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THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MAGAZINE

PM # 40013048

Specia l ed it ion

THE

issue

Your official

centennial invitation!

an amazing look at the last 100 years

A century of excellence at your Lorem ipsum business school

10 people, 10 decades a profile of 10 notable alumni over the last 100 years


1917

Centennial 1917

2017

20 17

Join us for the Centennial

SEPT 20-22, 2018 Genuinely reconnect and proudly celebrate all we’ve built together over the past Century

TOGETHER WE THRIVE

one graduate at a time

edwards100.ca


Take your degree to the next degree. Today’s ever-changing business climate demands analytical thinking and insightful decision making that goes beyond discipline or industry. A CPA designation arms you with the tools and knowledge to make impactful decisions in the face of change.

becomeacpa@cpask.ca cpawsb.ca


BIRTHPLACE REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN RESIDENCE LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

N. Murray Edwards: Alumnus, friend, namesake

MR. EDWARDS has had a long-standing relationship with the University of Saskatchewan’s business school as a student, alumnus and donor. He believes strongly in the value of a business education. Over the years, he has given back to his alma mater so students today continue to receive an outstanding business education at the University of Saskatchewan.

In June 2000, when the PotashCorp Centre addition was opened, the N. Murray Edwards Case Room was unveiled. One of several smart rooms in the centre, the case room seats 75 students, is equipped with up-to-date educational technologies and is used by faculty and students across campus. Throughout his university years in Saskatoon, Mr. Edwards had a keen interest in investing. On October 3, 2002 he rang the official bell and the N. Murray Edwards MarketWatch went live. This stock ticker board, installed on the main floor of the PotashCorp Centre, still provides continuous stock and commodity information, bringing the business world to the halls of the business school. Faculty, staff and especially students benefit from the direct link to the investment industry. On July 24, 2007, the University of Saskatchewan very proudly acknowledged Mr. Edwards’ continued relationship with the business school by transforming the College of Commerce to the N. Murray Edwards School of Business. Mr. Edwards’ investment in the business school allows us to gain recognition with our new brand and helps to position the business school as one of the top five in Canada. At the University’s Spring Convocation Ceremony on June 2, 2011, Mr. Edwards was presented with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree, the highest honour the University of Saskatchewan can bestow. Mr. Edwards continues to remain truly engaged in the activities of the business school, supporting the George S. Dembroski Student-Managed Portfolio Trust and acting as judge and keynote speaker at the 2013 National Mining Competition. He also gives his time and knowledge by serving on the Edwards School of Business Dean’s Advisory Council, and is a member of the Edwards Dean’s Circle. The students, faculty and staff of the Edwards School are grateful for Mr. Edwards’ continued support.

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EDUCATION BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (GREAT DISTINCTION) – UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN BACHELOR OF LAWS (HONOURS) – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO HONORARY DEGREES LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY LL.D. – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO OCCUPATION CORPORATE DIRECTOR/INVESTOR CREDENTIALS LEADING INVESTOR AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN - CANADIAN NATURAL RESOURCES LTD. - ENSIGN ENERGY SERVICES INC. - MAGELLAN AEROSPACE CORPORATION CHAIRMAN AND CO-OWNER - CALGARY FLAMES HOCKEY CLUB OF NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE RECOGNITION MEMBER OF THE ORDER OF CANADA SASKATCHEWAN OIL PATCH HALL OF FAME INTERNATIONAL HORATIO ALGER AWARD COMPANION OF THE ORDER OF THE CANADIAN BUSINESS HALL OF FAME


thrive (thrīv) verb

1 to make steady progress; to

2

prosper; be fortunate or successful.

to grow vigorously;

flourish.

YEARS OF

PAGE 40

TABLE OF CONTENTS

6 8

DEAN'S MESSAGE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Edwards hosts conference on evidence-based decision making and unveils 2017 Grandey Leadership Honouree

GENERAL EDWARDS STUDENT EXPERIENCE ALUMNI RELATIONS FACULTY PROGRAMS & CENTRES DEVELOPMENT EDWARDS CENTENNIAL THRIVE

11 EDWARDS CO-OPERATIVE

EDUCATION PROGRAM CELEBRATES 10 YEARS

12 EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING INITIATIVE

Alumnus' gift transforms hands-on learning initiative

16 INTERNATIONAL BEGINNINGS

Edwards launches students' society for international students

18 THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE Edwards students spark bright ideas to commercialize allergy cure

21 2017 DEAN'S SPEAKER SERIES 22 BUILDING RECONCILIATION Indigenization efforts in Edwards.

24 FEATURED RESEARCHERS 26 EDWARDS AT A GLANCE 27 FASHION GURU

Edwards alumna creates career as a style and beauty expert

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THRIVE

THE EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MAGAZINE

STRATEGIC DIRECTOR Keith Willoughby EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Natasha Katchuk ART DIRECTOR Larry Kwok CREATIVE CONSULTANTS Shawna Jardine Brooke Klassen

FASHION GURU

PAGE 27

HEAD WRITER & COPY EDITOR Jessica Stewart WRITERS Julie Barnes Natasha Katchuk Lynette Suchar Keith Willoughby CONTRIBUTORS Christina Dolan Molly Doucette Enactus U of S Shawna Jardine PHOTOGRAPHY Matt Braden Photo Maude Chavin Jimmy Hammelin Larry Kwok Lindsay Skeans Photography Stobbe Photo Dawn Stranden Photography Lynette Suchar PUBLISHER Edwards School of Business 25 Campus Drive Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 5A7 PRODUCTION Mister Print / Printwest 619 8th Street East Saskatoon, SK S7H 0R1 ADVERTISING SALES thrive@edwards.usask.ca

30 THE LAUNCH OF A LEGACY

How three summer students launched Cosmo Shred

33 DEAN'S CIRCLE MEMBERS BENEFIT EDWARDS STUDENTS

34 NEW FACES - FACULTY & STAFF 36 JACK OF ALL TRADES

From accounting to athletics one Edwards alumnus never looked back

39

If you no longer wish to receive a printed copy, email alumni@edwards. usask.ca or call (306) 966-7539 and we'll sign you up to receive only a digital version.

4

A sneak peak at the 2018 All Years Reunion schedule and the Dean's Speaker Symposium

66 AN OUTSTANDING YEAR FOR FINANCE

Edwards finance programs reach goals and receive international recognition

68 ENACTUS U OF S RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION

100 years of business education

70 EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

40 OUR TIMELINE: AN UNOFFICIAL

71 A FAMILY AFFAIR: THE KELLEHERS

AHEAD BY A CENTURY

HISTORY

A look at the evolution of the business school

46 ALUMNI IN SERVICE

Edwards alumni who served in World War II

49 CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

Edwards alumni making a difference in health care

52 10 PEOPLE, 10 DECADES 58 THEN & NOW WITH THE EBSS Commerce student societies then and now

PREFER DIGITAL?

63 CENTENNIAL EVENTS

60 THIRD ANNUAL ALUMNI JUBILEE 62 CITIZENSHIP CHALLENGE Help us collect 100 stories of good citizenship

Training and development for business professionals Edwards goes behind the scenes with siblings

74 A VISION BEYOND OUR BORDERS

Edwards students travel to Germany to learn about evidence-based strategy

77 DONOR ROLL 80 ALUMNI UPDATES 85 HONORARY ALUMNI

Five long-serving Edwards staff named honorary alumni

86 RETIREMENTS 87 IN MEMORIAM 88 KICKING OFF THE NEXT 100 YEARS Dean Willougby looks to the future on what the next century will bring for Edwards


THE DEAN’S ADVISORY COUNCIL Keith Willoughby

Murray Edwards

Dean and Chair of the DAC Edwards School of Business

Chairman/Director Edco Financial Holdings Ltd.

Shelley Brown

Wayne Brownlee

L. David Dubé

James Estey

Tim Gitzel

Partner Deloitte LLP

Executive VP and CFO PotashCorp

President and CEO Concorde Group Corp.

Chairman PrairieSky Royalty/Gibson Energy

President and CEO Cameco

Gerald W. Grandey

Daniel Halyk

A. Stewart Hanlon

Russel Marcoux

George Marlatte

Retired President and CEO Cameco

President and CEO Total Energy Services Inc.

Retired President and CEO Gibson Energy Inc.

President and CEO Yanke Group of Companies

President Marlatte International Inc.

Keith Martell

R. Scott McCreath

Neil McMillan

Larry Moeller

Gordon Rawlinson

CEO First Nations Bank of Canada

Senior Investment Advisor BMO Nesbitt Burns EDWARDS EXECUTIVE IN RESIDENCE

Chair, Board of Directors Cameco

President Kimball Capital Corp.

CEO Rawlco Radio Ltd.

Tracy Robinson

Marvin Romanow

Karen Stewart

W. Brett Wilson

Greg Yuel

Senior Vice President & General Manager TransCanada Corporation

Retired CEO Nexen EDWARDS EXECUTIVE IN RESIDENCE

President and CEO Fairway Divorce Solutions

Chairman Prairie Merchant Corp.

President and CEO PIC Investment Group

THRIVE

5


DEAN'S MESSAGE

w

Lights! Camera! Action!

elcome to the Centennial edition of the Thrive magazine. One hundred years’ worth of excellence at the Edwards School of Business is captured in this illustrious issue’s pages. Born of prairie pride, we were launched as a School of Accounting in October, 1917. We offered the nation’s first accounting degree. We seamlessly transitioned to a College of Accounting, then to a College of Commerce and—a decade ago—to the Edwards School of

6

BY KEITH WILLOUGHBY

Business. Throughout the past century, we have tirelessly proceeded onward and reached upward. Our 25,000 alumni embody excellence in industry, community service, professional societies, academia, government and a host of other organizations. Unending perseverance and a meticulous work ethic continue to be the hallmarks of an Edwards graduate. These women and men have been, are now, and will forever be, true nation-building business professionals. Fittingly, this centennial year will

include the culmination of our journey to business school accreditation. It will be an opportunity for us to celebrate a century of achievements while we honour the present and envision a distinguished future. Although the eventual awarding of accreditation is a direct result of dedicated service from so very many, please permit me to acknowledge the stellar leadership provided by Dr. Daphne Taras, my predecessor as Edwards dean. Her dynamic vision offered the energy for us to pursue the path. Well done, Daphne – your monumental service as


“UNENDING PERSERVERANCE

AND A

METICULOUS

WORK ETHIC

CONTINUE TO BE THE HALLMARKS OF AN

E D WA R D S

G R A D U AT E .” exciting times on the 100th year Far Left: Keith dons the new Centennial varsity jacket. Top left: Keith cuts into the Edwards Centennial cake at the Welcome Back BBQ for students, faculty and staff. Bottom right: Shaking hands with Harold Allsopp at the grand opening of the Allsopp Learning Lab.

PHOTO BY LARRY KWOK

PHOTO BY STOBBE PHOTO

Edwards dean will never be forgotten! This past year featured a number of stellar moments. I’d like to draw your attention to two of them. Both are more fully described in this Thrive issue. In September, we celebrated the grand opening of the Allsopp Learning Lab, the first facility of its kind in the world. Through a generous donation from Mr. Harold Allsopp (B.Comm. 1962), we transformed a classroom into an exhilarating experiential learning space. This will superbly enhance engagement within Edwards and throughout the community. It will THRIVE

contribute to the capacity of Edwards to engage with groups, clients, partners, students and organizations who might otherwise be outside our reach. During early March, we welcomed Mr. Cameron Proctor (Chief Operating Officer, PrairieSky Royalty Ltd.) to Edwards. PrairieSky, the leading mineral title owner in Saskatchewan, provided a tremendous gift to our Student Managed Portfolio Trust (SMPT). The donation—the largest ever made by this company—will bring the value of the SMPT to over $1.8 million over the next four years.

I am confident that each and every one of you will find your reflection in this edition’s images and features. Read the stories. Observe the pictures. Relish in the memories. Plan to attend the all years reunion (Sept. 20-22, 2018; edwards100.ca). Our narrative is best described by the collective contributions of the students, alumni, staff and faculty of the Edwards School of Business. We share in the lasting legacy of this special place. edwards100.ca

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Vendasta Technologies VP of Growth Jacqueline Cooke.

Edwards School of Business Dean Keith Willoughby addresses the audience.

Mount Royal University Associate Professor David Finch.

Saskatoon Health Region's Leadership and Quality Improvement Specialist Vanesa Vanstone.

University of Toronto Assistant Professor Kristina McElheran.

TSN Sportscaster Darren Dutchyshen (right) leads a discussion with special guests Gregg Sauter (left) and Deniece Kennedy (middle).

2017 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Big Data + Organizational Leadership = Evidence-Based Decision Making

Edwards School of Business hosted the 2017 Leadership Conference this past May. The speakers spoke about data in a variety of contexts: Kristina McElheran, professor at the University of Toronto (U of T), spoke about data in action. Based on her experiences at Harvard, MIT and Rotman School of Management at U of T, Kristina emphasized the steps that firms and individuals can take to improve performance through data. SportsCentre’s Darren Dutchyshen led an interactive panel with Gregg Sauter (Saskatchewan Roughriders) and Deniece Kennedy (Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation). 8

PHOTOS BY STOBBE PHOTO

They discussed sports analytics and delved into retail strategy and customer experience, revealing how organizations track personal and consumer data. New this year was the choice of concurrent sessions in the afternoon, each focusing on a different aspect of leadership and data use. Guest speakers included David Finch (Mount Royal University), Vanesa Vanstone (Saskatoon Health Region), and Jacqueline Cook (Vendasta Technologies). The conference also included the annual Grandey Leadership Luncheon where the Edwards School of Business proudly unveiled Keith Martell as the 2017 Grandey Leadership Honouree. leadershipconference.usask.ca


2017 Grandey Leadership Honouree

Who was your leadership role model or mentor?

keith martelL CPA, CA and CAFM

Chief Executive Officer, First Nations Bank of Canada

awards / Honours / Recognition Honorary Doctor of Laws, University of Saskatchewan (2016) Excellence in Leadership Award, AFOA Canada (2004) Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 Award (2001)

Community / Business Involvement Founding Director, First Nations Bank of Canada Director, Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. Founding Member, AFOA Canada Former Director, Public Sector Pension Investment Board of Canada Director, Saskatoon Safe Streets Commission Inc. Dean’s Advisory Council, Edwards School of Business Director, River Cree Enterprises GP Ltd Trustee on the Primrose Lake Settlement Trust Former Director, Canadian Chamber of Commerce Former Director, North West Company Inc. Former Trustee, North West Company Fund

I have had many mentors and role models. Observing leadership in action is the best education you can get for future leadership and you can never start learning this too early. Some of the most important lessons I learned were from watching bad leadership. Instead of just complaining about it, try to figure out what you would do differently; how you would be better at leadership.

What qualities do you think make for a good leader?

I think there are three things that make a good leader:

First, a leader has to have an above average level of personal skill in what the organization they lead actually does. You may not need to be the best in your organization, but definitely well above average. A leader without skills will lose their following and simply become a cheerleader for any and all action without a strategic purpose or an understanding of when things are going well or not. Second, a leader needs to be able to take calculated risks. Business, politics, and even community service is not about risk elimination, but risk management. Leaders need to know how to take enough risk to achieve the goals of the organization without putting its existence in danger. Last, but most important, leaders need to be self-aware. Leadership requires that you be honest with yourself and have a willingness to listen to what others think about you, but not be obsessed with what other people think about you. Good leaders who are not self-aware begin to believe their own press. If they don’t recognize their weaknesses or the fact that changes in circumstances may need them to move on or get help, they may stay too long, living on past glory.

What is your advice for aspiring leaders? In order to be a leader, you need to lead. There are many opportunities that require leadership. There is always a need for people to do some work, take a stand or make decisions. The longer you avoid filling these spaces, the less likely you are to develop the skills, risk taking capacity and self-awareness to be a good leader. Start leading in small ways, learn from that experience, and keep taking on larger roles. THRIVE

9


Real business. Real opportunity. Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL)

Kristina S., C o-op Studen

t

is the largest company in Saskatchewan (SaskBusiness Magazine) and one of the Top 100 largest companies in Canada (Financial Post). FCL is a unique multi-billion dollar wholesaling, manufacturing, marketing and administrative co-operative working in five industries with over 3,000 employees across Western Canada.

And you can be at the centre of it. Apply Now.

Federated Co-operatives Limited INTEGRITY • EXCELLENCE • RESPONSIBILITY

www.fcl.crs


PHOTO BY DAWN STRANDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

EDWARDS CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION CELEBRATES 10 YEARS!

