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PM # 40013048

THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MAGAZINE 2016

EXTREME MAKEOVER READING ROOM GETS A MAKEOVER PAGE 30

A WINNING BRAND EDWARDS ALUMNI BECOME CLIENTS FOR EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING CLASS

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A CAREER FOR THE KID IN YOU EDWARDS ALUMNUS WORKS IN DIGITAL GAMING INDUSTRY

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What’s the Edwards Network?

It’s a networking platform exclusive to Edwards Alumni. Now our alumni can stay in touch with each other and with us from anywhere and at any time!

faculty as soon as you join! You’ll stay current on professional opportunities, social events, advances in education, and news about your classmates. It’s all these things in one place.

Why should I join?

How do I join?

It’s an easy way to stay connected and network online with thousands of Edwards alumni, faculty and graduating students. Just like traditional networking, the Edwards Network can help you find top recruits for your company, advance your career, keep in touch with your classmates and professors, and learn of upcoming alumni events.

How is it different from LinkedIn?

The Edwards Network is an open-door platform, where you’re connected to participating Edwards alumni and

It’s simple:

1. Go to www.edwardsalumni.com. 2. Click on the LinkedIn, Facebook or Email button and follow the prompts. 3. Explore the site, check out what fellow alumni have to offer and be part of the community.

Need help? Contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7539.


ON APRIL 15, 2016, THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND SASKATCHEWAN POLYTECHNIC SIGNED A HISTORIC AGREEMENT.

STUDENTS CAN NOW TRANSFER COLLEGE CREDITS TOWARD A UNIVERSITY DEGREE AND EXPAND CAREER OPTIONS WHEN

"I am very excited to be enrolled in the Edwards School of Business. Initially, my plan was to obtain an accounting diploma at SaskPolytech. When the opportunity came to further my education, there was no question I had to apply. If it was not for the agreement between the two schools, I would never have had continued with my education. I cannot express the gratitude I have towards the Edwards School of Business. They worked along side me to ensure my transition into the new school went smoothly. I am thrilled to be able to graduate with a diploma and a degree after only four years of study!" -Megan Mossman

THEY GRADUATE.

ENHANCE, UPGRADE OR SPECIALIZE YOUR EDUCATION AT THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.

1ST

2ND

3RD

4TH

YEAR

YEAR

YEAR

YEAR

TRANSFER INFORMATION AVAILABLE AT WWW.EDWARDS.USASK.CA/PROGRAMS/UNDERGRAD


BIRTHPLACE REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN

RESIDENCE LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

N. Murray Edwards: Alumnus, friend, namesake

EDUCATION BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (GREAT DISTINCTION) – UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN BACHELOR OF LAWS (HONOURS) – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

HONORARY DEGREES LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

OCCUPATION CORPORATE DIRECTOR/INVESTOR

CREDENTIALS LEADING INVESTOR AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN

Mr. Edwards has had a long-standing relationship with the University of

Saskatchewan’s business school as a student, alumnus and donor. He believes strongly in the value of a business education. Over the years, he has given back to his alma mater so students today continue to receive an outstanding business education at the University of Saskatchewan.

- CANADIAN NATURAL RESOURCES LTD. - ENSIGN ENERGY SERVICES INC. - MAGELLAN AEROSPACE CORPORATION CHAIRMAN AND CO-OWNER - CALGARY FLAMES HOCKEY CLUB OF NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE

In June 2000, when the PotashCorp Centre addition was opened, the N. Murray Edwards Case Room was unveiled. One of several smart rooms in the centre, the case room seats 75 students, is equipped with up-to-date educational technologies and is used by faculty and students across campus.

RECOGNITION MEMBER OF THE ORDER OF CANADA SASKATCHEWAN OIL PATCH HALL OF FAME INTERNATIONAL HORATIO ALGER AWARD

Throughout his university years in Saskatoon, Mr. Edwards had a keen interest in investing. On October 3, 2002 he rang the official bell and the N. Murray Edwards MarketWatch went live. This stock ticker board, installed on the main floor of the PotashCorp Centre, still provides continuous stock and commodity information, bringing the business world to the halls of the business school. Faculty, staff and especially students benefit from the direct link to the investment industry. On July 24, 2007, the University of Saskatchewan very proudly acknowledged Mr. Edwards’ continued relationship with the business school by transforming the College of Commerce to the N. Murray Edwards School of Business. Mr. Edwards’ investment in the business school allows us to gain recognition with our new brand and helps to position the business school as one of the top five in Canada. At the University’s Spring Convocation Ceremony on June 2, 2011, Mr. Edwards was presented with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree, the highest honour the University of Saskatchewan can bestow. Mr. Edwards continues to remain truly engaged in the activities of the business school, supporting the George S. Dembroski Student-Managed Portfolio Trust and acting as judge and keynote speaker at the 2013 National Mining Competition. He also gives his time and knowledge by serving on the Edwards School of Business Dean’s Advisory Council, and is a member of the Edwards Dean’s Circle. The students, faculty and staff of the Edwards School are grateful for Mr. Edwards’ continued support.

COMPANION OF THE ORDER OF THE CANADIAN BUSINESS HALL OF FAME


E X T R E M E M A K E OV E R : R E A D I N G R O O M G E T S A M A K E OV E R PAG E 30

TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 SUCCESS COMES FULL CIRCLE n

19

Dean's Circle gives back to Edwards

Edwards alumni become clients for experiential marketing class

9 A YEAR OF TRANSITIONS n n GENERAL EDWARDS n STUDENT EXPERIENCE n ALUMNI RELATIONS n FACULTY n PROGRAMS & CENTRES n OUTREACH & ENGAGEMENT n DEVELOPMENT

Callan Kimber's time as EBSS president

10 FIVE PEOPLE FIVE JOBS n 13 MEET THE INTERIM DEAN n Dr. Keith Willoughby explains his timeline and plans for the year

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FEAR AND LOATHING IN THE CLASSROOM

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DEAN'S WAR ON WORDS GARNERS NATIONAL ATTENTION

Dean holds competition teaching students to dismiss filler words

A WINNING BRAND nn

22 2016 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE 23 2016 GRANDEY LEADERSHIP HONOUREE

24 THE ALUMNI LIFECYCLE n 25 BOOM! ALUMNI HAVE IMPACT Edwards celebrates alumni with paint night

26 FEATURED RESEARCHERS n 28 WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND


THRIVE

A C A R E E R F O R T H E K I D I N YO U PAG E 53

THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MAGAZINE

STRATEGIC DIRECTOR Keith Willoughby

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jan Kalinowski

COPY EDITOR & OUTREACH CO-ORDINATOR Brooke Klassen

ART DIRECTOR Larry Kwok

HEAD WRITER & COPY EDITOR Jessica Stewart

WRITER & COMMUNICATIONS Natasha Katchuk

ALUMNI OUTREACH CO-ORDINATOR Shawna Jardine

CONTRIBUTORS Christina Dolan Molly Doucette Shawna Jardine Jan Kalinowski Natasha Katchuk Travis Rotenburger Jessica Stewart

PHOTOGRAPHY Matt Braden Photo Ken Greenhorn Chris Hendrickson Patricia Holdsworth Larry Kwok Jodi O Photography Stobbe Photo Dawn Stranden Photography Studio D YXE

PUBLISHER

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35 EDWARDS AT A GLANCE n 36 REDUCING BARRIERS; BUILDING COMMUNITIES

Edwards alumna's experience as refugee inspires career in human rights

YOUTH GET A KICKSTART ON ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AT EDWARDS

40

FAMILY THAT WORKS TOGETHER WINS TOGETHER

Edwards alumni named Family Enterprise of the Year

42

PRODUCTION

43

ADVERTISING SALES thrive@edwards.usask.ca

49 DONOR ROLL n 51 EDWARDS CELEBRATES SECOND ANNUAL ALUMNI JUBILEE

52

WOMENTORSHIP ALUMNI EVENT REUNITES PARTICIPANTS

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A CAREER FOR THE KID IN YOU n

Edwards alumnus works in digital gaming industry

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Edwards School of Business 25 Campus Drive Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A7

Mister Print / Printwest 619 8th Street East Saskatoon, SK S7H 0R1

EXTREME MAKEOVER nn

Reading Room gets a makeover

BACKPACKING MADE EASY nn

The Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies focuses on the Study Abroad Program

BUSINESS FOR NON-BUSINESS STUDENTS

Engineer and Gordon Award recipient receives MBA

44 NEW FACES - FACULTY nn 46 NEW FACES - STAFF n

57

LIGHTS... CAMERA... ACTION! n

The new MPAcc commerical showcases facility improvements and one of our premiere programs

58 ALUMNI UPDATES n 61 RETIREMENTS n 62 IN MEMORIAM - ALUMNI nn 63 IN MEMORIAM - FACULTY nn 64 STRONGER TOGETHER n Merger results in more professional development opportunities for business community


n

Success Comes Full Circle SETTING AN EXAMPLE Top: Dean’s Circle members participate as judges in the first Year Business Competencies Course Competition. Bottom: Annual appreciation event in Calgary. Special guest was Riders CEO and alumnus Craig Reynolds.

Established in 2013, the Dean’s Circle is an elite community of members

who demonstrate extraordinary commitment to the Edwards School of Business and the quality business education that Edwards delivers. As the business of attracting talented students has become more competitive, the Dean’s Circle acts as a conduit to build our business programs and support student-focused initiatives. Your commitment to the Dean’s Circle will enhance the school’s ability to recruit and retain top students while continuing to uphold a tradition of business school excellence. Your investment will also help us respond quickly to emerging

opportunities that enhance the student experience. Last year, this generosity supported experiential learning opportunities, scholarships, student competitions, facility improvements and alumni initiatives that fall outside the school’s operating budget. Dean’s Circle members are helping shape the next generation of business leaders and are developing meaningful connections with Edwards students. Through your membership you will also enjoy regular updates from the dean on the school’s operations, access to special networking events and the opportunity to judge student competitions.

"DEAN’S CIRCLE MEMBERS ARE HELPING SHAPE THE NEXT GENERATION OF BUSINESS LEADERS AND ARE DEVELOPING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS WITH EDWARDS STUDENTS."

“As a Dean’s Circle member, I was asked to serve as a judge for the Comm 119 Business Case Competition. I was completely impressed with the quality of the presentations by the students. It was hard to believe they were first year students. It was motivational for me to experience firsthand the excitement, anticipation, and more importantly the energy level within the building. Congratulations to all the participants, job well done!”

“I believe with no uncertainty that my exciting and challenging career is a credit to the foundation I had as an MBA student at the U of S. The launching of a career is a pivotal time in life and it sets the stage for opportunities and door openings that we can hardly imagine. Since education and learning are the keys to that career path, I personally put a high value on ensuring that the younger generation gets that same advantage. Given my positive experience at the U of S, it is an honour to be a part of seeing this tradition being carried on.”

“I am so delighted to continue to be a member of the Dean’s Circle. It is a privilege to make a multi-year commitment to high quality education. Dean’s Circle members have a true relationship with the Edwards School of Business. We hear the latest news, meet the faculty, staff and students, and get to know other members of the Dean’s Circle. We know our financial support is a wise investment in the future, and that 100 per cent of our donations are spent on enhancing learning opportunities at the Edwards School. I am a better ambassador for the University of Saskatchewan because I’m a member of the Dean’s Circle.”

Neil Evans

Karen Stewart

Daphne Taras

Pillar Properties Corp.

Fairway Divorce Solutions

Professor & Edwards Dean’s Circle Founder

To learn more about becoming part of this special community, contact Rae Oleksyn at oleksyn@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7471.

5


THE DEAN’S ADVISORY COUNCIL Keith Willoughby Interim Dean and Chair of the DAC Edwards School of Business

PotashCorp

Tracy Robinson Vice President Supply Chain TransCanada Corporation

THRIVE 2016


Congratulations to our Dean’s Advisory Council Members for Their Recent Achievements David Dubé

David Dubé and Heather Ryan were selected as the 2016 Red Cross Humanitarians of the Year for their philanthropic efforts and ongoing commitment to Saskatchewan. The husband and wife pair created the Heather Ryan and L. David Dubé Foundation in 2006 to support organizations like the University of Saskatchewan, Huskie Athletics, the Children’s Hospital Foundation, St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation and the Soldier On Fund. The foundation has contributed over $6 million since its inception. They are also involved in the organization Be More than a Bystander which aims to increase understanding of the impact of men’s violence against women. David is also a member of the Edwards School of Business Dean’s Circle.

Gordon Rawlinson

Gordon Rawlinson received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit recognizing his excellence, achievements and contributions to the social, cultural and economic well being of the province. Gordon has made Saskatchewan the centre of his broadcast activities, and his philanthropy is deeply embedded in the culture of Rawlco Radio. His philanthropic contributions throughout the province extend to health, education and the performing arts, including the Rawlco Centre for Mother Baby Care, state of the art theatres for the performing arts, and the Rawlinson Centre for Aboriginal Business Students at the Edwards School of Business. Gordon is also a member of the Dean’s Circle at the Edwards School.

Shelley Brown & W. Brett Wilson

On June 6, 2016, Shelley Brown and Brett Wilson were inducted into the Junior Achievement of Saskatchewan Business Hall of Fame. They participated in a panel discussion called the Achiever’s Den as part of the award ceremony, providing advice and answering questions for Junior Achievement students. Candidates for the hall of fame are nominated based on their success in business and community involvement. Shelley and Brett excelled in both categories with numerous personal and business successes. They both also give back to their communities in a variety of ways, including Brett funding the Wilson Centre at the University of Saskatchewan, and both are members of the Edwards Dean’s Circle.

