two Boutique, she had to wear a lot of hats—metaphorical hats, that is. “I was the janitor, the accountant, the salesperson, the buyer—I was everything,” the Edwards alumna said. “I did all the social media and I learned a lot on the fly.”

research, created a 93-page business plan, and—along the way—learned the importance of finding other entrepreneurs to lean on for invaluable advice.

her a form she could ask new clients to complete when paying with a credit card, which ensures she’s not liable if the card has been stolen.

In the four years since she opened the doors to her high-end boutique in Saskatoon, she’s hired a bookkeeper and learned to delegate certain tasks to her staff. She’s also earned multiple SABEX awards, and, in 2017, she opened a second location in Regina.

FIND YOUR TRIBE

“You don’t even know that stuff happens until it happens,” she said. “Some lessons you just have to learn the hard way. It’s unfortunate, but it’s growth.”

START BEFORE YOU’RE READY

After graduating with her Bachelor of Commerce degree in 2013, Firby worked in sales for several years. But, hailing from a family of entrepreneurs, starting her own business was never far from her mind. “I always knew that I wanted to do something for myself—I just wasn’t sure what it was,” she said. A long-held interest in fashion, coupled with the realization that certain luxury brands were unavailable in Saskatoon at the time, sparked the idea to open her own store. With her education and sales experience, Firby knew she had a firm foundation on which to build a business, but retail was still unchartered territory. That didn’t stop her from pursuing her passion. She invested long hours in

“I’m fortunate—I have a group of friends and we all have our own businesses,” said Firby. “I’ll say to them, ‘This person approached me for advertising. Have you worked with them before?’” If one of her friends gives a glowing review, Firby proceeds accordingly because she trusts their opinions. “I’ve asked for tonnes of help and advice. If I’m not sure what to do, I’ll ask one of them.” EXPECT UNEXPECTED CHALLENGES

No matter how much you prepare, there are always going to be unexpected challenges to contend with, and things you will only learn “from being burned,” said Firby. She shares an example of a fraudulent credit card transaction. Visa called her to explain that a stolen credit card had been used in her store, and Firby was on the hook for the loss. She sought advice from her entrepreneurial friends once again— and they delivered. One of them sent

Another challenge she knows she’ll always contend with is inventory management. “I’ve talked to people who have been in the business for 30 years and say, ‘We still don’t get it right.’” Purchase volumes, uptake on trends and weather all add to the unpredictability. “Your buying has to be so perfect, and it will never be perfect—that’s the problem,” said Firby. “If you don’t have enough variety, then you don’t get the sales. If you buy too much, and have too many things, then you have to have a sale and you don’t get your markup. If you don’t buy into some of the trends, or buy too much into the trends, things either won’t sell, or you’ll run out of stock.” Firby said she grew up on a farm, and offers an analogy. “It’s kind of like farming. If you get too much rain, or not enough, you have a problem. It’s the same here. Weather plays a huge part. If we have a really hot summer, we sell tons of shorts. If we don’t, we sell very few shorts.” As with any business, Firby acknowledges that there will always be elements that are beyond her control. Business owners need to get comfortable with a little discomfort, find trusted advisors, embrace challenges and adapt accordingly. But the hustle appears to be well worth it. Firby said she loves coming to work every day and visiting with her clients. “It never gets stagnant. I’m never bored. I just thoroughly love it,” she said. “It’s a lot of hard work, but it’s a lot of rewards.” n

twofiftytwoboutique.com @twofiftytwoboutique 34-1824 McOrmond Dr, Saskatoon

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Edwards School of Business

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NOT YOUR ORDINARY ACCOUNTING FIRM

Eight Edwards alumni create dynamic corporate culture JULIE BARNES

The moment you walk through the doors to Buckberger Baerg & Partners LLP, you can tell this isn’t your ordinary accounting firm. Natural sunlight floods the open-concept space, thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows. Vibrant paintings by local artists adorn the walls. It’s a contemporary space for a young, contemporary firm.

Ashley Buckberger, one of the firm’s eight partners and an Edwards alumnus, said the open space echoes their open-door policy. “As partners, we’re very receptive to people who come into our offices and ask questions. I think the whole learning process for our graduate and co-op students is one of a lot of collaboration internally within the firm.” THE CO-OP CONNECTION

This summer, the company offered coop positions to three Edwards accounting students, and all three accepted. “We were lucky,” said Buckberger, adding that it can be a competitive process for firms seeking co-op students, as many of them receive multiple offers.

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L-R: Terry Baerg, Alan Koop, Ashley Buckberger, Jennifer Funk, Kathryn Bankowski, Jeff Persic, Tyler Kachur and Paul Pastor

HELEN FRITZ


NOT YOUR ORDINARY ACCOUNTING FIRM

Kirsten Chickowski is one of those students. She received four offers for coop positions, but knew Buckberger Baerg was the perfect fit after her first interview. After sitting down with two of the firm’s partners, she said to herself, “I just have to work here.” She said she felt comfortable right away. “Everyone is so eager to help and everyone is so friendly.” Chickowski echoes Buckberger’s view about the collaborative spirit. “Having such an open space allows you to make connections with so many people. The energy in the office is phenomenal. I never thought I’d feel like this at work.” During her co-op term, Chickowski worked with all eight partners, which is something she doesn’t think would be possible had she chosen a position at a large international firm. She said she’s learned different things from each of them. DIVERSE SKILL SETS BRIAN KACHUR

“We have to recognize what we’re good at and what we’re not as good at, and really develop and grow what we’re good at to make us stronger.” ASHLEY BUCKBERGER

Buckberger and the seven other partners—all Edwards alumni—decided to establish their own firm four years ago. “Accountants generally aren’t risk takers,” he said. “They’re more risk-averse than most would be. So, for us, it was a big decision to start a business. The one thing about starting a business is the expectation that whatever efforts you think will be required, it’s probably going to be more than that.” Buckberger said the diversity of expertise within the firm has been a key to their success. “We all have such different skill sets and personalities. That’s made our firm the firm it is today,” he said. “We all have different strengths and weaknesses. We have to recognize what we’re good at and what we’re not as good at, and really develop and grow what we’re good at to make us

stronger. This is important not just for our partners, but our entire staff.” THE ROBOTS ARE COMING

Embracing change will also be key to staying strong, Buckberger said. “You see so many industries moving so quickly. Amazon has changed the landscape of retail. Netflix has changed the landscape of media. So, for us to not think that our accounting industry is going to change would be shortsighted.” At a recent conference he attended, one of the presenters displayed a list of 10 professions that won’t exist in 10 years, due to artificial intelligence (AI). “The second one was accountants,” he said. Despite that ominous list, Buckberger remains optimistic. He envisions AI taking over more of the “number-crunching” side of accounting, and believes accountants will still be required to interpret the data. “The actual work we do might change, but in the end, our clients are still looking to us to help with advising.” He hopes some of the questions they frequently field today won’t be answered so easily by AI. Business clients often ask for advice on bringing in new owners, how to sell their company or transition a family business to the next generation. “We hope that’s something AI can’t address, because for a lot of our clients, that’s where a lot of the value comes from—just talking to them.” Buckberger said his firm is going to embrace change, stay relevant and adjust to challenges as they come. “It’s still a great profession to choose.” n

bbllp.ca/ 210 - 616 Main Street, Saskatoon

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Edwards School of Business

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LESSONS FROM A LIFELONG ENTREPRENEUR:

ALUMNUS DUANE SMITH SHARES HIS JOURNEY JESSICA STEWART

When Duane Smith began attending the College of Commerce in 1983, the focus of the B.Comm. program was corporate training and big business. But Smith had a penchant for entrepreneurism. At age 12, Smith took over his grandfather’s chicken business, increasing the number of laying hens and adding broilers for roasting birds until he graduated high school. He said if the chickens ever got sick, he would take them to the research station in his hometown of Swift Current. “They got a real kick out of me—this kid worried about his birds,” Smith said. Although he didn’t receive training specific to starting his own business, Smith said he did learn to think analytically and plan ahead during his university years. Now retired after selling his award-winning

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company to Jim Pattison Group, Smith, the former CEO of JayDee AgTech, looks back on his journey. Smith’s first business attempts were learning experiences. While at university, he started selling leather goods in the hallway but was soon shut down by the dean. After graduation he worked at Federated Co-op for a year training employees before starting his own training and development business in Saskatoon. Smith said he was too young and inexperienced for that venture to work out.


LESSONS FROM A LIFELONG ENTREPRENEUR

Lesson one: Focus on getting customers. No matter how good you are at what you’re doing, if you don’t have customers, it doesn’t matter. Around that time, Smith’s father and uncle owned a John Deere business and were starting to think about succession planning. Smith went to work for his uncle in Swift Current in 1992 and spent three years learning all aspects of the business. Then, he and three partners bought the company, with Smith owning 55 per cent. He said having the right partners is critical to business success. Smith got to know the personalities of his partners before going into business with them. “It’s not only about who you select but who you don’t select,” he said.

