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English as a Second Language Cycle One, Secondary Two

JUMP IN 3rd Edition

2

CONNECTED CLASSROOM

Competency Development and Text-Based Grammar

Carole Gauthier Gwenn Gauthier Leena M. Sandblom

CONFORMS TO THE PROGRESSION OF LEARNING


Table of Contents

CHAPTERS

Reading

Task 4 Oh My Gods! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Listening Task 5 A Tricky Trickster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Task 6 Write About It Writing a Myth. . . . . . . 53

GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY Bonus Grammar The Simple Past. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Bonus Grammar The Passive Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Bonus Vocabulary Who Rules What? . . . . . . . . . . . 64

1 RANT OR RAVE? CHAPTER

3 THE FRIENDSHIP FILE CHAPTER

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Task 1 Essential Language Expressing Positive and Negative Opinions . . . . . . 3

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Reading

Task 2 What’s Your Rant? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Grammar Task 3 The Simple Present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Reading

Task 4 Wow! She’s Amazing! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Task 5 It Bugs Me! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Grammar

Reading

Task 2 Making Friends Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Grammar Task 3 Modals: Could, Might, May and Should. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Reading

Listening

Task 1 Essential Language  Helping and Suggesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Task 6 Simple and Compound Sentences . . . . 21 Task 7 Write About It What Bugs You? What Do You Appreciate? . . . . . . . . . . . 24

GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY Bonus Grammar The Simple Present and

Sentence Structures . . . . . . . . . . 26

Task 4 Grammar Task 5 Viewing Task 6 Grammar Task 7

Bonus Vocabulary Pet Peeves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

2 MYTHICAL PEOPLE, MAGICAL STORIES CHAPTER

Task 1 Essential Language  Using Conversational Connectors and Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Reading

Task 2 Myths, Mythologies and Gods . . . . . . . 37 Grammar Task 3 The Simple Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

iv

Modals: Must, Have To and Would. . . . 81 Showing Empathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Complex Sentences with Relative Clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Task 8 Write About It What Is a Good Friend? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY Bonus Grammar Modals and Complex

Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Bonus Vocabulary Friends, Friends, Friends . . . . . 99

4 HIGHER, FASTER, STRONGER

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

False Friends: Who Needs Them?. . . . . 77

CHAPTER

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Task 1 Essential Language  Making and Asking for Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Reading

Task 2 The Great Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

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Letter to Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv Scope and Sequence Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi Inside Jump In 2: A Step-By-Step Overview . . . . . viii Check It Out! How to Improve My English . . . . . . . xi Check It Out! T he Purpose of Essential Language Tasks in the Chapters . . . . xii


Grammar Task 3 Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Grammar

Reading

Reading

Task 4 Grammar Task 5 Viewing Task 6 Grammar Task 7 Task 8

A Passion for Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Bossaball: Music and Sports . . . . . . . . . 118 Phrasal Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Write About It Focus on Sports . . . . . 122

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GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY

Task 3 The Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Task 4 School Lunches Around the World . . . . 177 Viewing Task 5 Food Alert! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Grammar Task 6 Ing Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Task 7 Write About It What Is Best to Eat  … for You? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Task 8 Write About It The Food Truck . . . . . . 187

GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY

Bonus Grammar Plural Nouns and Prepositions . . . 125

Bonus Grammar The Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189

Bonus Vocabulary Maze Daze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Bonus Grammar T  he Present Continuous

5 GETTING AT THE TRUTH CHAPTER

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Task 1 Essential Language  Giving Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Reading

Task 2 Urban Legend. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Grammar Task 3 Modals: Can, Could, Would and Question Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Reading

Task 4 The Hoax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Grammar Task 5 Modals by Context and Function . . . . . 149 Viewing Task 6 Getting the Whole Truth . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Grammar Task 7 Imperatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Task 8 Write About It Think Smart! . . . . . . . . 154

GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY Bonus Grammar More on Modals and

Imperatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Bonus Vocabulary Are You Sure? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

6 FOOD STUFF CHAPTER

Jump In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

Task 1 Essential Language Asking About and Making Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

Reading

Task 2 The Food Debate: Vegetarian or Meat-Eater? . . . . . . . . . . . 171

to Express the Future . . . . . . . . . . 193

Bonus Vocabulary Food Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . 199

REFERENCE SECTION Essential Language

Essential Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201

Strategies and Tools

The Response Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 The Writing and Production Processes . . . . . . . . . . 207