BY JESSICA STEWART

T

he Edwards School Co-operative Education program celebrated its 10th anniversary this September in true Edwards style: with networking and Huskie football. Current and former co-op students and employers attended the event at Prairieland Park to celebrate the success of the program over the past decade. Over 110 current undergraduate students were able to meet local business representatives at the networking open house, and 97 returning students showcased their recent eight-month experiences. “Participating in the co-op program meant being of value to an accounting firm, and solidifying my career choice,” said Susan Winmill. “I have gained technical competencies, communication skills and a better insight into the accounting profession that I only could have gotten from this amazing work experience.” “Not only did I have the opportunity to experience the coop program as an Edwards student, I was also pleased to be able to recruit from the same program as a human resources professional,” said Lyle Acoose, senior benefits specialist at Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan. The co-op program has consistently boasted high employment rates among its participants. In 2016, 92 per cent of B.Comm. graduates who participated in the co-op program secured employment, compared with 82 per cent of nonparticipants. Heather Ryan, vice-president of human resources at Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL) said the organization is proud to continue their partnership with our co-op program. “We have participated in the Edwards Co-operative Education program since 2009, providing 63 students from THRIVE

“we have had the tremendous opportunity to be able to work with candidates that are wellprepared, eager to learn, and want to take charge of their careers."

every major with valuable and meaningful work experience,” she said. “The program has been mutually beneficial as many of the individuals that started with FCL as students have continued on as valued team members in our organization.” In 2015, FCL extended its partnership with the school, committing to $500,000 over five years. MNP LLP is another longstanding co-op employer. "Through our partnership with the Edwards Co-op Education program over the past nine years, we have had the tremendous opportunity to be able to work with candidates that are wellprepared, eager to learn, and want to take charge of their careers,” the firm said. “We appreciate the talent that every student has brought to the firm and HIRE EDWARDS TALENT: the long-lasting relationships that Over the past 10 years, have been fostered.” the Saskatoon business After networking, event attendees community has recruited took in the Huskies Tailgate Party hundreds of Edwards at Rally Alley before watching the undergraduate co-op Huskie football team win 43-17 students and MBA interns. This fall, let’s work together against the University of Alberta to find you an enthusiastic Golden Bears. “It was a great way co-op student for January to celebrate the success of our 2018! Contact Edwards program,” said Brent Wellman, Career Services to find Edwards career services director. out how your company “We had a fantastic turnout, can hire a student for an connected our students with potential eight-month placement: co-op employers, and had some coop@edwards.usask.ca Saskatchewan-style fun.” or (306) 966-1454.

edwardscoop.ca

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GROUP EFFORT Experiential learning at Edwards

“B

BY NATASHA KATCHUK

Left to right: Dean Keith Willoughby, Harold Allsopp and President Peter Stoicheff

12

ringing the community into the school and giving students hands on experience while learning,” was on the forefront of Harold Allsopp’s (B.Comm. 1962) mind when he decided to make a $500,000 gift to the Edwards School of Business. Experiential learning is defined as learning-by-doing, or hands-on learning. It is incredibly valuable to students who wish to acquire real-world and applicable experience not always gained in a traditional classroom setting. Allsopp’s gift formalized the concepts for both an ongoing experiential learning initiative and the creation of a learning lab. As part of the formalized process, assistant professor Vince Bruni-Bossio was appointed director of the Edwards Experiential


“WE BELIEVE

BUSINESS E D U C AT I O N IS MORE THAN

AT T E N D I N G LECTURES

AND WRITING TESTS

O R F I N A L E X A M S .”

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AREAS OF FOCUS: MARKETING RESEARCH & ANALYSIS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HUMAN RESOURCES GOVERNANCE PHOTOS BY STOBBE PHOTO

Learning Initiative (EELI), which also includes an oversight committee and two experiential learning liaison student positions. EELI seeks to build capacity for experiential learning at Edwards as well as market experiential learning opportunities to students and community partners. “We believe business education should be more than attending lectures and writing tests or final exams,” said dean Keith Willoughby. “We want to ensure students leave our institution with heightened confidence and experience working with clients on real projects, providing real solutions.” Experiential learning courses enable students to reach their full potential and learn beyond the classroom, while partner organizations can gain assistance THRIVE

regarding various aspects of their business. “A highlight of my undergraduate studies, the experiential courses were an excellent opportunity for me to develop confidence in the application of what I had learned in class and helped me form strong bonds with peers, professors, and the business community,” said alumna Lindsay Wileniec (B.Comm. 2016). “The skills gained through these courses are a key part of the foundation of my professional skill set.” Allsopp Learning Lab at Edwards School of Business a world first Allsopp’s gift also paved the way for the creation of an advanced technologysupported learning lab. The lab is a key driver for the future of experiential

learning and launched in September. The Allsopp Learning Lab allows students to collaborate in pods, sharing content with each other and even screen sharing with the larger group. A world-first installation, the lab can connect up to eight workgroups with six contributors per group. Sony Vision Exchange also enables remote participants to join in discussions through videoconference. These remote students or guests can share content from their own devices just like they’re in the room. “The Allsopp Learning Lab will substantively contribute to the capacity of the Edwards School of Business to engage and partner with those who might normally be outside our reach,” Willoughby added. “This includes 13


THE RENOVATION PROCESS

before

ABOUT HAROLD ALLSOPP

Harold was born in Assiniboia, SK and currently resides in Calgary, Alberta. He has over 40 years of senior management experience in the oil and gas industry.

EDUCATION:

Bachelor of Commerce University of Saskatchewan MBA – The University of British Columbia

DESIGNATIONS:

Chartered Professional Accountant Member Financial Executives Institute

during

after

OCCUPATIONS:

President, Habede Holdings Ltd. Senior consultant, Ernst and Young Vice-president finance, Canadian Hydrocarbons Ltd. Vice-president finance, Voyager Energy Inc.

access to rural communities and northern regions.” Initial plans include hosting classes and providing hands-on business advice for partners who are signed up for projects through experiential learning initiatives. “By supporting the Experiential Learning Initiative, students in Edwards will have access to applied learning space and technology that will help them develop the skills they need,” said Allsopp. “I trust that this gift will enhance the student experience and broaden the reach for the entire Edwards community.” Collaborate with Edwards today. Email eeli@edwards.usask.ca for more information.

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Lunafest LUNAFEST is an international film festival that’s hosted more than 175 times throughout North America each year. This year’s event marked the 16th season of the festival, and the fifth annual screening hosted by the Edwards School of Business and the Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Program.

Each season, six to nine films made by, for, and about women are selected by the LUNAFEST committee to comprise the festival. Films cover a wide variety of topics, experiences, styles, and genres. "One of the greatest parts of the festival is seeing such an array of stories and experiences," said LUNAFEST Program Coordinator Molly Doucette. "This past year, we saw films ranging from a documentary about a 17-year-old girl living in a refugee camp, to a scripted piece about a writer debating with her therapist whether to join a writer's group. Each story focuses on the lives of women in a way we can all relate to, communicated beautifully in a way that transcends culture."

"LUNAFEST provides an opportunity for women to come together and see their stories on the big screen."

Betty-Ann Heggie, founder of the Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Foundation, brought the festival to be a part of the Womentorship Program in 2013. “LUNAFEST provides an opportunity for women to come together and see their stories on the big screen,” she said. “This seldom happens at the movie theatre as more than 90 per cent of major film directors are men and they naturally gravitate to having male heroes in male stories.” She adds that the environment of LUNAFEST is great for networking – a central pillar to the Womentorship program. “LUNAFEST is an important part of our program as research shows that women are most successful in advancing their careers when they combine networking, professional development, and mentorship.” The Saskatoon event included a screening of the festival followed by a panel moderated by Heggie. The group discussed the films and invited participation from the audience. “LUNAFEST gave us an opportunity to bond over the life experiences and raw emotions that make us human,” said festival attendee Jordan Bonkowski. “The films facilitated thoughtful reflection and sharing with the panel of ambitious female leaders from throughout the community.”

Proceeds from LUNAFEST went towards the Breast Cancer Foundation, as well as tuition for a protégé from the not-for-profit sector to participate in the Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Program.

March 7, 2018

the broadway theatre saskatoon, sk lunafest takes place in march each year in celebration of international women's day. For tickets, visit

lunafest2018.eventbrite.ca


“I’VE IMPROVED A LOT OF MY SKILLS, SUCH AS

LEADERSHIP, ORGANIZATION, ENGLISH SPEAKING, AND NETWORKING. I ALSO MADE MANY NEW FRIENDS.”

16


PHOTO BY LARRY KWOK

EISS Founding Executive Members

INTERNATIONAL BEGINNINGS

Edwards Launches Students’ Society for International Students

T

hanks to marketing major May Jiao, the Edwards School has a new students’ society! We spoke with May about how the Edwards International Students’ Society (EISS) came to be and what she learned as its inaugural president. THRIVE:Tell us a bit about

yourself. Where are you from? Why did you choose to study at Edwards? MAY JIAO: I’m from Shaanxi, China. I chose to study here because I would love a career in international business. My father owns a small business in my hometown. When I was a little girl, I always went to business events with my dad. I thought it was very interesting. How did the EISS come about? When I was in my first year, I wanted to join the Edwards Business Students’ Society (EBSS) to practice THRIVE

my soft skills but I thought it might be difficult for international students. When Marc Usunier from the Hanlon Centre asked me about international student issues at Edwards, I shared my experiences and noted that we didn’t have enough connection with other international students. Marc surveyed other international students and took our feedback. He started the conversation about creating the students’ society.

The international welcome party in September was the highest attended student-run international student event ever. There were over 90 international students in attendance. What did you take from your experience as president? I’ve improved a lot of my skills, such as leadership, organization, English speaking, and networking. I also made many new friends. More and more

May Jiao

President

Anni Zhang

Vice-President

Zhijun Liu

Marketing Portfolio

Rashid Ahmed

Academic Portfolio

Hans Wang

Social Portfolio

I’ll become a new street marketer for the EBSS. I’m so excited about learning new skills and helping more international students at Edwards. What’s coming up for the EISS this year? Given that it was a huge success, we plan to have another welcome party. Edwards Career Services will give weekly talks about career development, and we’re considering an international student

“WE WANT TO HELP INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS GET INVOLVED IN THEIR NEW COMMUNITY MORE QUICKLY.” What’s the goal of the EISS? We want to help international students get involved in their new community more quickly. We provide them with social networking opportunities as well as academic and community services. How did the EISS celebrate its launch?

international students are getting involved in activities at the school.They ask for help from EISS and share their suggestions. How does EISS work with the Edwards Business Students’ Society (EBSS)? The president of EISS is also a member of the EBSS and attends weekly meetings, so I did that last year. In the 2017-2018 academic year,

job expo to connect with local companies who are willing to hire international students. We also want to work more with other student groups to hold social events. And at the university level, more international students’ societies may be implemented because EISS was so well received and organized.

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“IT COULD

TURN THE CURRENT SYS T E M O N I T S HEAD AND

MAKE IT O B S O L E T E .”

“Being part of enabling people access to potentially revolutionary technology is quite exciting,” said David Burlock, (left) an MBA grad who worked on the project.

PHOTO BY MATT BRADEN PHOTO

18


Dr. John Gordon manipulates cells in the laboratory at the Health Sciences Building at the University of Saskatchewan.

THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE

BY JULIE BARNES

EDWARDS STUDENTS SPARK BRIGHT IDEAS TO COMMERCIALIZE ALLERGY CURE

i

(L-R): Ed Pas, Dr. John Gordon, and Johannes Dyring

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f you’re one of the 2.5 million Canadians who suffers from a food allergy, you may be happy to hear that scientists at the University of Saskatchewan could be on the cusp of developing a cure. If proven successful, the treatment could also cure asthma, non-food allergies and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis. “We’ve developed a method by which we can reshape immune responses by using cells taken from the affected individual,” said Dr. John Gordon, the lead scientist behind the discovery. “We manipulate the cells in the test tube and we give them back to the same person. It’s a kind of personalized medicine.” Dr. Gordon’s team is awaiting approval from Health Canada before commencing inhuman clinical trials, but the initial findings appear promising. They’ve successfully turned off the immune response to allergens in human cells in test tube experiments, and have reversed food allergies and asthma in mice. But before you say, “pass the peanuts,” there are still some hurdles to jump. With no existing business model for this kind of personalized medicine, finding a way to commercialize the potential cure is a key challenge. That’s where an intrepid Edwards MBA class enters the picture. “Industry players and investors found the technology exciting, but it didn't fit their business model,” said Johannes Dyring, managing director of Innovation Enterprise. “I hatched the idea that if current business models or companies do not or cannot accept this kind of innovation, maybe we should be trying to develop a new business model and see if it can fly.” He found the ideal partner in Prof. Lee Swanson’s MBA 846 class last February. Swanson divided his students into four teams with diverse backgrounds and tasked them with creating a viable business model. He then hired Ed Pas (MBA 2016) to synthesize

the groups' ideas into a report for Innovation Enterprise. “John Gordon’s research could be a disruptive technology,” Swanson said, explaining why the project was an exciting opportunity for his students. With some exceptions, Swanson says the typical healthcare model involves a patient visiting their doctor with a medical concern, the doctor writing a prescription and the patient visiting a pharmacy to have their prescription filled. Personalized medicine doesn’t fit that existing model, and that’s why finding a solution for commercializing it “is fascinating and it’s a dilemma that requires an innovative solution,” Swanson said. “I hope the students felt that they were a part of something that might literally change the way people get treated for things. It could turn the current system on its head and make it obsolete.” One of those students, David Burlock (MBA 2017), echoes Swanson’s enthusiasm. “It represents why I got into business studies,” he said. “This could be a life changing technology that has the potential to redefine the way common diseases are treated or cured. It would be better for the world if this technology was out there.” As an MBA alumnus, and now a portfolio manager with Innovation Enterprise, Ed Pas says he was impressed with the business models the students brought forward. “They had ideas I hadn't thought of, which is really valuable.” Although it’s too early to confirm if the MBA students’ ideas will come to fruition, Pas says the exercise presented “a different kind of learning because you're actually trying to solve a problem and come up with solutions, as opposed to second guessing what the correct solution is in the light of history. I think the students realized that there’s more to it than just following a recipe.” 19


What’s the Edwards Network?

It’s a networking platform exclusive to Edwards Alumni. Now our alumni can stay in touch with each other and with us from anywhere and at any time!

faculty as soon as you join! You’ll stay current on professional opportunities, social events, advances in education, and news about your classmates. It’s all these things in one place.

Why should I join?

How do I join?

It’s an easy way to stay connected and network online with thousands of Edwards alumni, faculty and graduating students. Just like traditional networking, the Edwards Network can help you find top recruits for your company, advance your career, keep in touch with your classmates and professors, and learn of upcoming alumni events.

How is it different from LinkedIn?

The Edwards Network is an open-door platform, where you’re connected to participating Edwards alumni and

It’s simple:

1. Go to www.edwardsalumni.com. 2. Click on the LinkedIn, Facebook or Email button and follow the prompts. 3. Explore the site, check out what fellow alumni have to offer and be part of the community.

Need help? Contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or (306) 966-7539.


PHOTO BY STOBBE PHOTO

Darren Zatwarnitski delivers a compelling presentation to students, staff, faculty, and community members at the Edwards School of Business.

DEAN'S SPEAKER SERIES

T

he Edwards School of Business Dean’s Speaker Series showcases inspiring business professionals and alumni from around the world. The event is slated to be part of the kickoff to the academic year and brings a compelling exchange of ideas to students, faculty, staff and the entire Edwards community. As part of the mission to develop business professionals to build nations, guest speakers delve into significant highlights, turning points and challenges

Willoughby says he is looking forward to bringing his vision for the speaker series to fruition. "We are delighted to share their stories,” he said. “Our grads are held in high regard around the province, the country and internationally. We are proud to welcome them back for these speaking engagements.” This year’s speaker was Darren Zatwarnitski, CPA, CA (B.Comm. 1995), who shared an inspiring message of his experiences and the winding road that led him to where he is today. His

tragedy into triumph.” In 2018, the series will be expanded as part of the school's centennial celebration, and will feature both alumni and business leaders from around the world in a day-long symposium event. Turn to page 64 to learn more about the upcoming Dean’s Speaker Symposium!

“HE HAS A CONSISTENT STRENGTH OF CHARACTER THAT WE CAN ALL LEARN FROM WHILE TURNING TRAGEDY INTO TRIUMPH.” as part of their story. Armed with knowledge and practical experience, thousands of our hardworking alumni continue to impact our communities. These alumni have become leaders in business, government and non-profit sectors. Dean Keith THRIVE

talk, titled Defying the Odds, motivated students, alumni, faculty, and staff. “I was inspired by Darren’s journey and I believe everyone in the room was moved as well,” said Willoughby. “He has a consistent strength of character that we can all learn from while turning

PAST SPEAKERS HAVE INCLUDED:

WILLIAM LEISS FRANK KOLLER PIERS STEEL KATHY BARDSWICK SCOTT BANDA JERRY GRANDEY KEITH NIXON KEN KOSOLOFSKI JONATHAN SCHAEFFER DAVID SHRIBMAN

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T

he University of Saskatchewan, situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis, is a leader in Canadian postsecondary education when it comes to Indigenous engagement. “If it’s not going to be us in a province like this, leading the universities’ response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, who is it going to be?” U of S President Peter Stoicheff said. “If not now, when?” Edward School of Business remains committed to recruiting and supporting Indigenous students and, like the university as a whole, to making our school the best place it possibly can be for the Indigenous peoples of our

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province and country. This past year, 25 self-declared Indigenous students graduated from Edwards programs, the highest number on record. Several of these graduates came to us through a partnership with the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies. In addition to $62,000 in Rawlco scholarships directed specifically for Aboriginal students, the Rawlinson Centre for Aboriginal Business Students remains a cornerstone to the Edwards Indigenization strategy. Edwards alumna Gabrielle Scrimshaw (B.Comm. 2010) said the dedicated space for Indigenous students helped her meet the challenges of being a firstgeneration university student. “Bannock Chats were my favourite

thing when I was a student,” Scrimshaw said. “There was free food, and I could meet other Indigenous students as well as Edwards faculty. The first time I spoke with a professor was at a Bannock Chat because I didn’t have the confidence to strike up a conversation after class. The Rawlinson Centre gave me that foundational support I needed.” Scrimshaw went on to receive an MBA from Stanford and is a Gleitsman Fellow at the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University. She’s the co-founder of the Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada, a non-profit organization now considered a global thought leader in Indigenous leadership. “Creating an inclusive educational institution is such a meaningful step


PHOTOS BY STOBBE PHOTO

We will be an outstanding institution of research, learning, knowledge-keeping, reconciliation, and inclusion with and by Indigenous peoples and communities. – From University of Saskatchewan’s Mission, Vision and Values

“WE CANNOT DEEM OUR ROLE IN THE FOSTERING OF A CIVIL SOCIETY A SUCCESS UNLESS WE BECOME DEMONSTRABLY AND WITH COMMITMENT THE BEST PLACE WE CAN POSSIBLY BE FOR THE ABORIGINAL PEOPLE OF THIS PROVINCE AND THIS COUNTRY. NONE OF THE REST OF IT MATTERS— AT THIS POINT IN OUR NATION’S HISTORY—IF WE DO NOT ACHIEVE THIS.” – PETER STOICHEFF, PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN 2017 U of S Spring Convocation

BUILDING RECONCILIATION BY JESSICA STEWART

2017 Spring Graduation Powwow

forward,” Scrimshaw said of the university’s Indigenization strategy. “I’m a big proponent of bringing more Indigenous knowledge into education systems and of teaching Indigenous history.” She’s not alone in thinking this. Rheana Worme (B.Comm. 2017), who is now a first-year student in the College of Law at the U of S told Edwards, “I strive to be a worthy advocate for my community and believe Indigenous legal principles can help to reform the current justice system.” Scrimshaw explained that one third of non-Indigenous Canadians have still not heard of residential schools. “I think it’s going to take time to figure everything out and bring all the right stakeholders to the table but the fact that we’re having THRIVE

the conversation speaks volumes in a positive way.” Armand LaPlante (B.Comm. 2017), another recent graduate, commented “Indigenization is especially important in the business school because of the demographic of our province. Indigenized content and information, I think, will be welcomed by business students because it could help them

to its indigenization efforts during the Centennial Celebrations as part of the Dean’s Speaker Symposium. Scrimshaw will be moderating a panel at Edwards on truth and reconciliation and how it relates to business and industry. Turn to page 64 for more information. To further our commitment as a college, Edwards is embarking on a formal indigenization strategy to foster

“CREATING AN INCLUSIVE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION IS SUCH A MEANINGFUL STEP FORWARD.” understand Indigenous people, their culture and the business environment they operate within.” Edwards will be unveiling one of its first community initiatives related

strong, positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous business professionals, academics, students and community members.