Lesson two: Choose the right partners. Get to know people first and go with your gut.

ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS PHOTOGRAPHY

“Instead of losing hours or a day, our customers had a solution within a half hour. That helped build customer loyalty.” DUANE SMITH

As the agricultural business grew, so did Smith’s success. His company added four more stores in 2009, forming JayDee AgTech. With dealerships in Swift Current, Maple Creek, Kyle, Kindersley, Leader, Unity, North Battleford, Humboldt and Kelvington, it became the largest privately held John Deere dealership in Canada. Smith also started his own finance company within the John Deere business so he could provide loans directly to customers. As CEO, Smith paid attention to the staff culture. He determined it was better to give employees more autonomy to make decisions and manage their own budgets, accepting that some mistakes would be made along the way. “The empowerment we gave our management team was invaluable because our customers could get splitsecond answers instead of waiting for the message to be relayed to upper management,” Smith said. “Instead of losing hours or a day, our customers had a solution within a half hour. That helped build customer loyalty.”

Lesson three: Let risk happen. You have to be courageous to move forward and grow. The Jim Pattison Group approached Smith to sell his business in 2013. “It was hard to keep it all quiet while we were deciding what to do,” Smith said. “When Jim Pattison comes to Swift Current on his jet, people notice.” He said there were many things to consider before accepting the deal, including whether the change would be good for customers and staff, and whether the two companies were a good match. “I was very impressed with Pattison’s approach and vision, and how the company was exploring options,” Smith said, adding that six months later, the deal was finalized. But Smith wanted to ensure a smooth transition for everyone, so he stayed on for one year afterward. “When you’re going through a succession planning process, you can’t forget to keep running the business,” he said. “It’s hard to balance during that time but it’s important to keep your eye on both aspects.”

Lesson four: Make a succession plan. Set a timeframe to guide the transition to new leadership. Remember that the old guard has a wealth of knowledge, but it’s also good to have new people with new ideas. Now that he’s retired, Smith stays connected to the business world in a new way, sitting on boards like the Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation Board, where he can continue to share his knowledge and skills. He still deals with private equity funds and makes time for fun activities. “I believe the quote that says you should be as strategic in retirement as you are in business,” he said. n

This was one of the reasons JayDee AgTech of Swift Current was named Dealership of the Year by Farm Equipment magazine in 2011.

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Edwards School of Business

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T H G I L SPOT LT Y U C A F ON H C R A E RE S HOW CA N W E TO HE LP PE O PL E RK ? O W AT VE RI TH REASE W E I NICO N O F N A C H OW R E S E N TAT I O R R E P E N I N S E N L E S? WO M R S H I P RO LEADE

MEGAN WALSH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HUMAN RESOURCES AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

ES HOW DO PI CTEUR IT H W AT IC UN CO M M DE UA RS AN D PE PE O PL E? BARB PHILLIPS PROFESSOR MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING Recent award Recognized as a top (1%) Percentile Author Based on Advertising Research Productivity, International Journal of Advertising Editor, Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising

HOW SHO ULD A BUS INE SS IN A CYC LIC AL IND UST RY CAN ACCOUN TIN G OR FINA NCI AL STATEM ENT INV EST? ANA LYS IS HEL P MIT IGATE COR POR ATE SHO RT-T ERM ISM? HOW CA N W E BE TT ER HA RN ES S TH E W IS DO M OF L CR OW DS IN CA PI TA MA RK ETS?

HAN-UP PARK ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ACCOUNTING Recent award 2017 Excellence in Reviewing Award, Financial Accounting and Reporting Section, American Accounting Association

H OW D O ES O P EN N ES SATO N FF EC T IM M IG R AT IOEU R SH IP? EN T R EP R EN

MIN MAUNG ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

H OW D O E FA M ILY IN VO LV ESM AFFECT A ENT CO R P O RFAIR M’S D E C IS IO N T E S?

HOW DO DIFFE RENT FORM S OF EXEC UTIV E COMP ENSATION AFFE CT CORP ORAT E DECI SION S?

WHY AR E SO ME SO CI ET IES MO RE EN TR EP RE NE UR IA L TH AN OT HE RS? HOW DO CULTUR AL DIF FER ENC ES AFF ECT FIN ANC IAL DEC ISIO NS?

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CRAIG WILSON DEPARTMENT HEAD ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE


G N I R A SH E G D E L K N O W ID E W D L R O W

ST JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND

DEVAN MESCALL

HONOLULU, HI

GEORGE TANNOUS

“FEE-BASED INCOME, EARNINGS VOLATILITY AND HEDGING BY BANKS.”

“HOW IFRS ADOPTION CHANGED THE PAY-FORPERFORMANCE SENSITIVITY IN CEO COMPENSATION CONTRACTS: EVIDENCE FROM CANADIAN FIRMS.”

“THE IMPACT OF JOB-BASED HR SYSTEM DIFFERENTIATION ON FIRM PERFORMANCE AND EMPLOYEE ATTITUDES.”

“JAIPUR RUGS: A MANAGEMENT CONTROL JOURNEY.”

HONG KONG

VINCE BRUNI-BOSSIO

ERICA CARLETON

JOSEPH SCHMIDT

SURESH KALAGNANAM

DEV MISHRA

“DARK SIDE OF CEO ABILITY: CEO GENERAL MANAGERIAL SKILLS AND COST OF EQUITY CAPITAL.”

DUBLIN, IRELAND

VANCOUVER, BC

DALLAS, TEXAS

MAASTRICHT, NETHERLANDS

“GOVERNANCE ROLES OF COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS. CONTINGENCY AND PLACEBASED PERSPECTIVES.”

“TESTING MEDIATORS OF THE NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF PASSIVE LEADERSHIP ON MENTAL HEALTH AND WORK ATTITUDES.”

SEVILLE, SPAIN

CHELSEA WILLNESS

“TOWARD A MULTILEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR).”

SINGAPORE

WILLIAM MURPHY

“A KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT RESEARCH AGENDA FOR CHINA.” SAPPORO, JAPAN

PHILADELPHIA, PA

JAMES CAO

“THE VALUE OF DEMAND FORECAST UPDATES IN A SUPPLY CHAIN WITH ASYMETRIC INFORMATION.”

ATHENS, GREECE

GARY ENTWISTLE

“EXPLORING CAPITAL STRUCTURE: AN INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF IAS 1 DISCLOSURES OF FIRM CAPITAL.”

DAVID DI ZHANG

“CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS OF BENEFITS AND RISKS: EXPLORING MARKET ACCEPTANCE OF FUNCTIONAL FOODS WITH GENETICALLY MODIFIED INGREDIENTS FROM CANADA.”

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Edwards School of Business

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Contracts, torts, liability, negligence and consent. These are some of Judge Samuel Goldstein’s favorite words. Goldstein has been teaching at the University of Saskatchewan for over half a century. In that time, he estimates he has touched thousands of students’ lives from commerce, hospital administration, arts and science, and engineering – some of whom went on to become colleagues. And he’s not done yet. When asked how he got his start Goldstein answered the best way he knows how: through a story.

57 YEARS AND COUNTING

GOLDSTEIN’S TALE FROM A LONG STINT TEACHING BUSINESS LAW NATASHA KATCHUK

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His passion for teaching and learning came naturally. The son of a rabbi, clergyman and teacher, Goldstein is the youngest of seven. Goldstein’s parents fled the pogroms of Europe for a better life in Canada and their legacy for the family was education. His father and siblings worked to put each other through school resulting in three medical doctors, a bacteriologist, a high school teacher and two judges, including Goldstein. After he completed a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Manitoba, Goldstein completed his LLB at the University of Saskatchewan in 1959. Following the bar exams, he was admitted in 1960 to the Law Society of Saskatchewan. “It was March of 1961, and I had just signed a six-month lease for $900,” said Goldstein. “I visited a local bank where I intended to put up my beloved Volkswagen as collateral for a $500 loan to ensure I could pay the lease.” As luck would have it, he was turned down. Little did he know just how good this turn of events would be. “Later that day I had two marvelous phone calls,” said Goldstein. “The first was from Dean Tommy McLeod who had been given my name and was inquiring if I was interested in teaching a commercial law course that summer at the College of Commerce. The second phone call was from another bank in the city offering me


Community Involvement LONGTIME MEMBER AND BOARD MEMBER OF THE RIVERSIDE BADMINTON AND TENNIS CLUB FORMER VICE-CHAIRMAN, SASKATCHEWAN POLICE COMMISSION

Credentials BACHELOR OF ARTS

U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A N I TO B A

BACHELOR OF LAWS

PAST BOARD MEMBER, SASKATCHEWAN POLICE COLLEGE PAST REPRESENTATIVE, SOLICITOR GENERAL OF CANADA - RACE RELATIONS COMMITTEE PAST LECTURER AND MEMBER, INSTITUTE OF CANADIAN BANKERS (ICB)