Grammar

The Simple Present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Questions in the Simple Present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Question Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 The Simple Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Questions in the Simple Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 The Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 The Present Continuous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Imperatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Modals: Could, Might, May, Should, Must, Have To and Would . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 More Modals: C  an, Could, Would, May and Question Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Common Phrasal Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 The Passive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Ing Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 How to Form Simple and Compound Sentences . . . 217 Complex Sentences with Relative Clauses . . . . . . . 218 Common Irregular Verbs by Sound and Spelling . . . . 219 Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220

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Scope and Sequence Chart

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C1

STRATEGIES: READING

C2

STRATEGIES: VIEWING / LISTENING

C2

What bugs you? What do you appreciate?

Expressing positive and negative opinions

Skim Self-monitor

Listen for the general idea Listen for specific information

What role did myths play in ancient civilizations?

Using conversational connectors and expressions

Find the main idea Predict using headings and images

Use what you know

CHAPTER

3 THE FRIENDSHIP FILE

What do you look for in a friend?

Helping and suggesting

Monitor your comprehension Compare Use resources

Organize information Listen for specific information

4 HIGHER, FASTER, STRONGER CHAPTER 5 GETTING AT THE TRUTH

What’s your game?

Making and asking for suggestions

Use what you know Scan and take notes Use resources

Compare

How can you become a more critical thinker?

Giving warnings

Infer meaning of words Compare Infer ideas

Pay selective attention

6 FOOD STUFF

How does food make us who we are?

Asking about and making plans

Use context cues Scan Visualize

Listen for details

CHAPTER

RANT OR RAVE? CHAPTER

2

MYTHICAL PEOPLE, MAGICAL STORIES

CHAPTER

CHAPTER

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ESSENTIAL LANGUAGE

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GUIDING QUESTION


STRATEGIES: WRITING

C3

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Personalize the writing process

Self-monitor

Recombine

The Simple Present • Understanding and Using the Simple Present • How to Form the Simple Present with To Be • How to Ask Questions with To Be

Use varied resources

Bonus Grammar Review the Simple Present Review Sentence Structures Bonus Vocabulary

Bonus Grammar Review the Simple Past The Passive Voice

Modals: Could, Might, May and Should • Understanding Modals • How to Use Could, Might and May • How to Use Should • Review Could, Might, May and Should

Complex Sentences with Relative Clauses • Understanding and Using Complex Sentences • Understanding and Using Relative Clauses

Bonus Grammar Review Modals Review Complex Sentences

Phrasal Verbs • How to Form Phrasal Verbs • Meaning of Common Phrasal Verbs

Bonus Grammar Review Plural Nouns Review Prepositions

Plural Nouns • Understanding and Using Countable Nouns • Understanding and Using Non-Countable Nouns Prepositions • Prepositions of Position • Prepositions of Movement

Cooperate

Simple and Compound Sentences • How to Form Simple Sentences • How to Form Compound Sentences • Understanding and Using Conjunctions

The Simple Past • Understanding and Using the Simple Past • How to Form the Simple Past in the Affirmative Form • How to Form the Simple Past in the Negative Form

Modals: Must, Have to and Would • How to Use Must and Have To • How to Use Would Check your work

BONUS GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

Bonus Vocabulary

Bonus Vocabulary

Bonus Vocabulary

• Prepositions of Location • Prepositions of Time

Modals: Can, Could, Would and Question Forms • Understanding and Using Can and Cannot • How to Form Questions with Can • Understanding and Using Could and Could Not • Understanding and Using Can, Could or Would and Would + Like Modals by Context and Function Imperatives • Modal Question Forms • Exploring Imperatives • Using Modals • Understanding and Using Imperatives

Bonus Grammar Review Modals Review Imperatives

The Future • Understanding and Using the Future

Bonus Grammar Review the Future Review -ing Words

Ing Words • How to Use -ing Words

Bonus Vocabulary

Bonus Vocabulary

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Inside Jump In 2: A Step- By- Step Overview Jump In 2 is comprised of chapters for classroom use; a bonus grammar and vocabulary section for autonomous work; and a helpful reference section for functional language, learning processes, and grammar charts and rules.