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FEATURED RESEARCHERS Hamilton Elkins ACCOUNTING

Assistant Professor Hamilton Elkins’ first career as a manager in the construction and landscaping industries gives him a unique perspective on accounting research. Broadly, he now studies how corporate governance, strategy, and managerial accounting numbers interact to influence manager decisions, and then how those decisions relate to the firm’s performance. One of the questions Elkins has looked at is how to get people to work harder and be happier about their jobs, aside from paying them more money. “I wondered if you could make people happy by the way they fit into the pay scale in the organization,” he said. Elkins designed a way to measure the relative differences in pay with increasing responsibility, called the promotional pay ladder. “Imagine you’re climbing a ladder. Do you want the rungs to get further apart or closer together, or to be consistently spaced as you climb?” he explained. Elkins found that firms with consistent compensation structures perform better in the future. He hopes his findings will influence businesses to reexamine how they pay employees. “It’s not about overall dollar amounts. It’s about how you fit in the organization,” he said.

william murphy MANAGEMENT & MARKETING

Associate Professor William Murphy’s research activities and output are multi-faceted, ranging from sales management and key account management, to international business and supply chains, to quality management (QM). Over the past several years he has published extensively on QM, with his articles appearing in many respected academic and practitioner journals and forums. A 2016 paper published in Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development provides an example of Murphy's impact in QM. He interviewed small business owners who won National Quality Awards, providing first-hand perspectives of the benefits and challenges of QM for small businesses. “Until now, few articles have discussed the merits of QM for small businesses using the voices of small business owners,” Murphy said. Just six months following publication, the paper has been downloaded over 3,000 times, indicating that numerous professionals are seeing its relevance. And Baldrige, one of the most respected quality programs in the world, wrote about Murphy's paper on its blog, ensuring quality experts and businesses across the world would see his findings. “The findings from my research justified offering strong advice for improving the performance of small businesses by embracing QM,” Murphy said. “It is gratifying to see my work recognized by one of the most esteemed organizations in the quality world.”

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erica Carleton

HUMAN RESOURCES & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

Assistant Professor Erica Carleton studies leadership and employee health and well-being from a different perspective than most researchers in her field. “Organizational behaviour researchers tend to act like work is in a bubble that’s very unrelated to other parts of our lives and that’s untrue,” she said. “Things in our personal lives influence our work and vice versa.” Carleton has been looking specifically at the impact of sleep on both employee work-related outcomes and leadership behaviour. In one of her studies, she found that sleep influences leadership behaviours, which further affect employees. On days when leaders experience less sleep, they are more abusive with employees. “Organizations need to understand that sleep has a very important impact on their employees, and that they can have a positive influence by making small changes.” She said sending fewer late emails and scheduling fewer early meetings would be a good start. “We’re trained to think about our work and life as very separate. Employees should think about how those two areas flood into one another very easily, and how they can positively impact their own health by improving their sleep.”

roman Lukyanenko FINANCE & MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

Assistant Professor Roman Lukyanenko is part of design science research (DSR) – a niche field within information systems (and social sciences, broadly) that actively seeks to improve human and natural conditions though theoretically-grounded interventions. “DSR research is about enacting desired change in the world. My research interests are driven by the urgent need to better manage dwindling natural resources,” he says. “I look at innovative information technology approaches to make natural resource management more effective.” Lukyanenko’s recently published article on user-generated content provided novel design principles to make it much easier for people with different backgrounds and technical abilities to participate in crowdsourcing projects. The key was finding a common language between scientists and non-scientists. “We let non-experts describe objects the way that they see them. It shifts control to the people.” Lukyanenko explains that machine learning can be applied to the resulting data to increase its quality for interested scientists. His design ideas have already resulted in biological discoveries, including sightings in Newfoundland of the mosquito species Ochlerotatus japonicas, originally from Asia and a known carrier of West Nile virus. “To me nothing can be more exciting than knowing that the research paradigm you’re working in has such potential.”

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EDWARDS AT A GLANCE 1,811

154

B.COMM.

STUDENTS ENROLLED

86

MPACC

MBA

14

M.SC. FINANCE

6

M.SC. MARKETING

2,071

TOTAL STUDENTS

PLUS 100S IN CERTIFICATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

EMPLOYMENT

82%

66 FACULTY

FACULTY AND STAFF

92%

B.COMM.

EMPLOYMENT RATE* (77% RESPONSE RATE)

CO-OP

33 STAFF

EMPLOYMENT RATE* (96% RESPONSE RATE)

*OF THOSE LOOKING FOR WORK

ALUMNI

BY LOCATION

BY DEGREE

SASKATOON REGINA SK - OTHER CALGARY AB - OTHER BRITISH COLUMBIA CANADA - OTHER USA/INTERNATIONAL

B.COMM. CERTIFICATES MBA MPACC OTHER GRAD PROGRAMS

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES & AWARDS:

$1,289,040

FOR

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

$391,526

FOR

GRADUATE STUDENTS


“A R T H I S T O RY AND MARKETING D E F I N I T E LY O V E R L A P.”

FASHION

GURU EDWARDS ALUMNA CREATES CAREER AS STYLE AND BEAUTY EXPERT

BY JESSICA STEWART

PHOTO BY MAUDE CHAVIN

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“Ther e ar e s o many ph e n om e n a l ly cr eativ e peo pl e wit h astoun d i n g car eers and yo u g et to l e a r n d i r e ctly f ro m th em. It ’ s v ery ins p i r i n g.”

LIV ON: HER PERSONAL STYLE:

“Elegant, colourful, and accessorized.”

WHAT’S IN HER SUITCASE:

“80 pounds of shoes and clothing.”

BEING NAMED ONE OF HELLO! MAGAZINE'S 50 BEST-DRESSED CANADIANS: “It was so

flattering. I was very pregnant when they told me and I was like, what?”

SPENDING THE DAY WITH KATY PERRY: “It felt very dreamlike.

She’s a fashion icon, but she’s just a normal person.”

FRUGAL FASHION: “Places like H&M and Zara are really good at picking up the trends.” A TYPICAL DAY: “No two days are alike! I love that it’s always different.” WHAT’S SURPRISING ABOUT THE STYLE AND BEAUTY INDUSTRY: “It’s a wonderfully

glamorous world but it is physical, hard work. You need to put your back into it.”

LIFESTYLE TIPS FOR STUDENTS:

“Be kind to your skin. Wear sunscreen every single day. And even if you don't feel like washing your face late when you get home late from class, the bar, or a night of studying, do it! Your skin always remembers.”

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tyle, beauty, and lifestyle expert Liv Judd Soye not only has to stay on top of the trends, but also on top of a changing industry. Judd Soye’s marketing degree and unofficial minor in art history provided her with the perfect combination of creative and business acumen for her career. “It was a really great balance to learn the history of the world through art along with commerce,” she says. “Art history and marketing definitely overlap. It’s about how we interact with each other and how we perceive the world around us, all with a visual focus.”

Judd Soye says her internship in the media department at McCann Erickson in New York is what gave her a head start in the industry. “I wouldn’t have been able to do what I do if didn’t get my foot in the door as an intern,” she said. “You might not think that picking up shoes at 15 different showrooms is going to help you, but if you can do that with a smile and work long hours, it will take you so far.” She moved from advertising to magazines, and from New York to Toronto. As shopping editor for LOULOU magazine, Judd Soye wrote about


FALL TRENDS FROM A PERSONAL STYLE EXPERT: COLOR OF THE SEASON: RED

RED WAS EVERYWHERE ON THE RUNWAY FOR FALL.

DARK FLORALS

FLORALS ARE NO LONGER JUST FOR SUMMER.

DELICATE SHINE AND SHIMMER

THINK DELICATE PIECES ON SHOES OR A LIGHT SHIMMER ACROSS YOUR CHEEKS.

FEATHER ACCENTS

LITTLE ACCENTS ARE EVERYWHERE, LIKE ON THE BOTTOM OF A SKIRT.

LIV’S FAVE BEAUTY PRODUCTS RIGHT NOW: RENEWED HOPE IN A JAR GLOW DROPS BY PHILOSOPHY: “This gives my face a touch of

luminosity and glow where I want it. I can customize the amount of glow I want: mix it in my moisturizer, use it alone as a highlighter, or add brightener to my concealer.”

BYE BYE UNDER EYE CONCEALER IN MEDIUM BY IT COSMETICS: “A little of this goes a long way

and it does not crease. It’s simply brilliant!”

VOLUMINOUS LASH PARADIS MASCARA IN BLACK BY L’OREAL: “This mascara gives

massive, thick, voluminous lashes in just one swoop. God's gift to women's lashes everywhere.”

WOWDER IN LIGHT/FAIR BY GLOSSIER: “It’s a powder that helps get rid of shine but doesn't make my skin look flat. It still allows my skin to look like my own skin.” THRIVE

fashion, lifestyle, and beauty. She says one of the perks that comes after years in the industry is being able to learn directly from experts. “Going straight to the source can be really amazing. There are so many phenomenally creative people with astounding careers and you get to learn directly from them. It’s very inspiring.” When Judd Soye saw that the publishing world was shifting, she embraced the change and went out on her own. “There are very few magazines left in Canada,” she said. “We’re still telling a story, but now it’s a different format.” Judd Soye says on top of her time in the TV studio, producing content for her YouTube channel, at client meetings, or at product launches, she’s constantly on her phone, posting photos and responding to questions on social media. Her business degree has become even more relevant now that she is an entrepreneur. “Even people going into a very creative field need to have business fundamentals, especially if you’re going to go out on your own. A lot of your day-to-day is how you market yourself, the operations of your business, and your finances,” she said. “It’s a fantastic degree to give you a solid base no matter where you’re going.” Judd Soye says she feels lucky to have a career that combines her passion with her education. “They go together so well,” she said. “It could not have worked out better.” Liv creates new beauty and fashion content weekly for her YouTube channel. Watch and subscribe: YouTube.com/livjudd Follow Liv on Instagram: Instagram.com/livjudd

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Jack Bartel has been working at Cosmo Industries since 1971.

"RECYCLING WAS T O TA L LY

FOREIGN

T O S AS K AT O O N . . . WE ENDED UP SELLING IT LIKE, 'LET US

THE

LAUNCH OF A LEGACY 35 years in the making

S

BY JULIE BARNES

andee Reed, Arlene White and Brent Krajewski started their summer jobs at Cosmopolitan Industries 35 years ago, their first task came as a surprise. “We had no idea what we were walking into,” Reed said (B.Comm. 1983). “Our first job was to build an office we could work out of.” The three Edwards School of Business students assembled their office in Cosmo Industries’ Alberta Avenue location out of two-by-fours and drywall panels, and

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then set to work on the launch of Cosmo Shred—Saskatoon’s first secure document collection and shredding program, which is still surviving and thriving today. Once shredded, the paper is sent to market and recycled. But back in 1982, “recycling was totally foreign to Saskatoon, so there was a huge education process involved,” Reed said. “We would make phone calls to businesses and ask them if they wanted to participate in a confidential shredding service or if they had paper they wanted to recycle. We ended up selling it like, ‘let us clean out your basement.’” In addition to office construction and establishing a client base, Reed worked alongside Cosmo Shred’s program participants—adults living with intellectual disabilities. She remembers taking Jack Bartel, one of Cosmo Industries’ original participants, on client visits. He was 39 at the time, and had been with Cosmo since their inception in 1971. Today, he’s still happily feeding paper through the shredders at age 74. Reed often runs into participants she used to work with and fondly remembers her time at Cosmo. “I think we all felt that we actually had a summer job that was meaningful,” she said. Today, another Edwards alumnus is employed at Cosmo—although he’ll tell you he’s never done a day of work. Ken Gryschuk (EBAC ’13) is Cosmo Industries’ manager of business development and

CLEAN O U T YOUR

B AS E M E N T.' "


community relations. He says he has witnessed a shift in Cosmo Shred’s focus over the years. “When Sandee was first working with Cosmo Shred, it was a way of building up recycling volumes. Paper was quite valuable at the time. The motivation on the Cosmo side was, ‘where can we find paper so that we can sell it in the

market?’ Today the focus is on security first—secure destruction—not building up recycling volumes. The recycling is a side benefit—we’re disposing the paper in an environmentally responsible manner.” One factor that remains a constant is the business they receive from local organizations. Gryschuk says customers

"I THINK

WE ALL F E LT T H AT

W E A C T U A L LY HAD A

SUMMER JOB T H AT WAS M E A N I N G F U L ."

Sandee Reed and Jack Bartel with other employees at Cosmo Industries.

Sandee Reed outside of Cosmo Industries.

Ken Gryschuk, manager of business development and community relations at Cosmo Industries.

PHOTOS BY LARRY KWOK

All the recycled paper and products are pressed and wrapped into giant cubes for processing.

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like the University of Saskatchewan enable Cosmo “to operate Shred for our participants.” The program’s participants shred 1.5 million documents every month, and since the day Sandee assembled her makeshift office, they’ve shredded the equivalent weight of the Statue of Liberty. The numbers speak volumes, but the byproduct is even better—dozens of engaged participants who feel a strong sense of purpose. “It’s really a neat thing to start something that’s good for the environment, good for the business community and helps an awful lot of participants in the process,” Reed said.

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Give confidence that lasts a lifetime For University of Saskatchewan student Kellie Wuttunee, receiving the Dr. Grace E. Maynard Bursary for academic achievement and financial need meant relief—from the financial stresses of obtaining an education and being a single parent, trying to make it all work. “I am grateful for the financial assistance because I do not come from privilege and receiving the bursary has helped me be even more successful in my education,” Kellie said. “I will not forget this generosity during the most challenging time of my education.” She’s now preparing to enter the work world, feeling confident and inspired. Thanks to legacy donors like Dr. Grace Maynard, deserving students across campus have access to life-changing opportunities through scholarships and bursaries, giving them the additional support they need to fulfill their potential—at university and beyond.

You too can help ambitious students overcome obstacles and achieve their goals. Consider making a gift in your Will, and contact us today to discuss how your support can improve the lives of U of S students for years to come. Vicki Corbin Gift Planning Specialist University Relations 306-966-6571 or 1-800-699-1907 vicki.corbin@usask.ca usask.ca/giftplanning


Grit McCreath (left); Tracey Robinson (right)

DEAN’S CIRCLE MEMBERS BENEFIT EDWARDS STUDENTS

(L-R) Scott McCreath, Gordon Rawlinson, and Jack Neumann Russel Marcoux tests out a pinhole projector box during the solar eclipse.

Dean's Circle members share a meal during the Waskesiu retreat.

DEAN’S CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP GROWTH

When the Dean’s Circle launched in 2013, 23 alumni and business professionals signed up to support the Edwards School of Business. Members of the Dean’s Circle have a unique relationship with the school and the dean. Students get the benefit of each member’s wisdom and professional experience to prepare our students with the skills and knowledge the business community is looking for. Four years later, the funds raised by the Dean’s Circle have already had an impact on the student experience at Edwards. Here are just a few of the initiatives supported in part by the Dean’s Circle:

100 78

23

36

2014

2015

2016

2017

A CENTENNIAL SUCCESS! 100 YEARS 100 MEMBERS 100+ DONATIONS TO THE DEAN'S CIRCLE FUND

75 student awards, bursaries, and scholarships Saskatchewan High School Business Case Competition � Edwards Alumni Network � Centennial events to connect students and alumni � JDC West competition � COMM 119 case competition � �

Thank you so much to the 100 Dean’s Circle members! You truly make a difference to the student experience and together we will continue to develop business professionals to build nations! JOIN THE INNER CIRCLE: edwardsdeanscircle.ca

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NEW FACES FACULTY

Ilona Bastiaansen

is a lecturer in the Department of Accounting. Prior to joining Edwards, Ilona worked at Deloitte in the audit and assurance practice. Ilona obtained her B.Comm. (Hons.) and MPAcc degrees from the University of Saskatchewan. Ilona aims to bring a practical perspective on accounting into the classroom. In her spare time, she travels the world and teaches ballroom dancing.

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Lorelei Nickel

is a lecturer in the Department of Management and Marketing. She recently returned to Saskatchewan after spending 18 months serving with a humanitarian organization in Southeast Asia. Prior to completing her MBA with a specialization in leadership from Royal Roads University, Lorelei worked as an Occupational Therapist for 17 years. Since 2007, she has been a leadership consultant and coach focusing on organizational strategy, change management, and leadership development. Lorelei has had the opportunity to inspire and influence leaders from the corporate boardrooms of North America to the jungle villages of Myanmar, and she is excited to bring her experiences with her into her ethics and communication classes here at the U of S.