U N I V E R S I T Y O F S A S K ATC H E WA N

ADMITTED TO THE LAW SOCIETY OF SASKATCHEWAN (1960) APPOINTED TO QUEEN’S COUNSEL (1976) APPOINTED JUDGE TO THE PROVINCIAL COURT OF SASKATCHEWAN (2000)

The Hangar building during the flood of 1951. EDWARDS ARCHIVES

the $500 loan and overdraft as soon as I could get over to sign the paperwork.” Dean McLeod offered him the job and remarked before he could accept that the honorarium wasn’t very much, so he was worried Goldstein might change his mind. “It was $600, and it was an answer from heaven,” said Goldstein. And so began Goldstein’s teaching career as a sessional lecturer. The summer of 1961 began with an evening class of approximately 10 business students in the hangar building. Then Dean McLeod asked Goldstein to stay on and teach commercial law that fall. The rest, as they say, is history. Goldstein was appointed assistant professor, and the course eventually ran three nights a week in the College of Commerce. The College of Engineering also included a core course for all civil engineers which Goldstein taught on

Friday mornings. This meant at the height of Goldstein’s teaching career, the only day of the week he wasn’t teaching on campus was Thursday. He managed all of this while continuing to run a successful practice. There have been many changes to campus since that time. Class sizes have increased. The school eventually got its own building. But the essence of Goldstein’s lectures has stayed the same. “Professionals need to understand the legal implications of what they’re getting into,” explained Goldstein. “Everything we do creates rights and obligations as part of a contractual relationship. Your relationship with your client is a contractual agreement. It’s also an ethical relationship, and it can involve liability whether direct or negligent.” In 57 years and counting, there is only one thing that bothers Goldstein. “When I was sitting as a judge on a case in

Shellbrook, SK a snowstorm blew up, and I couldn’t get back to Saskatoon to teach my evening class,” he shared. “It bothers me to this day because it’s the only class I ever had to cancel. Even when I was sitting in Swift Current and teaching two classes a week, I would finish court at 4 pm, drive back to Saskatoon, teach, and leave at 10 pm to go back to Swift Current and then repeat it all over again the next day.” As for the $500 loan, Goldstein paid it back the same month he borrowed it in March of 1961. He went on to run a very successful practice for 40 years until April 30, 2000, when he was appointed judge to the provincial court of Saskatchewan on May 1 of that year. Goldstein said he plans to keep teaching for the foreseeable future and advises students and alumni “not to be afraid to take a risk.” n

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DAVID STOBBE

EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS EARNS PRESTIGIOUS AACSB INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION KEITH WILLOUGHBY The Edwards School of Business at the University of Saskatchewan has earned accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International. Synonymous with the highest standards of quality, AACSB Accreditation inspires new ways of thinking within business education globally and, as a result, places Edwards among the top five per cent of business schools worldwide. Currently, over 80 institutions across more than 50 countries and territories maintain AACSB Accreditation in business. From its beginnings as the first accounting school in Canada, the Edwards School of Business continuously strives to offer high-caliber programming, research and engagement activities that alumni and employers value around the world. Being the first AACSB-accredited business school in the province provides a hallmark of business education excellence. AACSB Accreditation includes a framework of 15 international standards against which business schools assess

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the quality of their educational services. Achieving accreditation follows a process of rigorous internal review, engagement with an AACSB assigned mentor and external peer evaluation. In November 2017, a peer review team comprised of three business school deans visited Edwards. The peer review team came prepared with insightful queries and constructive commentary. They met with groups of Edwards staff, students and faculty, and conversed with university senior administration and Dean’s Advisory Council members. Now that Edwards has earned AACSB Accreditation, we enter a five-year continuous improvement review cycle, ensuring that the school has the resources, credentials and commitment needed to provide students with a first-rate, futurefocused business education. Accreditation is by no means a “one-and-done” endeavor. We will maintain our successes by continually striving for excellence in all of our activities.


Together we thrive! The peer review team remarked positively on the experiential learning and Business Co-operative Education program available at Edwards. Moreover, they noted initiatives that help support the university’s Indigenization strategy including the Aboriginal Youth Entrepreneurship Program, the Aboriginal Youth Innovation Challenge and the Aboriginal Business Administration Certificate (ABAC). Regarding research and scholarly work, the peer review team commented on the school’s “partnership package” that documents faculty research achievements and educational partnership possibilities.

FACULT Y AND STAFF AWARDS LEE SWANSON Provost’s College Award g Outstanding Teachin

NATHALIE JOHNSTO

for

NE

hewan University of Saskatc Award g hin ac Students' Union Te

Together we built! Accreditation successes represent a combined achievement. Our school’s foundation was formed by previous students, staff, faculty and senior leaders. Employer groups and industry professionals provided opportunities for our graduates to build nations. The devotion and dedication of all parties served to help us reach this outcome.

Together we will! Achieving accreditation offers an opportunity for us to celebrate the past, honour the present and envision a distinguished future. Our school will remain committed to business education excellence, professional outreach, community engagement and impactful scholarly research contributions.

This is an absolutely tremendous outcome, a celebratory milestone that marks the path of our progress and points us toward the future. This is a fitting recognition for all of us. We can share the spotlight. We did it. Together! n

O ROMAN LUKYANENK hewan University of Saskatc hing Award Students' Union Teac

FRED PHILLIPS

siness Edwards School of Bu fessor Pro e tiv Most Effec

VANESSA LEON

hewan University of Saskatc ing Award vis Ad ion Students' Un

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WE’VE HELD EVENTS ALL ACROSS CANADA THIS YEAR, AND OUR CENTENNIAL CONCLUDED WITH THE ALLYEARS REUNION HELD IN SASKATOON SEPT 20–22. THE EVENT KICKED OFF WITH A GOLF TOURNAMENT ON THURSDAY, FOLLOWED BY THE DEAN’S SPEAKER SYMPOSIUM ON FRIDAY, WHICH HIGHLIGHTED THE THEME OF CITIZENSHIP. OVER THE WEEKEND CENTENNIAL PARTICIPANTS TOOK PART IN A NUMBER OF EVENTS INCLUDING A HUSKIE FOOTBALL GAME, CAMPUS TOURS, THE INAUGURAL PINNING CEREMONY, CLASS REUNIONS AND AN EVENING GALA DINNER. IT WAS A CHOCK-FULL THREE DAYS OF RECONNECTING AND CELEBRATING. DAVID STOBBE

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A HUGE THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS, MAKING OUR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS POSSIBLE!

GORDON RAWLINSON

SCOTT & GRIT MCCREATH

JOY CRAWFORD

CORPORATE SPONSORS

GOLF TOURNAMENT SPONSORS

SASKPOWER

ELK RIDGE RESORT

TOURISM SASKATOON

PERFECTION PLUMBING & DRAIN CLEANING LTD.

SASKATCHEWAN RESEARCH COUNCIL

LB DISTILLERS

INNOVATION PLACE

IMAGINE THAT MEDIA

SEVENTY-SEVEN SIGNS LTD.

MORRISON & LOKINGER REALTY

SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS

J & T INCOME TAX SERVICE INC.

MID-WEST SPORTSWEAR WORKWEAR & SAFETY

SKIPTHEDISHES

THE GREATER SASKATOON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

ORANO

ESSENCE RECRUITMENT COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL NEXGEN ENERGY LTD. MISSINIPI BROADCASTING CORPORATION

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ISCO INDUSTRIES THE CALGARY FLAMES

KEVIN GOYER REAL ESTATE

GREAT WESTERN BREWING COMPANY

EMCO CORPORATION

AG-WEST BIO INC

METAL CONNECTION

THE PRINT BARON


fix nitrogen in the soil to fertilize other crops—but it also increased production of a sustainable protein. This realization inspired him to create SaskCan Pulse in 2001, which later became AGT Food and Ingredients—one of the world’s largest pulse-processing companies. Al-Katib challenged the audience to think of social purpose as part of profitable business. Growing up in a family dedicated to community service—his father only recently retiring as a small-town doctor and his mother having served as the first woman in Saskatchewan elected as a rural municipal councillor—he learned the value of combining social responsibility with business. When an opportunity arose to give back during the Syrian refugee crisis, he took it. The United Nation’s method of distributing food to individuals led to significant distribution losses, so his team proposed creating ration boxes for every family to simplify the process. The change in distribution fed more people, saved the UN $13 million, and was profitable for the company. Through his experience, he has come to believe that entrepreneurs, rather than governments, will solve wider societal problems. Gabrielle Scrimshaw (B.Comm. '10), Indigenous entrepreneur and advocate, was inspired by the birth of her nephew, Ethan, in 2006. Knowing the challenges faced by young Indigenous people, particularly young men, she promised to make the world better for him. DAVID STOBBE