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Edwards Celebrates Honorary Degree Recipients During the university’s 2016 Spring Convocation Ceremonies Keith Martell (Edwards Dean's Advisory Council member) & Rajat Nag were presented with Honorary Doctorate of Law degrees, the highest honor the University of Saskatchewan can bestow.

Dr. Keith Martell

A member of Saskatchewan’s Waterhen Lake First Nation and a 1985 graduate of the University of Saskatchewan’s commerce program, Martell turned his education into a 10-year stint with the chartered accounting firm KPMG. He went on to become one of the founders of the First Nations Bank of Canada, the only chartered bank headquartered in Saskatchewan. The bank now boasts close to half a billion dollars in assets and is 80 per cent Aboriginal owned. Martell has also worked with the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and is on the board of directors of PotashCorp. In 2001, The Globe and Mail’s Report on Business magazine named Martell as a member of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40, a prestigious list of business and social leaders.

Dr. Rajat Nag

Originally from Delhi, India, Nag earned two graduate degrees—Master of Business Education (MBA) and Master of Science (M.Sc.)—during his time at the University of Saskatchewan before moving on to the London School of Economics. He began his successful career in international banking and as a global leader in development with a position as an economist at the Bank of Canada and later served as managing director general of the Asian Development Bank (ADB). For more than 25 years, Nag has played a key role in fostering regional co-operation in Asia, with his work at the ADB focused on infrastructure and economic development, as well as with education and the environment. He remains an ardent advocate of balancing economic growth with equity, justice and human rights, particularly gender-related issues, and bridging the gap between the region’s thriving economies and the millions of poor being left behind. THRIVE 2016


A Year of Transitions

n

Callan Kimber’s time as EBSS president OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW Top: Callan Kimber reflects on his time as EBSS president. Bottom: [L-R] Office cleaning reveals hidden treasures; The team finds the old Saskatoon Commerce Students' Society sign; EBSS members in the empty room after cleaning is done.

Callan Kimber says his year as Edwards Business Students’ Society (EBSS) president felt like a metaphor for change. “We’ve

reached a point in the timeline where we realized things are different now.” He explains that the society has been transitioning to a new way of doing things: shifting to an academic focus rather than social, and operating more like a business. “The past few presidents have put strategies in place so we can be more efficient and focus on benefiting the students,” Callan says. “We put a lot of time and effort into that this year.” He says this year’s renovation to the EBSS office serves as a physical marker of the transition. “It’s nice and modern,” he says. “And the process of renovating reminded us of the society’s history.” Callan’s highlights of his year as president show the changes to the EBSS, as well as its connection to the past. STUDENT CONFERENCES & COMPETITIONS

S P E A K I N G E N G AG E M E N T S

“This year we were able to send more students to conferences than ever before,” Callan says. The EBSS helped over 60 students attend 11 conferences and competitions. “It’s expensive to send students and the fact that we’re increasing numbers every year is positive.”

Callan spoke at numerous events through the year, including the openings of the Schwartz Gallery and the Moeller Resource Room, as well as the inaugural Jubilee Reunion. “I loved interacting with the alumni,” Callan says. “It made me more proud of where we came from as a school. A lot of interesting people have come through these doors.”

L B 5 Q R E- I M AG I N E D

This past year saw the return of EBSS’ traditional LB5Q social event in a new indoor location. “Renting out Prairieland Park meant a safer set up and that allowed us to focus on making it a quality event,” Callan explains. He says it felt different, but there was the same grand atmosphere. “You walked in and could see the stage and all the lights. There were some unique benefits that past events didn’t have.”

E B S S O F F I C E R E N OVAT I O N

While cleaning out the old space, the society uncovered some EBSS history. Callan says the most interesting find was a Chug Pub trophy, back from the days when students would have beer-drinking contests in the Reading Room. “When we first discovered it I had no idea what it was,” he says. “It’s always fascinating to find pieces of the past.”

$50,081 ON ACADEMIC EVENTS, INCLUDING SENDING 61 STUDENTS TO 6 COMPETITIONS AND 5 CONFERENCES $7,803 TO ITS NEW CHARITY: HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

EBSS SPENT EBSS GAVE

9


n

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A BUSINESS EDUCATION? FIVE OUTSTANDING EDWARDS GRADUATES TELL US WHAT THEY LOVE ABOUT THEIR JOBS.

THRIVE 2016

JASON HASTIE

BOB DEUTSCHER

Lead Singer Jason Hastie and The Alibi B.Comm. 1999, MPAcc 2000

Professional Food Photographer Bob Deutscher Media B.Comm. 2010

“There is nothing like the feeling of being on-stage performing in front of 15,000 people. It’s a rush you can’t describe. Playing live, hearing your songs on the radio and doing TV interviews are the glamorous parts of the entertainment industry. But, as crazy as the ‘music business’ is, it’s also a ‘business,’ and I feel very fortunate to have a skillset that very few in my industry have. When offstage, I use all I have learned through the MPAcc program, my commerce degree, and my CPA, CA designation to drive my career forward.”

“If someone told me I’d make a living as a food photographer when I enrolled in the College of Commerce in 2006 I wouldn’t have believed it! From picking up my first camera in 2010, to making it my fulltime profession in 2013, it’s been an amazing journey, and my business education has definitely helped make it a successful one. Whether I’m creating images for local clients like Ayden Kitchen & Bar or Co-op/FCL, or shooting recipe videos for multi-national companies like General Mills, I always wake up hungry to work!”


n

STEVE DANNERS

SERESE SELANDERS

STEPHANIE SUMMACH

Assistant Chief Executive Officer & Manager – Métis Energy and Resource Program Clarence Campeau Development Fund BAC 2016

VP Member Experience, Affinity Credit Union Founder & CEO, Kasiel Solutions Inc. (ORA) BA 1995, MBA 2013

Chief Pilot Kreos Aviation Inc. B.Comm. 1991

“Challenging the status quo can often result in unexpected and sometimes exceptional results. At Affinity I help create innovative ways to improve the lives and financial well-being of our members. As CEO of ORA, an exciting start-up launching in October, we strive to improve the quality of life for older adults and their loved ones in a unique way. ORA is a personal alert device disguised as beautiful jewelry. The MBA program helped me realize my entrepreneurial potential. I’m excited to see where this journey will take me next!”

“Wow - I LOVE my job! I‘ve been fortunate to work alongside amazing people, both as colleagues and clients. I’ve had the privilege of travelling to incredible destinations, contributing to my deep appreciation for our planet and the many cultures and peoples that occupy it. I could never have predicted that I would end up using my degree to help start a company that helps our business community do more efficient work as we reduce travel time and enhance productivity. Plus, flying is cool!”

“Assisting Métis entrepreneurs and Métis communities to realize their goals of business ownership is a passion of mine and has contributed towards a rewarding career. CCDF has proudly contributed $54 million in equity contributions to over 1,500 projects. This has created 2,498 direct and 6,245 indirect jobs. The BAC program has strengthened my confidence and sharpened my knowledge to ensure I am helping my clients fulfill their dreams of business ownership. Our support allows for the best chance of success for our clients and this strengthens our province and its economy.”

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EDWARDS CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM CELEBRATES 10 YEARS!

CO-OP ALUMNI

HIRE EDWARDS TALENT

THE EDWARDS CO-OP PROGRAM INVITES PAST STUDENTS AND EMPLOYERS BACK TO CELEBRATE THE GROWTH AND SUCCESS OF THE PROGRAM OVER THE LAST 10 YEARS

CO-OP/INTERN STUDENTS ARE THE BEST THAT EDWARDS HAS TO OFFER; THESE STUDENTS ARE HIGHLY ENGAGED, OVERACHIEVING AND ARE READY FOR WORK EXPERIENCE

PLEASE WATCH FOR YOUR INVITATION TO THE ANNUAL JUBILEE REUNION IN THE FALL OF 2017!

OUR SEVEN AREAS INCLUDE ACCOUNTING, FINANCE, MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, HUMAN RESOURCES, OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT, AND FIRST YEAR MBA STUDENTS

TO UPDATE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION OR FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE ALUMNI JUBILEE SCHEDULE PLEASE CONTACT JARDINE@EDWARDS.USASK.CA

CO-OP/INTERN STUDENTS ARE AVAILABLE IN JANUARY FOR 8 MONTHS

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: COOP@EDWARDS.USASK.CA OR (306) 966-1454


n

Meet the Interim Dean A Year of Momentum

“IT WILL BE GREAT TO HAVE EXTERNAL VALIDATION OF WHAT WE’VE KNOWN ALL ALONG.

WE’RE AN EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD BUSINESS SCHOOL.”

Dr. Keith Willoughby will serve as interim

dean for this academic year, but says interim doesn’t mean neutral. His overarching goal for the 2016-2017 academic year is that the Edwards school continues to enhance the student experience. “We can’t afford to be neutral because many things still need to be done,” he says. “I want this to be a year of momentum.”

13


n Keith shares his thoughts on … Accreditation

“Accreditation is vital this year because we’re nearing the culmination of a multi–year journey,” Keith says. The school’s final report is due in June 2017 and the peer review, where three deans will assess the school and make a recommendation, will take place the following November. “It will be great to have external validation of what we’ve known all along. We’re an exceptionally good business school,” Keith says. “We’ll be in the top 5 per cent of business schools worldwide who carry this accreditation.” Centennial

“Centennial is a key part of the 2017 plans,” Keith says. “It’s great the way accreditation and centennial are dovetailing together. We can really make the 2017-18 school year a celebration.” Dean’s Circle

“I want us to continue to grow Dean’s Circle. It’s an opportunity to contribute broadly to the student experience.” Keith explains that the money in the Dean’s Circle fund is targeted to help students through initiatives like conferences and co-curricular opportunities. “What I’ve seen with Dean’s Circle is that a little bit here and there multiplied by a lot of people creates a huge opportunity.” Research

Keith says the impact of research is difficult to measure. “At Edwards, we do research in different areas: some are discipline-based, other people write textbooks that become widely used, and others do work for governments or public organizations,” he says. “We want to ensure that all of our scholars provide impactful research in all its forms.” Dean’s Advisory Council (DAC)

“The DAC provides a level of clarity and advice I would get no other way,” Keith says. “These are people that have been there; done that. They have their ear to the ground when it comes to preparing our students for careers.”

FUN FACTS ABOUT KEITH � Has struck out at t-ball. “Who strikes out at t-ball? The ball is just

standing there!” � Was in the final 40 at Who Wants to Be A Millionaire tryouts in 2000. � Flunked the Jeopardy try out quiz in 2002. “All my life I was good at

cramming useless facts into my head. And then I had the worst eight minutes of my life.” � Shot a hole-in-one on the 154-yard 17th hole at White Deer Vintage

Golf Course in White Deer, Pennsylvania. “I’m the world’s worst golfer to get a hole in one.” � Had a poem published in the Star Phoenix. “It was my therapy for

recovering from the Rider’s infamous 13th man Grey Cup loss in 2009.”

THRIVE 2016

“I ENDED UP COMING FULL CIRCLE THROUGH A LOT OF DIFFERENT TWISTS AND TURNS."


n Keith’s Timeline

2008

2011

Took two-year term teaching position at thenCollege of Commerce.

Completed Ph.D. from University of Calgary.

Took faculty position at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania.

Moved back to Saskatoon and took a position at Health Quality Council. “It was a career shift for me and really impacted my research trajectory and my perspective on teaching.”

Returned to Edwards as tenured associate professor.

Became associate dean academic.

2016

2005

Worked for BC Transit. “We were looking at improving the efficiency of the transportation system. I love doing real world applications of our science.” Graduated from UBC with Master's degree in management science.

1999

1993

1990 Graduated from thenCollege of Commerce with B.Comm. (High honours) degree.

1998

Then-Assistant Dean Doug Bicknell encouraged Keith to think about academia as a career. “He said it was a way of taking your knowledge and giving back. Cultivating your interests and serving the broader community.”

1997

Became U of S student in then-College of Commerce. Had a double major in finance and quantitative methods.

1988

1984

Keith’s connection to the U of S can be traced through several key moments. Keith left the province twice, but returned both times. In part for work, for family, and, of course, to maximize the number of Rider games he could attend. “I ended up coming full circle through a lot of different twists and turns,” Keith says. “I’ve been a student, term faculty, sessional instructor, tenured associate professor, associate dean, and now interim dean here at the Edwards School.”

Became interim dean. “Through five years serving as an associate dean, I learned much about the systems and structures of higher education. I am looking forward to using this background to assist me in my interim dean position.”

KEITH LEFT THE PROVINCE TWICE, BUT RETURNED BOTH TIMES.

IN PART FOR WORK, FOR FAMILY, AND, OF COURSE, TO MAXIMIZE THE NUMBER OF RIDER GAMES HE COULD ATTEND. 15


PHOTO BY KEN GREENHORN

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WELL-DESERVED RECOGNITION Willoughby receives his Master Teacher Award from Dr. Patti McDougall, Vice-Provost, Teaching and Learning.