CHAPTERS Jump In

C1 © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Chapters begin with a guiding question, a warm-up activity and a Talk Box, so you can quickly start thinking and talking about the topic.

C1

The Essential Language Task

In the first task, read a dialogue and use the essential language (functional language) in a Talk About It or another speaking activity. This task helps you to interact orally with the topic at hand and prepares you for the rest of the oral interaction in the chapter. Essential Language usually includes one or two Talk Boxes.

C2

Talk Box

The Reading, Listening and Viewing Tasks Each reading, listening and viewing task comes with activities to do before, during and after each text, followed by a Talk About It or another activity for oral interaction. How is it going? boxes ask you to self-monitor your progress. Simply put a ✔ in the coloured box that applies to you.

= It’s easy. = It’s somewhat easy. = It’s difficult.

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

Talk About It

viii

Glossary For the meaningin-context of difficult words, use the glossaries.

How Is It Going?

Strategy To help you learn more efficiently, read the Strategy boxes.


Grammar Sections

The grammar content for each chapter appears in two sections. First, grammar tasks in the chapter introduce usage and/or form to students in the classroom setting. Additional autonomous practice is found in the Bonus Grammar & Vocabulary section. The second section consolidates or expands on the grammar notion.

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Understanding Grammar Points Look for texts and charts in green. They illustrate the function and form of the grammar notion.

Grammar Tips More practical tips are offered in the margins.

Practice Activities A variety of activities are provided between the grammar charts. Form Charts

Bonus Grammar Look for the red stickers for where to find more practice activities in the workbook.

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

How Is It Going? A self-monitoring box appears at the end of some grammar sections that show more advanced grammar notions.

C3

Write About It with Models A step-by-step layout of the writing task is offered at the end of each chapter along with models of text types.

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GRAMMAR &  VOCABULARY C2C3

Bonus Vocabulary (autonomous) Activities offered include word searches, secret messages, crosswords and vocabulary logs.

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Bonus Grammar (autonomous) A minimum of five supplementary pages of grammar activities per chapter provide you with many opportunities for autonomous work. Remember to look back at the grammar sections in the chapters to help you along.

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

REFERENCE SECTION Essential Language You will find all the functional language you need for this level. The material follows the MEES’ Progression of Learning guidelines. Strategies and Tools This resource provides you with an overview of processes to help you learn. Grammar You can see most of the grammar charts from this book together in this section, plus essential information on imperatives, modals, phrasal verbs, plural nouns and prepositions, as well as a handy list of common irregular verbs.

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Grammar


Check It Out! How to Improve My English Competency © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Do I ...

1

C1

I can ...

speak during class discussions?

write my ideas to prepare for a discussion.

talk clearly and express my ideas well?

ask for help when I don’t understand.

use correct grammar and vocabulary?

think about what I want to say.

choose good resources to help me communicate?

take risks by using new words and expressions.

Competency Do I ...

2

pay attention when I listen to, view and read texts? give clear and thoughtful answers that show I understand the texts? use information from the texts to help me express my ideas? choose good strategies and resources when I listen to, view and read texts?

C2

I can ... look for context cues to help me learn the meaning of new words. choose strategies to use when I read, listen to or view a text. check that I understand something by talking about what I heard or saw. compare what I think with what other people think. think about what I already know about a topic.

Competency Do I ...

3

use the writing process? write and produce texts that are well written? use correct grammar, vocabulary and punctuation? select and use good strategies and resources when I write and produce texts?

C3

I can ... take more time to plan before I write or produce my text. research my topic and use a variety of resources to do my research. use vocabulary that I read in other texts. give my opinions to other people and ask for their opinions too. choose strategies that will help me write and produce texts.

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Check It Out! The Purpose of Essential Language Tasks in the Chapters

Read dialogues carefully. Practise them with a partner. Pay special attention to new vocabulary.

Do the activities in Essential Language tasks to practise what you have learned.

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It’s never easy to start an English conversation in class. Near the beginning of each chapter, you will find a useful language task called Essential Language. This task gives you an opportunity to use functional language like expressions and sentence starters to help you interact more easily in a conversation. Here are some tips to help you use this information effectively.

Use information in Essential Language tasks to help you interact with partners during Talk About It and other oral activities.