DEAN’S SPEAKER SYMPOSIUM HIGHLIGHTS THE THEME OF CITIZENSHIP JASMINE LISKA

Five alumni and industry leaders gathered for the Dean’s Speaker Symposium as part of the Centennial All Years Reunion to reflect on citizenship and the changing relationship between businesses and society. They inspired the audience of Edwards students and alumni to rethink of the role business plays in strengthening communities and building nations. Murad Al-Katib (B.Comm. '94), 2017 Oslo Business for Peace Award recipient and the opening keynote speaker, discussed his journey from Davidson, SK, to the CEO of AGT Food and Ingredients. Driven by the knowledge that over the next 40 years, the world needs to produce the same amount of food it has produced in the last 10,000, Al-Katib saw an opportunity as Saskatchewan farmers began to use lentils in their crop rotation instead of summer fallow. Not only did this change help farmers—pulses like lentils

As an Edwards student, she was further inspired when she traveled internationally and saw that, despite their diversity, Indigenous people face very similar challenges and outcomes, but still maintain their culture. After receiving her degree, Scrimshaw connected with the Royal Bank of Canada through the Aboriginal Human Resource Council (now Indigenous Works) and was offered a position as an associate in RBC’s Graduate Leadership Program in Toronto. When she moved there, she didn’t feel like she was leaving her community, but becoming an ambassador for them. She quickly realized that many Indigenous professionals were like her— first-generation graduates who were away from their communities with no familial professional network to draw upon. To help them form professional relationships and maintain their identities in a new environment, she co-founded the Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada, which reached 100 members

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DAVID STOBBE

in the first quarter and has grown into an international non-profit. As Canada’s population grows increasingly young, diverse, and Indigenous, she challenged the audience to look beyond applicants’ resumes to see their trajectory and their potential. She called for the private sector to create more consultation, equitable job access, and employee training to engage indigenous applicants. “Reconciliation is for everyone but it will only work if everyone is involved,” Scrimshaw said. Building on Scrimshaw’s speech, a panel spoke over lunch on reconciliation and the business world. Read the full story on page 37. After lunch, Wayne Dunn, president of the Corporate Social Responsibility Training Institute, continued the theme of connecting a sense of citizenship with business. The traditional view of business was unidimensional: businesses should focus on efficiently building value. Dunn argued that value has increasingly more dimensions. Shareholders and the public now expect businesses to be inclusive and sustainable while creating profit. He encouraged the audience to look beyond donating, and instead to think of social responsibility, reconciliation and environmental stewardship as opportunities. These can be strategically

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advantageous, not only because they encourage investors, but also because they create opportunities to solve larger societal problems as part of profitable businesses.

Romanow, entrepreneur and Dragons’ Den investor, argued for a small, start-up approach to entrepreneurship by detailing what she learned from her business experiences.

The final speakers, Ainsley Robertson (B.Comm. '09) and Michele Romanow, further challenged traditional views of giving and entrepreneurship by encouraging the audience to think small.

As an engineering student, she and her partners researched and planned a caviar business for two years before starting it. Adapting to changes as they went helped them learn more about the industry in the summer they ran the business than they did during the planning stage. However, the two-year delay for planning meant that they started it just before the 2008 recession, when the large market for luxury products, like caviar, ended.

“We often imagine that, to have an impact, we must do something big, which stops us from doing anything,” noted Robertson, co-founder of The Princess Shop and the 2017 Red Cross Young Humanitarian of the Year recipient. Through her experience with nonprofit organizations, Robertson learned that giving back is not just for people who have time, money and experience: she co-founded The Princess Shop with no experience but lots of time; became a director for Chic Geek with some experience and time; and started mentoring for the Sauder School of Business with more experience, but less time. Working with these organizations helped her gain experience and develop skills while building her career. She encouraged the audience to think of themselves not as being a citizen, but as holding the office of “citizen.” Considering citizenship as a role, she said, helps people feel a sense of responsibility and an obligation to perform that role well.

Their next businesses were built as start-ups so they could start working on them immediately. Although the startup process was messy, they found that successful ideas came from hundreds of small tests and iterations, rather than from creating a detailed business plan or waiting for a flash of inspiration. She noted that, although entrepreneurship is the most failuredriven career in the world, technology has made it easier than ever to test a project and start a business. To increase the chances of success, she encouraged new entrepreneurs to ask entrepreneurial friends for feedback: professional friends tend to see the probability for failure, while entrepreneurial friends can help turn the low probability chance of success into a high probability event. n


DAVID STOBBE

RECONCILIATION AND THE BUSINESS WORLD NATASHA KATCHUK

As part of the Centennial All Years Reunion, Edwards held a lunch and learn panel to explore the importance of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Call to Action 92 to businesses. This particular call to action encourages the corporate sector and their leadership to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Dr. Jacqueline Ottmann, the moderator for the panel, opened the discussion with an overview of the TRC’s Calls to Action, which she considers a milestone for Indigenous people. Before delving into Call to Action 92, she invited the panelists to share what the TRC means to them personally.

THOUGHTS ON THE TRC

Kelly Lendsay said he believes that the TRC Calls to Action to the corporate sector could pave the way for more Indigenous people to become educated in business and play a greater role in the Canadian economy.

Moderator:

JACQUELINE OTTMANN,

VP INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT, UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

Panelists (left to right):

KELLY J. LENDSAY (MBA '93), PRESIDENT AND CEO INDIGENOUS WORKS

GABRIELLE SCRIMSHAW

(B.COMM. '10), INDIGENOUS ENTREPRENEUR, ACTIVIST AND SPEAKER

CECE BAPTISTE (B.COMM. '04), ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, FINANCE SASKATCHEWAN INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGIES

CRAIG MURRAY

VICE-PRESIDENT, MINING AND MINERALS SASKATCHEWAN RESEARCH COUNCIL

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RECONCILIATION AND THE BUSINESS WORLD

DAVID STOBBE

Gabrielle Scrimshaw and CeCe Baptiste both highlighted the need to remember the truth aspect of the TRC, not just the reconciliation. They suggested that as a first step, the hard truths of residential schools need to be addressed in public schools. Craig Murray said he views the TRC as an opportunity for non-Indigenous Canadians to own up and apologize for wrongdoings in the past and lauded it for the framework it provides to all Canadians for how to move forward. A CALL TO BUSINESS LEADERS

Scrimshaw encouraged business leaders to look beyond the resumé and consider the potential of Indigenous applicants who, by making it through post-secondary education with the odds stacked against them, might already possess characteristics that translate well into management roles. The Aboriginal mentorship program Murray and Baptiste helped get off the ground has brought more Aboriginal people into business and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) jobs, where they are highly underrepresented. “Corporations have a responsibility, but also an opportunity,” Murray said. Lendsay agreed, citing the $27 billion of GDP generated annually by Indigenous people, which is projected to grow to $37 billion over the next decade. He also referenced a recent report that stated 85 per cent of corporate Canada lacks Indigenous engagement or partnership strategies. In contrast he said the resource sector is ahead of the curve here, as they’ve had partnerships with Indigenous people in place for decades. “The presidents

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and CEOs in this sector know the right questions to ask, and they understand the business, legal and community issues.” Baptiste reminded business leaders that diversity is a strength. She encouraged boards of directors to step up and ask executive teams to incorporate the TRC Calls to Action into their policies and strategies, rather than simply acknowledge them.

“Corporations have a responsibility, but also an opportunity.” CRAIG MURRAY

CLOSING REMARKS: MESSAGES OF HOPE

Ottmann asked the panelists for their views on the future of reconciliation, to which all responded with clear optimism. Murray said he sees the TRC as a path forward for Indigenous and nonIndigenous Canadians to work together, creating better opportunities for all. Baptiste agreed, adding that normalizing conversations on reconciliation will be the key to the TRC’s success. Scrimshaw surveyed Indigenous youth recently and said the results showed an average score of 4/5 on how hopeful participants were about proper reconciliation. Lendsay said many public and private sector leaders have embraced reconciliation, and that the indigenization of colleges and universities is ahead of industry. “If we can change the conversation from talking about how to manage poverty to how do we manage prosperity, there’s great hope for the future of reconciliation,” he said. Ottmann ended the event by highlighting existing social costs of disengaged Indigenous populations and asking the audience to reflect on the following question: “What would be the cost if we continue the way that we’ve been continuing over the last 150 years?” n

“Normalizing conversations on reconciliation will be the key to the TRC’s success.” CECE BAPTISTE

“If we can change the conversation from talking about how to manage poverty to how do we manage prosperity, there’s great hope for the future of reconciliation.” KELLY J. LENDSAY