As Master Teacher, Keith Willoughby Tackles Fear and Loathing in the Classroom BY J E S S I C A S T E WA R T

Keith Willoughby received the University of Saskatchewan’s Master Teacher Award last fall,

recognizing his years of excellence in teaching. Keith says his teaching strategy revolves around inspiring and connecting with his students. “It’s in my nature to be enthusiastic,” he says. “But instructor enthusiasm can only go so far.” To inspire his students in the topics of business analytics, statistics, and operations management, which Keith says are often accompanied by “fear and loathing,” he uses real life examples. For one, he shows a clip of the famous I Love Lucy chocolate-wrapping episode to explain assembly line balancing. He’s also used long lineups at local coffee shops, nearly empty flights, and what he calls “the world’s worst four-way stop” at the corner of Preston and Main in Saskatoon. But most of Keith’s examples are taken from his experiences working for the Health Quality Council. “I always wanted to be a professor that could teach from actually having done it; not read about it,” he says. And stories about reducing congestion in hospital emergency rooms help bring meaning to complex concepts. “Real world problems don’t look like textbook problems,” Keith says. “And lessons that resonate with students will broaden their interest and leave a stronger impression.” He also developed a course where senior undergraduate students can apply operations management principles to actual problems involving real life clients. Student teams have completed 25 pro-bono projects since 2011. Clients have included the local food bank, health care organizations, mining companies, national sporting federations, and auto repair shops. These THRIVE 2016

"I ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A PROFESSOR THAT COULD TEACH FROM ACTUALLY HAVING DONE IT; NOT READ ABOUT IT.

REAL WORLD PROBLEMS DON'T LOOK LIKE TEXTBOOK PROBLEMS." real life problems inspire innovative solutions from the students, with one Saskatoon food bank project group winning the prize for Most Innovative Operations Management project at the 2015 Student Conference on Operations held at the University of Alberta. This project competition brings together student teams from across Alberta and Saskatchewan. To better connect with his students, Keith takes the time to learn their names at the start of each semester. “It’s a straightforward technique but powerful,” he says. “I’m convinced that student interest and attention is heightened when a professor can call on individuals by name.” He says it takes about two weeks to commit 60 names and faces to memory. These efforts haven’t gone unnoticed by his students. “He strikes the perfect balance of being a serious academic with a great sense of humour and relatability,” says undergrad Kaylee Lam. “He has years of experience and wisdom to share with us.” His graduate students have been equally impacted: “Keith consistently displayed passion and enthusiasm for his subject and caring towards the learning of the students,” says MBA alum Gordon Mosher. “I believe I will retain many of his teachings for years to come.“ Keith certainly has many more years of teaching excellence ahead of him. “I became excited about operations management concepts as a student. I continue to be passionate about these principles and endeavor to deliver energy in the classroom.”


Dean’s war of words garners national attention BY N ATA S H A K AT C H U K

We have all been witness to a conversation

LIKE, UM ...

where the word “like” has been dropped more times than on a Facebook post. For then Dean Daphne Taras, it was after spending time in the hallways of the Edwards School of Business having overheard one too many frustrating conversations that she decided to take action. Annoyed by the use of verbal fillers such as “um, y’know, like, you guys, and hey,” Dr. Taras issued a matching challenge to her network of faculty, staff and donors. Donations quickly began pouring in, resulting in a $7,000 pool of funds from which prizes can be drawn for years to come. Aptly named the Dean’s Golden Tongue, the program is believed to be first of its kind in business schools. Targeted at first year students, the goal is to make an oral presentation without reliance on a script or using a crutch of wasted words and verbal fillers. The competition not only garnered the attention of media outlets such as the Globe & Mail and CBC, but sparked widespread discussion. Taras’ own son engaged in the conversation bantering back about his own experiences with generational filler words. The Edwards School of Business also received comments and confessions from alumni and donors of all generations. In the end, 23 students met the challenge and successfully competed to be among the inaugural group of winners, witnessed by classmates and industry judges. Recipients will be able to add this talent to their résumés, with employers sure to be grateful.

nn 2016 INAUGURAL WINNERS: Hannah Classen

Hayli Riach

Brianne Daviduik

Andrew Slusar

Joshua DeCorby

Levi Smith

Sarah English

Andrew Sproule

Sarah Firby

Emily Sweeney

Carl Fuentes

Taylor Thiessen

Jenae Funk

Katharine Tupper

Jackson Lowell

Jordan Turcotte

Aihua Mao

Brett Weiman

Leighton Nelson

Ethan Wingerak

Owen Peters

Huisi Wu

Melissa Reigert

... Y'KNOW?

Watch the video on our YouTube channel:

WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/ESBUofS

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A WINNING

BRAND

Edwards alumni become clients for experiential marketing class

BY J E S S I C A S T E WA R T

Edwards alumni Janea Dieno and Sean Morton graduated years apart and started out on very

different paths. Janea (B.Comm. 2001) used her marketing degree to work in international sales, traveling to places like Paris and Dubai. Sean’s finance degree (B.Comm. 1997) took him to Calgary to work for an oil company, then into the financial services industry.

“WE BOTH FELT CONFIDENT IN THE STUDENTS, HAVING BEEN THROUGH THE B.COMM. PROGRAM OURSELVES.”

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nn BRANDING LEADERS Top Left: The winning group [L-R] Nicole Greschner, Anya Slowenko, Nicole Mulenga-Woo, Jordana Knoblauch. Below: The students explain their process to the clients. Bottom Left: The clients give their feedback [L-R] Janea Dieno, Sean Morton, Professor Barb Phillips.

Both grads ended up with Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designations, working as independent financial advisers in Saskatoon. After getting to know each other and sharing administrative staff, Sean and Janea decided to join forces and rebrand under a shared company name. “We didn’t have a business name, logo, branding, or anything,” Janea says. “And then I remembered taking a class taught by Barb Phillips where we had to come up with a communications plan for a real life client.” By contacting the school, Janea and Sean discovered Barb would be running a similar class in second semester. “The branding course is designed to teach students how to analyze, evaluate, and manage a brand. The best way to learn these concepts is to have the students apply their brand strategies to a real-world problem,” Barb says. “Janea and Sean were the perfect partners for the course because of their positive, open attitudes.” Sean says agreeing to have Edwards students come up with the company’s new brand was easy. “We both felt confident in the students, THRIVE 2016

“IT DIDN’T TAKE ANY MORE TIME THAN IF WE’D GONE THROUGH A BRANDING FIRM.” having been through the B.Comm. program ourselves,” he says. “We liked the idea of getting six different proposals and, at the end of the day, we weren’t obliged to implement anything. It was low risk.” He and Janea provided the class with background information, including detailed biographies, goals, and business approach. They then visited the class to meet the students and answer any follow-up questions. “It didn’t take any more time than if we’d gone through a branding firm,” Janea says.


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The staff at Brightrock Financial [L-R] Lorelle Brehaut, Sean Morton, Janea Dieno, Nicole Greschner.

“I ALWAYS LIKE THE PROJECTS WITH REAL CLIENTS. THE STAKES ARE A LITTLE BIT HIGHER. YOU REALIZE IT’S SOMEONE’S BUSINESS AND YOU WANT TO DO A GOOD JOB FOR THEM.”

The business partners picked a winning group but found value in each proposal. “We chose the logo and business name we liked best but tweaked them a bit,” Sean says. “And we used the market research some of the other groups did. So we found nuggets in most of the projects.” He and Janea then decided to hire Nicole Greschner – one of the students from the winning group – to implement the new brand. “That was a huge weight off our shoulders,” Janea says. “Nicole was already familiar with the project and dealt with the signage, the printing company, and the website. It was all off of our plates.” Nicole’s favourite classes are experiential learning classes like Branding. “I always like the projects with real clients. The stakes are a little bit higher. You realize it’s someone’s business and you want to do a good job for them.”

She says being able to actually implement her group’s work was a rewarding way to end her undergraduate degree. “The best part of the process has been seeing our work put in place. It’s a cool feeling, especially because this was my first job after graduating.”

DID YOU KNOW? We offer experiential learning opportunities in all majors of the B.Comm. program! For information about the courses or becoming a client, contact Vince Bruni-Bossio, Director, The Edwards Experiential Learning Initiative: bruni-bossio@edwards.usask.ca or call (306) 966-7580.

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PHOTOS BY STUDIO D YXE

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LEARNING FROM LEADERS [Top to Bottom]: Murad Al-Katib speaks at Spring Forward; John Lagimodiere leads a discussion during the interactive panel; Deri Latimer takes a photo of the audience; Panelist Marvin Romanow answers an audience question.

2016 Leadership

Top: Billy Strean captivates the audience. Bottom: Strean leads an interactive chair exercise with audience.

CONFERENCE

The Edwards School of Business was pleased to host the 2016 Leader-

ship Conference last March with the theme Building a Culture of Resilience. The conference featured many accomplished speakers, including:

� Deri Latimer, director of Positivity Speaking and TEDx speaker. Deri spoke about personal resilience in a manner that was eye opening, easy to follow, and life changing. � Billy Strean, professor at the University of Alberta. Billy presented strategies to help bring attention to the importance of fostering human connection and awareness.

The day also included an interactive panel on organizational resiliency featuring panelists Marvin Romanow (executive in residence at the Edwards School of Business), John Lagimodiere (president of ACS Aboriginal Consulting Services), and Chelsea Willness (associate dean – research and academic and Grandey scholar in sustainable leadership at the Edwards School of Business.) The conference also included the annual Spring Forward Grandey Leadership Luncheon where we proudly announced Murad Al-Katib as our Grandey Leadership Honouree. For more information on this and other programs offered by Edwards Executive Education, please contact execed@edwards.usask.ca or call (306) 966-8686.

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2016 GRANDEY LEADERSHIP HONOUREE

MURAD AL-KATIB’S THOUGHTS ON LEADERSHIP AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE.

M U R A D A L- K A T I B

President, Chief Executive Officer and Board Member, AGT Food and Ingredients Inc.

AWARDS/HONOURS/RECOGNITION United Nations Association of Canada Global Citizen Laureate Award (2016) PROFITGuide Magazine’s List of Canada’s 30 Most Fabulous Entrepreneurs of the Past 30 Years (2012) Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012) Led AGT to its second Saskatchewan Business of the Year ABEX Award (2012) BASF Pulse Promoter of the Year Award (2012) Queen’s Saskatchewan Centennial Medal (2006) Canada’s Top 40 under 40 by the Globe and Mail (2005) Ernst & Young Emerging Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2004)

COMMUNITY/BUSINESS INVOLVEMENT Chair, Regina Regional Opportunities Commission Board Member, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada Current Chair, Former Board Member, Canadian Special Crops Association

WHAT QUALITIES DO YOU THINK MAKE FOR A GOOD LEADER? A good leader is multi-dimensional. One must have the skills and singular focus to take an idea and bring it to fruition. One must show passion to inspire and guide others in the pursuit of the singular goal, whether in entrepreneurism, social activism or even to get a group of people to agree on something. A good leader is accountable and collaborative with a drive to succeed against all odds and costs, sharing the glory but at the same time willing to take more than the due criticism in failure. An important overlooked quality is the ability to recognize one’s own weaknesses and find others to fill the gaps turning weakness into strengths.

Former Chair, Advisory Board for Small and Medium Enterprise, Canadian Minister of International Trade Former Advisory Committee Member, Review of the Canada Transportation Act for the Minister of Transport Former Panel Member, Government of Canada’s Renewal of Canada’s Global Commerce Strategy Former Board Member, Pulse Canada

WHO WAS YOUR LEADERSHIP ROLE MODEL OR MENTOR?

My greatest role model is Sir Winston Churchill. Churchill encompassed the single-minded pursuit of success taking the many experiences he had throughout his career to mold and shape his views. When he was called upon to lead during difficult times, he demonstrated an ability to inspire others regardless of the circumstances and private and public cost. He demonstrated great character in the face of adversity, never wavering from pursuing his vision with optimism and determination, inspiring others to accept unimaginable conditions for the greater good. Churchill said, “History will be kind to me for I intend to write it" not in arrogance; however, showing his commitment to succeed and be accountable for his own legacy.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR ASPIRING LEADERS? Young leaders should never be afraid to share their ideas and views with commitment and passion. However they should also develop the skill of listening to those with experience. “Grey” matters. Experience is viewed as unimportant until you have it. Then it is the most valuable commodity one can have. Be passionate, work hard and every day do something to advance yourself to your goals. As you succeed, you will inspire others to succeed along with you and develop the skills needed to lead yourself and others around you to greater and greater things.

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Encourage

Join

next generation to attend Edwards

JDC West and Enactus

Study Volunteer

Attend

Volunteer

hard, finds a major at Edwards

Edwards Alumni events & class reunions

at Edwards with Students, faculty, staff, and alumni

for student society (EBSS), charity drive, tax prep program, and more

Mentor

students and junior alumni formally or informally

Continue

Education at Edwards

Participate

in Edwards mentorship program

Edwards Students

Edwards Alumni Join

Hire

Edwards Alumni Network & encourages others to stay in touch

Edwards Graduates

Attend

Edwards Case Competitions

Graduate and become an Edwards Alumni

Speak

Volunteer

at Edwards events & to student classes

Co-Op Placement

on Edwards Board

Collaborate

with Edwards Alumni

with Edwards faculty members

COMPLETE THE CYCLE The diagram illustrates the cycle a graduate at the Edwards School of Business will go through and the continued commitment as an alumnus.

The Alumni Lifecycle BY S H AW N A J A R D I N E & N ATA S H A K AT C H U K

More than 25,000 commerce alumni have walked through our doors since we became a school 100

years ago. From its early roots as the School of Accounting, the Edwards School of Business is rich with history. Many alumni and friends in our community have played vital roles in our success. Together we are working towards a common goal of developing business professionals to build nations. Your journey began as a student, but it didn’t end the day you graduated. You studied hard, played hard, collaborated with classmates and faculty, and learned life lessons while making friends and business connections. You became an alumnus. The people you met and experiences you gained along the way became your resources and your network. You made strong connections and developed a love for lifelong learning. You have become ambassadors for your alma mater! You volunteer to help our students, you take advantage of networking with fellow alumni, and you encourage your friends, children and grandchildren to attend Edwards. You realize you have a home at Edwards that continues to benefit your life, your career, and your community. Together we are building vibrant and thriving nations. Now you can join the Edwards Alumni Online Network and reconnect with classmates at www.edwardsalumni.com

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Valerie Hoeflicher (Top Right) leads a tile paintiing session with volunteers.