Carla Odnokon is a

lecturer in the Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour. Her work experience includes over ten years as a manager in Municipal Government and as a business consultant. Carla’s work has given her the opportunity to be involved with a number of initiatives, which she uses in teaching Edwards students. Some of these initiatives include community engagement, leadership development and business strategy. In the classroom, Carla strives to provide a safe environment for the student to be engaged in conversation, learn human resources and organizational behaviour theories of practice and understand how these concepts are implemented outside of the classroom.

Megan Walsh

is an assistant professor in the Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour. Her research is focused on mindfulness, leadership, well-being, and gender issues in organizations. She received her Ph.D. from Memorial University of Newfoundland, where she examined the benefits of mindfulness in relation to leader behaviours and employee well-being. She has published her work in outlets such as the Journal of Organizational Behaviour and the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. She was also a founding committee member of Empowering Leadership, an annual conference and monthly workshop series for women in leadership positions.


STAFF Britney Bergermann

joined the Edwards School of Business in December 2015. She is an alumna of our B.Comm. and MPAcc programs. As Manager of Accreditation and Special Projects, she has been working with the senior leadership team on the college’s journey to AACSB accreditation. She has also been working closely with Nathalie Johnstone and MPAcc alumni to develop cases for the Edwards Accounting Case Publishing Centre. Prior to Edwards, Britney worked as a CPA at Virtus Group LLP in Saskatoon. Britney is happy to be back on campus where she enjoys the Bowl and convenient access to coffee shops.

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Shannon Hassen joined the

University of Saskatchewan in July 2017 as a human resources strategic business advisor supporting Edwards School of Business and Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy. She is an alumna of our B.Comm. program with a major in Human Resources and also one of the first participants of the co-operative education program. Shannon is a valued-added partner who works collaboratively on the development, guidance, and implementation of various HR initiatives. Prior to joining the U of S, Shannon worked in health care as an HR specialist. Shannon is excited to return to campus and be a part of the Edwards team.

Vanessa Leon

joined the Edwards School of Business in December 2016 as an Undergraduate Programs Advisor. Vanessa is an alumna of the University of Saskatchewan with a B.A. in Public Administration, and a Certificate in University and College Administration from the University of Winnipeg. She joins Edwards after five years of working with student recruitment for the U of S. Vanessa uses advising as a teaching model and is excited to support students in achieving their academic goals.

Tara Lucyshyn

joined Edwards School of Business in August 2017 as an Undergraduate Programs Advisor. Tara has a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Saskatchewan and a degree in Human Resources and Labour Relations from Athabasca University which she attained while working as a finance specialist at Aon Hewitt. She moved to an HR generalist role at Legal Aid Saskatchewan where she assisted in a major overhaul and revamp of the organization’s policy manual along with providing general HR assistance to staff lawyers. Tara brings many years of business and policy knowledge to her advisor role and looks forward to helping students with their academic and career goals.

Bobbi Spicer

joined the Edwards School of Business, Executive Education team in November 2016. She is an alumna of our B.Comm. program with a major in Human Resources. As a Program Coordinator, Bobbi will be working within the team to promote and coordinate management and executive training and development programming for the Saskatchewan business community. Prior to joining Edwards, she spent 12 years as a small business owner and currently owns Vanity Hair & Esthetics salon here in Saskatoon. Bobbi has a wealth of experience in sales and customer relationship management and is excited to return to Edwards as a staff member.

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JACK OF ALL BY NATASHA KATCHUK

IF YOU ASK JACK NEUMANN (B.COMM. 1969) IF HE EVER WORKED A DAY IN HIS LIFE, HE’D TELL YOU HIS CAREER SUCCESS WAS A “LABOUR OF LOVE”.

36

TRADES


“90%

OF THE TIME

I LOOKED F O R WA R D TO

GOING TO W O R K .”

J JACK NEUMANN WEARING HIS HUSKIES LETTERMAN JACKET FROM HIS DAYS AS THE MANAGER OF THE HOCKEY TEAM.

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ack was one of the last students to study in the hangar building and one of the first to take classes in the Commerce/Law addition at the U of S. Outside of classes, he shared fond memories of writing for the Cat’s Ask, the commerce student newspaper, attending college dances and Roughrider games and hanging out at Rutherford Rink. Jack’s early interest in sports is something that followed him his whole life. When he wasn’t studying accounting and economics, he curled and played soccer, managed the university hockey team, worked at Rutherford Rink, and did the odd tax return for people who didn’t want to do them. After graduating, Jack took a job as an auditor at Clarkson Gordon Inc. before moving on to Amoco Canada and later Total Petroleum. Despite the demands of starting a career in the accounting industry, Jack still found time to fuel his passion for sports in his spare time with Little League baseball and Calgary Canucks hockey. When a sports information position came up at the University of Calgary (U of C), Jack was faced with a dilemma to stay in the oil and gas industry or take a chance and follow his passion for sports. “The risk was great," he said. "There would be a pay cut, my stock option would disappear, and there would be more evening and weekend work.” But it was a risk that would pay off. What started out as a one-year leave turned into a 34-year stint. “In fact, 90 per cent of the time, I looked forward to going to work,” he said. Over the course of Jack’s career at the U of C, he became known as a trailblazer in Canadian university athletics and a champion of the sports information profession (SID). He served as president of the Canadian SID association, along with his involvement in the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) while growing the profession at the local, national and international level. In 2004 he was recognized as the first and only full-time sports information director in Canada when he was inducted into CoSIDA’s 37


PHOTOS BY LINDSAY SKEANS PHOTOGRAPHY

JACK REMINISCES AS HE LOOKS FONDLY AT THE HISTORY OF PHOTOS DISPLAYED IN HIS STUDY.

Hall of Fame, and in 2015 he was received the CoSIDA Warren Berg Award for his lifetime of contributions. These awards added to a long list of honours including the Order of the University of Calgary (2005), induction into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame (2006), the Dinos Football Distinguished Alumni Award (2008), induction into the University of Calgary’s Athletics Hall of Fame in the builder category (2012), and receipt of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport Austin-Matthews Award (2015). While that list of recognitions is long, Jack said one of his career highlights was his involvement with the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. CTV contracted Jack to develop media guides for the top six hockey teams in the world for use during on-air broadcasts. At the time he was working full-time at the U of C. Being able to prioritize, work as a team, and meet deadlines is something Jack said he attributes to the lessons he learned during his commerce education. “Building the trust of contacts from other countries was challenging, but not unattainable,” he said. “When ABC and CTV called looking for a unique tidbit about a player, I had just the right thing up my sleeve because of the relationships I cultivated with contacts across the world.” Jack remained in the sports information field until 2007 when he transitioned into a position in alumni relations at the U of C, where he raised over $1 million in endowed athletic scholarships. It was a natural 38

fit, since during his time at the U of C, Jack saw two generations of students leave as men and women. The relationships he built over the years are what he is most proud of.

AS A STUDENT, WHO INSPIRED YOU?

Assistant Dean Georgia Goodspeed took a personal interest in my success as a student and challenged me. She was tough but fair and led by inspiration not intimidation.

WHERE DID YOU HANG OUT?

In the Commerce Reading Room, the Murray Library, and Rutherford Rink.

TELL US ABOUT A STUDENT TRADITION DURING YOUR TIME AS A STUDENT.

Decorating floats for frosh week down Cumberland. This was the way to catch up after a summer away.

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR STUDENTS?

Follow your dream and don’t be afraid to make a career change.


Together we built We’ve come a long way in the last century: from an accounting school to a robust business school offering six undergraduate majors, four graduate programs, several certificate programs, flexible executive education options, study abroad opportunities, and a co-op program. Check out our timeline (page 40) for an overview of our transformation. Together we thrive In our 100 years as a school, we’ve accumulated over 25,000 alumni worldwide. Doing research for this centennial issue left us amazed at the things our graduates have achieved. Read up on the links between our grads and the Second World War (page 46) and the health care field (page 49). Plus, this year we’ve transformed 5 People, 5 Jobs into 10 People, 10 Decades (page 52) to highlight even more of our fantastic alumni. We also put a centennial spin on our regular interview with the outgoing Edwards Business Students’ Society (EBSS) president (page 58), this year talking with both 2016-17 President Courtney Roy and 1975-76 President Colin Taylor. Together we will In addition to celebrating what we’ve achieved, we’re using this milestone to look to the future. We’re on our way to becoming accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and we’re committed to Indigenization, moving forward with our Aboriginal initiatives. In the spirit of looking to the future, we start this next century with a citizenship challenge (page 62) for you! Congratulations to Edwards students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends! We celebrate this milestone anniversary together.

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Campus view from the North, about 1918.

1917

An Unofficial History BY NATASHA KATCHUK

ACCOUNTING CHEER: BALANCING LEDGERS AUDITING BOOKS WE'RE THE BOYS WHO CATCH THE CROOKS — 'COUNTANCY

"Together, Walter C. Murray, the first president of the University of Saskatchewan; George H. Ling, the first dean of arts and science; James Neilson, the first professor of accounting; and, most critically, the educational needs of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Saskatchewan all combined to create the School of Accounting. The first classes for the B.Sc. in Accounting were scheduled for the fall of 1914. However, due to the start of World I, the School of Accounting did not admit its first students until the fall of 1917." Buhr, N., Feltham, G.D., and Thompson Tremaine, T. (2006). Institutional Dances: How the First Accounting Degree in Canada Came to Be at the University of Saskatchewan. Canadian Accounting Perspectives, 5(1), 113-143.

Before the School of Accounting was ever opened, the university awarded the first B.Sc. in Accounting degrees in Canada to the entire existing membership of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Saskatchewan in 1914.

1923

The School of Accounting program included two years of classes and one year of a “service” requirement in an accountancy office. Following graduation and a second year of “service,” graduates were eligible to write exams for admission as Chartered Accountants.

1932 Isabel Wright was the first female graduate of the program.

40

Walter Whittaker was the first graduate of the program with a B.Sc. in Accounting.

1936

The School of Accounting – initially part of the College of Arts and Science – became the College of Accounting in 1936.


1941

1941 accounting hockey team.

1943 paved the way for the College of Commerce, reflecting an expansion in business education. In addition to accounting, the specializations of the present day such as finance, marketing, human resources, management and operations management were now offered.

1944

1943 The first Bachelor of Commerce (B.Comm.) students graduate.

The Commerce Students' Society officially forms.

1946 1951 The Hangar building during the flood of '51. Commerce students are shown saving College records.

The "Commerce Review" became the first student venture in the field of journalism.

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1956 41


1958

The new “four-year program of studies” went into effect.

The first certificate students graduate (Hospital Administration).

1964

The "Cat's Ask" becomes the new student newsletter.

1962

1965 The first 50 years came with several moves, from the main campus to the No. 4 Campus by the Airport, to the Hangar Building (shown above), and then into our space in 1968.

1968 The Commerce/Law addition was designed for 700 students and featured 14 classrooms, a library-reading room, a laboratory work room, a 20-station Calculator room, and rooms for the Dean’s office, faculty offices, and secretarial offices.

42

The MBA program launches.

The Master of Science in Accounting is offered.

1967


1981 The first Executive Education programs launch.

1988 International students begin attending the College of Commerce.

1988 1993

The Master of Science in Finance is offered.

The Volunteer Tax Preparation program runs for the first time.

1996

The first Indigenous business program ran.

1998

While enrollment increased in the years since the Commerce/Law addition opened in 1968, the physical footprint remained the same in the College of Commerce until a $5-million donation was made in 1998 that established the PotashCorp Centre. The ground was broken later that same year and the building officially opened in June 2000.

—Summer 1995 Commerce Newsletter

The PotashCorp Centre is a two-storey addition to the existing building and includes six classrooms and the 175-seat Georgia Goodspeed Lecture Theatre.

"PCS donation launches a new era for College"

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2001

The Master of Professional Accounting (MPAcc) begins running.

Gordon Rawlinson establishes the Rawlinson Centre for Aboriginal Students (formerly Rawlco Resource Centre).

1998

The N. Murray Edwards Market Watch stock ticker went live.

2002

Left to right: Former Dean Grant Isaac and N. Murray Edwards.

2007

Dr. Edwards has had a long-standing relationship with the University of Saskatchewan’s business as a student, alumnus and donor.

On July 24, 2007, the University of Saskatchewan very proudly acknowledged Dr. Edwards' continued relationship with the business school by transforming the College of Commerce to the N. Murray Edwards School of Business.

In 2007, Career Services opens to students and the co-operative education program launches.

44

A partnership in 2007 between entrepreneur and philanthropist, W. Brett Wilson and the U of S, establishes The Wilson Centre to promote entrepreneurship among all disciplines.

The Gord & Maureen Haddock Entrepreneurial Speaker Series launches in 2007.


2009

2008

The K.W. Nasser Centre opens downtown on third avenue. The new campus location is named after Dr. K.W. Nasser and is a custom executive education training facility with dedicated classroom space, a boardroom and five breakout rooms for group discussions.

The Hanlon Centre launch in 2008.

Ted Hanlon establishes The Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies to increase international student enrollment and provide students with international opportunities.

The Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship program launches in 2009. Dr. Nasser stands in front of the downtown location.

2011 A gift from George S. Dembroski forms the Dembroski Student Managed Portfolio Trust.

The Master of Science in Marketing is offered.

2014

A combined donation from Jerry and Tina Grandey and a legacy gift from Cameco Corporation establishes the Grandey Leadership initiative in 2011.

2015 Samuel Schwartz donates the largest Inuit & First Nations art collection in U of S history to Edwards.

2016 The Reading Room undergoes renovations and is renamed the Moeller Resource Room thanks to Larry Moeller.

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2012 Robert and Brenda Gordon establish the “Business Catalyst MBA Awards� for students with non-business backgrounds.

Federated Co-operatives Limited becomes a proud supporter of the Edwards co-operative education program in 2015.

The Allsopp Learning Lab is established thanks to a gift from Harold Allsopp.

2017 45


ALUMNI IN SERVICE

Edwards during the Second World War BY JESSICA STEWART

0

ne of the most impactful events of the past century was the Second World War. As we look back on the history of our college, it is clear how much of an effect World War II had on the business school and the university as a whole. By the end of the war, 2,500 University of Saskatchewan students had enlisted in the armed services, which included approximately 175 business school students. Many of the students who continued to study at the university

46

throughout the war served their country in other ways. All male students were required to undergo military training, and women volunteered three hours per week to war work. The Esquire Club was formed in 1943 to boost morale among students, the same year the School of Accounting became the College of Commerce. Despite spotty records, we uncovered some incredible alumni who were connected to the Second World War. We share these stories with gratitude for all students and alumni who served our country.


ROSS FULLERTON

GERALD

STEWART

(B.COMM. 1947)

(B.COMM. 1948)

RANK: Captain DIVISION: Royal Regina Rifles

Infantry Contribution: Made the mathematical calculations to return the Canadian Army home after the war

POST-WAR: Received MBA from Columbia University; Became Chartered Financial Analyst; Worked for the Royal Trust in Montreal

HUGH HARDY

(B.COMM. 1948)

RANK: Lieutenant Commander DIVISION: Royal Canadian Navy; Served as signal officer on the Prince David assault ship RECOGNITION: Inducted into the French Legion of Honor POST-WAR: Studied Hospital Management at University of Toronto; Became chief hospital administrator in California, overseeing 12 hospitals & 15 clinics

RANK: Royal Canadian Regiment POST-WAR:Became Executive Vice President at Royal Bank of Canada; Was an author and columnist; Received Golden Jubilee Medal; Served as president of the U of S Alumni Association; Was a member of the U of S Senate

H. AUSTIN

HUNT (BACC 1933) RANK: Private

DIVISION: Royal Regina Rifles Infantry

MURRAY

MCFARLANE (B.COMM. 1948) RANK: Flight Sergeant Bomb Aimer DIVISION: Royal Canadian Air Force NOTABLE EXPERIENCE: Parachuted out of his

burning Halifax bomber returning from a bombing raid

POST-WAR: Had a 30-year career at Mobil Oil Canada

ANNA

FULTON

THOMAS

DE FAYE

(BACC 1938)

(B.COMM. 1942)

RANK: Major

DIVISION:

DIVISION: Somerset Light Infantry

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTION: Secretary

treasurer of infantry and machine gun association

POST-WAR: Ordinance inspector office with Corps of Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers; Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel

JAMES

LAWSON

(BACC 1937) RANK: Major DIVISION:

Paymaster Corp

Led soldiers in attack on Agira, Sicily

Stationed in England, Holland and Germany

the British Empire

Married Allied nurse Elizabeth Burnham

POST-WAR: Worked as a Chartered Accountant Worked for the Royal Trust in Montreal

Killed while fighting in Italy

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RECOGNITION: Awarded Member of the Order of

Royal Regina Rifles

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Edwards Deans 1937-2016

James Nielson

Joseph H. Thompson

Thomas H. McLeod

Georgia M. Goodspeed

1937 - 1940

1940 - 1952

1952 - 1964

1964 - 1965

Lloyd I. Barber

Samuel Laimon

P. Michael Maher

W. John Brennan

1965- 1969

1969 - 1976

1976 - 1982

1982 - 1996

V. Lynne Pearson

Grant E. Isaac

C. Brooke Dobni

Daphne Taras

1996 - 2006

2006 - 2009

2009 - 2010

2010 - 2016

Dean

Dean

Dean

48

Dean

Dean

Dean

Dean

Dean

Acting Dean

Acting Dean

Dean

Dean


CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Edwards alumni making a difference in health care

0

BY JESSICA STEWART

ne of the The Edwards School of Business has been connected with health care since the 1960s, when the school began offering its first health care-related certificate. Between 1964 and 2002, thousands of certificates in hospital administration and health care administration were awarded. Additionally, many Edwards alumni have gone on to amazing careers in the health care field. Some are medical doctors, a few are surgeons, others are involved in clinical research, and several work on the administrative side as executive directors, policy

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makers, or chief hospital administrators. Uwe Reinhardt (B.Comm. 1964) has received international recognition for his health service research and has been a professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University since 1970. Tony Dagnone (B.Comm. 1965) has more than 38 years of experience in the health care sector, 25 as a chief executive officer. When he was appointed CEO of Royal University Hospital in 1977, he was the youngest chief executive of a major teaching hospital in Canada. We spoke with Uwe and Tony about their time at the school, then called the College of Commerce.