L A I N N E T N E C

E G N E L L A H C P I H S N E Z I T I C R E S U LT S To celebrate a century of service and usher in the next one, Edwards initiated a Centennial Challenge. Our intention was to bring together alumni, students, staff, and friends of the school. In the spirit of the school’s mission: we develop business professionals to build nations, we set out to highlight stories of good citizenship. We asked you to tell us about the good things you’re already doing to strengthen your communities and you answered our call to action! Here are some of the stories you shared with us:

✓✓SITTING ON A BOARD ✓✓COACHING KIDS’ SPORTS TEAMS ✓✓VOLUNTEERING OR CANVASING IN THE COMMUNITY ✓✓ORGANIZING OR PARTICIPATING IN FUNDRAISERS ✓✓MENTORING OR COACHING STUDENTS ✓✓WALKING OR RUNNING FOR CHARITY

JDC WEST

All submissions received an entry for the centennial prize package that included a $500 sponsorship to a registered charity. Congratulations to the 2017 and 2018 Edwards JDC West teams and their coaches! As part of the competition, JDC West students are encouraged to obtain as many volunteer hours and raise as many dollars as they can for up to six charities. In fact, there were over 14 entries mentioning JDC West. Thank you participated! n

to

everyone

who

✓✓FOUNDING COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS OR GROUPS ✓✓DONATING BLOOD ✓✓WELCOMING REFUGEES AT THE AIRPORT ✓✓REINSTITUTING COMMUNITY EVENTS

Visit edwards100.ca to see all the submissions.

✓✓OFFERING BUSINESS SERVICES PRO-BONO

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Give confidence that lasts a lifetime For University of Saskatchewan student Kellie Wuttunee, receiving the Dr. Grace E. Maynard Bursary for academic achievement and financial need meant relief—from the financial stresses of obtaining an education and being a single parent, trying to make it all work. “I am grateful for the financial assistance because I do not come from privilege and receiving the bursary has helped me be even more successful in my education,” Kellie said. “I will not forget this generosity during the most challenging time of my education.” She’s now preparing to enter the work world, feeling confident and inspired. Thanks to legacy donors like Dr. Grace Maynard, deserving students across campus have access to life-changing opportunities through scholarships and bursaries, giving them the additional support they need to fulfill their potential—at university and beyond. 40

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You too can help ambitious students overcome obstacles and achieve their goals. Consider making a gift in your Will, and contact us today to discuss how your support can improve the lives of U of S students for years to come. Vicki Corbin Gift Planning Specialist University Relations 306-966-6571 or 1-800-699-1907 vicki.corbin@usask.ca usask.ca/giftplanning


DONOR ROLL

THANKS TO OUR DONORS AND FRIENDS The Edwards School of Business acknowledges, with gratitude, our many donors who generously support the school and the programs and services offered. Through gifts of time, knowledge and resources, you inspire students, faculty and staff to be creative, meet new challenges and continue to be leaders in business education. Be assured that your contributions are being used effectively to enhance the school's ability to provide quality education opportunities, undertake research activities and share the results with local, national and international communities.

The annual donor roll lists supporters who gave $500 or more from May 1, 2017 to April 30, 2018. For a complete list of annual donors, including gifts of $1-$500, please visit the Edwards School of Business website. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the report, we acknowledge that errors may have occurred. If you have questions about this list, please contact us at 306-966-5437 or advancement@edwards.usask.ca. Thank you for your continued support of the Edwards School of Business.

All donor recognition categories are exclusive of corporate matching gifts. Those who have passed away are gratefully acknowledged and marked with an *.

INDIVIDUALS GIFTS OF $100,000 TO $499,999

GIFTS OF $50,000 TO $99,999

SCOTT AND GRIT MCCREATH LARRY MOELLER

RON AND JANE GRAHAM GORDON RAWLINSON

GIFTS OF $10,000 TO $49,999 MERLIS BELSHER MANSEL BINKLEY JAMES ESTEY JOHN AND JOLENE GORDON WADE AND BETTY-ANN HEGGIE GRANT AND SHANNON ISAAC JOSEPH KROCHAK AARON LORAAS SUSAN MILBURN GARY SMITH KAREN STEWART AND DAN THEMIG GREG AND OLIVIA YUEL

GIFTS OF $5,000 TO $9,999 RALPH AND MARY BIDEN LEO BOURASSA AND DAPHNE ARNASON SHELLEY BROWN N. MURRAY EDWARDS NEIL AND YVETTE EVANS ROD GERLA TIMOTHY GITZEL JERRY AND BETTINA GRANDEY BRENT AND DEBORAH HESJE TODD AND JAN* LAHTI WINNIE LIAO MARTIN MARGOLIS

LYNNE PEARSON ALLEN PONAK MAY PRINGLE DOUGLAS PROLL DONALD ROBB WILLIAM SENKIW SHERWOOD AND ELAINE SHARFE JOHN AND MRS. DIANNE STOREY GORDON THOMPSON JOE AND DEBBIE VIDAL LORNE WRIGHT

GIFTS OF $1,000 TO $4,999 Lee Ahenakew Zeba Ahmad Wade Anderson Paulette Benning Mel Berg Bill Black W. John Brennan Bruce Burnyeat Walter Chayka Tim Conlin Robert and Nadine Connoly

Dwayne Dahl Don Engle Ronald Fior Steve Flynn Mark Folstad Don Fox Jack Fraser Cliff Friesen Mike Greenberg Kristen Hamm Stewart Hanlon Zane Hansen

Christopher Hengen-Braun Randy Jespersen Cara Keating Bill Lamberton Michael Lamborn Wally and Colleen Mah Louis Marcil Brian Mark and Roxanne Frey George Marlatte Tom McClocklin Bryan McCrea

Tom McLellan* Neil McMillan Randy Meidl Laurie Moen Larry Mumford Penney Murphy Jack Neumann Annette Pilipiak Barry Quon Jerry and Cathy Richardson Susan Ruf

Michael Rushby James and Jill Salamon Matt McMillan and Krystle Sawatsky Larry and Irene Seiferling Nels W. Seleshanko Bernard Slogotski Barry and Pat Slusarchuk W. Keith Smith Ruby Spillett James Sproule Gord Stewart and Maria Styacko

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Lee Swanson Colin Taylor Shelley Thiel Kelly Tomyn Gregory Trotter Michael Tumback Wayne Ulrich Daymond Volk Basil Waslen Colton Wiegers Chelsea Willness Keith Willoughby Kim Woima

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DONOR ROLL

GIFTS OF $500 TO $999 Rob Anderson Arnie Arnott Al Briggs Melinda and Dick Carter Brian Chambers Robin Chapman Joy Crawford Bill Dittmer

Rand Flynn Donna Francis James Gottselig Richard Hallson Mike Hegedus Brad Hunter Rob and Sheila Innes Brian Kusisto

Peter and Barb Loubardeas Maxine Maksymetz Trevis McConaghy Karen O’Brien Bob Ogilvie Stuart Pollon John and Nicholle Povhe Patricia Riccio

Sidney Rieger Theodore Rivney Dennis Rook Mervin Sokul Donald Somers Dustin Sundby Art Wakabayashi Trent Webster

CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS & ORGANIZATIONS GIFTS OF $100,000 TO $499,999

GIFTS OF $25,000 TO $49,999

ANLUAN FOUNDATION FEDERATED CO-OPERATIVES LIMITED

AQUEDUCT FOUNDATION LLOYD CARR-HARRIS FOUNDATION

GIFTS OF $50,000 TO $99,999

GIFTS OF $10,000 TO $24,999

CPA SASKATCHEWAN

NUTRIEN

GIFTS OF $5,000 TO $9,999 CAMECO CORPORATION CANADIAN WESTERN BANK CONCORDE GROUP OF COMPANIES FOUNTAIN TIRE LTD

GIFTS OF $1,000 TO $4,999 AFFINITY CREDIT UNION CANADIAN PETROLEUM TAX SOCIETY CPA FOUNDATION OF ALBERTA CPHR SASKATCHEWAN ERNST & YOUNG LLP FREEDOM 55 FINANCIAL, A DIVISION OF LONDON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY INNOVATION PLACE MASTERS OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING - EXECUTIVE COUNCIL NEXEN ENERGY, A CNOOC LIMITED COMPANY

GIFTS OF $500 TO $999 ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED FRAUD EXAMINERS INC. (SASK CHAPTER) EDWARDS BUSINESS STUDENTS’ SOCIETY, EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION, EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MNP LLP

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NEXGEN ENERGY LTD. NORTH RIDGE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION ORANO CANADA INC. PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS LLP SASKATOON ASSOCIATION OF FAMILY ENTERPRISE (SAFE) TAX EXECUTIVES INSTITUTE INC. (TEI) CALGARY CHAPTER WIEGERS FINANCIAL & INSURANCE PLANNING SERVICES