TALK ABOUT IT

C1 TALK BOX

Use Talk Boxes or other word lists to help you explore similar words.

xii

Questions What do you think … ? How about you? Are you sure? And you? Oh, really?

Responses I think … And you? That’s a great idea! I’m not sure … I think … 


1

CHAPTER

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RANT OR RAVE? What bugs you? What do you appreciate?

JUMP IN We all rant about the things we dislike and rave about what we love. In this chapter, we’ll look at what bugs other people and consider what makes you rant—or rave. Write three things that bug you in the Rant column and three things you love in the Rave column. Rant

Rave

Get together with a partner and share your rants and raves.

GLOSSARY rant: verb complain about something in an angry way rave: verb talk or write about something with admiration bugs: verb irritates greatly

TALK BOX Questions Responses What bugs you? … really bugs me. What do you like? I really like … What do you really dislike? I don’t like … What do you rave about? I rave about …

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name:

C1

Essential Language Positive opinions

Negative opinions

I really like …

I really hate/dislike …

That is great/fabulous.

That really bugs me.

Awesome!/Fantastic!

I can’t stand …

I agree …

I disagree …

I think … is better than …

It annoys me …

I think … is the best.

It bothers me …

ACTIVITY 1 Choose positive opinions or negative opinions from the chart above to complete the conversation.

What do you like better, math or English? math. It’s my favourite subject.

with you about the homework. There really is too much of it.

. I don’t like math. when I have to spend hours and hours on math homework.

I like English a lot, but phys ed at all sports.

I like sports, but I’m not very good at them. when we have to run around the track in cold weather. Lara

I’m very good

Well, we all have to do some things we don’t like.

Alec

Practice the conversation with a partner. Then change roles, and do it again.

2

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1

TASK

group:


name:

group:

ACTIVITY 2 Reorder the jumbled sentences to form opinions. Then, write a response using the expressions in the chart on page 2.

1. season the best summer is Opinion:

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Response:

2. cats in better my dogs are opinion than Opinion: Response:

3. comprehend is easy English to

Opinion:

Response:

4. I the world in sport the soccer is think best Opinion: Response:

5. zoo wild in I think animals belong a don’t Opinion: Response:

Get into a group of four. Take turns reading your opinions and responses. Decide if you agree or disagree with each other.

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

3


group:

name:

ACTIVITY 3 Read the conversations below. Write down some things you could say. Then, get into groups of four and follow the sentence starters.

CONVERSATION 1 Add something that bugs you.

React to what annoys Student 2 and add something that annoys you.

I hate it when …

React to what annoys Student 3 and add something that annoys you.

Student 4

Student 2

That bugs me too.

Student 1

Student 3

Now, have a conversation about things that you like.

CONVERSATION 2 Me too. It’s my favourite …

I really like it when …

Student 2

Yes, that’s great. I really like … Student 1 Student 4 Student 3 Change groups and have another negative and another positive conversation.

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It really bugs me when …


name:

group:

ACTIVITY 4 Read a list of the things that bother many people. Rate them for yourself from 1 (least annoying) to 5 (most annoying). 1. There’s no toilet paper on the roll. 2. My parents remind me to do my homework. 3. People don’t clean up after their dogs. 4. School is cancelled because of a snowstorm. 5. The teacher gives us piles of homework. 6. A post has a lot of likes on Facebook. © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

7. The internet is down. 8. People eat with their mouth open. 9. Friends do not reply to text messages. 10. Friends text instead of talking to the person in front of them – me!

Total your score and rate yourself on the Annoyance Scale.



My total score is

Annoyance Scale 40 - 50

You are seriously bothered by a lot. Lighten up.

GLOSSARY

30 - 40

Too many things bother you, really. Let them go.

25 - 30

 mm, you are bothered by things that aren’t H important. Figure out what they are.

20 - 25

 K, you let quite a few things bother you, but you O are pretty cool.

15 - 20

Good. You don’t let much get to you. Stay on course.

10 - 15

Very good. You don’t seem to sweat the small stuff.

lighten up: expression take things less seriously let (things) go: expression stop thinking negatively stay on course: expression continue the way you are don’t sweat the small stuff: expression don’t worry about unimportant things

0 - 10

Are you alive? Doesn’t anything bother you?