BOOM! Alumni Have Impact Mentoring students, joining an advisory board, speaking

in classrooms or assisting with research projects are just a few ways alumni are volunteering their time and expertise to the Edwards School of Business. “The smallest act of kindness can mean so much to a student or fellow alumnus,” says Shawna Jardine, alumni relations officer. “We are grateful to our alumni volunteers who support the student experience at the Edwards School of Business.” In the 2015-2016 school year, over 360 Edwards alumni contributed 2,900 volunteer hours to various initiatives, events and groups. We are very proud of our alumni and how they contribute to their communities, their alma mater and each other.

“OUR ALUMNI CONTINUE TO GIVE BACK BECAUSE THEY FIND IT REWARDING."

The benefits are two-fold for alumni. Volunteering provides an opportunity to expand their professional networks, gain access to new hires and make a difference in the lives of the next generation. “Our alumni continue to give back because they find it rewarding,” says Jardine. “It also keeps the value of their degree up because they know our students are educated to their recommended standards. We could not do it without them.” In celebration of our alumni volunteer efforts, a paint appreciation night was held at Edwards in May 2016. Alumna Valerie Hoeflicher led the session and participants left with a piece of art and a good understanding of how much we appreciate them.

To find out more about volunteer opportunities or view the full photo album join the Edwards Network at www.edwardsalumni.com.

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Featured Researchers Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi HUMAN RESOURCES AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Dr. Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi has spent his career studying the complex environment of global business strategies. Supported by the Edwards School as well as Canadian research funds, Aloysius looks at how political and cultural environments impact global strategy. He says mitigating the risk of doing business in developing markets is especially important when entering countries dealing with civil war, corruption, or terrorism. International companies can alleviate risk through various means, one of which is language. “The language we use in business can seem derogative and othering,” Aloysius says. “Businesses have good intentions but people in these markets may not want to hear formal, abstract language. They want to hear the language of collaboration.” He adds that through language, businesses can come to grasp contextual institutional logic, legitimacy, and people’s imagination. Aloysius now teaches a global strategy course, using case studies and simulations to help students understand the struggle to penetrate emerging markets.

Marjorie Delbaere MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING Before Associate Professor Marjorie Delbaere began her Ph.D. studies, she worked for the medical product division of Hewlett Packard. “Right from then I was interested in marketing in health care because it’s complex and a little controversial,” she says. “We need to understand the full range of consequences of applying effective persuasion techniques in health care domains.” Her paper recently published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing examined whether average Saskatchewan consumers perceived their doctors as influenced by pharmaceutical companies. Participants were asked to imagine that they were in their doctor’s office being prescribed medication. Half of the participants were then presented with a photograph of a doctor’s office that included items bearing the logo of that brand of medication. “If we see a logo from a brand we’ve been prescribed, do we get suspicious of the doctor? What goes through our mind?” Marjorie found participants were more sceptical of the doctor’s motives and more willing to consider non-pharmaceutical treatment. She’s now looking at health care marketing on social media. “Pharmaceutical companies are increasingly putting out Facebook pages and educational websites,” she says. “It’s an interesting persuasion approach: building goodwill and awareness as opposed to the standard branding technique.”

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Kenneth Fox ACCOUNTING While working on his Ph.D. at the University of Alberta, Dr. Kenneth Fox became interested in a particular way of studying accounting. “Most accounting researchers study financial reporting as an economic process,” he says. “I study it as a social process.” In addition to the required accounting reports, many public companies often prepare a second set of financial figures to help the market determine the company’s value. Ken looks at how and why companies produce these second sets of numbers, how they communicate to financial analysts, and how the analysts use the numbers to come up with share prices. As part of his dissertation, he found that coming up with the second set of numbers was actually a collaborative process. “Both managers and analysts changed their practices throughout the process,” Ken says. “Together they came up with the set of numbers that the analysts actually used.” His findings suggest that companies can improve their relationships with financial analysts, providing more useful information and communicating it effectively.

Shan Wang FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE As the field of e-commerce has evolved over the past 10 years, so has Associate Professor Shan Wang’s research. “At the beginning it was difficult because people didn’t believe in the future of e-commerce,” Shan says. She initially looked at the e-commerce adoption, but moved to more complex topics like online strategy management. “E-commerce is not only a sales channel, but also an organizational strategy,” she explains. “If firms don’t change their operations, they don’t sell well online.” More recently, Shan has researched entry timing strategy. “I looked at whether the first mover advantage exists in e-commerce platforms with low entry barriers.” She found there is an advantage due to factors like the herding effect. “When people shop they tend to see how many items have been sold previously,” Shan says. “Early movers have larger sales numbers.” Her other research areas, social commerce and business analytics, are related to e-commerce. She was part of a major research project that collected data across six countries and tried to find how business analytics contribute to firm performance. “There are always new developments in e-commerce,” Shan says. “So there are always new research opportunities.”

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FOREVER YOUNG Lenny Williams stands next to a kiosk that will search for your grad photo. The photos have now been digitized so that they will never age, preserving them for years to come.

What Goes Around Comes Around BY N ATA S H A K AT C H U K

Do you remember cat eye glasses? Bouffant hair styles? Shoulder pads? Wide collars? Narrow ties?

Through the decades the commerce halls have seen it all and now you can too at Edwards or online! Lenny Williams, now a fourth-year accounting student, was hired as an alumni relations student assistant for the summer of 2015 and tasked with the enormous project of digitizing the composite boards of the many commerce graduates of years past. Over the course of the project he met Ognjen Ivkovic, a U of S computer science graduate, Edwards employee and his future business partner. The pair created custom software to automate the process of scanning and organizing the photos, and ended up co-founding their company Oglen Solutions. Last summer Edwards unveiled the results of this project on digital kiosks around the building. They are now available on our website so you can relive memories of university on a laptop or mobile device from the comfort of your own home. Visit the display at www.edwards.usask.ca/apps/alumnilookup.

THRIVE 2016


DREAM JOB Make all the pieces fit. Become a CPA.

International recognition, higher earning potential and instant credibility in the business world are just a few of the things you can look forward to when you graduate from the CPA program. Make the smart choice today, for your dream job tomorrow.

becomeacpa@cpask.ca cpawsb.ca


THRIVE 2016


PHOTO BY STOBBE PHOTO

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BY N ATA S H A K AT C H U K

There was a collective sense of anticipation

Edwards Reading Room Gets a Makeover

while the Edwards JDC West chant reverberated throughout the hallway as special guests and students walked through a spirit tunnel into the former Commerce Reading Room. Many alumni will remember the space as a place to hit the books, play cards, socialize, and attend events. For decades students used it heavily, but in recent years those decades of late night study sessions finally caught up and took their toll. To ensure future students experience this area with the same fondness as past alumni, the Edwards School of Business partnered with Group 2 Architecture and Facilities Management at the University of Saskatchewan to renovate the former Commerce Reading Room.

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PHOTOS BY STOBBE PHOTO

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SPIRITS WITHIN Left: Guests are greeted with a spirit tunnel. FULL HOUSE Right: Moeller speaks to a packed audience at the grand reopening.

REMEMBER THE TIME Left & Right: The old reading room as many students and alumni would remember it.

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“THE GOAL IS TO CREATE THE BEST EXPERIENCE FOR OUR STUDENTS BOTH INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM.” PHOTOS BY LARRY KWOK

“The goal is to create the best experience for our students both inside and outside of the classroom,” then-Dean Daphne Taras said. “We wanted to ensure students felt like it was their space again — a place they wanted to gather in.” Edwards alumnus Larry Moeller (B.Comm. 1980) and his family generously donated $500,000 to rejuvenate the dedicated student space in which he and his classmates studied in during the 1970s. The Moeller donation was immediately matched by the university in order to create $1 million in extensive changes both to the Reading Room and other student meeting space on the school’s top floor, honoring the Edwards School of Business’ commitment to the student experience.


PHOTOS BY PATRICIA HOLDSWORTH

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Students, staff and faculty alike went through several brainstorming sessions and quickly agreed the space needed to feel bright and welcoming. Similar to other great study spaces on campus, the design eventually focused on: �

ME Space: Creating individual workstations along

the sides of the room and adding dozens of electrical plugs to charge devices.

WE Space: Incorporating flexible small group

worktables, multi-level seating and breakout rooms – all with state of the art technology and audio-visual capabilities. US Space: The flexibility to transform the space for special occasions or large gatherings such as orientation, networking events, career fairs, case competitions and more. The additional student lounge and eating area can also become part of the greater space through a moveable wall design.

A ROOM WITH A VIEW Top Left & Middle: The new student lounge. Top Right: Study and meeting rooms. Bottom: Full view of the new renovation.

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PHOTOS BY STOBBE PHOTO

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Edwards worked with designers to ensure natural light was incorporated into the refurbished space by adding additional windows and a significant amount of new lighting. The existing furniture, flooring and paint were all replaced and essential technologies incorporated. After four months of construction, the newly named Moeller Resource Room was officially unveiled on March 29, 2016. “For decades this room has served as the nucleus of daily student life at the Edwards School of Business,” said Larry Moeller. “By making this gift I want to inspire, support and encourage all students in their journeys to become leaders in business and in society at large. I trust that this gift will enhance the student experience and make it a richer period of education and development for the entire Edwards community.”

ABOUT LARRY MOELLER Larry was born in Humboldt and raised in Moose Jaw and Meadow Lake. EDUCATION: Bachelor of Commerce – University of Saskatchewan DESIGNATIONS: Chartered Professional Accountant, Chartered Business Valuator OCCUPATIONS: President, Kimball Capital Corporation President, Moeller Financial Corporation Vice President Finance, Edco Financial Holdings Ltd. CREDENTIALS: Magellan Aerospace Corporation, Board of Directors Imperial Metals Corporation, Board of Directors Resorts of the Canadian Rockies Inc., Director Sunwest Aviation Ltd., Managing Director Edwards School of Business Dean’s Advisory Council Member Edwards School of Business Dean’s Circle Member Edwards Alumni Network Member YPO Gold Member

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“BY MAKING THIS GIFT

I WANT TO INSPIRE, SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGE ALL STUDENTS

IN THEIR JOURNEYS TO BECOME LEADERS IN BUSINESS AND IN SOCIETY AT LARGE.”

MINGLING WITH STUDENTS Top Left: Moeller discusses the new space with students. DONOR’S ADDRESS Above: Moeller talks about his experiences as a student.


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EDWARDS AT A GLANCE

1,943

STUDENTS

66 41

1,726 B.COMM. 154 MPACC 54 MBA 7 M.SC. FINANCE 2 M.SC. MARKETING

FACULTY STAFF

AND100S IN CERTIFICATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

B.COMM. EMPLOYMENT RATE

88%

*

(73% RESPONSE RATE)

CO-OP EMPLOYMENT RATE

95%*

$1,048,059 FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

$241,336

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

(100% RESPONSE RATE) * OF THOSE LOOKING FOR WORK

ALUMNI BY GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

NUMBER OF DEGREES GRANTED

(BASED ON VALID ADDRESSES IN THE UNIVERSITY DATABASE)

EDWARDS HAS GRANTED MORE THAN 26,000 DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES. 1%

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"BEING ACCEPTED AS A CANADIAN CITIZEN TRANSFORMED THE OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE TO ME. MY LIFE WOULD HAVE HAD A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT TRAJECTORY IF WE HADN’T BEEN SPONSORED."

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Reducing Barriers; Building Communities Edwards alumna’s experience as refugee inspires career in human rights

BY J E S S I C A S T E WA R T

When Edwards alumna Louise Simbandumwe

is asked what she’s most proud of, she doesn’t say her Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford or even her Human Rights Commitment Award of Manitoba. Instead, she says it’s the times she has worked with others to build on their skills and strengths to do things that they didn’t know they could. “When people I’ve taught or supervised at work, or community partners feel a sense of ownership of the programs we have built or their perspective has been changed radically, that’s what I feel best about,” she says. “Playing a positive role in building that confidence, knowledge and skills in others.” Louise has plenty of opportunities to create environments where that’s possible in her role as co-director of Supporting Employment & Economic Development (SEED) Winnipeg. “A big part of the work we do is connected to building on strengths of community members working to move out of poverty, and providing them with practical supports to overcome external barriers,” she says. “We also work at the systemic and structural level to address these barriers and the root causes of economic inequality.” Louise’s own experiences inspired her to

work in the human rights field. At age 11, she and her family arrived in Canada as Burundian refugees, by way of India and Kenya. She explains that this taught her how your life circumstances shape the opportunities available to you. “People like to think it’s how hard you work, but the biggest predictor of success is your socioeconomic status at birth,” she says. “Being accepted as a Canadian citizen transformed the opportunities available to me. My life would have had a completely different trajectory if we hadn’t been sponsored.” She says she felt an obligation to try and create opportunities for others, addressing the issues that result in desperate circumstances for so many people in Canada and abroad. And getting her B.Comm. from thenCollege of Commerce was an important step in achieving her goals. “What I learned through my time at the U of S I still use today,” she says. “It was very practical, and gave me the confidence and the language to talk with policy makers, community members and corporate donors.” Louise says she is also grateful for her internship as a Research Assistant at the Centre of the Study of Co-operatives. “That was life changing for me,” she says. Her current projects include teaching a

course on human rights advocacy at the University of Winnipeg’s Global College, working to increase the impact of financial empowerment initiatives through SEED, and volunteering with Amnesty International, the University of Winnipeg Community Renewal Corporation, Make Poverty History Manitoba and the Stop Violence Against Aboriginal Women and Girls Action Group. For business students interested in the non-profit sector, Louise recommends volunteering and taking electives from outside the business school. “There are different theoretical frameworks and ways of looking at the world,” she explains. “Travel, talk to people, work in the community, and be open to these other approaches.” Louise also encourages students – and all Canadians – to build an understanding of the ongoing impacts of colonization on Indigenous communities in Canada. “Reading the final report and calls to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is an important first step,” she says. “Taking classes in Indigenous Studies would be another.” To read the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report, visit www.trc.ca.