COMPANIES WHO MATCHED GIFTS CAMECO CORPORATION ENCANA CORPORATION FOUNTAIN TIRE LTD. NEXEN ENERGY ULC NUTRIEN


HANLON CENTRE

RECORD NUMBER OF EDWARDS STUDENTS STUDYING ABROAD Edwards students continue to explore the wider world through study abroad. Students who study abroad are exposed to new ways of thinking, have the opportunity to develop friendships and connections with students across the globe, and can truly internationalize their degree program. Through direct partnerships with business schools around the world, we ensure that Edwards students who study abroad can pursue courses that transfer directly back to their B.Comm. programs. 2017/18 was a record-breaking year, largely as a result of the increased funding opportunities available to Edwards students through a donation from the Hanlons. Although Edwards students comprise only 11 per cent of the total University of Saskatchewan undergraduate student population, we had the second-largest contingent of outbound exchange students on campus. Here are a few photos submitted by students from their study abroad experiences! n

10+ study abroad destinations 24 visiting exchange students 39 Edwards students studied abroad $30,000 in Hanlon funding

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A LEADER LISTENS:

EBSS 2017-18 president makes changes for the Edwards student body second term: Luminosity. The event was held at P!nk Nightclub and Lounge and included body paint artists and local DJs. “It was low cost and sustainable, which was one of our goals,” Spooner said. “They’re going to offer it again this coming year.” With money raised from Luminosity, and great work from current EBSS president Josh DeCorby and the corporate relations portfolio, 62 Edwards students were sent to four competitions and three conferences across Canada. The EBSS made several other changes that were well received by Edwards students:

✓✓INTRODUCING NEW CHARITY EVENTS, LIKE TRIVIA NIGHT ✓✓LAUNCHING THE COMMERCE MAJOR OLYMPICS ✓✓REVAMPING CLOTHING SALES ✓✓CREATING A CLUB POLICY DOCUMENT ✓✓REVISING THE FORMAT OF THE SPONSORSHIP APPRECIATION EVENT ✓✓STARTING MONTHLY BREAKFASTS (INCLUDING DELICIOUS WAFFLES) WITH PROCEEDS GOING TO CHARITY The executive also offered a variety of new volunteer opportunities that hadn’t been available in the past. NATASHA KATCHUK

JESSICA STEWART Mikaela Spooner’s focus as 2017-18 Edwards Business Students Society (EBSS) president was to listen to the students and figure out what they needed. Her growth throughout her years at Edwards and with the EBSS, starting as a street marketer, then contacting sponsors as a part of the EBSS corporate relations portfolio and most recently being elected president, helped by giving her the full spectrum of a student’s experience. Sometimes figuring out what Edwards students needed came from listening to what they were saying indirectly. The usually popular LB5Q event wasn’t as successful as previous years. “That’s where we get a lot of our funding to send students to case competitions and conferences,” Spooner said. “So we knew we had to make changes.” The social team came up with a completely new event for the

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“There’s been monthly volunteer opportunities for several years. This year we tried to mix it up so there was something for everyone,” Spooner said, noting that as a result of the change, volunteer positions were completely full every month. “It really shows the students are interested in charity and want to give back.” After Spooner graduates with her B.Comm. in marketing in December, she’ll start looking for a job. She says being part of the EBSS has given her a head start. “I was able to expand my network across campus and in the community,” said Spooner. Spooner said it may be cliché, but getting involved during your time at university really makes a difference. “It changes your experience. You’re not just going to class and heading home. You’re actually meeting people you might not have met in the classroom,” she said. “It’s really great to be able to meet those people and make a difference at Edwards.”


FACULT Y AND STAFF AWARDS GLEN KOBUSSEN

EBSS YEAR BY THE NUMBERS

siness Somer’s Edwards School of Bu chable Professor Award - Most Approa

15 students, staff and faculty participated in a Habitat for Humanity build Over $6,500 raised for Habitat for Humanity

$91,235 spent on

BRIAN LANE Year MBA Professor of the

academic events

62 students sent to four competitions and three conferences

8 social events 3 networking events 8 monthly lunch and learns

N ILONA BASTIAANSE aching CPA Alberta MPAcc Te Excellence Award

2017-18 EXECUTIVE Mikaela Spooner President Josh DeCorby VP corporate relations Jarek Wicijowski VP marketing

PAUL LEPAGE

aching CPA Alberta MPAcc Te Award e nc lle Exce

Michelle Fergusson VP social Danielle Hopkins VP charity Riley Stefaniuk VP academic

MARJORIE DELBAER

E

hing Innovation

Dean’s Award for Teac

Jenna Townsend VP finance

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FRED’S FINAL NUMBERS 1 Worldwide Ranking

among 7,209 BME Researchers1

2 National Teaching

Awards (3M Canada NTF and CAAA Rosen Award)

3–time winner of

Outstanding Research in Accounting Education Award (AAA)

4–time winner of

Edwards/Commerce Most Effective Professor Award

5 editions of Canadian

financial accounting textbook

6 editions of U.S. financial accounting textbook 15 other teachingrelated awards2

50 articles, cases and commentaries in peerreviewed outlets 5,000+ students’ names memorized3

500,000+ students who have read one of his textbooks4 1

Fred Phillips is a true world leader in business and management education research. Without a doubt, Fred raised the profile of teaching excellence in our school. He represented genuine class in each and every one of his endeavors. During his illustrious career, Fred taught roughly 5,000 university students. He superbly combined enthusiasm and rigour in imbedding a deep understanding of foundational principles to a few decades’ worth of undergraduates. In MPAcc courses, Fred brilliantly provided expertise and wisdom to graduate students ready to embark on professional accounting careers.

Although his academic teaching career may be concluding, he is ready to embark on a fresh set of adventures. Fred is presently on leave and will officially retire when he turns 55 in August 2019. He hopes to devote more time over the next few years to professional tennis officiating. In just three years of officiating, he already has received the Tennis Canada 2017 Rookie Official of the Year Award and been a line official at 10 professional tournaments, including the 2018 Coupe Rogers and 2018 Davis Cup tournaments. Congratulations, Fred, and all the best in your retirement!

Argbaugh, J. B., et al. 2017. “Key Authors in Business and Management Education Research.” Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education 15 (3): 268-302. (Table 3).

U of S Master Teacher Award, three USSU Teaching Effectiveness awards, two MPAcc Teaching Effectiveness awards, the U of S Provost’s Award for Outstanding Innovation in Learning, five first prizes in the CAAA Annual Case Competition, two first prizes in the CAAA Howard Teall Innovation in Accounting Education Award, and the AAA Innovation in Auditing and Assurance Education Award. 2

3 Includes 21 years teaching in the U of S undergraduate program, eight years in the U of S MPAcc program, two years in the U of S MSc in Accounting program, and two years at the University of Texas at Austin (as a doctoral student and as a visiting scholar on sabbatical leave). 4

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Estimated by McGraw-Hill Education; does not include students reading used textbooks.

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E D U T S

S S E C C U S T N

Edwards student recognized as 2018 Canadian Student Leader of the Year

Indigenous graduates honouring

Congratulations to Edwards student and president of Enactus U of S Dani Nichols who was named Student Leader of the Year at the Enactus Canada National Exposition in Toronto. The award recognizes a student president who has made the most outstanding contribution to their Enactus team.

One of the highlights of convocation this year was the Edwards Indigenous student graduation. Indigenous graduates from the Bachelor of Commerce, Aboriginal Business Administration Certificate and Business Administration Certificate were celebrated at the event. Thank you to our guests CeCe Baptiste (Edwards alumnus) and Dr. Jacqueline Ottmann (vice-provost, Indigenous engagement) for sharing your stories and words of encouragement with our grads.

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ON ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY, EDWARDS MBA TAKES ON A COSTBENEFIT ANALYSIS It’s hard to believe, but Edwards very first MBA students graduated 50 years ago, in 1968. The decision to earn an MBA shouldn’t be taken lightly. It takes money, time and effort. These things need to be weighed against the potential benefits of the degree. On this milestone anniversary, we’re donning our MBA hats and putting our own degree to the test with a costbenefit analysis. Fifty years after the degree’s inception, is getting an Edwards MBA still worth it?

FIRST, THE COSTS Tuition for the program is currently around $30,000 for Canadian students and around $45,000 for international students. Of course, there are also student fees as well as the cost of textbooks and materials to factor in. And if you’re already working, there’s the cost of missed wages, too. To help, the Edwards Graduate Program Office distributes awards and bursaries to MBA students worth over $100,000 per year. There are also many external scholarships and awards for both Canadian and international students. In terms of time and effort, the MBA program can be completed in a year full time or up to three years part time. And if you’d like to expand your career options,

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you can also combine the MBA with degrees in law, medicine, or veterinary medicine.