49


Uwe Reinhardt THRIVE: How did you come to study at the College of Commerce? REINHARDT: Because in Germany I did not attend a gymnasium (the springboard for a university career) but only a Realschule (the springboard for more practical higher education) I was not sure whether or not the U of S really had accepted me. After all, it was a university, not a technical college. So, to have something with which to bargain, I asked for a one-year credit, because I had served an apprenticeship in business. As I stood in the long line in the hangar to be fully registered, I was pulled out of the line to see the dean. My heart sank. Realschule was not good enough. But all the dean wanted was to discuss that credit I had requested. So, heart pounding, I told the dean: “upon second thought, maybe I should take that first year after all.” With that, I was in. I think I kept up my bargain by graduating with the Governor General’s Gold Medal four years later. THRIVE: What’s one thing you remember about your time at the College of Commerce?

REINHARDT: I always took crisp notes of my readings. When reading a chapter by the famous sociologist Talcott Parsons, I had trouble distilling what he had written into two pages. As an immigrant projected into English-speaking higher education, I attributed my problem to language. I visited then-dean T.H. McLeod, requesting that I be allowed to finish the degree in five rather than four years. He looked at me and asked, “do you have a girlfriend?” Upon my affirmative, he said, “cancel your date with her this weekend and tell her that you must study English.” A few years later, I published in the U of S student newspaper a column entitled “The Kindest Act Ever.” Instead of allowing me to whine, the dean told me “when the going gets tough, get tougher.” It became a life-long motto for me. THRIVE: How did your B.Comm. education help you as your career progressed? REINHARDT: I have found that having

50

James Madison Professor of Political Economy Professor of economics and public affairs Princeton University

Education B.Comm. from University of Saskatchewan (1964) PhD in economics from Yale University (1970)

Honorary degrees Drexel University Medical College of Pennsylvania Mount Sinai School of Medicine City University of New York College of Optometry of the State University of New York

Recognition Governor General's Gold Medal as Most Distinguished Graduate (1964) Second Century Award for Excellence in Health Care from Columbia University School of Nursing (1998) Distinguished Investigator Award by AcademyHealth (2004) Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (2010) The William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research (2010)

a degree in business, especially if combined with a good dose of economics, is enormously helpful in my role as a health economist and health policy analyst. Most pure economists have no idea how business actually works, nor do they really understand accounting statements. As a director of a number of healthcare organizations in the U.S., my competence in accounting and corporate finance has always stood me

Canada’s system is not perfect – no national health system is – but it is distinct among nations and, in my view, it has served Canadians well. By contrast, the US has never reached a consensus on the nature of health care, as the recent fiasco in the Republicans’ effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare so vividly demonstrated. Many Americans share the Canadian view. But just as many think of health care as just another private consumption

“THE DEAN TOLD ME ‘WHEN THE GOING GETS TOUGH, GET TOUGHER.’ IT BECAME A LIFE-LONG MOTTO FOR ME.” in good stead (although it also always landed me on the hard-working audit committees). THRIVE: What’s the biggest change you've seen in healthcare during your career?

REINHARDT: The most profound change in health care that I experienced was transitioning from the Canadian system to the U.S. In Canada, there exists a political consensus that health care is to be viewed as a social good to be made available to all who need it on roughly equal terms, and to be financed (through taxes) by ability to pay. It is the principle of social solidarity.

good whose financing is the individual’s responsibility, aside from a presumed right to a bare bones package of health benefits. In general, prices for health care services in the U.S. tend to be twice as high as or higher than those same health care goods or services command in the rest of the OECD, Canada included. Consequently, Americans spend twice as much per capita on health care than do Canadians, yet our health statistics are worse than Canada’s. THRIVE: Anything else you’d like to share? REINHARDT: I would be remiss in not thanking the gentle, generous, and


Tony Dagnone, C.M. Retired president and CEO, London Health Services Centre

Education endowing the province’s great university system, of which they can justly be proud. That university graciously took a chance on me, at a low tuition price a poor immigrant like me could afford. Saskatchewan was the portal through which I entered into a wonderful career in academia and policy advising. I hope the people of Saskatchewan will always stand by this great institution, producing the most important capital in modern society – human capital.

B.Comm. from University of Saskatchewan (1965) Postgraduate diploma in Hospital Administration from University of Toronto (1967)

Recognition Dr. Harvey Agnew Award from University of Toronto (1966) Robert Johnson Award from University of Toronto (1967) Fellow, Canadian College of Health Leaders (1971) Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives (1977) B'nai Brith We're Proud of You Award (1982) Member of the Order of Canada (1991) Queen's Jubilee Medal (2003) Canadian College of Health Service Executives (CCHSE) Distinguished Service Award (2005) CCHSE Honorary Life Member Award (2008)

THRIVE: What’s one thing you remember about your time at the College of Commerce? DAGNONE: My involvement in student council, especially as student president, gave me the opportunity to develop organizational skills that I later utilized in the work place. It was during my years at the College of Commerce that I became committed to volunteerism, which I continued on the local, provincial and national levels. Hospitals continuously reach

further developed in my leadership roles. As a commerce student, I embraced the importance of corporate citizenship and responsibility to the community and its citizens. My commerce education enhanced my career in health care. If we are to deliver the promises of medicare to Canadians, and for the sake of tomorrow's patients, we need to rely on management principles that we learned as commerce students. THRIVE: Can you tell us a bit about the Patient First review you were advisor of? DAGNONE: Medicare was invented

“MY INVOLVEMENT IN STUDENT COUNCIL, ESPECIALLY AS STUDENT PRESIDENT, GAVE ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS THAT I LATER UTILIZED IN THE WORK PLACE. ” out to the community for donations, volunteers and governance talent. Thus, I have always believed that hospital leaders are obligated to give back to the community. Chairing Saskatoon's centennial celebrations and the Canada Games are two examples of my involvement in Saskatoon. THRIVE: How did your B.Comm. education help you as your career progressed? DAGNONE: The B.Comm. gave me a business foundation, which I THRIVE

which, when implemented, would address the major shortcomings of medicare. A report followed in 2009, with the focus on delivering timely quality care to Saskatchewan people. Recommendations were implemented immediately and a lot of resources were invested into reducing wait times. Do you have an interesting story about your job that you’d like to share? DAGNONE: My postgraduate thesis at the University of Toronto was on the role of multi-unit hospital systems. I have always embraced the notion that hospitals are valued community resources. As such, we should not be competing with each other, but collaborating to deliver the best value for each patient and taxpayer. Shortly after being recruited in 1992 to London, Ont., a city that prided itself with three hospitals managed by three different governance boards, I was given the opportunity to direct what others deemed Canada's largest voluntary hospital merger. What followed over the next decade was a $1 billion infrastructure investment to serve the region as an academic referral centre.

in Saskatchewan in 1962 and subsequently adopted by all provinces. Over time, medicare was coping with a sustainability crisis across Canada as demand outstripped capacity to deliver services. In response to citizen concerns, the Saskatchewan government sponsored the Patient First Review in 2008 and I had the number of certificates awarded privilege of serving 1697 certificates in Health-Care Administration as commissioner. The 1465 certificates in Hospital Administration overall objective was to 151 certificates in Hospital and Health-Care Administration craft recommendations

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1920'S

“Since Walter Whittaker, now controller of American Radiator Corporation, New York, received the first degree granted to an Accounting student in 1923, 250 young men and women have received the degree.” – J.H. Thomson, Dean, College of Commerce, 1945 Controller, American Radiator Company 1st graduate of the School of Accounting Governor General’s gold medal, Convocation 1923 Member of the Athletic Directorate President of the Student Representative Council (School of Accounting)

WALTER

WHITTAKER BACC 1923

10 PEOPLE 1930'S

“Sincerity, charm and a marry smile have won for Isabel many friends who showed wisdom in choosing her for: President of House Committee, Secretary of Penta Kai, Vice-President of her school. Success in her business career is predicted by all who know her attractive personality and executive ability.” – Greystone, 1930

ISABEL

WRIGHT BACC 1932

1st female graduate of the School of Accounting Vice President of the Saskatoon Commerce Student Society President of the House Committee Secretary of Pente Kai Deka

52


"I think the most important event that happened in Saskatoon's history was the coming of the University. It has made us the technological centre of Saskatchewan - agriculture wise, science wise and cultural wise. And the reason for the tremendous growth in Saskatoon has been that it is so diversified." Founder of Arscott & Associates Writer of “Hugh’s Views”, Saskatoon StarPhoenix Golden Jubilee Medal First recipient of the Alumni Achievement Award, U of S Alumni Association Member of the Fund Raising Committee to establish the Memorial Union Building (MUB) Original member of the Rhinoceros Party Served in World War II

HUGH

ARSCOTT

1940'S

B.COMM. 1948

10 DECADES “Showing respect for others maintains credible interpersonal relationships with whomever you meet in your social and business life."X"

ARTHUR

WAKABAYASHI B.COMM. 1953

Former Chancellor, University of Regina Former Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy), Government of Canada Former Deputy Minister of Finance, Government of Saskatchewan Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays, Government of Japan Member of the Order of Canada Member of the Saskatchewan Order of Merit

1950'S THRIVE

Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal Saskatchewan Lieutenant Governor’s Medal for the Institute of Public Administration of Canada

53


SCOTT

MCCREATH

"The more you are able to give of your time and treasure, the greater life’s rewards." B.COMM. 1969

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

Investment Advisor, BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc. - The McCreath Group

Executive in Residence, Edwards School of Business 2011 Recipient of the Brendan Wood TopGun Designation 17-time recipient, Deane Nesbitt/Charles Burns Award 2014 Alumni Achievement Award, U of S Alumni Association BMO Nesbitt Burns Chairman’s Council member Former Chairman, Alberta Stock Exchange Board of Directors, Investment Dealers Association of Canada Dean’s Advisory Council, Edwards School of Business

1960'S

10 PEOPLE 1 970'S B.COMM. 1978

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

“The ability to gather all of the evidence in a situation and critically analyze the bigger picture is a crucial skill to develop."

BRIAN

TOWRISS Former Head Coach, Huskies Football

CIS Football’s Winningest Head Coach – which included 71 All-Canadians, 47 CFL players, and one NFL player 2017 Canadian Football Hall of Fame Builder Inductee 2017 Alumni Achievement Award, U of S Alumni Association Nine-time recipient, CIS Canada West Coach of the Year 1994 CIS Frank Tindall National Coach of the Year Award Member of the Saskatchewan Order of Merit 54


B.COMM. 1983

“Though our lives have taken us to different cities and continents, the value of friendship remains strong and true.”

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

CAROLYN

TASTAD

Group President, North America, Procter & Gamble Fortune’s Most Powerful Women: 2015, 2016, 2017 2015 Cincinnati YWCA’s Woman of Achievement 2015 Women’s Project Theater Women of Achievement Award Kellogg Company, Board of Directors Cincinnati Museum Center, Board of Trustees

1980'S

Grocery Manufacturers Association, Board of Directors Executive sponsor of P&G’s Gender Equality Citizenship Effort Leader of P&G’s Corporate Women’s Leadership Team

10 DECADES “Objectiveness in decision-making is an important attribute."

NORAINI

B.COMM. 1991

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

AHMAD

Member of Parliament, Government of Malaysia MBA, 2006, University Tun Abdul Razak (UNITAR) Malaysia Ph.D. 2016, Nothern University of Malaysia Part of the first cohort of international students in the College of Commerce under an agreement with the Government of Malaysia First female Chair of the Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (Matrade) First Malaysian to be elected Chair of the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians (CWP) Former Deputy Human Resources Minister, Government of Malaysia Former Head of the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO) Women’s Youth Wing Recipient of the Friendship Award from the Japanese Government THRIVE

1 9 9 0 'S 55


"Teamwork has been an invaluable skill when it comes to success in sports and business."

AMY

B.COMM. 2000

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

ALSOP

SaskTel Marketing Manager, Service Development Motivational Speaker Gold Medalist - Paralympic Games (Goalball): 2000 and 2004 2004 Canadian Female Team of the Year 2005 King Clancy Award Winner - Canadian Foundation Physically Disabled Persons 2008 Paralympic Games (Goalball)- 5th 2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal Recipient Saskatchewan Disability Strategy, Co-chair

10 PEOPLE 10 DECADES B.COMM. 2010

“Success takes persistence. Put the hours in and don’t forget to take risks.”

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

GABRIELLE

SCRIMSHAW Gleitsman Fellow at the Center for Public Leadership, Harvard University MPA 2018, Harvard Kennedy School MBA 2017, Stanford University Co-Founder of the Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada Profiled by the New York Times, Forbes, and the Globe and Mail

2010'S 56

Member of Hatchet Lake First Nation 2013 Recipient of Indspire Youth Laureate Award First and only undergraduate Associate accepted into RBC's Graduate Leadership Program


EDWARDS

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

CENTENNIAL

CLOTHING STORE I S N OW

OPEN The official Edwards Centennial branded clothing is now available for purchase online. Featuring high quality fabrics and modern and classical designs, there is variety of Edwards-branded merchandise. Browse our online catalogue for a look at our new varsity jacket, cardigan, hoodie, ball caps and a variety of shirts. Visit

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edwards100.ca to order yours today.

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THEN & NOW

Commerce Student Societies Then and Now: The EBSS and the SCSS

F

BY JESSICA STEWART

or our centennial issue, we wanted to not only highlight the year of our past Edwards Business Students’ Society (EBSS) president, but also dig a bit further back and remember what the student council used to be like. We spoke with 2016-2017 EBSS president Courtney Roy as well as 19751976 Saskatoon Commerce Student Society (SCSS) president Colin Taylor. Read on to see how the student society has changed – and remained the same – in the last 40 years:

Colin Taylor 1975-1976 SCSS President

THRIVE: Tell us a little bit about

yourself. COLIN: I graduated in 1976. I spent 25 years in the banking industry, living in Regina, Mississauga, and Winnipeg, among other cities. Even though I was a finance major, I found the need to pursue an accounting designation and obtained my CMA in 1991. I had the opportunity in 1999 to move into a public practice accounting firm. I completed my CGA designation in 2001 and was honoured to be recognized by CGA Canada with an FCGA in 2010. Currently I am the managing partner of EPR Saskatoon, CPA Prof Corp, and we have about 15 people on staff. Over the next two to five years I hope to be able to transition the firm to provide good succession. 58

COURTNEY: I’m a marketing major in my last term, graduating this December. Over the past three years I've been an intern with PotashCorp over the summers and for the co-op program, in the corporate relations and community investment departments. After I graduate, I’d like to start my career in marketing and I’m optimistic I’ll be able to find something great in Saskatoon. I've always had an entrepreneurial spirit, so maybe down the road I will pursue something of my own! THRIVE: How and why did you get involved with student council? COLIN: I was at the first-year student tour of the college in September 1972. I ran into Dick Pinder, who was the president of the student council. He

told me that the one thing that I needed to do was to become involved with the student council. I ran for first-year rep, but was not successful. However, someone decided that there was a role for me so I became assistant first-year rep even though there was no such position. My run for second-year rep was more successful as was my desire to serve as treasurer in my third year. At the end of that year, there was an election for the president’s position and I was successful in my bid to serve as president in my fourth year. COURTNEY : I got involved because I wanted to meet more people in a setting where I felt comfortable because I was kind of shy in my first year. I liked event planning and wanted to grow my skills in that area, so at the end of my


Then and now

1976 2017

Prime Minister Premier of SK Best Picture

Courtney Roy 2016-2017 EBSS President

Pierre Trudeau Justin Trudeau Allan Blakeney Brad Wall One Flew Over the Moonlight Cuckoo’s Nest #1 on Billboard's Silly Love Songs Love Yourself Top Hot 100 by Wings by Justin Bieber SK minimum wage $2.80 $11.00 Postage stamp price 13 cents $1.00 Edwards students 829 1,866 U of S students 10,299 21,441 Student council 8 members 52 voting members 2 – 3 assistant roles 9 club Presidents Assignment format Handwritten Presentations Typed and emailed Where to study Library; Home Moeller Resource Room; Law Library Hangouts Sportsman’s Den; Hudson’s Pub Sutherland Bar Crazy Cactus

first year, I was an event director and helped plan two events: White Out, which is a big winter party, and the Rider trip down to Regina. The following year I was

board for the graduating class and used those pictures to provide a handbook for prospective employers when they came to campus. 1975 and 1976 saw the beginning of students becoming directly involved in university committees such as the faculty council, so part of what we were considering was the role of our student council in the overall work being done by the USSU. COURTNEY: The EBSS offers a ton of services to students apart from

we raised over $43,000 for Habitat for Humanity, which included matching donations from N. Murray Edwards and Federated. We also connected 109 students with volunteer opportunities throughout Saskatoon, including Big Brothers Big Sisters and a group Habitat for Humanity build. This past year I implemented the Borrow a Charger program where students could borrow a laptop charger if they forgot theirs at home. It was really successful and helped out a lot of students.

“I WANTED TO MEET MORE PEOPLE IN A SETTING WHERE I FELT COMFORTABLE BECAUSE I WAS KIND OF SHY IN MY FIRST YEAR.” VP-Charity and then I was President in my last full year. THRIVE: What services did the student council offer students? COLIN: The council in the '70s was focused on social events and intramural sports. We also oversaw the photo THRIVE

social events. They send students to competitions and conferences throughout the year with the help of our generous sponsors. Last year we sent 58 delegates to six case competitions and five conferences. They also raise money for a particular charity each year. Last year

They also have a clothing sale, locker sale, and coffee Tuesdays. THRIVE: What was LB5Q like? COLIN: We always tried to make sure that the incoming class was “welcomed” early in September, and we had the BBQ on an

EBSS Executive 2016 – 2017 Courtney Roy President

Cady Polishchuk VP Academic

Erica Chessall VP Charity

Kallum Perkins

VP Corporate Relations

Emily Thomas VP Finance

Kim Dutchak VP Marketing

Sydney Sanders VP Social

acreage or at the hospitality garden of a local brewery. The key seemed to be the sponsorship by one of the major beer vendors, with a hope that their product would be the one of choice for the school year. COURTNEY: LB5Q is traditionally on one of the first Mondays of the school year and held outside at Prairieland Park. Last year over 2,300 students were in attendance. There was a full stage with lighting, audio, visuals, and the best local DJs. We ran the event with safety as our first priority, and it’s the biggest annual fundraiser for EBSS, accounting for a large portion of the operating budget for other events. LB5Q is something generations of commerce students have in common and is talked about by many commerce grads over the years. edwardsbss.com

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Jubilee attendees taking in a student tour of campus.