TALK BOX Questions Responses What bugs/bothers you the most? I really dislike … What do you like/appreciate? I really like … Does anything not matter to you? I don’t care about …

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

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2

TASK

group:

name:

C2

What’s Your Rant?

READING

A Before You Read Example: have and have to

I have three cats. means I possess three cats. I have to feed them. means I have an obligation to feed them.

ACTIVITY 1 Choose a meaning from the Word Box for the underlined verbs in the following sentences.

WORD BOX

• manage • suspend

• use • erect

• place • stops

• resulted in • receives instruction in

1. Paul takes piano after school. 2. Studying for my French exam didn’t take up

much of my time.

3. What are you doing? This behaviour ends now! 4. I stayed up late last night, so I ended up sleeping

in this morning.

5. We like to hang the laundry on a clothesline outside. 6. The teens like to hang out at the mall. 7. Deal the cards so we can play! 8. Try to deal with this crisis in a mature way. 9. Put the books back on the shelf. 10. We have to put up the stage before the concert.

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• spend time • distribute

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For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

Many English verbs have two parts. The second part is usually a preposition and it changes the meaning of the verb.


name:

group:

ACTIVITY 2 Skim the rants on pages 8 and 9 and summarize what you think each text is about.

What I Think: My Say:

ACTIVITY 3

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Place a ✔ beside the title of the rant that interests you the most.

  What I Think

  My Say

What is the main problem for the teen in the text you selected? Place a ✔ beside the best answer. What I Think

My Say

  math classes

  eating breakfast

  some teachers

  body changes

  school in general

  becoming a teen

ACTIVITY 4 Skim the reactions to the text you selected and predict whose comments you will agree with most. Note a keyword or phrase this person used to justify your prediction. WHAT I THINK

MY SAY

PARENT(S)

TEACHER(S)

STUDENT(S)

B While You Read

STRATEGY SKIM

Do not read every word of a text when you skim. Skimming should be done quickly.

Underline any text you agree with and circle what you disagree with.

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

7


What I ThinkRANT 1 But now I want to tell you what seriously bugs me. I really hate it when some teachers think that their subject is the only one we have. They give us so much homework it takes up a whole evening, and they expect it to be done for the next day. “MATH IS THE MOST IMPORTANT SUBJECT IN THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM!” I mean … what are they thinking? My mom said she took all the math courses in high school and she never uses anything from them. Are we really going to use algebra or geometry in our adult life? It’s not likely—for most of us, anyway. Then there are the teachers who ask, “Does everyone understand?” What do they expect? Do they want us to jump up and say, “No sir, I didn’t understand a thing you said”? That’s not going to happen. And finally, I find that some teachers try too hard to be your friend, especially some of the younger ones. Personally, I don’t want my teachers to be my friends. I want them to teach. I can make my own friends.

Reactions from readers Well, that was quite a rant. I have been teaching math for 15 years and I do think it is an important subject. But I’m not writing to tell you why. I’m writing to tell you that some math teachers don’t know how to calculate the time it takes to do homework. You see, we can do those exercises very fast, and we don’t always take into consideration that it’s not the same for our students. So, why don’t you tell your math teacher how many hours it took you to complete the homework for each subject? If he or she sees that math takes up a lot more time than the other subjects, you might find that he/she makes a change in your assignments. – J-P Linden (math teacher)

Right on, dude! Last night I had three hours of math homework. Of course, I’m not very good in math, but still … – Donnie Lawson (student)

I agree with your comment about teachers who ask if we understand. I have a lot of trouble in Spanish. When the teacher explains a grammar rule that I don’t understand, I feel too shy to say so. There must be a better way to find out whether we get it or not … – Jessica Bernard (student)

OK, guilty as charged. I’m a second-year science teacher and it’s true that I treat my students like friends. This doesn’t seem to be a problem in my classes, but I’ll have to think about your comments some more.

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– Andrew Russell (science teacher)

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OK, first of all, let me say I like school. I like my school. I like my friends at school. I like most of my teachers. OK?


My SayRANT 2 So, now you’re a real teenager. What is it like?

Oh boy, do I have a thing or two to say about that. Why is it that life gets so complicated when you’re a teen? Think about it: the best time of your life? It’s so not true. First of all, you have all these body changes. You feel totally bizarre most of the time. Inside, things are just jumping around like crazy.

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What do you mean?