THE BENEFITS Every year the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) conducts a survey on alumni satisfaction. The data shows that completing an MBA results in considerable salary growth. Recent polls of MBA alumni show 79 per cent found the program financially rewarding and 86 per cent reported an increase in earning power. Over the span of a career, these salary increases can add up to millions of dollars. Earning an MBA also results in faster career advancement, as reported by 82 per cent of the alumni polled. The specialized skills learned and the connections made during the interactive courses are recognized by employers and are especially valuable to opening your own business. A graduate business degree unlocks employment opportunities in many industries, job functions and levels, organizational sizes and locations. While moving up the corporate ladder did show more working hours per week,

Left to right, MBA class of 2018 graduates Deidra Aitken, Shakiba Jalal and Tate Cao. DAWN STRANDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

the numbers also showed a big increase in personal growth, leadership skills, critical analysis skills and people skills, all leading to an increase in career satisfaction. Overwhelmingly, MBA alumni say they enjoyed their program. The GMAC survey showed 95 per cent of alumni found the program personally rewarding and 91 per cent found it professionally rewarding.

THE VERDICT People interested in getting an MBA are usually hoping for one of three things: to take their current career to the next level, to switch careers or to launch their own business. Based on the experiences of our MBA alumni, we found our program results in quantifiable returns on investment. On average, our MBA alumni experience starting base salaries of almost $84,000 upon graduation. So, is it worth it to enrol in the MBA program at Edwards? Our analysis suggests it is. And while we may be biased, we have 50 years of alumni to back us up! Congratulations to the Edwards MBA faculty, staff, students and alumni on this milestone anniversary! n


20 years of growth IN THE MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING PROGRAM

YOUR PIC TUR E HER E

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ALUM NI AC HIE V E M E NT S

2017-2018

Once again, our Edwards alumni have been getting noticed. Graduates of our programs win awards and are appointed to leadership positions around the country. Here are just a few of this past year’s alumni successes.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 1950 s MERLIS BELSHER

DR. FCPA, FCA (B.COMM. '57) RECEIVED A FELLOW OF CHARTERED PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS (FCPA) DESIGNATION, AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN AND WAS INDUCTED INTO THE JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BUSINESS HALL OF FAME.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 1960 s FREDERICK SUTTER

MR. (ACC '62, LOCADM '64, ADMIN '70) RECEIVED A CANADA 150 MEDAL.

JACK NEUMANN

MR. (B.COMM. '69) RECEIVED THE COSIDA LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 1970 s WAYNE BROWNLEE

MR. (MBA '77) RECEIVED THE AFP SASKATOON CHAPTER HONOURED SUPPORTER AWARD.

BRIAN TOWRISS

MR. S.O.M. (B.COMM. '78) RECEIVED A 2017 ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.

CLARE ISMAN

DAVE GUEBERT

MR. CPA, CA (B.COMM. '79) WAS NAMED A DIRECTOR OF NEBO CAPITAL CORP.

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MS. (B.COMM. '79) WAS APPOINTED SENIOR ADVISOR TO THE DEPUTY MINISTER TO THE PREMIER WITHIN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL BY THE GOVERNMENT OF SASKATCHEWAN AND WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE SASKATCHEWAN LIQUOR & GAMING AUTHORITY.


C L A S S E S O F T H E 1980 s LEE SWANSON

KENT SMITH-WINDSOR

DR. (B.COMM. '84, MBA '95) WAS AWARDED THE 2018 PROVOST’S COLLEGE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING TEACHING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN.

ALICE WONG

DR. CAFM, CPA, CA (B.COMM. '85) WAS APPOINTED TRUST FUND CHAIR FOR THE NATIONAL INDIAN BROTHERHOOD TRUST FUND (NIB).

MR. (B.COMM. '82) RECEIVED THE ROGER PHILIPS CHAMBER BUILDER AWARD AT THE 2017 SABEX AWARDS.

MS. (B.COMM. '84) WAS NAMED AN ARTS AND SCIENCE ALUMNI OF INFLUENCE FOR 2018.

KERRY PREETE

MR. (B.COMM. '85) WAS APPOINTED A DIRECTOR OF UNIVAR INC.

KEITH MARTELL

JUSTICE

JASVINDER (BILL) BASRAN

(B.COMM. '89) WAS APPOINTED TO THE SUPREME COURT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 1990 s SLOANE MULDOON

MS. (B.COMM. '91) WAS APPOINTED AS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, PRAIRIE REGION AT SCOTIABANK.

MURAD AL-KATIB

MR. S.O.M., ICD.D (B.COMM. '94) WAS APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF GOLDEN OPPORTUNITIES FUND INC.

JOY CRAWFORD

MS. (B.COMM. '93) WAS APPOINTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN BOARD OF GOVERNORS.

CHAD MAGUS

MR. CPA, CA (B.COMM. '98) WAS APPOINTED EXECUTIVE VICEPRESIDENT AND CFO AT SECURE ENERGY SERVICES INC.

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1990 s C O N T I N U E D… SUSAN BUSSE

MS. (B.COMM. '99) RECEIVED THE 2017 IMPACT IN MUSIC MARKETING AWARD FROM THE WESTERN CANADIAN MUSIC ASSOCIATION.

NATHALIE JOHNSTONE

MS. FCPA, FCA (B.COMM. '99, MPACC '00) RECEIVED A 2018 UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN STUDENTS’ UNION TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 20 0 0 s JOHN PANTAZOPOULOS

MR. CPA, CFA (B.COMM. '00) WAS RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF CALGARY’S TOP 40 UNDER 40 FOR 2017 BY AVENUE CALGARY.

SHELLEY KIRYCHUK

DR. (MBA '01) RECEIVED THE 2017-2018 SHRF COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION DEVELOPMENT (CID) GRANT.

MACKENZIE FIRBY

MS. (B.COMM. '03) WAS APPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS.

JOEL FRIESEN

MR. Q.C. (B.COMM. '05) WAS APPOINTED TO THE QUEEN’S COUNSEL (Q.C.) BY THE GOVERNMENT OF SASKATCHEWAN.

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DANIELLE FAVREAU

MS. CPA, CA (B.COMM. '01) WAS APPOINTED CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER OF KARNALYTE RESOURCES INC.

HENRY CHOW

MR. (MPACC '03) CO-FOUNDED AND IS A PARTNER AT CHOW CONNOLLY LLP.

CECE BAPTISTE

MS. CPA, CMA (CIBA '02, B.COMM. '04) WAS NAMED ONE OF CBC SASKATCHEWAN’S FUTURE 40 FOR 2017.

SHERI WILLICK

MS. (BUSADM '06) WAS ELECTED TO THE SASKATCHEWAN SOCCER BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND THE 2018 SASKATOON REGION ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® BOARD OF DIRECTORS.


JESSICA CONNOLLY

MRS. (MPACC '07) CO-FOUNDED AND IS A PARTNER AT CHOW CONNOLLY LLP.

BRITTANY WALTER

MS. (B.COMM. '07, MPACC '09) WAS NAMED PARTNER, AUDIT & BUSINESS ADVISORY SERVICES AT KPMG.

PAUL GROCH

MR. (MPACC '09) WAS NAMED PARTNER, RISK ADVISORY AT DELOITTE.

HOLLY KRAL

MS. (B.COMM. '07, MPACC '09) WAS NAMED DIRECTOR, PLANT FINANCE, CANADA AT NUTRIEN.

SEAN WILLY

MR. (B.COMM. '08) WAS APPOINTED CEO OF DES NEDHE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.

JAYME MCCOLL

MS. (MPACC '09) WAS NAMED DIVISIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS AT HOLT RENFREW.

C L A S S E S O F T H E 2010 s ANAS EL-ANEED

DR. (MBA '12) WAS APPOINTED A MEMBER OF THE NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA (NSERC) GOVERNING COUNCIL, GOVERNMENT OF CANADA.

SERESE SELANDERS

MS. (MBA '13) WAS APPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE SASKATCHEWAN HEALTH QUALITY COUNCIL.

KAREN ROBSON

MS. (B.COMM. '13) WAS NAMED ONE OF CBC SASKATCHEWAN’S FUTURE 40 FOR 2017.

GRAHAM SNELL

MR. (CEBAC '14) WAS ELECTED TO THE GREATER SASKATOON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

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2010 s C O N T I N U E D… COLTON WEIGERS

MR. (B.COMM. '16) WAS ELECTED TO THE GREATER SASKATOON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

JARED ABLASS

MR. (B.COMM. '17) COMPLETED HIS SPECIALIZED MASTER IN FINANCE DEGREE FROM OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY.

KALYANI PREMKUMAR

DR. (MBA '16) RECEIVED THE 2017-2018 SHRF COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION DEVELOPMENT (CID) GRANT.

RENATA HUYGHEBART

MS. (B.COMM. '17) RECEIVED THE AFP SASKATOON CHAMBER CHAMBERLAIN SCHOLARSHIP.