EDWARDS CELEBRATES THIRD

ANNUAL ALUMNI JUBILEE

T

his year the Edwards School of Business celebrated the third annual Alumni Jubilee. As one of the first events of the Centennial year, the 2017 jubilee brought graduates back to the school to celebrate decade milestones for years ending in -7. Held over September 7 & 8, alumni participated in a variety of events and explored spaces around campus. Professor Marjorie Delbaere hosted a lunch and learn for alumni titled, A Day in the Life of Professor. The event also included networking time and tours of the Edwards building, the university campus, and the Diefenbaker Canada Centre exhibits. In addition to the regular line-up of

60

fun events, this year attendees were also special guests at the grand opening event of the Allsopp Learning Lab and the Dean’s Speaker Series featuring Darren Zatwarnitski. The Jubilee wrapped up with a VIP tailgate party at the homecoming football game where the Huskies took home a win 43-17 against the University of Alberta Golden Bears. edwardalumni.com

To update your contact information, find out more about the Alumni Jubilee, or learn how you can help organize upcoming reunions, contact Shawna at jardine@edwards.usask.ca or 306.966.7539.

COMING TO A CITY NEAR YOU! Our Centennial year is a time for us to celebrate with you and recognize all that we have accomplished together over the past century. Join us in a city near you; visit Edwards100.ca to be part of it.


Centennial

THANK YOU

TO OUR CENTENNIAL SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR

19 17

20 17

TOGETHER

WE BUILT

businesses that foster strong communities Edwards100.ca

MARKETING PARTNER

PILLAR

Properties Corp.

Resume of Pillar Properties Corp. Pillar Properties Corp. (“Pillar”) is a significant landlord in the office, industrial and retail property markets in Saskatoon and has the financial and development capacity to accommodate the needs of a wide variety of tenants – in buildings with superior specifications and the right locations. Through a strategy of “buying, developing and leasing”, Pillar has grown to own and manage a portfolio of 31 properties, over one million square feet of prime commercial real estate. The Company specializes in build-to-suit developments working with tenants to understand their building requirements and then developing properties that fit those specific needs. The Company works with a team of experienced Architects, Engineers and Contractors throughout the design and construction phases to complete detailed plans and specifications of the tenant.

THRIVE

The Company has a demonstrated capacity for engaging in developments that are completed on time and on budget. Moreover, once tenants have located in a Pillar property, the Company continues to look after details, ensuring the building functions properly, enabling the tenants to focus their time on their business. At Pillar, extensive experience is matched up with exacting expectations and tenants win – with the right buildings in the right locations, with superior specifications.

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THE EDWARDS CENTENNIAL CITIZENSHIP CHALLENGE One of the ways we’re celebrating our 100 years as a college is to launch the Centennial

Citizenship Challenge.

We know our students, alumni, and friends work hard to improve their communities. Now we’re calling on you to help us collect 100 stories of good citizenship.

What makes a good citizen story?  VOLUNTEER WORK  ACTS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

 MAKING A DONATION  ANYTHING THAT MAKES THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE

Tell us about the good things you’re already doing or be inspired to try something new! Every action, large or small, strengthens our communities. By sharing your story, you’ll be featured on the Edwards centennial website and entered to win a centennial prize package which includes a donation to the charity of your choice. Visit Edwards100.ca to learn more and submit your story!

SIT ON A BOARD COACH A KIDS’ SPORTS TEAM VOLUNTEER AT A SOUP KITCHEN ORGANIZE A FUNDRAISER BECOME A CLASS REP FOR THE EDWARDS ALL YEARS REUNION WALK OR RUN FOR CHARITY CLEAN UP A SECTION OF HIGHWAY DONATE TO THE FOOD BANK VISIT ANIMALS AT THE SPCA At the Edwards School of Business volunteers make a difference. During the 2016-2017 academic year, we’ve been fortunate enough to have: 435 volunteers contribute 24,000 hours of their time!

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Centennial

Edwards Centennial

19 17

20 17

ALL-YEARS REUNION

SEPT 20 - 22, 2018 SCHEDULE SNEAK PEEK THURSDAY, SEPT 20, 2018

TOGETHER

WE THRIVE

10AM Golf Tournament: Riverside Country Club

one graduate at a time

6PM Registration & Networking: Holiday Inn (Campus location)

Edwards100.ca

FRIDAY, SEPT 21, 2018 9AM

Registration: Holiday Inn (Campus location)

DEAN’S SPEAKER SYMPOSIUM U OF S CAMPUS

10AM OPENING KEYNOTE: Murad Al-Katib, Founder, AGT Food & Ingredients

11AM SPEAKER: Gabrielle Scrimshaw, Indigenous Educator & Advocate

11:30am LUNCH & LEARN: Reconciliation and the Business World 1:30PM SPEAKER: Wayne Dunn, President, CSR Training Institute

2:30PM SPEAKER: Ainsley Robertson, Founder, The Princess Shop

3:30PM CLOSING KEYNOTE: Michele Romanow, CBC Dragons' Den 5pm Class Parties or Huskie Event

SATURDAY, SEPT 22, 2018 9AM Registration: Holiday Inn (Campus location) 9:30AM College & Campus Tours 12PM BBQ in the Bowl 1:30PM Pinning Ceremony: U of S Campus - Convocation Hall

5PM Centennial Gala: TCU Place Centennial Hall

THRIVE

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DEAN'S

SPEAKER SYMPOSIUM SEPT 21, 2018

Citizenship demands participation, involvement and contribution. Every action, large or small, strengthens our communities and these renowned alumni and industry leaders are no strangers to making the world a better place. Join us for the 2018 Dean’s Speaker Symposium as part of our Centennial celebrations and take in a variety of thought-provoking sessions featuring: CBC Dragons' Den star Michele Romanow, 2017 Oslo Business for Peace Award Winner, Murad Al-Katib (B.COMM. ‘94), Indigenous Educator & Advocate, Gabriele Scrimshaw (B.COMM. ’10), President & Founder of CSR Training Institute, Wayne Dunn, and 2017 Red Cross Young Humanitarian of the Year, Ainsley Robertson (B.COMM. ’09). GABRIELE

WAYNE

SCRIMSHAW

DUNN

INDIGENOUS ENTREPRENEUR, ACTIVIST & SPEAKER

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER, CSR TRAINING INSTITUTE

AINSLEY

ROBERTSON

CO-FOUNDER, THE PRINCESS SHOP | PRODUCT MANAGER, CLIO

MURAD

AL-KATIB

PRESIDENT & CEO, AGT FOOD & INGREDIENTS

MICHELE

ROMANOW

"DRAGON", CBC DRAGONS’ DEN | CO-FOUNDER, CLEARBANC Visit edwards100.ca/reunion/speakers.aspx for full speaker bios. 64


Centennial

Edwards Centennial

19 17

20 17

ALL-YEARS REUNION

SEPT 20 - 22, 2018 R E G I S T R AT I O N PAC K AG E S ALL

INCLUSIVE

SEPT 20

DEAN'S SPEAKER

SYMPOSIUM

TOWN &

GOWN

REGISTRATION

TOGETHER

WE WILL

develop business professionals to build nations

& NETWORKING

SEPT 21

Edwards100.ca

SPEAKERS LUNCH & LEARN

CLOSING KEYNOTE:

MICHELE ROMANOW

CBC DRAGONS' DEN

CLASS PARTIES OR HUSKIE EVENT SEPT 22

COLLEGE & CAMPUS TOURS

BBQ IN THE BOWL PINNING CEREMONY

CENTENNIAL

GALA

PRICING R E G I S T E R E A R LY AT E D WA R D S 1 0 0 . C A

1ST EARLY BIRD

$275

$150

$150

2ND EARLY BIRD

$375

$250

$250

REGULAR

$450

$325

$325

BY DEC 31, 2017

BY APR 30, 2018 BY AUG 31, 2018

OPTIONAL

GOLF TOURNAMENT SEPT 20, 2018

THRIVE

$100

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Student Managed Portfolio Trust Left: Prairie Sky CEO Cameron Proctor makes an investment presentation during the SMPT class. Bottom: Edwards School of Business Dean Keith Willoughby (left) with Cameron Proctor (right).

AN OUTSTANDING YEAR FOR FINANCE

Edwards finance programs reach goals and receive international recognition

T

he department of Finance & Management Science at Edwards is always noteworthy, but has had more successes than usual this past year in every area: student performance, international recognition, and reaching donation goals. Take a look at the program highlights from the 2016/2017 academic year. Student Managed Portfolio Trust The Dembroski Student Managed Portfolio Trust (SMPT), our student-run investment portfolio, has performed well and inspired several donations since its inception in 2012. This past February, PrairieSky

66

Royalty Ltd. announced a $250,000 gift to the portfolio, which helped the SMPT students reach their goal of raising $1 million in donations at the time of the school’s centennial. As of April 2017, the students had received over $1,100,000 in donations, and PrairieSky’s gift will bring the trust’s value to over $1.8 million over the next four years. Cameron Proctor, chief operating officer of PrairieSky, said the practical nature of the program inspired their gift. “When students have an opportunity to work with real money as opposed to a model portfolio, it teaches them to focus on being diligent, thorough, and having accountability for their work product and results,” he said.

"When students have an opportunity to work with real money ... it teaches them to focus on being diligent, thorough, and having accountability for their work product and results."

“We are grateful for PrairieSky’s investment in our student experience,” said Edwards Dean Keith Willoughby. “The proof is in the student’s ability to manage funds that produce a higher percentage of return on a comparable market index.” Indeed, the SMPT has also grown as a result of the good choices made by students in the course. For example, the


CFA Institute University Recognition Program Student Cam Andrusiak (left) is recognized for his outstanding contributions towards managing the SMPT by Professor George Tannous (right).

CFA Society Ethics Challenge L - R: Ryley Dalshaug, Zhijun Liu, Robbin Rempel, David Fortosky, and Coach Brian Lane

holding period rate of return between September 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 was 8.92% (equivalent to 15.42% annual return). CFA Institute University Recognition Program The finance program was also welcomed into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program this past year. This recognition means our finance specialization is closely aligned with the requirements of the Chartered Financial Analyst® designation, the most respected and recognized investment credential in the world. Finance students often write the Level 1 CFA exam after graduating. However, our current students are finding that our curriculum gives them a head start. “In December, I wrote the CFA Level 1 exam and passed,” said fourthyear finance student Cam Andrusiak. “Knowing the Edwards curriculum matched the CFA standards boosted my confidence to write the exam early.” Through participation in this recognition program, Edwards is also eligible to receive student scholarships for the CFA Program each year. “Our faculty in the Department of Finance & Management Science bring us great pride in achieving recognition for our B.Comm. finance major through THRIVE

the CFA Institute,” Willoughby said. “This attests to the high quality of our finance program and will further position our students in their career paths.” CFA Society Ethics Challenge Our finance students are also making their mark in competitions. Four Edwards students placed first in the Prairie region of the inaugural Canadian CFA Society Ethics Challenge. The Ethics Challenge focuses on the Society’s Future of Finance initiative and strives to prepare graduates entering the investment profession, with ethical challenges they may encounter during the course of their career. Competing teams receive an ethics case to study and evaluate three months prior to the event. On the day of the challenge, teams have 10 minutes to present their analysis and recommendations to a judging panel of CFA charter holders. The winner is selected based on the quality of the team’s understanding of the ethical issues involved, their recommendations, and the quality of their analysis, presentation, and responses to the judges’ questions. Congratulations to Robbin Rempel, David Fortosky, Zhijun Liu, Ryley Dalshaug and coach Brian Lane!

And congratulations to our entire finance and management science department for an amazing year!

Top 20 Canadian and US Cash Holdings RBC Savings Sr A (2010) Costco Wholesale Corp-New Telus Corporation Toronto-Dominion Bank Canadian National Railway Visa Inc Cl A Common Stock Canadian Natural Resources Magna International Inc Com Johnson & Johnson E I Du Pont De Nemours & Co Sun Life Financial Inc Royal Bank of Canada Hershey Company (The) Chevron Corporation Union Pacific Corp West Fraser Timber Co Ltd 3M Company Microsoft Corp Brookfield Infrastructure Bonds

67


In 2017, the organization was awarded the Vera Pezer Award for Student Enhancement Campus Group and placed third in the following categories: the Scotiabank EcoLiving Challenge, the TD Entrepreneurship Challenge, and the Capital One Financial Education Challenge at the Enactus Canada Regional Competition.

CURRENT PROJECTS The Aboriginal Youth Idea Challenge, a business incubator competition supporting young Indigenous entrepreneurs to make their business ideas a reality.

DIG IN.

Student business group recognized nationally for advancing the lives of Indigenous People

CentsABLE, a financial literacy program for at-risk women, university and high-school students, and lowincome individuals. The Stock Market Challenge educates university students on the fundamentals of investment and portfolio management through simulated stock trading online.

e

nactus University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is a group of 50 entrepreneurialminded students from across the university who partner with academic, business and civic leaders to create projects that positively impact the community. This global organization started in 1975 as Students in Free Enterprise, where university teams were invited to attend leadership-training programs to learn about free enterprises and create their own. In the late 1990’s, the program expanded internationally with the first world cup held in London, England. The name changed to Enactus in 2012 to better represent the spirit of entrepreneurship and taking action. This past year, Enactus U of S has enhanced its projects to increase the community impact through projects such as Food for the Future. The project

Food for the Future focuses on addressing food insecurity in northern Saskatchewan.

connects community champions with funding and education, facilitating community members to work together to grow healthy fruits and vegetables in community gardens. In 2012, the Saskatchewan Food Costing Task Group determined that the cost of a nutritious basket of food was over $70 more in northern Saskatchewan compared to urban centres. In addition to higher prices, many of the rural communities lack grocery stores— forcing individuals to make a round-trip of up to 14 hours to purchase food. Food for the Future launched when the Enactus team identified the need for inexpensive, fresh, and nutritious food to combat the rising prices and adverse health effects that prevail in northern Saskatchewan. In total, the team has traveled to Beauval, St. George's Hill, Dillon, Cumberland House and Pelican

Narrows to provide education, create gardens and foster relationships with community members. These gardens were accomplished in partnership with Agriculture in the Classroom, the Northern Lights School Division, Bioriginal, Early's Farm and Garden Centre, and Floral Acres. Food for the Future's impact received recognition at the 2017 Enactus Canada National competition by winning the HSBC Indigenous Advancement Project of the Year, an award presented to a project that accelerates the advancement of Indigenous people by creating social and economic opportunities that strengthen communities. Enactus U of S is a group of passionate and diverse students who are continuously looking for sustainable solutions to assist community members through entrepreneurial action. facebook.com/enactususask

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STUDENT SUCCESS

ALBERTA ENERGY CHALLENGE Edwards students Travis Smit and Briane Vance and engineering students Alex Yaskowich and Alex Barnes placed second at the Alberta Energy Challenge in Edmonton in September 2016.

CANADIAN CFA SOCIETY ETHICS CHALLENGE Robbin Rempel, David Fortosky, Zhijun Liu, and Ryley Dalshaug competed in the inaugural Canadian CFA Society Ethics Challenge (Prairie Regional Division) and took home first place. Brian Lane served as their coach.

VERA PEZER AWARD Two Edwards students received the Vera Pezer Award for Student Enhancement. Congratulations to Preston Thomson (Member of Student Council) and Rashid Ahmed (Volunteerism).

MPACC GIVES BACK HUSKIES ATHLETICS

ENACTUS

Soccer defender Meagan Manson received the Valerie Girsberger Trophy recognizing an upper year female all-round athlete and Jordon Cooke was named Huskie Athletics' Male Athlete of the Year for the second straight season.

Enactus U of S took home numerous awards for their social entrepreneurship projects and a Vera Pezer Award for Student Enhancement Campus Group.

JDC WEST

ABORIGINAL AWARDS

CANADA 150 SCHOLARSHIPS

Congratulations to the 2017 Edwards JDC West team who took home first place in business technology, second in human resources and third for social.

Congratulations to Bailey Delainey and Lauren Martell, who both received Aboriginal Student Achievement Awards.

Congratulations to Edwards student Stephanie Kane who was recognized with a Canada 150 Study Abroad Undergraduate Scholarship.

THRIVE

Now in the ninth year, MPAcc students invite local elementary school kids to invade campus and spend a fun day working on teamwork and leadership activities.