Really?

I started getting acne this fall, so my mother says not to eat chocolate anymore. Then our coach tells us to eat chocolate for a quick energy boost just before the end of a game. Which is it? Then, everyone tells us     we need to stay active and do lots of exercise. But I feel tired     all the time. I could sleep 16 hours a day and still feel tired. Yeah, really. And then there’s breakfast: THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL OF THE DAY! I used to love breakfast, especially when my father made pancakes. Now, the thought of food first thing in the morning makes me feel sick. So I end up arguing about eating with my mother every day. She thinks I’m being very rude.

What about friends? Friends? My parents don’t always like who I hang out with, and they try to get me to stop seeing them. Too bad! I feel that I am able to choose my own friends at my age. Well, that’s just a start. Being a teen is not nearly as easy as our parents like to think. Too bad they have forgotten their own teen years. Reactions from listeners . have a lot in common Wow! You and I su re t the best time in my This is definitely no — me about ever ything life. My pa rents bug what I eat to the from how I dress to a teen is ha rd work . friends I see. Being

ent) – Liliane Koba (stud

I am a father of two teenagers . My daughter is 17 and my son, 14. My son would probably agree with everything you said. And I do remember what it was like to be that age. My hormo nes were all over the place all the time, and I cou ld never get enough sleep. I like to think I remember tha t when I tal k with my son. I don’t appreciate it when he says I don’t know any thing about being a teen in today’s world.

My daughter is 15, and we’re having a lot of trouble getting along with each other. She has become surly and difficu lt to live with. I know it will pass, but it gets tiresome for a parent to deal with all the time. I try to be patient, but it would be nice if you’d think about us sometimes, OK?

– Jef f Anderson (father)

GLOSSARY surly: adj rude and irritable tiresome: adj exhausting

– Rachel Langford (mother) CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

9


group:

name:

C After You Read

The title of the rant is

 .

The rant is about

 .

The first thing he/she rants about is

 .

After that, he/she

 .

And finally,

 .

The sentence I agree with most is  . The reaction I like best is

TALK ABOUT IT

C1

Choose an activity to do with a partner. Pair up with a student who chose a different text than you on page 8 or 9. Tell each other what the text is about and what you liked in it. Read the sentences that you underlined in both the text and the comments. You may also share the summary you wrote. Be sure to ask each other questions.

OR Pair up with someone who chose the same text as you on page 8 or 9. Tell each other what you liked in it. Read the sentences you underlined in both the text and the comments. You may also share the summary you wrote. Be sure to ask each other questions.

10

 .

TALK BOX Questions What is your text about? What did you like about it? What bothers/upsets the writer in your text?

Which sentences did you underline? Why did you choose those? Do you disagree with anything in the text?

Responses My text is about … I really liked the part about … The writer says it bugs him/her when … It annoys/upsets the writer when … Here’s what I underlined. I chose this line / these lines because … I disagree with this sentence because …

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Write a summary about the rant you chose to read. Use your own words as much as possible.


name:

group:

3

TASK

The Simple Present

GRAMMAR

A Understanding and Using the Simple Present © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Use the simple present: • to describe

This math test is challenging.

• to state a fact

Tomorrow is the last day to hand in your report.

• to talk about habits

We spend too much time on our phones.

• to talk about likes, dislikes and wants

This is the best party ever.

B How to Form the Simple Present with To Be Subject + verb

Contracted form

Rest of sentence

I am

I’m

15 years old.

You are

You’re

happy today!

He/She/It is

He’s/She’s/It’s

interesting.

We are

We’re

at school.

You are

You’re

teachers.

They are

They’re

students.

BO N U S

GRAMgeM26AR pa

Saying no Place not after the verb to form the negative. • It is not seven o’clock.   • We are not at school. For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

ACTIVITY 1 Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb to be.