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JDC West Hosted in 2016

Faculty Awards KEITH WILLOUGHBY MBA PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR (2015-16)

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN MASTER TEACHER AWARD (2015) On January 15, 2016, 620 excited students ar-

rived in Saskatoon to partake in the 11th JDC West business case competition. This competition came to fruition after 15 months of planning by a team of over 20 students and recent alumni, plus the dedication of over 300 student volunteers from across the University of Saskatchewan. With a budget of over $600,000 the student organizing committee was required to work with local business organizations and Western Canadian corporate partners. The student participants, from 12 Western Canadian universities, competed in 10 academic cases, two athletic events, a parliamentary style debate and a social and spirit portion of the competition. The 2016 organizing committee added their own personality to the competition, and some highlights include having the first live cases in JDC West history, as well as ensuring that there was equal male/ female representation on all of the judging panels. Together, the delegates raised $252,828 and logged over 10,528 volunteer hours for Canadian charities.

BRANDY MACKINTOSH

EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MOST EFFECTIVE PROFESSOR (2015-16)

EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SOMERS AWARD - MOST APPROACHABLE PROFESSOR (2015-16) CANADIAN ACADEMIC ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CASE COMPETITION - 1ST PLACE ENGLISH CATEGORY (2016)

DOUG KALESNIKOFF DEAN'S AWARD FOR TEACHING INNOVATION (2015-16)

1ST PLACE IN THE 2015 IMA CASE WRITING COMPETITION

REGAN SCHMIDT

DEAN'S AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING RESEARCH ACHIEVEMENT (2015-16)

NOTABLE FIGURES:

CPA ALBERTA MPACC TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD (2015)

27 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE MEMBERS 300 VOLUNTEERS 620 DELEGATES $600,000 BUDGET 10,528 VOLUNTEER HOURS $252,828 CHARITY DOLLARS RAISED

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VINCE BRUNI-BOSSIO

PROVOST'S OUTSTANDING NEW TEACHER AWARD (2016)

1ST PLACE IN THE 2015 IMA CASE WRITING COMPETITION

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n ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM INSPIRES ABORIGINAL YOUTH Top Left: Elder Oliver Cameron speaks to students. Bottom Left: Lindsay Dillon, Mackenzie Cameron, Keenan Bird and Dallas Billette were among about 70 students from across Saskatchewan who attended the first annual gathering. Right: ShopIndig.ca founder Heather Abbey shares her entrepreneurial story with students.

Youth get a kickstart on Aboriginal entrepreneurship at Edwards BY N ATA S H A K AT C H U K

In May 2016 the Aboriginal Youth Entrepreneurship

Program (AYEP) held an event at the Edwards School of Business, bringing in Aboriginal students from across Saskatchewan. Over the course of two days, high school students participated in workshops, presentations and a pitch party to strengthen their entrepreneurial spirit. Students who came from out of town also lived in residence, ate at the cafeteria and participated in activities at the Physical Activity Complex. AYEP is the vision of former Prime Minister Paul Martin to improve elementary and secondary school education outcomes for Aboriginal Canadians who have the highest high school dropout rate. The idea is to keep students in school by expanding the boundaries of the traditional classroom. By receiving Grade 11 and Grade 12 school credits, the program moves students closer to high school completion and the opportunity to go on to post-secondary studies. “Indigenous students in Saskatchewan are very fortunate to have the Edwards School of Business as a partner for the first AYEP gathering,” said Yves Bousquet, AYEP co-ordinator for the Saskatchewan School Boards Association. “The business expertise and talent they were able to

provide gave the students a much clearer path to successful entrepreneurship.” Situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis, the University of Saskatchewan and Edwards share a commitment to Aboriginal success and breaking down barriers to post-secondary education. “We are extremely proud to host the first provincial gathering of AYEP,” said Brooke Klassen, director of undergraduate and certificate programs. “The event is closely linked to our long-term recruitment goals and provides a preview of real university life. Our hope is to plant the seed that students can come here to study business and entrepreneurship and they can succeed.” Support from the community was also evident. Sponsors of the event included Affinity Credit Union, PotashCorp, Edwards School of Business, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and the Wilson Centre. “The future is looking bright. We look forward to seeing where the students of AYEP are five years from now,” said Jacalyn Pilon, Affinity Credit Union First Nations district delegate. “With the great ideas and skills learned through this program, they’re well prepared to bring their dreams to a successful reality.”

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Family that Works Together Wins Together Edwards alumni named Family Enterprise of the Year

PARTNERS AT SUTTON FINANCIAL GROUP [L-R]: Tim Hansen, Andrea Hansen, Stuart Sutton, Jay Stark

Congratulations to four of our alumni for being named national Family

Enterprise of the Year by the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise (CAFE)! Stuart Sutton, Jay Stark, Andrea Hansen and Tim Hansen are partners at Sutton Financial Group in Saskatoon, a company founded by Stuart’s father Bob Sutton in 1990. The company provides financial planning and personal development advice with a focus on integrating all aspects of their clients’ lives. For business clients, the company provides benefits and pension planning services helping clients build their total rewards strategy. Stuart says he’s proud to be involved in

what his father has built – a caring, professional firm that looks out for each client’s best interest. The CAFE award recognizes the achievements of Canadian family businesses and the contributions they make to both local communities and our national economy. It’s based on several evaluation categories, including a shared vision, governance and continuity, growth, and culture and community. Sutton Financial Group received their award at a gala in Calgary on May 17, 2016.

The partners share their thoughts on business and family: “Graduating at a time when Saskatchewan’s greatest export was its people certainly challenged the decision to stay. Then partnering with my spouse and two friends has helped us leverage our abilities to multiply the effect we have on our community and of course our families. Staying eternally optimistic and believing in abundance certainly helps create the right environment to achieve more than we thought possible.” – Tim Hansen (B.Comm. 2001) THRIVE 2016

“It was in a commerce class that Tim and I set a goal to own a business together. Our path to achieve that goal was not clear, but the desire and commitment was strong. Being in business together was a great decision and our lives are fully integrated to maximize our time together. We serve our clients, do what we love, build our community and most importantly raise our children, which are the next generation of future leaders and likely entrepreneurs.” – Andrea Hansen (B.Comm. 2000)

“Our founder (my father, Bob Sutton), passed on to us the importance of doing what is in the best interest of our clients and our community, and it is rewarding to know that we are carrying on his legacy in a way that the business community recognizes and appreciates.” – Stuart Sutton (B.Comm. 1996)

"Marrying my high school sweetheart, staying in Saskatchewan and partnering with like-minded people in a family business are decisions that have helped me achieve a level of authentic success beyond my expectations. A belief in lifelong learning, a little initiative and a lot of luck provided a solid foundation to pursue my passions. The result is a wonderful family at home and work that has me enjoying my days and anticipating the future.” – Jay Stark (B.Comm. 1997)


Cameco - ranked Canada’s most sustainable corporation


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Backpacking made easy The Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies focuses on the Study Abroad Program

W H AT D I D S T U DY I N G A B R OA D M E A N T O YO U ?

"Studying abroad opens many doors to new cultures, people, and places. I was able to experience a unique business culture that has given me the ability to look at any new situation through a different set of lenses. Everyone should take the opportunity to study abroad since it not only increases personal awareness but can also be seen as a huge benefit to future employers. The things you can learn are endless and the places you get to visit are extraordinary!"

- Brenley Schaan, Management Major Studied at: University of Strasbourg

The Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies has provided support for students since 2008. This past year, the centre focused on growing the study abroad program and more than doubled the number of student participants over the previous year. The Thrive committee met with Marc Usunier, co-ordinator of international initiatives to talk about the shift in focus and other changes at the centre. WHY HAS THE CENTRE DECIDED TO FOCUS M O R E O N T H E S T U DY A B R OA D P R O G R A M ?

For a couple reasons. First, it’s so valuable for students. They get the opportunity to travel and study in a different country while earning credit towards their degree. And the crosscultural knowledge they gain gives them a real advantage when entering the job market. Second, the study abroad program is closely tied to the new global business streams at Edwards. TELL

US

ABOUT

THE

GLOBAL

BUSINESS

S T R E A M S . W H AT A R E T H E O P T I O N S ?

The Edwards School of Business now offers two academic streams: the Global Business Stream (GBS) and Advanced Global Business Stream (AGBS) for students interested in the international elements of business. Students have to complete three internationally themed Edwards courses and three Going Global workshops put on by the Forum for International Trade Training (FITT) to meet the requirements for the GBS. The AGBS requires additional courses or a study abroad tour. We strongly encourage students to take the study abroad option and give them as THRIVE 2016

much support as possible as they prepare to take classes at a foreign university. HOW

DOES

THE

HANLON

CENTRE

HELP

S T U D E N T S S T U DY A B R OA D ?

In terms of academics, we set everything up between Edwards and the partner universities. We present it as backpacking made easy – all they have to do is show up! For students with financial need, we offer several Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies Bursaries, valued at $1,000 each. All students receive funding through the centre’s Go-global Student Subsidy in addition to the funding opportunities available through the University of Saskatchewan Student Travel Award program. In the past year, all U of S B.Comm. students received a minimum of $1,000 when they studied abroad.

Commerce, KPMG Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Trade & Export Partnership (STEP), North Saskatoon Business Association, and the U of S International Student and Study Abroad Centre. HOW CAN INTERESTED STUDENTS LEARN MORE?

We’ve got information on our website, or students can stop by our office for a chat! To learn more about the Hanlon Centre’s initiatives, visit www.edwards.usask.ca/hanlon or call Marc at (306) 966-1837.

IN THE 2015/2016 ACADEMIC YEAR EDWARDS STUDENTS STUDIED AT:

W H AT O T H E R C H A N G E S H AV E H A P P E N E D AT

� University of Canberra, Australia

THE HANLON CENTRE?

� Curtin University, Australia

We now have a Hanlon Advisory Board. It’s great to be able to bounce ideas around with a team of knowledgeable people. The board includes representatives from Gibson Energy, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of

� Masaryk University, Czech Republic � NEOMA Business School, France � Kansai Gaidai University, Japan � University of Strasbourg, France


Business for Non-Business Students: Engineer and Gordon Award recipient receives MBA

BY J E S S I C A S T E WA R T

Kevin Graham decided to study mechanical

engineering at the U of S, although commerce was in the running. “It was a tough decision, but I went the engineering route. I was strong in the sciences, and math came quite naturally,” he remembers. After graduating in 2004, Kevin began working at the farm equipment company Bourgault Industries in Melfort, SK. He became licensed as a professional engineer (P.Eng) a few years later. And then Kevin says his interest in business resurfaced and he began looking at other opportunities within the company. “I started looking at jobs that involved manufacturing, sales and service,” he says. “I also had an interest in markets.” He started writing an investing blog, hoping to connect with people with similar interests. Soon after people within the company noticed Kevin’s interest in business and discussed long-term career opportunities with him. “I’d always wanted to do an MBA but I didn’t always think it would be possible,” Kevin says. “It’s tough to make a decision to return to school when you’re already 10 years into your career.” He says a few things made it possible for him to get his MBA at Edwards. One was receiving the Robert and Brenda Gordon MBA Scholar Award. “It’s fantastic that the award supports students from non-business backgrounds,” Kevin says. “The $10,000 covered a significant portion of the program cost. I was very appreciative of that.” The flexibility of the program also helped a lot. “The Edwards program is really well laid out for people who want to keep working while they study. Evening and weekend courses meant I didn’t have to take one to two years off from work.” He says there were some long days, but you just need to be determined and willing to put in the time. “My family didn’t see me that often because all my extra time was spent do-

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"THERE’S SO MUCH MORE TO UNDERSTANDING A BUSINESS THAN JUST THE NUMBERS.

ing homework, writing reports and preparing for exams, but it was just one year. I pushed through and got it done.” The course material broadened Kevin’s understanding of business and gave him a new perspective. “There’s so much more to understanding a business than just the numbers,” he says. “It’s a lot of strategy. I can see now that broad business concepts are gaps for some engineers and they don’t even realize it.” Kevin says his new appreciation for China was an unexpected benefit of the program. “I had no interest in China before the MBA study tour but going there was one of the best things I’ve done in my life,” he says. “I was so impressed with the country and its huge economy. It was really eye opening.” He has even returned to China in his new role as procurement team lead at Bourgault. “I’m responsible for all materials purchased by the company,” he says. “I really enjoy meeting people, visiting their factories, and negotiating big deals.” Kevin encourages others to follow their interests. “Find work you’re passionate about. If that’s business, go for it,” he says. “Don’t let what you don’t know get in the way. There are always great people to learn from.”

I CAN SEE NOW THAT BROAD BUSINESS CONCEPTS ARE GAPS FOR SOME ENGINEERS AND THEY DON’T EVEN REALIZE IT.”

MBA - Kevin Graham

To learn more about the Edwards MBA program, visit www.edwardsmba.ca or call (306) 966-8678.

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New Faces FACULTY AFSHIN AMIRASLANY is a lecturer in the Department of Finance and Management Science teaching business statistics. For over two decades Afshin has been teaching courses from undergraduate micro and macroeconomics to graduate advanced economics. His managerial experience started when he was assigned as the director of business and data analytics unit at Saskatchewan Ministry of Social Services in 2014. He hopes to equip his students with proper statistical techniques to get prepared for the era of Big Data.