FOR MORE ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENTS, VISIT EDWARDS.USASK.CA/ALUMNI. DO YOU HAVE A SUCCESS STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT SHAWNA AT JARDINE@EDWARDS.USASK.CA OR 306-966-7539.

Professor Ashok Patil retires Statistics. Operations management. Optimization models. Mathematical programming. Spreadsheet analysis. Such were the topics taught by Professor Ashok Patil during a wonderful 32-year career at the Edwards School of Business. Combining a quiet elegance with a wry sense of humour (who can ever forget the cartoons that graced the front of his exams?), Ashok brilliantly delivered courses in our undergraduate and MBA programs. His friendly disposition and personality ensured that students—who may have approached his courses with a blend of fear and panic—were able to receive knowledge and skills that made sense of management science. Later in his career, he co-supervised a graduate student’s thesis on the application of analytical modeling in health care. His outreach and impact, in terms of total student headcount, truly numbers in the

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thousands. Current students and alumni vividly recount his patient explanations of quantitative concepts and his conscientious approach of drawing real-world applicability from statistical principles. His career spanned a fascinating panorama of pedagogical platforms – from the use of meticulous, hand-written tables to perform quantitative calculations to the deployment of the Excel spreadsheet as a decision-making and analysis tool. Clearly, Ashok was a professor ahead of his time. He specialized in analytics before it became a trendy topic!

Ashok’s influence even extends to our very own faculty. At least six current members of the Edwards faculty were Ashok’s students during their undergraduate or MBA programs. Congratulations, Ashok, on a fantastic career! n


The Edwards School of Business regrets the passing of these alumni and friends. In Memoriam includes those who have passed between August 21, 2017 and August 20, 2018. 1940

1980

McLean, Marguerite I (Howes) BACC '44, Langley, BC

McLeod, Gordon G B.Comm. '64, Edmonton, AB

Burrows, Mark A B.Comm. '80, Barrie, ON

McNay, Elizabeth N (Betty) BACC '44, Calgary, AB

Owen, Robert T B.Comm. '66, Calgary, AB

Cairns, Patricia A (Sikorski) B.Comm. '82, Cudworth, SK

Ochitwa, Peter B.Comm. '48, St. Catharines, ON

Pavelich, Barbara V (Pavelick) ACC '62, Saskatoon, SK

Hantke, Jeanne B (Bell) B.Comm. '86, Edmonton, AB

Stephenson, Kenneth R BACC '45, Saskatoon, SK

Payne, Terry F B.Comm. '67, Saskatoon, SK

Humphries, Charles B BUSADM '84, Saskatoon, SK

Walls, Gerald M B.Comm. '48, Victoria, BC

Phillips, Gerald E B.Comm. '65, Moose Jaw, SK

Korvemaker, Bette L (Burns) B.Comm. '83, Saskatoon, SK

Reinhardt, Uwe E B.Comm. '64, Princeton, NJ

Lyons, Lenore T (Schmidt) B.Comm. '89, Calgary, AB

Rozon, Gordon M B.Comm. '69, Calgary, AB

Peterson, Magnus B (Bryan) HECADM '85, Calgary, AB

Sorochan, Patricia J B.Comm. '63, Regina, SK

Warwick, Helen M (Murrer) BUSADM '85, Saskatoon, SK

1950 Acres, Donald H B.E. '58, Cert. Bus Admin. '58, Regina, SK Chapman, Gerald ACC '57, Cert. Bus Admin. '58, Fort Erie, ON Flanagan, Herbert C B.Comm. '52, Calgary, AB

Wylie, Wesley W Cert. Bus Admin. '62, Saskatoon, SK

1990

Hopkin, Lorna C (Dowswell) B.Comm. '53, Calgary, AB

1970

Bohn, Arlene V (Batke) HECADM '90, Yorkton, SK

McLellan, Thomas A (Tom) B.Comm. '55, Palm Springs, CA

Bastian, Karl HOSADM '73, Moose Jaw, SK

Hamre, Barry A BUSADM '95, Saskatoon, SK

Rayner, Lawrence C B.Comm. '51, Winnipeg, MB

Boys, Raymond R PUBADM '74, Regina, SK

Hingston, Danita L LSC '98, Saskatoon, SK

Selby, Austin W B.A. '58, B.Comm. '58, Regina, SK

Gabruch, David R B.Comm. '76, Saskatoon, SK

Stinson, James H (Harvey) B.Comm. '53, Chilliwack, BC

Grace, Michael J B.Comm. '79, Saskatoon, SK

Korsberg, Edmee G (Clermont) HECADM '92, HECADM '93, HECADM '94, Lanigan, SK

1960 Banks, Harold H ACC '63, ADMIN '67, Regina, SK Bright, John A B.Comm. '68, Victoria, BC Burak, Daniel M B.Comm. '67, Calgary, AB Burke, John A Cert. Bus Admin. '64, Delta, BC Byrnes, John L Cert. Bus Admin. '68, Saskatoon, SK Hooge, Gary B B.Comm. '64, Abbotsford, BC Lane, Thomas C B.Comm. '64, Regina, SK

Grossmann, Hans K HOSADM '71, Gibsons, BC Hardowa, Ronald D BADMIN '71, Edmonton, AB Machula, Larry M B.Comm. '76, Saskatoon, SK McCulloch, William B PERADM '73 Rosten, Donald A B.Comm. '74, Saskatoon, SK Wolan, Wallace T B.Comm. '76, Cochrane, AB Yuzwa, Robert P B.Comm. '72, Saskatoon, SK

Leonard, Serge HECADM '94, Yorkton, SK Leung, Maggie L BUSADM '90, Saskatoon, SK Morrison, Marie-Anne P (Welker) BUSADM '93, Saskatoon, SK Mueller, Lenard B B.Comm. '93, Saskatoon, SK Ricketts, Marjorie (Dennis) HECADM '91, High River, AB Schuck, Joseph T B.Comm. '93, Calgary, AB

2000 Marshall, Jillian A (Suddaby) HOSADM '00, Warman, SK Sather, Harvey A B.Comm. '07, Saskatoon, SK

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EDWARDS CLOSES OUT CENTENNIAL WITH A NEW TRADITION

JESSICA STEWART DAVID STOBBE

The Edwards School of Business has been celebrating our centennial this past year, honoring the many successes of our alumni, the companies and boards they serve, and all we’ve built together over the past century. But to ensure we build on this celebration of successes, and to keep our network strong, we launched a new tradition on the final day of the reunion: a pinning ceremony. The ceremony presented alumni and current third and fourth-year business students with the opportunity to recognize the great impact they can have on society whether through public, social or private sectors. Participants pledged to uphold the Edwards School of Business values and high standards, acting with integrity and

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safeguarding the interests of shareholders, co-workers, customers and society. “By participating in the ceremony, our alumni and students acknowledged the responsibilities they have as leaders in the communities in which they work,” says Shawna Jardine, alumni relations officer. “We are very proud of the shared values of our alumni network. This pinning ceremony gave participants the opportunity to officially pledge to uphold those values.” “It was particularly important to include a celebration of diversity and pluralism in the pledge,” says Dean Keith Willoughby. “Participants vowed to consider the perspectives of all peoples in Saskatchewan, in Canada, on First Nations and throughout the world.”

Participants received the newly minted Edwards School of Business pin as a reminder of their pledge, and as a symbol of their admission into the Edwards alumni network. Going forward the pinning ceremony will coincide with Edwards annual jubilee reunions and focus on third-year students who have chosen their major and are entering the business world either through co-operative education placements, parttime or summer employment. “This tradition of the pinning ceremony will remind our new and more experienced alumni that they’re part of an exclusive network of business professionals,” says Jardine. “Our shared values and commitment to making a positive impact keep us connected.” n


2018 Get a Bigger Wagon

Young Entrepreneur Awards presented by Edwards School of Business and the Annual Haddock Entrepreneurial Speaker Series

If you have your own business and are between 7 and 15 years of age,

we want to hear from you. All you need to do is: * Submit a one to two minute video telling our judges what you do, make, or sell and how long you have been in business. * Submit 1 to 2 pages describing your business and include a basic profit and loss summary.

Need Help?

Contact entrepreneurs@edwards.usask.ca

Enter to win cash prizes!

Age of entrants as of Dec. 31, 2018 determines category placement. 7-9 years - $500 10-12 years - $750 13-15 years - $1000

Send your entries to entrepreneurs@edwards.usask.ca

Submission deadline is December 1, 2018

The books that inspired the Young Entrepreneur Awards are available at For bulk purchases contact sales@Kinnairdbagpipes.com

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www.edwards.usask.ca www.getabiggerwagon.com Edwards School of Business

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E D WA R D S . U S A S K . C A

Profile for Edwards Thrive Magazine

Thrive 2018  

The entrepreneurship issue.

Thrive 2018  

The entrepreneurship issue.