My name

is

Brian. I

this year. If this school year

14 and I’

in Secondary 2

anything like last year, I

sure I will have lots of homework every night. The teachers (neg.) easy on us. I have the same math teacher as last year, and he’ very demanding. Well, that’s what school work! My parents say this

about, I guess—work, work, my job right now, and they

determined that their children get good grades every year, in every subject. My sister and I

lucky to have parents who care about our schoolwork,

even if it does bug us sometimes. All in all, we’

pretty good students. CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

11


group:

name:

ACTIVITY 2 Put the words into the correct order. Then, choose why the simple present is used. See Chart A on page 11 for tips. 1. very / you / are / good / students

 describe

 habit

 describe

 likes/dislikes

 fact

 habit

 opinion

 fact

 fact

 wants

2. we / here / are / to / be / happy / not

3. father / I / the / of / teenagers / am / two

5. Talysha / to be / engineer / hopes / an

C How to Ask Questions with To Be YES/NO QUESTIONS Verb + subject Am I

Rest of sentence on this team?

Are you

excited?

Is he/she/it

cold?

Are we

in Rimouski?

Are you

from Spain?

Are they

teenagers?

Complete the questions with the verb to be. If the answer is negative, provide the correct answer. Example:

12

Is

Brian 15? No, he isn’t. He is 14.

1.

Brian in Secondary 2 this year?

2.

Brian sure he will have less homework this year?

3.

the teachers hard on the students?

4.

Brian’s math teacher easy on the students?

5.

Brian’s parents determined that their children get good grades?

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

4. is / subject / an / important / math


group:

C2

Wow! She’s Amazing!

4

TASK

name:

READING

A Before You Read © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

ACTIVITY 1 For each expression, select the correct meaning. Look for the expressions in the text and use the context to help you. 1. raise kids (paragraph 1)

3. be all about (1st comment)

•  elevate to a high place 

•  find the subject 

•  teach how to behave 

•  ask about something 

•  give a higher allowance 

•  be connected to a subject 

2. put into a box (paragraph 2)

4. make sense (2nd comment)

•  be told how to think 

•  seem rational 

•  arrange things in boxes 

•  look better 

•  put society in a box 

•  be real 

ACTIVITY 2 Read the summary of the event and the issue it raised.

In 2010, Abby Sunderland, 16, undertook a solo circumnavigation of the world with her parents’ full permission and encouragement. She ran into trouble and could not complete the voyage. It cost a lot of money to rescue her in the Indian Ocean.

Were Abby’s parents crazy? Give your opinion and a reason for your answer.

I think that

GLOSSARY crazy: adj foolish

B While You Read Answer the questions beside each paragraph as you read the text.

STRATEGY SELF-MONITOR Check each part of a text to make sure you understand before you continue reading. Ask yourself: Do I really understand this?

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

13


In Praise of Abby Sunderland’s Parents 1

2

GLOSSARY distress signal: noun message that calls for help trained: verb prepared achievement: noun exploit; accomplishment

14

It’s easy to criticize the way other parents raise their kids—particularly when their children start to become famous. That’s what happened when teenage sailor Abby Sunderland sent out a distress signal from the Indian Ocean. Abby tried to sail solo around the world, just as her older brother had done a year before her.

Abby’s parents were in constant communication with their daughter. And they were in the news around the world because they let Abby (16 years old) go on a trip that was a dream of hers and for which she was well prepared. Abby’s father told one reporter, “She has trained for this her whole life.” He felt that not everybody “should be put into a box, the boxes of society.” in What did you learn paragraph 2? d full a. Abby ’s parent s ha confidence in her. re very b. Abby ’s parent s we worried about her. ld reporters c. Abby ’s parent s to e. that Abby would be fin

Read paragraph 1. How did some people react when they heard about Abby’s trouble? a. They hoped she would be OK . b. They criticized the parent s. c. They were glad she was famous.

3

Not everyone agreed with Abby’s father, though. People asked why the trip was necessary for someone so young. Would her achievement be better at 16 than at age 26 or 36? In paragraph 3, what did some people think? a. Abby was old enough to take

this voyage. b. Abby should have taken an adult with her. c. Abby should not be on a voyage like this at her age.

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Revised version of a blog by journalist Sara Libby


5 Well, an achievement early in life might not be better, but it might encourage a 16-year-old to believe in herself and her abilities as she moves into her late teens and early 20s. That could help her make her next great achievement. writer of this In paragraph 4, the ar ticle: by could be a. believes that Ab r an inspiration for othe 16 -year- olds. yage was b. think s that this vo not a good idea. should try to c. think s that Abby do this voyage again.

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

4

6

In my opinion, we don’t give kids and teens nearly enough credit. They don’t listen to everything TV tells them, and they’ve come of age in a scary world full of colour-coded terrorism alerts. If they want to break records and get their hands dirty, let them do it.