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NILI BERNER is a lecturer in the Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour. Driven by her passion for organizational dynamics, psychology and communication, Nili’s aim is to help students achieve success in the business world by understanding both the intricacies of the field, as well as what they themselves bring to it. Nili worked in public relations and marketing for several years prior to turning to academia. She is currently completing a Ph.D. in organizational communication at Université de Montréal, with a focus on the role of emotions in organizational processes.

ERICA CARLETON is an assistant professor in the Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour and a native Saskatchewanian. She was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Ian O. Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership at Ivey Business School at Western University. She completed her Ph.D. in organizational behaviour at the Smith School of Business and her M.Sc. at Saint Mary’s University in industrial and organizational psychology. Her research interests include leadership, sleep and well-being. Her Ph.D. research examined sleep and its impact on leadership and well-being. Erica is an editor of the 2016 book Work and Sleep: Research insights for the workplace.

H A M I LT O N E L K I N S is an assistant professor in the Department of Accounting. Prior to joining Edwards, Hamilton completed his Ph.D. in business administration with a concentration in accounting at Texas Tech University and his MSM with a concentration in accounting at Bridgewater State University. With a background that includes varied professional experience including time as a construction superintendent building golf courses, Hamilton’s research and teaching style reflect his atypical path into academia. His primary research focus is on the convergence of financial and managerial accounting, specifically how managerial accounting, corporate governance and firm strategy interact to influence a manager’s decisions that affect the financial performance of the firm.

ALLISON FIELD is a lecturer in the Department of Management and Marketing. She has over seven years of successful communication, strategy, policy and analysis experience within the federal government, private and not-forprofit sectors. Allison has lived in Montreal, Ottawa and South Korea, studying and working in a number of fields. She has an open and collaborative teaching philosophy. In 2013, Allison returned to Saskatchewan and in 2014 she graduated from the MBA program at the Edwards School of Business. She is enjoying being back in her home province and having the opportunity to invest time in her favorite hobby: horseback riding.


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New Faces FACULTY G L E N KO B U S S E N is a lecturer in the Department of Accounting. Since 2000, Glen has taught in the areas of accounting, finance, leadership, statistics, strategic management, international business, and negotiations. He has taught at the U of S as well as St. Peter’s College, First Nations University, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, and Cape Breton University. Previously Glen also served as president of St. Peter’s College and CEO for Great Plains College. The majority of his current research focuses on strategic and performance management. Glen has worked with several Saskatchewan and Manitoba Crown Corporations in the area of performance management programs.

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R O M A N L U K YA N E N KO is an assistant professor in the Department of Finance and Management Science. Prior to joining Edwards, Roman was an assistant professor of information systems and business analytics at Florida International University. He got his Ph.D. from Memorial University of Newfoundland, receiving the best dissertation award in the field of information systems. In his research, Roman investigates and develops innovative information technologies (e.g., crowdsourcing, business analytics) and novel information quality and database management approaches in hopes to tackle major societal challenges (e.g., managing dwindling natural resources, improving healthcare).

MINA ROHANI is an assistant professor of marketing at the Edwards School. Before her doctoral studies, she worked in industry as a marketing manager in a high-tech telecommunication company. Mina’s research interests revolve around service marketing, online public complaining, and consumer behavior. She concentrates on understanding the effects of asking questions on consumer revenge and reconciliation over time. Mina has received several awards and scholarships for the academic excellence and quality of her research.

JULIE TSUI is a lecturer in the Department of Accounting. She joins Edwards as an alumna of the University of Saskatchewan (B.Comm.) and a Chartered Professional Accountant, and also recently obtained her MBA. Her accounting experience has been varied, although primarily focused in the non-profit and educational sectors. The desire to give back to the accounting profession led her to become a sessional instructor first for the Certified General Accountants and then with the Edwards School of Business. She brings to her teaching role an enthusiasm to communicate accounting concepts in a manner that makes them understandable, practical and fun.

S H A N WA N G is an associate professor in the Department of Finance and Management Science. She earned her Ph.D. in management information systems at McMaster University, and M.Sc. in economics from Queen’s University. Before joining the Edwards School of Business, she worked in the school of business at Renmin University of China as an associate professor. She has experience teaching at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral levels. Her primary research interests focus on electronic commerce, social commerce and the business value of Big Data.

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New Faces STAFF A M A N DA D R AYC O T T joined the Edwards School of Business in March 2016 as an undergraduate programs advisor in the Student & Faculty Services Office. Amanda earned a BA in Philosophy from the University of Western Ontario and a human resource management certificate from Confederation College. She worked within the territorial government and diamond mining industry in the Northwest Territories in an HR and training capacity, and more recently led the implementation of a healthcare education system to support accreditation and curricular review at the Atlantic Veterinary College at the University of Prince Edward Island. She approaches advising holistically, and encourages students to recognize their unique strengths, interests and experiences in order to make academic decisions that will support their professional goals.

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DEBBIE ENS joined the Edwards School of Business as an office administrator in May 2016. In this role, Debbie provides frontline support to students, parents, faculty, staff and the general public and is the smiling face you see when you walk into the Edwards Student and Faculty Services Office (formerly the General Office). Prior to joining the University of Saskatchewan, she spent 17 years as a customer service representative in the printing industry. Debbie brings a wealth of experience in customer relations, advanced computer applications and process management.

N ATA S H A K AT C H U K joined the Edwards School of Business in April 2016. She is an alumna of our B.Comm. program with a major in marketing and management. As the communications officer, she will be working with the senior leadership team to develop and implement a college level communications plan and lead a refresh of our external Edwards website. Prior to Edwards, Natasha worked as a marketing manager in the college system in Yorkton. She has also volunteered with several Grand Slam of Curling events. Natasha is very excited to be back in Saskatoon and to join the Edwards team.


Enactus Team Places First at TD Entrepreneurship Challenge The Enactus University of Saskatchewan team placed first in their

league at the TD Entrepreneurship Challenge this past March. The challenge was part of the Enactus Canada Regional Exposition, where 16 of the top universities from across Western Canada presented projects to a panel of prominent Canadian business leaders. Each project presented at the Exposition had to demonstrate improvement to the environmental, economic and social health of communities across Canada.

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Keenan Davreux and Chase Shevernoha, 3rd and 2nd year Edwards students, presented the award-winning project: The Aboriginal Youth Idea Challenge (AYIC) presented by PotashCorp. This is the third consecutive year that the U of S team, headquartered in the Edwards School, has placed first in the TD Entrepreneurship Challenge. Enactus University of Saskatchewan is a group of 45 entrepreneurial students from across the U of S, supported by Edwards faculty advisors Chelsea Willness and Tyler Case.

Presenting U of S Teams at the 2016 Enactus Regional Exposition in Calgary, AB.

Students Place Second in National Agri-marketing competition The University of Saskatchewan’s Canadian Agri-Marketing Association

(CAMA) team, consisting of students from the Edwards School of Business and College of Agriculture and Bioresources, placed second in an international agri-marketing competition. The competition was held at the National Agri-Marketing Conference in Kansas City, Missouri in mid-April where teams from 30 universities were required to come up with a product and present a marketing plan. The U of S team’s product, “Go-Fer-It” Oatmeal Smoothie, was marketed as a filling, healthy snack for children who live a busy and active lifestyle. Melissa Strom, assistant professor in the Department of Management and Marketing at Edwards, is a co-advisor of the CAMA team. “The competition boosts the students’ confidence and they are able to see that all their extracurricular hard work was worth it,” she says.

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Real business. Real opportunity. Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL)

Kristina S., C o-op Studen

t

is the largest company in Saskatchewan (SaskBusiness Magazine) and one of the Top 100 largest companies in Canada (Financial Post). FCL is a unique multi-billion dollar wholesaling, manufacturing, marketing and administrative co-operative working in five industries with over 3,000 employees across Western Canada.

And you can be at the centre of it. Apply Now.

Federated Co-operatives Limited INTEGRITY • EXCELLENCE • RESPONSIBILITY

coopconnection.ca


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DONORROLL THANKS TO OUR DONORS AND FRIENDS The Edwards School of Business acknowledges, with gratitude, our many donors who generously support the school and the programs and services offered. Through gifts of time, knowledge, and resources, you inspire students, faculty and staff to be creative, meet new challenges and continue to be leaders in business education. Be assured that your contributions are being used effectively to enhance the school's ability to provide quality education opportunities, undertake research activities and share the results with local, national and international communities. The annual donor roll lists supporters who gave $500 or more from May 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016. For a complete list of annual donors, including gifts of $1-$499, please visit the Edwards School of Business website. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this report, we acknowledge that errors may have occurred. If you have questions about the list, please contact Jan Kalinowski, Edwards School of Business donor relations officer, at (306) 966-5437 or kalinowski@edwards.usask.ca. Thank you for your continued support of the Edwards School of Business. • All donor recognition categories are exclusive of corporate matching gifts. • Those who have passed away are gratefully acknowledged and marked with an *.

INDIVIDUALS Gifts of $100,000 - $499,999 Ted Hanlon Larry Moeller Gordon Rawlinson W. Brett Wilson Gifts of $50,000 - $99,999 Lorne & Patricia Larson Gifts of $25,000 - $49,999 N. Murray Edwards David W. McClement* Scott & Grit McCreath Gifts of $10,000 - $24,999 James Estey John & Jolene Gordon Ron & Jane Graham Wade & Betty-Ann Heggie Grant & Shannon Isaac Philip Leong Aaron Loraas Tracy Robinson Greg & Olivia Yuel Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999 Ralph & Mary Biden Mansel Binkley

Leo Bourassa & Daphne Arnason Shelley Brown Clay Dowling Neil & Yvette Evans Barry & Giselle Frank Jerry & Bettina Grandey Gord & Maureen Haddock Donna Kitsch Winnie Liao Susan Milburn Barry Munro Tom Pinder May Pringle William Senkiw Elaine & Sherwood Sharfe W. Keith Smith John & Dianne Storey Daphne Taras Joe & Debbie Vidal Chelsea Willness Gifts of $1,000 - $4,999 Zeba Ahmad; John & Rhonda Bean; Melvin Berg; Bruce Burnyeat; Drew Byers; Timothy Conlin; Robert & Nadine Connoly; Dwayne Dahl; Ronald Fior; Mark Folstad; Donald Fox; Craig & Judi Francis; John Fraser; Cliff Friesen; Timothy Gitzel; Brad & Audrey Grant; Michael Greenberg; Kristen Hamm; Stewart Hanlon; Zane Hansen; Todd Hargarten; Mike J. Hegedus; Cara Keating; Todd Lahti; Paul Maczek & Tracey Kowalchuk; Wally & Colleen Mah;

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n Brian Mark & Roxanne Frey; George Marlatte; Trevis McConaghy; Bryan McCrea; Tom & Lynne McLellan; Matt McMillan & Krystle Sawatsky; Randall Meidl; Laurie Moen; Larry Mumford; Penney Murphy; Bob Myers; Jack Neumann; Bob Ogilvie; Travis Ogilvie; George & Lynne Pearson; Annette Pilipiak; Douglas Proll; Barry Quon; David W. Richardson; Marvin & Dagmar Romanow; Susan Ruf; Michael Rushby; James & Jill Salamon; Nels W. Seleshanko; Arnie & Linda Shaw; Barry & Pat Slusarchuk; Gregory Smith; Olive Spillett; James Sproule; Gord Stewart & Maria Styacko; Lee Swanson; Colin Taylor; Gord Thompson; Kelly Tomyn; Ryan Townend; Gregory Trotter; Michael Tumback; Daymond Volk; Basil Waslen; Duane & Nancy Wikant. Gifts of $500 - $999 Robert Anderson; Brandon Anholt; Arnie Arnott; Paulette Benning; William Black; W. John Brennan; Roger Carrobourg; Evan Chan; Robin Chapman; Waylon Danyluk; Glen Demke; Keith Eliasson; William Brebber & Carmen Gareau; Christopher Hall; Richard Hallson; Randall Jespersen; Michael Klein; Brian Kusisto; Karen O'Brien; John & Nicholle Povhe; Angela Rea; Sidney Rieger; Alexander Robertson; Mervin Sokul; Norm & Marie Soulsby; Brian & Kathleen Turnquist; Keir Vallance; Art Wakabayashi; Don & Janice Woodley. CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, AND ORGANIZATIONS Gifts of $100,000 - $499,999 Federated Co-operatives Limited Gifts of $50,000 - $99,999 CPA Saskatchewan Gifts of $25,000 - $49,999 Cameco Corporation Lloyd Carr-Harris Foundation PotashCorp Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999 Canadian Western Bank Ernst & Young LLP Graham Construction and Engineering Ltd. Gifts of $1,000 - $4,999 BHP Billiton Canada Inc. CAFE (Saskatoon) Canadian Petroleum Tax Society CPA Foundation of Alberta Ernst & Young LLP Freedom 55 Financial, a division of London Life Insurance Company Innovation Place KPMG Charitable Foundation THRIVE 2016

Masters of Professional Accounting Executive Council Milavsky Family Fund North Ridge Development Corporation Phillips, Hager & North Investment Management Ltd. PrimeWest Mortgage Investment Corporation Shaw Communications Inc. Tax Executives Institute Inc. (TEI) Calgary Chapter Wiegers Financial & Insurance Planning Services Ltd. Gifts of $500 - $999 IABC: Saskatoon Chapter

Companies Who Matched Gifts Cameco Corporation Ernst & Young LLP KPMG Charitable Foundation PotashCorp Shaw Communications Inc.