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EDWARDS EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

PHOTO BY STOBBE PHOTO

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS Last year, more than 2,500 business professionals from 250 companies across Canada chose Edwards Executive Education for their professional training and development. If you’re looking to further your career, the school offers a wide range of programs and a fun, fast-paced, and dynamic learning environment. Here are a few reasons to choose Edwards Executive Education:

Business community

Extensive course offerings

Quality education

We • • • • • • •

offer over 70 courses and programs from the areas of: Communications Governance Leadership Management Project and process management Women’s initiatives Special events

Flexibility

We create our schedules with business professionals in mind. Our options for individuals range from half-day courses to 18day certificate programs spread over six months. Choose a time commitment that works for you! Organizations can choose to have any of our courses or programs delivered to employees on-site. We can also provide customized training programs to meet your specific needs. 70

We know building a network is key in today’s business environment. Our location in the heart of downtown Saskatoon keeps our students connected to the business community. Programs include networking opportunities through one-onone and group discussions, and students are encouraged to use our networking nook for further peer learning. Being part of the Edwards School of Business at the University of Saskatchewan means a commitment to excellence in education since the school’s founding in 1981. Over 50 instructors from across North America bring a combination of academic and business experience into the classroom. By partnering with universities and professional associations across Canada, Edwards programming is of the highest quality. These partners include: • Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Foundation • Gardiner Centre, Faculty of Business Admin, Memorial University • Institute of Corporate Directors • Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto • Schulich School of Business, York University edwards.usask.ca/execed


AFAMILY

THE KELLEHERS

BY LYNETTE SUCHAR

THRIVE

hen the Kellehers are all at the kitchen table together, it can be a lively family gathering. With nine Kelleher siblings, their partners and kids, a typical family event can include up to 25 people. And with a lineage of university-educated family members, everyone has an opinion. Their conversations are always well-rounded and full of unique perspectives on a variety of current issues. Education and discussion were always encouraged by the Kelleher’s parents Lin and Jackie, who are educators themselves.

71


With the combination of entrepreneurs and business owners in the family, and a mix of degrees and trades, it’s hard to avoid talking about work; however, they try to keep shoptalk to a minimum. “My sister Sarah (B.Comm. 2009) works 20 feet away from me, so I try not to bring up work while we’re outside the office,” said Mark, owner of BlackRock Developments. Mark’s son, Noah, who is finishing his degree at Edwards, said sometimes he finds it hard not to get caught up talking about business. “Not a day goes by where my dad and I don’t send each other our ‘Business Idea of the Day,’” he said. “Many hours of debate are thrown around during these conversations and they’ve definitely contributed to my business knowledge.” Even though the siblings have taken their commerce degrees in different directions, they all agree that the skills they learned while studying at Edwards have helped them. Karrie said she liked the flexibility of a business degree and has used her knowledge in the health-care, education, and financial industries. Mark said he uses the skills he learned at Edwards, particularly accounting, every day while he runs his business. And Holly said her B.Comm. and MBA education have given her the tools she needs to navigate challenges that come up in the education industry. The Kelleher siblings are passing on the message about education that they learned from their parents. Stephen and Karrie live in Calgary now but said they wouldn’t mind if their daughters followed in their footsteps. “We often take our children to the U of S campus when we are in Saskatoon visiting, partly to reminisce about those days when we first met, and partly to inspire them to attend university as well.” Stephen said family events are

72

“N O

G

WHERE MY DAD AND I DON'T SEND EACH OTHER OUR

‘BUSINESS

O F T H E D AY.’ NAME:

Karrie Kelleher Married to Stephen

RELATIONSHIP:

GRADUATIOn DATE:

Stephen Kelleher Oldest sibling

GRADUATIOn DATE:

B.Comm. 1995

MAJOR:

Marketing

INSPIRATION:

Alex P. Keaton

PROF/CLASS:

David Williams

RELATIONSHIP:

NAME:

FAVOURITE

Marketing classes with

FAVOURITE HANGOUT:

Late afternoons/ evenings in the reading room, the law library when studying for finals, Friday nights at Louis’, and basement suite crash pad playing video games.

DOING NOW: Manager, Procurement, ATCO Ltd. Calgary

B.Comm. 1995

MAJOR: Human Resources & Marketing INSPIRATION:

Her dad. He was the first in his family to go to university.

FAVOURITE PROF/CLASS: Labour Relations and Collective Bargaining. She loved the professor’s stories about the “Teamsters.” DOING NOW: This spring, she finished a 13-month contract at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in the HR department working on Employee Development and Talent Acquisition.


S A I D I F I C A N B E H A L F AS AS M Y FA M I LY I S , I ' L L C O N S I D E R T H AT

NAME:

s

RELATIONSHIP:

Second oldest sibling

NAME:

B.Comm. 2000, MPAcc 2001

Holly Kelleher

MAJOR:

Third oldest sibling

INSPIRATION:

GRADUATIOn DATE:

RELATIONSHIP:

Accounting His son Noah. Right after Noah was born, Mark knew that he had to get an education and make sure he was able to support his son.

B.Comm. 2004, MBA 2011

FAVOURITE HANGOUT: He didn’t have

Marketing

GRADUATIOn DATE: Currently

completing B.Comm.

MAJOR:

Management He thinks his friends are tired of him bragging about his business-savvy family members, but he says he’s truly inspired by them every day.

FAVOURITE HANGOUT: U of S Junior

Chamber of Commerce

FAVOURITE PROF/CLASS: Carla Odnokon was a real highlight of his first year. He also enjoys Dr. Keith Willoughby, who always brings a fresh and exciting perspective to the classroom.

MAJOR:

INSPIRATION:

Stephen and Mark.

Her brothers

FAVOURITE HANGOUT: She worked as a ski and snowboard instructor at Blackstrap, so she could usually be found on the hill teaching. FAVOURITE PROF/CLASS:

Management.

Operations

DOING NOW: Consultant and Executive Director, Public School Board Trustee, and Mom THRIVE

Mark’s son

INSPIRATION:

GRADUATIOn DATE:

DOING NOW: Property/Real Estate Developer and owner of BlackRock Developments Ltd.

RELATIONSHIP:

Mark Kelleher

a lot of time with a newborn son at home but found a little time for pool at The Cove and managed to have a $2 beer at Louis’ now and again.

NAME:

Noah Kelleher

mostly focused on chasing the youngest family members around. There are five children under four years old, and 10 nieces and nephews in total. With this strong educational lineage, it will be interesting to see if the next generation of Kellehers follow in their parents’ big footsteps. Noah summed up a Kelleher family sentiment that his young cousins will most certainly share. “I’ve always said that if I can be even half as driven as my family is, I’ll consider that a success.” 73


“THE TRIP ALLOWED ME TO OF MY

STEP OUT COMFORT ZONE AND PUSH THROUGH A N X I E T Y.”

Top: Students visiting the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart. Bottom: Out for dinner at a traditional Swabian restaurant.

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A VISION BEYOND OUR BORDERS

EDWARDS STUDENTS TRAVEL TO GERMANY TO LEARN ABOUT EVIDENCE-BASED STRATEGY

I

BY JESSICA STEWART

n 1984, former associate dean Asit Sarkar spent his sabbatical year traveling through Southeast Asia, an experience that would lead to the creation of the school’s study abroad courses. “Books cannot give you the whole story,” Asit said at the time. “Our graduates invariably get hired by firms with export interests, but the students have not had exposure to any country but our own.” The first MBA class embarked on a 12-day tour of Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand in 1989. Undergraduate students followed three years later. Representatives from Saskatchewan businesses accompanied students, and part of the agenda was to explore marketing opportunities. Over the past 28 years, our students have traveled to locations including Vancouver, Seattle, San Francisco, China, Brazil, Israel, Jordan and most recently Germany. The course has evolved through the decades, focusing on specific topics that relate to the destination. Associate professor Maureen Bourassa’s study tour to Germany centered on evidence-based strategy and decision-making as part of the COMM 498 course, and included

Left: Factory tour of Kärcher, a family owned company and leader in cleaning systems.

THRIVE

a partnership with the Centre for Empirical Research at the BadenWüerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW) Stuttgart. “The 20 students on the course did their own qualitative research,” Bourassa said. “They were tasked with interviewing three companies pre-departure, and seven companies in Stuttgart to learn more about best practices in terms of data-driven decisions.” The companies students visited included Kӓrcher, Eberspächer Climate Control Systems, AP Sensing and BitifEye. Students also learned about eye-tracking, brand management, and estimating marketing potential from professors and students at the DHBW. After collecting and analyzing their data, students put together presentations for their classmates. Their final requirement was to share their findings with the Saskatoon business community. “One of the big benefits of the course was that it pushed students to not only make observations about marketing, business, and cultural differences, but also to make sense of those observations and translate what they learned so that it could

The COMM 498 trip was made possible through the generous financial support of the PotashCorp Chair Fund, Edwards Dean’s Circle, the Hanlon Centre for International Business Studies, and Jan Paula Lahti Foundation & Todd Lahti.

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Cole Boser

Stephanie Pankiw

Dustin Wagner

Day 2: Arrive at Stuttgart

Day 4: Kärcher and Eberspächer company visits

Day 3: Tour of Stuttgart

learning log When I started this trip, I didn’t know anyone. I had never traveled overseas and, at the beginning, I felt like I was going to be alone, but already I feel like I’m exploring Germany with 19 friends and two great leaders.

Day 7: Brand management workshop with DHBW students

Before the workshop, we were told the Swabian people are disciplined and hardworking, and they proved these traits. They did most of the research, while we gave our ideas and used the data they collected. We worked together very well.

Day 10: Depart Stuttgart

The trip allowed me to step out of my comfort zone and push through anxiety. This experience has allowed me to make new insights about my life and the person I want to become. My confidence has improved and I may attempt a semester abroad.

Learning log

When you have a pre-existing framework, you tend to view information presented to you through a very specific lens. This isn’t always a good thing as you could be blind to other important information. I experienced this firsthand today, as I was very focused on framing my research question and collecting information on how organizations understand their consumer. In doing so, I avoided information that may be counterintuitive to my framework. It is important to avoid biases and remain objective.

Day 5: AP Sensing and BitlfEye company visits

Respect is so critical in successful business relationships. We often hear that the golden rule is to ‘treat others the way you want to be treated.’ Although this is a great guiding principle, a better ‘rule’ was emulated by the organizations that we visited today. This is the ‘platinum rule’, which is to treat others the way they want to be treated. I very much believe that this truly is what respect is and it is great to see organizations not just using respect as a buzzword.

Day 9: Discussion with Carmen Reiff, online marketing manager at GmbH

The dinner conversation with Carmen was an excellent opportunity to hear about digital marketing in the retail clothing industry. I asked Carmen a question about the ‘buy less but better’ trend. This trend focuses on consumers purchasing fashion staples that are of high quality and will last a long time rather than fast fashion that has permeated through our culture in recent years. Carmen emphasized the importance of sustainability in business practices such as sourcing and selling socially-conscious merchandise.

Bottom: Enjoying Stuttgart public gardens before an evening at the Opera.

learning log

Through the walking tour and reading online sources, I gained a better understanding of German customs and history. The value the local people and businesses placed on history and their roots amazed me and showed how resilient and proud they were of their history and customs.

Day 5: AP Sensing and BitlfEye company visits

I was a student consultant for a technology firm in Saskatoon. It was interesting to see parallels between the problems that the technology sector was having in Germany and in Saskatoon. Technology is becoming such a niche area that companies cannot find adequate personnel to meet their needs. This is a growing sector, and there is not enough human talent to meet demand.

Day 10: Depart Stuttgart

It takes a new situation to truly look at your own life in a different light. I became so fixated on my own problems that I missed the larger picture. I truly gained a new support system on this trip and became a more positive person by turning my mindset around. I am going to carry my personal reflection with me and truly try to pay this amazing experience forward.

be applied in other contexts," said Bourassa. "In that sense, it was such a rewarding teaching experience.” Sarkar is pleased that the course is still offered to Edwards students and continues to evolve. “I am delighted that Maureen Bourassa took her class to Germany and the class had a practical focus,” he said. “Since the first group’s foray into global experiential learning, each of the subsequent groups of students have impressed me in terms of their dedication and commitment to learning as well as keeping in mind that they were there to identify real marketplace opportunities for their sponsoring companies.” edwards.usask.ca/hanlon

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DONORROLL

THANKS TO OUR DONORS AND FRIENDS

The Edwards School of Business acknowledges, with gratitude, our many donors who generously support the school and the programs and services offered. Through gifts of time, knowledge, and resources, you inspire students, faculty and staff to be creative, meet new challenges and continue to be leaders in business education. Be assured that your contributions are being used effectively to enhance the school's ability to provide quality education opportunities, undertake research activities and share the results with local, national and international communities. The annual donor roll lists supporters who gave $500 or more from May 1, 2016 to April 30, 2017. For a complete list of annual donors, including gifts of $1-$499, please visit the Edwards School of Business website. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this report, we acknowledge that errors may have occurred. If you have questions about the list, please contact us at (306) 966-5437 or alumni@edwards.usask.ca. Thank you for your continued support of the Edwards School of Business. • •

All donor recognition categories are exclusive of corporate matching gifts. Those who have passed away are gratefully acknowledged and marked with an *.

INDIVIDUALS

Tracy Robinson Greg & Olivia Yuel

Gifts of $100,000 - $499,999 Ted Hanlon Larry Moeller

Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999 Ralph & Mary Biden Shelley Brown Neil & Yvette Evans Sandra Foster Rod Gerla Jerry & Bettina Grandey Jan Paula Lahti Foundation & Todd Lahti Winnie Liao May Pringle William Senkiw Elaine & Sherwood Sharfe Gregory Smith John & Dianne Storey Gordon Thompson Joe & Debbie Vidal W. Brett Wilson

Gifts of $25,000 - $49,999 N. Murray Edwards Robert & Brenda Gordon David W. McClement* Scott & Grit McCreath Gordon Rawlinson Gifts of $10,000 - $24,999 Mansel Binkley James Estey Timothy Gitzel Jolene & John Gordon Ron & Jane Graham Wade & Betty-Ann Heggie Grant & Shannon Isaac Philip Leong Aaron Loraas Susan Milburn

Gifts of $1,000 - $4,999 Zeba Ahmad; Howard & Nancy Baxter; John & Rhonda Bean; William Black; Ryan Bonnett; Bruce Burnyeat;

YES!

I would like to make a gift to the Edwards School of Business

 $100

 $500  $200  Other $ ___________

I would like to make a gift of:  $50

 $1,000

 $2,000

GIVE ANYTIME AT

https://www.edwards.usask.ca/donate or call (306) 966-5437 I'd like to give by:  Cheque or money order (made payable to the U of S)

 Pre-authorized debit

Go to www.usask.ca/pad or call 1-800-699-1907

 Visa, Mastercard or American Express

This will be a:  One-time gift

Please see next page for more information.

 Monthly gift of $___________ for ______ months Starting at the  1st or  15th of ______________ MONTH

 Yearly gift of $___________ for ______ months Starting at the  1st or  15th of ______________ MONTH

Please direct my gift to:  Student Awards Fund

 Student Managed Portfolio Trust  Faculty Research  Alumni Outreach  Other: _______________


James & Margaret Chim; Robert & Nadine Connoly; Ralph Cormack; Dwayne Dahl; Ronald Fior; Mark Folstad; Donald Fox; John Fraser; Cliff Friesen; Michael Greenberg; Donald Haggard; Kristen Hamm; Zane Hansen; Christopher Hengen Braun; Gordon & Shirley Hunter; Art & Deborah Korpach; William Lamberton; Michael Lamborn; Wally & Colleen Mah; Brian Mark & Roxanne Frey; George Marlatte; Tom McClocklin, Colliers International; Trevis McConaghy; Bryan McCrea; Tom & Lynne McLellan; Allan McMillan; Randall Meidl; Laurie Moen; Bradley Munro; Penney Murphy; Jack Neumann; Bob Ogilvie; George & Lynne Pearson; Annette Pilipiak; Allen Ponak; Douglas Proll; Barry Quon; Jerry & Cathy Richardson; Michael Rushby; James & Jill Salamon; Matt McMillan & Krystle Sawatsky; Larry & Irene Seiferling; Nels W. Seleshanko; Myles Shedden; Barry & Pat Slusarchuk; W. Keith Smith; James Sproule; Gord Stewart & Maria Styacko; Lee Swanson; Colin Taylor; Gary & Shelley Thiel; Ryan Townend; Gregory Trotter; Michael Tumback; Francis Ulrich; June Verhelst; Daymond Volk; Cathy Warner; Duane E. Wikant; Keith Willoughby; John Campbell & Judith Yungwirth

Gifts of $10,000 - $24,999 KPMG LLP PotashCorp Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999 AREVA Resources Canada Inc. Canadian Western Bank Crown Investments Corporation of Saskatchewan Deloitte & Touche Foundation Canada Ernst & Young LLP Nystuen Family Foundation Inc Pillar Properties Corporation

CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, AND ORGANIZATIONS

Gifts of $1,000 - $4,999 Cameco Corporation Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation Canadian Petroleum Tax Society CPA Foundation of Alberta The Chartered Professionals in Human Resources (CPHR) Saskatchewan Family Enterprise Xchange (Saskatoon) Freedom 55 Financial, a division of London Life Insurance Company Graham Construction and Engineering Ltd. Innovation Place Masters of Professional Accounting - Executive Council Milavsky Family Fund North Ridge Development Corporation Phillips, Hager & North Investment Management Ltd. Saskatchewan Association of Broadcasters Tax Executives Institute Inc. (TEI) Calgary Chapter Wiegers Financial & Insurance Planning Services Ltd.

Gifts of $100,000 - $499,999 CPA Saskatchewan Federated Co-operatives Limited

Gifts of $500 - $999 Edwards Business Students' Society IABC: Saskatoon Chapter

Gifts of $50,000 - $99,999 PrairieSky Royalty Ltd.

Companies Who Matched Gifts Cameco Corporation Ernst & Young LLP KPMG Charitable Foundation PotashCorp

Gifts of $500 - $999 Brandon Anholt; Gerald Arnott; Colin Baerg; Doug Bauman; Melvin Berg; W. John Brennan; William Brebber & Carmen Gareau; Vincent Briggs; Robin Chapman; Walter Chayka; Joy Crawford; Bill Dittmer; Rand Flynn; Craig & Judi Francis; Brad & Audrey Grant; Christopher Hall; Richard & Lynn Hallson; Randall Jespersen; Michael Klein; Brian Kusisto; Cecil McCreary; Marc Mentzer; Karen O'Brien; John & Nicholle Povhe; David W. Richardson; Theodore Rivney; Susan Ruf; Jeffrey & Jonna Smith; Mervin Sokul; Donald Somers; Brian & Kathy Turnquist; Art Wakabayashi; Trent Webster; Don & Janice Woodley

Gifts of $25,000 - $49,999 Lloyd Carr-Harris Foundation Scotiabank

 Credit card payment:

To what address should we send your tax receipt?