WAYS TO GIVE Online By phone By mail Pre-authorized debit Securities and mutual funds traded on the major Canadian and U.S. stock exchanges Gifts-in-kind Matching gifts Charitable estate gift

For information on any of the above giving options, contact Jan Kalinowski, Edwards School of Business donor relations officer, at (306) 966-5437 or kalinowski@edwards.usask.ca.


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This year's Alumni Jubilee involved a river cruise on the Prairie Lily.

Edwards Celebrates Second Annual Alumni Jubilee In September 2016 the Edwards School of Business cel-

ebrated its second annual Alumni Jubilee. Held over the course of two days, the event had a Town and Gown theme with a day at the university and a day on the town in Saskatoon. The campus portion of the jubilee included a lunch and learn, tours of the Edwards building and the university campus, a VIP tailgate party and a Huskies homecoming football game. Alumni then spent the day in downtown Saskatoon at the K W Nasser building where they participated in a life-

COMING TO A CITY NEAR YOU!

long learning workshop provided by Edwards Executive Education with facilitator Bruno Konecsni. The weekend concluded with a cruise on the city’s renowned Prairie Lily Riverboat. Plans are already in the works for graduates of years ending in -7. The 2017 Alumni Jubilee will also include a 10-year celebration for the Edwards Co-operative Education Program. Stay tuned for your invitations!

The Edwards School of Business will be joining the University of Saskatchewan Alumni Association's centennnial tour! Visit www.alumni.usask.ca/centennial

View the full gallery of pictures at www.edwardsalumni.com.

for tour dates and stops, and to RSVP.

To update your contact information, find out more about the Alumni Jubilee schedule, or learn how you can help organize upcoming reunions, contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7539.

At the Edwards School of Business, we’re proud of our alumni and know that every success brings value to your degree. Our Centennial year is a time for us to celebrate with you and recognize all that we have accomplished together over the past century. More than 25,000 commerce alumni have left our classrooms armed with knowledge and practical experience to make a tremendous impact on our communities. Help us capture the history and diversity of this milestone by taking the Edwards Centennial Challenge.

Be a part of it at Edwards100.ca

Centennial 1 9 17

2 0 17

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RECONNECTING WITH PEERS Top: Amy Carroll delivers a passionate message. Bottom Left: Amy Carroll smiles as she is introduced. Bottom Middle: Betty-Ann Heggie reconnects. Bottom Right: Past participants reunite.

Womentorship Alumni Event Reunites Participants Womentors and protégés from the past six years of the

Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Program met for an evening of networking, catching up, and professional development at the Radisson Hotel last November. The program began holding alumni events in 2014 to celebrate its growing success. The 2015-2016 session had the largest number of participants to-date. “The event is a great

"THE FEELING OF TOGETHERNESS AND POSITIVITY IS TANGIBLE." opportunity for alumni of the Womentorship program to reconnect,” says Program Co-ordinator Molly Doucette. “Protégés and Womentors alike are in attendance along with past speakers and guests of the program. The feeling of togetherness and positivity is tangible.” Amy Carroll, a Swiss/American communication coach

who specializes in leadership, emotional intelligence and communication training, spoke at the 2015 event. Her presentation “Are you Predator, Prey or Partner? The Art & Science of Positive Influence” included material from her book Undoing the Ego Tango. “Amy is so passionate and knowledgeable about her topic. She structured her session around audience participation and gave us individual feedback and guidance that attendees were able to take back to their organization and immediately implement,” says Molly. Womentor Maryann Deutscher says it was great to connect with her past protégés and see some new faces. “It was fantastic to have an event to bring together the talented women I’ve met over the years. The program helps us all build lifelong connections that encourage greatness.” The Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Program, developed in partnership with the Edwards School, matches seasoned female professionals with young women in the business community who are seeking guidance and support as they embark on their careers.

To learn more about the program, contact Executive Education Program Co-ordinator Molly Doucette at doucette@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-4798.

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A

Career for the Kid in You EDWARDS ALUMNUS WORKS IN DIGITAL GAMING INDUSTRY

BY J E S S I C A S T E WA R T

How would your 12-year-old self feel about what you’re

doing now? For Edwards alumnus Ryan Holowaty (B.Comm. 2008), the answer is easy: ecstatic. Since 2012, Ryan has been the head of marketing and business development at the Saskatoon-based gaming studio Noodlecake. He says all 17 people at the company (all U of S grads) were into gaming as kids, which prepared them for their careers.

“When you’re running a business it’s so important to know the industry. Little did I know I was doing 25 years of industry research,” he laughs. And since Noodlecake not only develops its own games, but also helps small developers get their games published, Ryan spends part of every day playing games. “My inbox is flooded with games from developers, so we have a vetting process,” he says. “I install new games every morning and

53


n Alum Ryan Holowaty manages the marketing and PR at the Noodlecake office.

Left: The winning game, Chameleon Run. Right: The coveted Apple Award, one of only three given out each year.

“I JUST THINK OF WEIRD AND GOOFY THINGS I CAN DO TO PROMOTE OUR GAMES.” play them for a couple hours to try them out.” Working in the technology industry has other perks. “We have an open office structure so there’s a lot of freedom with working hours,” Ryan says. And companies often send Noodlecake free products. “We’ve got piles of tablets and iPhones and virtual reality headsets,” he says. “Sometimes you’ll see guys ripping around the office on hover boards.” They also get to attend events like the Game Developers Conference where developers from all over the world come together.

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Ryan says past conference parties have included a world-famous DJ and food trucks inside the venue. “They paid to have a wall knocked out to get the food trucks in. It’s crazy how much money gets spent in the industry.” In his marketing role, Ryan connects with players and builds hype for new games. One of his publicity stunts went viral last year, getting the company into international media. Ryan leaked a special version of the game Shooting Stars that surprised players with a clever message about piracy. And to build hype for Noodle-


Faculty Awards “THEY’RE SO RARE. THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF GAMES COMING OUT EVERY WEEK AND APPLE GAVE OUT THREE AWARDS TO GAMES THIS YEAR.” cake’s game Super Stickman Golf 3, Ryan came up with a parody of golfer Ernie Els missing six putts in a row at the Master’s. “That also blew up on social media,” he says. “I just think of weird and goofy things I can do to promote our games.” The company has been getting even more attention since winning a 2016 Apple Design Award. The award recognizes state of the art apps that reflect excellence in design and innovation. “It’s probably one of the most coveted awards out there,” Ryan says. “They’re so rare. There are thousands of games coming out every week and Apple gave out three awards to games this year.” Noodlecake helped to finish and publish the winning game Chameleon Run, localizing it into eight languages and creating an Apple TV version. Before winning the award, Chameleon Run was given an Editor’s Choice tag in the app store – an achievement in itself. “It’s a really slick, colourful game and we focused on getting really solid Apple TV and phone versions out there,” Ryan says. “It’s done really well.” Ryan says there’s only one downside to working at his dream career. “It’s harder to play a game without a critical eye anymore,” he says. “I only play the huge games in my personal time because I can get lost in them.”

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GEORGE TANNOUS

PROVOST'S COLLEGE TEACHING AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING TEACHING (2016)

NATHALIE JOHNSTONE CPA ALBERTA MPACC TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD (2015)

FRED PHILLIPS

CPA ALBERTA MPACC TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD (2015)

CHELSEA WILLNESS

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN STUDENTS' UNION TEACHING AWARD (2015-16)

SURESH KALAGNANAM

1ST PLACE IN THE 2015 IMA CASE WRITING COMPETITION

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Lights… Camera… Action! The new MPAcc commercial showcases facility improvements and one of our premiere programs

ON THE CUTTING ROOM FLOOR: Left {Top-Bottom}: Video stills from the completed MPAcc video. Right: The new video was conceptualized by National Brand and edited by Bamboo Shoots.

The graduate programs office has created a new recruitment commer-

cial for the Master of Professional Accounting (MPAcc) program. It highlights the best features of the program and showcases some of the new facility improvements such as the Moeller Resource Room (formerly the Reading Room) and the new MBA classroom.

and geographic targeting we’ll be able to ensure that students with interests in business and accounting see our message and if they like what they see hopefully they’ll take the next step and give us a call to learn more.”

"IT'S A GREAT ADVERTISING MEDIUM." “MPAcc is the only CPA-accredited program in Western Canada and we attract 66 per cent of our student body from outside of Saskatchewan,” says Travis Rotenburger, program and marketing co-ordinator for the graduate programs office. “We focused on showcasing the student experience found only on the banks of the South Saskatchewan river at one of the most beautiful campuses in Canada.” He believes that advertising on YouTube will reach many prospective students, offering a glimpse into the life of an MPAcc student and what to expect during the two summers of the program. “It’s a great advertising medium,” says Travis. “Through interest

Watch the video on our YouTube channel:

www.youtube.com/ESBUofS Take a look and share it with your friends!

To learn more about the MPAcc program, contact Britney at bergermann@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-1227.

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Alumni Updates Once again, our Edwards alumni have been getting noticed. Graduates of our programs win awards and are appointed to leadership positions around the country. Here are just a few of this past year’s alumni successes:

CLASSES OF THE 1960S Mr. Gordon Rawlinson

Mr. Ronald Fior CPA, CA (B.Comm. 1978)

C.M., S.O.M. (B.Comm. 1968)

received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit.

received the 2015 Alumni Achievement Award from the University of Saskatchewan Alumni Association and was appointed CFO of Quotient Technology Inc.

Mr. Steven Dechka

Ms. Shelley Brown

S.O.M. (B.Comm. 1969)

FCPA, FCA, ICD.D (B.Comm. 1978)

received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit and the Oslo Business for Peace Award for Business Excellence.

was inducted into the Junior Achievement of Saskatchewan Business Hall of Fame.

CLASSES OF THE 1970S

CLASSES OF THE 1980S

Mr. Rajat Dr. Gordon NagRawlinson

Mr. Mike Hughes

C.M., S.O.M. (MBA 1974) (B.Comm. 1968)

Q.C. (B.Comm. 1980)

received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan.

was appointed Queen's Counsel (Q.C.) by the Government of Saskatchewan.

Ms. Daphne Arnason

Mr. Marvin Romanow

FCPA, FCA (B.Comm. 1977)

(MBA 1980)

received the 2015 Alumni Achievement Award from the University of Saskatchewan Alumni Association.

was the 2016 C. J. Mackenzie Distinguished Lecturer for the College of Engineering University of Saskatchewan.

Mr. Brian Towriss

Mr. Doug Hodson

S.O.M. (B.Comm. 1978)

S.V.M., Q.C. (B.Comm. 1981)

received the 2015 Coach Dedication Award Male from Sask Sport Inc.

THRIVE 2016

was awarded the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal.


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CLASSES OF THE 1980S

Hon. Dato’ Noraini Ahmad (B.Comm. 1991)

Mr. Roger Parent MLA (BUSADM 1982) was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly for the Government of Saskatchewan.

was elected Member of Parliament for the Government of Malaysia and appointed to the Chair of the Malaysia Trade Development Corporation.

Mr. Jason Bednar

Mr. Bob McDonald

CPA, CA (B.Comm. 1993)

P.Eng, F.E.C. (MBA 1982) was appointed Chief Financial Officer of Canacol Energy Ltd. was appointed Executive Director and Registrar for the Association of Professional Engineers & Geoscientists of Saskatchewan.

Mr. Lee Ahenakew (B.Comm. 1997)

Ms. Carolyn Tastad (B.Comm. 1983)

was appointed as Board Chair for the University of Saskatchewan Board of Governors.

was ranked #36 on the "Most Powerful Women" list as compiled by Fortune Magazine.

Mr. Jay Bachman

Dr. Keith Martell

CPA, CA (B.Comm. 1999, MPAcc 2000)

C.A.F.M., CPA, CA (B.Comm. 1985)

was appointed Chief Financial Officer for 3esi-Enersight.

received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan.

CLASSES OF THE 2000S Mr.

Damon Bailey Q.C. (B.Comm. 1987)

Mr. John Pantazopoulos CFA (B.Comm. 2000)

was appointed Queen's Counsel (Q.C.) by the Government of Alberta.

was listed as a 2016 Oil & Gas Rising Star in Oilweek.

CLASSES OF THE 1990S Dr. Keith Willoughby

Hon. Corey Tochor MLA (B.Comm. 2000)

(B.Comm. 1990) received a Master Teacher Award at the University of Saskatchewan, and was appointed Interim Dean of the Edwards School of Business.

was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly and Speaker of the Legislative Assembly for the Government of Saskatchewan.

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CLASSES OF THE 2000S Mr. Cody Barnett

Ms. Danielle Favreau

(B.Comm. 2008)

CPA, CA (B.Comm. 2001) was appointed Director of Development & Communications at the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

was appointed Interim Chief Financial Officer of Karnalyte Resources Inc.

Chief Darcy Bear S.O.M. (BUSADM 2009)

Dr. Barbara Gustafson (MBA 2001)

received the 2016 Aboriginal Business Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award from the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business.

was inducted into the 2016 Women's Hall of Fame by the Prince Albert Council of Women (PACW).

Hon. Jennifer Campeau

Ms. Shirley Zhou

MLA (MBA 2009)

(M.Sc. Marketing 2005) was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly and was appointed Minister of Central Services and Minister Responsible for Saskatchewan Transportation Corporation.

was a winner of CBC Saskatchewan’s Future 40.

CLASSES OF THE 2010S

Mr. Bryce Thoma (B.Comm. 2006)

Dr. Elad Ben-Ezra (MBA 2015)

was appointed Assistant Coach for the Saskatoon Blades Hockey Club.

received the Petplan Pet Insurance Award in Emergency and Critical Care and the Holstein Association of Canada Award.

For more alumni achievements, visit www.edwards.usask.ca/alumni/class-updates.aspx Got a success to share? Contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7539.

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Retirements

Isobel Findlay Dr. Isobel Findlay joined the Management and Marketing faculty at the Edwards School of Business in 1999, was promoted to associate professor in 2005, and to full professor in 2013. During her career, she published widely on business communications (including four editions of a leading textbook), co-operative studies, Aboriginal

Karen Georget Karen Georget started her career at the U of S in the College of Nursing in 1979. She spent three years there and another three in

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entrepreneurship, and law and culture. She has received numerous awards, including the USSU Teaching Excellence Award in 1998, the Saskatchewan Book Awards Scholarly Publication of the Year in 2000, and the Women of Justice Award from the Elizabeth Fry Society of Saskatchewan in 2016. Isobel served on university boards such as the President’s Advisory Council on the Status of Women and the Engaged Scholar Journal Advisory Committee. Outside the U of S, she served on and chaired a committee of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and is a member of several journal editorial boards as well as professional bodies such as the Canadian Commission for UNESCO: Sectoral Commission for Culture, Communication and Information and the Co-operatives and Mutuals Canada Task Force on Higher Education. Isobel will remain connected to the university as a professor emerita. She currently holds three SSHRC grants and one CIHR grant with ongoing commitments to community engagement and Aboriginal engagement and scholarship. She remains both Fellow in Co-operatives, Diversity, and Sustainable Development at the Centre for the Study of Co-operatives and University Co-Director at the Community-University Institute for Social Research. The Edwards School thanks Isobel for her years of service and looks forward to seeing her around campus in the future!

Veterinary Medicine before transferring to the then-College of Commerce in 1985 as an office administrator. It was the perfect fit for Karen and she worked in the undergraduate office for 31 years. Over this time she managed large volumes of work while still finding time to think about others and build relationships. It was not uncommon for alumni to return to the school after many years for a visit, only to have Karen greet them with a smile and welcome them back by name. This is quite amazing when you consider how many thousands of students Karen helped during the course of her career, and truly attests to the strong connections she made with students. Even in her 31st year at the school, Karen still had the same high energy and care for students that she had when she first started. In Karen’s interactions with faculty and other staff members, she was always friendly, encouraging and willing to help anyone in need. Her ability to care for others and take action in stressful situations has been incomparable. The Edwards faculty and staff bid Karen a bittersweet farewell before her last day in June. We wish you an adventurous and well deserved retirement Karen!

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In Memoriam - Alumni THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS REGRETS THE PASSING OF THESE ALUMNI AND FRIENDS:

1940

Acorn, Ivan M, BA’41, BACC’47, of Ottawa, ON, d. February 3, 2016

Ellis, Kenneth A, B.A. 1950, B.Comm.’51, of Regina, SK,d. June 2, 2016

Arrell, Bruce E, B.Comm.’66, of Calgary, AB, d. June 16, 2016

Rennie, John D, BSA’46, PUBADM’62, of Regina, SK, d. August 31, 2015

McConnell, John J, BSA’51, PUBADM’61, Cert Bus Admin’64, of Calgary, AB, d. January 25, 2016

Hare, Edward M, Cert Bus Admin’66, of Vancouver, BC, d. July 11, 2016

Goff, Arthur F, B.Comm.’47, of Victoria, BC, d. March 4, 2016 Dean, David R, B.Comm.’48, of Calgary, AB, d. July 17, 2016 Hillyard, Hugh H (Bus), B.Comm.’48, of Regina, SK, d. April 2, 2016 McFarlane, Murray G, B.Comm.’48, of Calgary, AB, d. June 6, 2016 Sanders, William E, B.Comm.’48, of Victoria, BC, d. March 11, 2016 Anderson, Earl A, B.Comm.’49, of Salmon Arm, BC, d. February 24, 2016 Deutscher, John L, B.Comm.’49, of Saskatoon, SK, d. March 13, 2016 Tomlinson, Ann L (Lawrence), B.Comm.’49, of Ottawa, ON, d. September 8, 2015

1950

Saunders, Gerald C, BA’52, B.Comm.’52, of Calgary, AB, d. March 27, 2016 Baxter, James C (Jim), B.Comm.’55, of Toronto, ON, d. January 30, 2016 Pringle, William G (Bill), B.Comm.’55, of Calgary, AB, d. November 16, 2015 Atchison, Lorne, Cert Bus Admin’57, of Calgary, AB, d. May 3, 2016 Maranda, Donald G, B.Comm.’57, of Kelowna, BC, d. April 8, 2016 Olson, Stanley E, Cert Bus Admin’57, of Saskatoon, SK, d. April 16, 2016 Paterson, Donald A, B.Comm.’59, of Calgary, SK, d. March, 2016

1960

Gebert, Philip A, B.Comm.’60, of Gloucester, ON, d. November 15, 2015

Dakin, Guy L (LeRoy), B.Comm.’50, of Calgary, AB, d. April 19, 2016

Showell, Frank, PUBADM’60, of Regina, SK, d. September 13, 2015

McClement, David W, B.Comm.’50, of Calgary, AB, d. April 10, 2016

Hillestad, Harold K, LOCADM’63, LOCADM’66, of Regina, SK, d. September 10, 2015

Wilkinson, Robert C, B.Comm.’50, of Calgary, AB, d. November 26, 2015 Anderson, Jack, BA'50, B.Comm.'51, of Struan, SK, d. August 14, 2016 Chater, Jeanne B, B.Comm.’51, of Saskatoon, SK, d. May 5, 2016 Crowe, William D, B.Comm.’51, BA’51, of North Vancouver, BC, d. March 25, 2016 THRIVE 2016

Zabinsky, Orest J, Cert Bus Admin’63, of Saskatoon, SK, d. May 28, 2016 Glessing, Clarence E, B.Comm.’64, of Calgary, AB, d. September 5, 2015 Hunter, Harry F, B.Comm.’65, of Regina, SK, d. October 13, 2015

Kjolberg, Gary L, HOSADM’66, of Saskatoon, SK, d. January 20, 2016 Kraus, Eugene C, B.Comm.’66, of Toronto, ON, d. March 22, 2014 Lozinsky, Charles, LOCADM’67, of Ogema, SK, d. November 2, 2014 Code, Robert W, B.A. 1968, B.Comm.’69, of Edmonton, SK, d. January 30, 2016 Faul, Adam, LOCADM’68, of Spy Hill, d. March 19, 2016 Forrest, James A, LOCADM’68, of Calgary, AB, d. February 6, 2016 Hall, Faith, PUBADM’69, of Regina, SK, d. May 4, 2016

1970

Mann, Wayne A, B.Comm.’70, of Comox, BC, d. October 29, 2015 Schwartz, Elmer J, ADMIN’70, Regina, SK, d. March 29, 2016 Cook, Leslie T, B.Comm.’71, of Compeer, AB, d. October 29, 2015 Dyck, Beatrice L, LOCADM’72, of Osler, SK, d. August 4, 2016 Hanes, Elgin A, BADMIN’73, of Regina, SK, d. September 30, 2015 Young, George J, BUSCER’73, of Regina, SK, d. January 30, 2016 Thomson, Doreen D (Arthurs), HOSADM’78, of Halifax, NS, d. September 23, 2015


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1980

Kost, Rebecca A (Shaw), B.Ed. 1980, B.Comm.’83, of Saskatoon, SK, d. January 31, 2016 Ochosky, Casimer P, BUSADM’80, of Saskatoon, SK, d. March 21, 2016 Richardson, Douglas A, BUSADM’81, of Regina, SK, d. February 3, 2016 Tunnicliffe, Donald B (Bruce), BUSADM’84, of Saskatoon, SK, d. August 1, 2016 McAlpine, Robert S, B.Comm.’86, of Calgary, SK, d. November 11, 2015 Gader, Carey D, B.Comm.’88, of Medicine Hat, AB, d. August 22, 2013 Peterson, Gwen A (Gillespie), HECADM’89, of Saskatoon, SK, d. December 5, 2015 Zwierzynski, Judith A (Lasiuk, HECADM’89, of Kamloops, BC, d. June 28, 2016

1990

Luciuk, Colin M, B.Comm.’90, of Saskatoon, SK, d. July 5, 2016

In Memoriam - Faculty

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IT IS WITH SADNESS THAT WE SHARE THE PASSING OF TWO OF OUR FORMER COLLEAGUES: Professor Richard J. Long

passed away on May 15, 2016 after a battle with cancer. Dr. Long grew up in Edmonton, where he received his bachelors and MBA degrees from University of Alberta, followed by his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He joined the Edwards School of Business (then College of Commerce) in 1977, achieving the rank of full professor in 1982 at the age of 31. He was widely respected as an expert on compensation, and gave testimony as an expert witness before a committee of the Canadian Senate. Dr. Long was the author of two books, New Office Information Technology: Human and Managerial Implications and, more recently, the textbook Strategic Compensation in Canada. In 2011, his textbook was named the #1 Best Seller on the Globe and Professor Richard J. Long Mail list of top business books. His students will remember him for his course in compensation, which he designed around a complex simulation and used the TV reality show, Survivor, as the organizing theme. With many of his students, he developed mentoring relationships that lasted long beyond graduation. He received the university’s coveted Master Teacher Award in 2014. In his personal life, Dr. Long was proud of hiking the entire British Columbia segment of the Trans Canada Trail, and used his spare time to travel the world, achieving his goal of visiting as many countries as his years of age.

Curry, William J, HECADM’94, of Wynyard, SK, d. November 12, 2015 MacLeod, Kimberley N (Epp), B.Comm.’97, of Pilot Butte, SK, d. October 15, 2015

2000

Ferguson, Ron W, B.Comm.’01, of Melfort, SK, d. October 27, 2015 Rosen, Adrian M, BUSADM’03, of Saskatoon, SK, d. April 18, 2016 Virgin, Ronald A (Ron), BUSADM’04, of Saskatoon, SK, d. January 5, 2016

Professor Halim I. Bishara passed away on April 23, 2016. Born and raised in Egypt, he

studied at the University of Cairo where he earned his B.Comm. and MBA. He continued his studies at the University of Wisconsin where he received his M.Sc. (Insurance) and a Ph.D. (Finance). Dr. Bishara taught at several institutions including the University of Cairo, Memorial University of Newfoundland and Dalhousie University before moving to Saskatchewan with his wife and family. He joined the Edwards School of Business (then College of Commerce) in 1970 as an associate professor, receiving tenure in 1975 and served as a former department head of finance and management science. Among many other things, Dr. Bishara will be remembered for his contributions to academia with research focusing on Canadian corporations and stock markets. He authored a number of refereed articles and was awarded numerous research grants during his tenure.

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Stronger Together: Merger results in more professional development opportunities for business community When Edwards Executive Education combined with the Business and Leadership Programs (BLP) unit from the University of Saskatchewan’s Centre for Continuing and Distance Education (CCDE) in August of 2014, exciting new collaborations began to happen. We spoke with Manager Christina Dolan about what the merger means for Edwards and what benefits it brings to the school and business community. W H AT I S T H E R O L E O F E D WA R D S E X E C U T I V E E D U C AT I O N AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y ?

We provide training and development programming for the Saskatchewan business community and local organizations. Our program areas include: communications, governance, labour relations, leadership, management, project management and process improvement, women’s initiatives and many unique special events. Upon inquiry, we also provide custom training to organizations in-house.

"WE PLAN TO KEEP GROWING AND EXPAND OUR REACH."

H O W H A S I T G R O W N OV E R T H E Y E A R S ?

We have been offering programs to businesses, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations as well as customized training and consulting engagements since 1981 under the name Business Advisory Services. In 2009, we moved to our downtown location, K W Nasser Centre, which made programming more accessible to the local business community and the unit became Edwards Executive Education. We have had even more substantial growth since the 2014 merger. W H Y D I D T H E T W O A R E A S M E R G E A N D W H AT H AV E B E E N T H E B E N E F I T S ?

Both units were offering similar programming while operating as part of the university. Merging has allowed us to operate more efficiently with streamlined processes, and provide more services, including online registration. Our staff, resources, facilitator pool and programs offered have doubled in size. We now deliver nationally recognized certificate programs in partnership with other universities such as the University of Toronto, Memorial University, York University and the University of Regina. This collaboration brings industry leaders to Saskatchewan to provide training on emerging trends in the professional development market. T E L L U S A B O U T O N E O F YO U R M O S T P O P U L A R P R O G R A M S .

In the early days of the merger we focused on the Leadership Development Program (LDP), which has been offered since 2001. This program’s popularity in Saskatchewan continues to grow within Edwards Executive Education as a public program and as customized training for organizations and government. Over the years it has evolved into a fiveday course offered over five consecutive weeks, that helps organizational leaders increase their knowledge and capabilities and develop the mindset to navigate the challenging business environment. The program uses the expertise of five facilitators using a client-centered design, 360 degree leadership assessment, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and innovative learning approaches to maximize the participant’s leadership potential. W H AT D O E S T H E F U T U R E H O L D F O R E D WA R D S E X E C U T I V E E D U C AT I O N ?

We plan to keep growing and expand our reach! We are developing new programming to fill gaps in the marketplace and will continue to offer our standard programs. The next offerings of the Leadership Development Program are October 18 – November 15, 2016 and April 25 – May 23, 2017. For more information visit www.edwards.usask.ca/execed or contact execed@edwards.usask.ca or call (306) 966-8686.

THRIVE 2016

Christina Dolan, Manager, Executive Education


PM # 40013048 Please return undeliverable items to: Edwards School of Business University of Saskatchewan 25 Campus Drive, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A7

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