Name: ________________________________________________________ FIRST NAME

 Visa

 Mastercard

 American Express

Card Expiry Date: ________/_____________ (month/year) Name as shown on card: _______________________________________ Cardholder signature: _________________________________________ Is this a corporate credit card?

 Yes

 No

If yes, please provide the name of the company ____________________________________________________________ Date: _______________________________________________________

MIDDLE INITIAL

LAST NAME

Address: _______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________________________ Email: _________________________________________________________ Would you like to be publicly recognized for this gift? For more information, call (306)

 Yes

 No

966-5437 or email: advancement@edwards.usask.ca


FACULTY AWARDS

Chris Burnley

Tyler Case

Marie Koop

Barbara Phillips

CPA Alberta MPAcc Teaching Excellence Award (2016)

Dean's Award for Teaching Innovation (2015-16)

CPA Alberta MPAcc Teaching Excellence Award (2016)

University of Saskatchewan Students Union Teaching Award (2016-17)

THRIVE

fred Phillips

keith willoughby

Vince Bruni-Bossio

University of Saskatchewan Students Union Teaching Award (2016-17)

Edwards School of Business Most Effective Professor (2016-17)

Provost's College Award for Outstanding Teaching (2017)

Edwards School of Business Somer's Award - Most Approachable Professor (2016-17)

MBA Professor of the Year (2016-17)

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ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENTS 2016-2017

Once again, our Edwards alumni have been getting noticed. Graduates of our programs win awards and are appointed to leadership positions around the country. Here are just a few of this past year’s alumni successes:

CLASSES OF THE 1970S MR. RICHARD CARTER FCPA, FCA, C.DIR., B.COMM. 1971

DR. WAYNE WOUTERS P.C., O.C., B.COMM. 1974

was appointed Chairperson of the Board of Directors for the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

was named a Board Member for Champion Iron Limited and was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

MS. SHELLEY BROWN FCA, CPA, B.COMM. 1978

MS. SUSAN MILBURN B.COMM. 1978, MBA 1980

was appointed to the University of Saskatchewan Board of Governors.

received a Woman of Distinction award from the Raymond James Network of Women Advisors.

MR. BRYAN TOWRISS S.O.M., B.COMM. 1978

MR. COLIN BACHYNSKI S.V.M., K.ST.J, B.COMM. 1979

was inducted into the 2017 Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

was awarded the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal.

MR. DAVE GUEBERT CA, B.COMM. 1979

was appointed Chief Financial Officer of Clarocity Corporation.

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WWW.EDWARDSALUMNI.COM


CLASSES OF THE 1980S MS. BEV DUBOIS BUSADM 1981

MR. THOMAS ZUROWSKI CPA, CA, B.COMM. 1982

was appointed City of Saskatoon Councillor.

was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

MS. CAROLYN TASTAD B.COMM. 1983

MR. BOB KOROL CPFA, FCPA, FCMA, B.COMM. 1984

was named one of 2016’s Most Powerful Women by Fortune Magazine.

received a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants (FCPA) designation.

MR. BARRY MUNRO FCPA, FCA, B.COMM. 1984

MR. GRANT KOOK S.O.M., C.DIR. B.COMM. 1985

received a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants (FCPA) designation.

was appointed Vice-Chairperson of the Board of Directors for the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

MR. JAMES CARRIERE BUSADM 1987

MR. NEIL WEBER CPA, CA, CMA, C.B.V., B.COMM. 1989

was appointed Trustee for the Greater Saskatoon Catholic School Division.

was re-appointed to the St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation’s Board of Directors.

CLASSES OF THE 1990S HON. DATO’ NORAINI AHMAD B.COMM. 1991

was elected Chairperson of the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians (CWP).

THRIVE

MR. DEAN BERNHARD CPA, CA, B.COMM. 1991

was appointed Director of RMP Energy Inc.

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CLASSES OF THE 1990S ... CONTINUED DR. HAYLEY HESSELN B.COMM. 1991

received a Master Teacher Award from the University of Saskatchewan.

was nominated for the 2017 EY Canadian Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

MR. DANIEL ZRYMIAK B.COMM. 1991

MS. SHARON ZAKRESKI-WERBICKI BUSADM 1992

was awarded the ASQ Crosby Medal for his work as the co-author of the ASQ Sigma Green Belt Handbook.

MR. TREVOR THIESSEN B.COMM. 1993, 1999

was re-elected to the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.

MR. COLLIN HIRSCHFELD Q.C., B.COMM. 1994

was appointed Trustee for the Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools Division.

DR. CRAIG DOIDGE B.COMM. 1994, M.SC. 1997

was appointed Professor and Area Coordinator Finance at Rotman School of Management and received a Professorship in Corporate Governance.

MR. MURAD AL-KATIB S.O.M., ICD.D, B.COMM. 1994

was appointed to the Queen's Counsel by the Government of Saskatchewan.

was awarded the 2016 EY Entrepreneur of the Year (Prairies), Canada's Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst & Young, the Oslo Business for Peace Award, the 2017 EY World Entrepreneur of the Year, and received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit.

MR. TROY DAVIES HOSADM 1999

MS. NATHALIE JOHNSTONE FCPA, FCA , B.COMM. 1999, MPACC 2000

was appointed City of Saskatoon Councillor.

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MR. CURTIS POTYONDI B.COMM. 1991

received a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants (FCPA) designation.


CLASSES OF THE 1990S ... CONTINUED MS. CARA KEATING B.COMM. 1999

was appointed Vice-President, Customer Service Development of PepsiCo Foods Canada.

WWW.EDWARDSALUMNI.COM

CLASSES OF THE 2000S MR. JASON PEREPELKIN B.COMM. 2002

received the Provost’s Award for Outstanding Innovation in Learning from the University of Saskatchewan.

was elected Mayor for the City of Swift Current and appointed to the Board of Directors for Saskatchewan Government Insurance.

MS. MACKENZIE FIRBY B.COMM. 2003

MS. HOLLY KELLEHER B.COMM. 2004, MBA 2011

received Best in Customer Service and New Business Venture SABEX Awards for Two Fifty Two Boutique.

was appointed Trustee for Ward 1 of the Saskatoon Public School Board.

MR. ALAN KOOP CPA, CA, B.COMM. 2007

CHIEF DARCY BEAR BUSADM 2009

was re-appointed to the St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation’s Board of Directors.

MS. JENNIFER CAMPEAU MBA 2009

was appointed Legislative Secretary to the Minister of Education by the Government of Saskatchewan and accepted a senior advising role with Rio Tinto Alcan.

THRIVE

HIS WORSHIP DENIS PERRAULT CPA, CA, C.DIR., B.COMM. 2002

was selected to chair the SaskPower Board of Directors and was inducted into the Junior Achievement Business Hall of Fame.

MS. AINSLEY ROBERTSON B.COMM. 2009

was named 2017 Young Humanitarian of the Year by the Canadian Red Cross.

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CLASSES OF THE 2010S MR. VINCE BRUNI-BOSSIO ICD.D, MBA 2010

MR. JOSHUA SIMAIR B.COMM. 2010

was awarded the Provost’s College Award for Outstanding Teaching from the University of Saskatchewan.

was named one of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40.

MR. CHRISTOPHER HENGEN-BRAUN B.COMM. 2011

MR. RAJESH KAVIA BUSADM 2016

received the University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union Engaged Young Alumni Award.

received the 2017 Newcomer Entrepreneur of the Year Award from the Saskatoon Regional Economic Development Authority.

FOR MORE ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENTS, VISIT WWW.EDWARDS.USASK.CA/ALUMNI. DO YOU HAVE A SUCCESS STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT SHAWNA AT JARDINE@EDWARDS.USASK.CA OR (306) 966-7539.


FIVE LONG-SERVING EDWARDS STAFF NAMED HONORARY ALUMNI

SHARON EVANS EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE DEAN

34 YEARS OF SERVICE AND STILL GOING

Sharon is the first point of contact in the dean’s office and has worked alongside five deans during her 14 years of service at Edwards (34 years on campus). Though the school’s leadership has changed, Sharon continuously maintains the dean’s office as an accessible, friendly and efficient hub for all those who visit. THRIVE

Combined, the recipients have over 150 years of service at the Edwards School of Business and all of our students, staff, faculty, and visitors will certainly have connected with at least one of them during their journey at Edwards. Congratulations to our 2016 honorary alumni recipients and welcome to the Edwards alumni family!

JAN KALINOWSKI DONOR RELATIONS OFFICER (RETIRED)

35 YEARS OF SERVICE

Jan’s leadership at the Edwards school significantly impacted our fundraising efforts and alumni and donor relationships. She spent tireless hours planning, co-ordinating and implementing events, and was a central pillar in the development and publication of Thrive magazine since its inception.

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KAREN WENDY ELLIE GEORGET WIGNES DYBVIG OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR (RETIRED) DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

31 YEARS OF SERVICE

For years Karen advised students with her wealth of information, supported them through stressful and emotional times, and liaised between them and the university to book rooms and organize events. It was not uncommon for alumni to visit the school after many years, only to have Karen greet them by name and with a smile.

PROGRAMS (RETIRED) 37 YEARS OF SERVICE

Wendy was the go-to person for advice and guidance and tirelessly supported thousands of commerce students. She had a way of making new students feel welcome in an institution that can sometimes feel overwhelming, and guided them through their years of higher learning.

OFFICER (RETIRED) 40 YEARS OF SERVICE

Ellie’s position was one of enormous responsibility, working alongside seven deans and mentoring countless staff members. She soon became the go-to operations person until her retirement in 2014. Ellie’s patience, dedication and willingness to help carried her through changing policies, leadership and technologies at the university.

RETIREMENTS

It’s bittersweet, for us on the Thrive committee especially, to say farewell to our Editor-in-Chief Jan Kalinowski. Jan has led this magazine’s growth since its inception, which has sometimes been like a full-time job in itself. Outside the Thrive world, Jan spent 35 years with the Edwards School of Business. She first rose through the ranks of clerk steno jobs from 1982–1997. Jan was then promoted to executive assistant to Dean Lynne Pearson in early 1997. When she took a temporary position in 2003 to assist the dean with college development activities, she found her niche. That sixmonth term turned into a two-year term, which Jan successfully took on. The development officer position became permanent in 2007, and Jan spent her remaining years at Edwards building countless relationships with donors and alumni. Her caring nature and knowledge of the school meant she connected easily with people. Donors and friends of the school would sometimes call her just to catch up. Throughout her time at Edwards, Jan has been a true team player. She will be missed for her positive attitude, her funny catchphrases, and the way she took on every role with her whole heart. Congratulations Jan, and all the best in your retirement!

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IN MEMORIAM The Edwards School of Business regrets the passing of these alumni and friends:

1940

Bell, Marion M, BACC '44, of Surprise, AZ Botham, (Grant) Alan G, B.Comm. '48, of Saskatoon, SK Boulter, Charles E, B.Comm. '49, of North Vancouver, BC Cameron, (Sandy) Alexander G, B.Comm. '49, of Calgary, AB Dolsen, Winnifred N, BACC '43, of Edmonton, AB Haney, Marjorie S (nee Allen), B.Comm. '47, of Ottawa, ON Hardy, Hugh S, B.Comm. '48, of Guelph, ON Kenny, Lois E (nee Watts), B.Comm. '47, of Calgary, AB Kjeldson, (Bob) Robert C, B.Comm. '49, of Calgary, AB Moore, Frank, B.Comm. '48, of Saskatoon, SK

1950

Atkinson, Donald G, B.Comm. '51, of Nepean, ON Bonham, (Dave) David H, B.Comm. '53, B.A. '58, J.D. '60, of Kingston, ON Dombowsky, David S, B.Comm. '58, of Kelowna, BC Gibson, James A, B.Comm. '50, of Calgary, AB Holtby, (Warren) George W, B.Comm. '54, of Regina, SK Krystyniak, Joseph N, B.Comm. '52, of Saskatoon, SK Litwack, Emanuel, B.Comm. '51, of Montreal, QC Meiklejohn, Morley I, B.Comm. '53, of Parksville, BC Molder, Vance C, B.Comm. '56, of Weyburn, SK Phillips, Clayton L, B.Comm. '51, of Regina, SK Prowse, Reginald T, B.Comm. '51, of Pawleys Island, SC Raymond, Dorothy J (nee Ahrens), B.Comm. '50, of Calgary, AB Spicer, (Bob) Robert T, B.Comm. '52, of Toronto, ON Tames, James S, B.Comm. '50, of Regina, SK Thomas, Dennis D, Cert Bus Admin '57, of Salt Spring Island, BC

1960

Armstrong, Donald E, B.Comm. '68, MBA '75, of Calgary, AB Beatty, Garry H, B.Comm. '62, of Fort Qu'Appelle, SK Czornobay, Michael A, LOCADM '63, LOCADM '65, PUBADM '69, of Regina, SK Demofsky, Michael P, LOCADM '62, of Whitewood, SK Dyck, Martin S, LOCADM '65, of Saskatoon, SK East, William A, Cert Bus Admin '64, of Victoria, BC Erdahl, Gary L, B.Comm. '64, of Calgary, AB Gareau, Andre J, B.Comm. '63, of Ottawa, ON Knoll, Richard P, B.Comm. '68, of Regina, SK Leblanc, Rheal J, HOSADM '69, of Saskatoon, SK Propp, Arnold C, B.Comm. '66, of Saskatoon, SK Rees, William J, BUSCER '61, of Edmonton, AB

THRIVE

Riddell, Betty C (nee Welcher), Cert Bus Admin '62, of Saskatoon, SK Serdachny, Leonard J, B.Comm. '64, of Regina, SK Suderman, Victor P, Cert Bus Admin '66, of Edmonton, AB Tough, Norman J, ADMIN '69, of Regina, SK Vick, Alan D, Cert Bus Admin '62, of Saskatoon, SK

1970

Baker, Douglas N, B.Comm. '75, of Calgary, AB Brown, David J, B.Comm. '75, of Kanata, ON Everitt, William B, BUSADM '77, of Warman, SK Gentles, Thomas B, ADMIN '70, of Regina, SK Gorkoff, Alexander A, BUSADM '74, of Moose Jaw, SK Hiebert, (Wilf) Wilfred J, HOSADM '77, of Saskatoon, SK Lyons, Wayne D, B.Comm. '71, of Calgary, AB McDonald, Margaret H, LOCGOV '73, of Carrot River, SK Pantella, Daniel F, B.Comm. '74, of Victoria, BC Richards, James E, HOSADM '73, of Melfort, SK Skoretz, Lawrence, B.Comm. '71, LOCGOV '73, of Ituna, SK Sunquist, Diana M (nee Tomalin), ADMIN '70, of Sidny, BC

1980

Cowie, Robert B, B.Comm. '85, of Toronto, ON Higgins, (Lynne) Sharon L, BUSADM '87, P.G.D. '97, of Saskatoon, SK Maltby, Clarice M (nee Crosthwaite), B.Comm. '86, of North Vancouver, BC Parent, Roger D, BUSADM '82, of Regina, SK Shiplett, Patricia A, B.Comm. '89, of Saskatoon, SK Walter, Brian T, B.Comm. '83, of Weyburn, SK Weber, Ellen J (nee Boyle), BUSADM '86, of Shellbrook, SK

1990

Crawford, Donald N, BUSADM '95, of Saskatoon, SK Kurenoff, Ward P, B.Comm. '94, of Surrey, BC Norrish, Colleen R (nee Kerr), BUSADM '93, of Saskatoon, SK Reddekopp, Marilyn S, BUSADM '92, of Saskatoon, SK Thiessen, Denise M, BUSADM '96, of Saskatoon, SK

2000

Howells, Janet F, BUSADM '00, of Saskatoon, SK O'Grady, Erin C, B.Comm. '04, of North York, ON

2010

Busse, Brett A, BUSADM '11, of Saskatoon, SK In Memoriam include those who have passed prior to August 15, 2017. 87


KICKING OFF THE NEXT 100 YEARS

BY KEITH WILLOUGHBY

100 years. Hundreds of faculty and staff. 26,000 alumni. Millions of memories. Blue chairs in the Reading Room. Floods in the Hangar Building. Volunteer tax preparation programs. Welcome back barbecues. Habitat for Humanity projects. Our energy and enthusiasm have enshrined for us a lasting legacy in the Edwards School of Business. Whether we toiled here as a student for four (or more!) years, whether we superbly served as a staff member, whether we enriched our profession through stellar teaching and research … each of us shares a passion for this place. We have collectively carved the first century of our story. So, what will the next century bring us? What will be the central stories in the 2117 edition of the Thrive magazine? Well, I’m not a soothsayer. I’m not George the scientist from The Time Machine (1960 movie), nor am I Dr. Emmett Brown from Back to the Future (1980s movie trilogy). However, I am absolutely convinced of the following: Edwards will continue to excel.

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Experiential learning will be a hallmark of our business school. Student groups, under the supervision of exceptional faculty, will meaningfully collaborate with organizations, businesses, clients and individuals. Indigenous engagement will permit our programs to connect strongly with society. We will reaffirm our relationship with one another through meaningful cooperation. Entrepreneurship offerings will allow students to sharpen skill sets. The seeds of ideas planted in the soil (and toil) of enthusiasm will be transformed into the businesses of tomorrow. Above all, the student experience will remain unchanged. Masterful teaching will deepen student knowledge and enrich student perspectives. Faculty research will scope and scrutinize the big questions of the day. Superb staff members will contribute time and attention to the operational and strategic activities of Edwards. It promises to be a captivating next 100 years. We invite you to join with us in the journey!


Centennial


PM # 40013048 Please return undeliverable items to: Edwards School of Business University of Saskatchewan 25 Campus Drive, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A7

TOGETHER

WE BUILT

TOGETHER

WE THRIVE TOGETHER

WE WILL

Edwards100.ca The Edwards School of Business develops business professionals to build nations.

Thrive 2017  
Thrive 2017  

Edwards School of Business magazine for alumni, students, and donors. This is the special Centennial edition celebrating 100 years of the E...