I don’t understand why Abby’s parents are being criticized. If the difficulties she encountered on her trip prove anything, it’s only how right they were to trust their strong, capable, nearly grown-up daughter: She didn’t panic; she followed the procedures they gave her before her trip and she’s now safely back home. In paragraph 5, the writer:

a. understands why the parent s

are criticized. b. understands why Abby wanted to do this. c. understands that Abby’s parent s were right to trust her.

In paragraph 6, the writer: a. expresses a lot of confidence in young people. b. expresses doubts about today’s teens. c. thinks today’s teens have it easy.

GLOSSARY encounter: noun experience

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

15


Comments Janyce Elderton, 42, mother of two teenage boys

I am really tired of all this criticism of Abby’s parents. Abby is a very mature 16-year-old, much more than most teens whose only pastime is texting and more texting. It is not her age that is important, but how prepared she was for this. She seemed to be very well prepared. Her brother did the same thing last year. No one had any problem with that. So is it all about her age or her sex? Does Janyce Elderton support Abby’s voyage?

 Yes 

 No

I am the father of a teenage girl, Dana, who is 17 now. There is no way I would have let Dana undertake such a voyage. She is just too young and inexperienced. And what is the point of being the youngest person to sail around the world? Why can’t this happen when she is 20 or 25? It would still be a great achievement. This whole thing just doesn’t make sense to me.

GLOSSARY undertake: verb begin something, such as a journey or project unforgiving: adj does not pardon errors

Does Don Miller think Abby’s voyage was a good idea?

 Yes 

 No

Madison Steiner, 15

My parents are sailors and my brothers and I have been on sailboats since we were very young. I know how to manage almost everything on a boat. This summer I hope to master the last things that I still don’t know. BUT I would never, ever, undertake a voyage like Abby did. The oceans are unforgiving and you need to have lots of experience to get through all the possible problems. I think Abby’s parents are not responsible. Is Madison Steiner for or against the decision to let Abby make this trip?

 For 

 Against

C After You Read Reread the comments people made about Abby’s trip and add your own. Indicate clearly if you agree or disagree with the parents’ decision to let Abby go on this voyage alone and why.

TALK ABOUT IT

C1

Find someone who has the opposite opinion. Read your comments to each other and decide who has the best argument. Take a poll to find out the class opinion.

16

TALK BOX Starters Responses It bugs/bothers/annoys me so much when … Why do you say that? I don’t understand why people … That’s a really good point. They should have … I never thought of it that way.

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Don Miller, 45, father of a teenage girl


name:

group:

ACTIVITY 1

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Think of some amazing exploit you would like to do or something you would like to achieve. Use an idea from the list below or choose your own.

  participate in the Tour de France

  go to the moon

  set a record and get into the Guinness World Records book

  sail around the world like Abby tried to do

  move to another country and experience life in a different way

  write a bestselling book for children

  become the next great musician

 other:

ACTIVITY 2 Imagine that you have achieved your exploit from Activity 1. Write a text to explain how you did it and what you learned from it. Write your text in the simple present. Examples: My

exploit is to write a bestselling book … The book is about … It takes six months to … The publisher really likes the book … OR I want to participate in the Tour de France. I practise and practise. The tour begins … I am very tired but … In the end, I …

Share your text with your classmates.

How is it going? How are you doing with strategies?

How are you doing with reading?

I skim the text......................................................

I use information from the text to talk.........................................

I self-monitor as I read...................................

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

17


5

TASK

group:

name:

C2

It Bugs Me!

LISTENING

A Before You Listen

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

Put the number of the correct meaning from the Word Box beside each word.

1. go somewhere fast 2. leave them alone 3. manoeuvre a car 4. take things from a store without paying 5. unjust 6. feel angry because you have to do something

7. poor nation 8. fragile 9. person who works in a store 10. area in a mall with fast-food restaurants 11. people who cause problems 12. old

STRATEGY

1. salesclerk 

7. elderly 

LISTEN FOR THE GENERAL IDEA

2. shoplift 

8. drive 

3. resent 

9. unfair 

The first time you listen to a text, focus on understanding the general idea.

4. food court 

10. troublemakers 

5. weak 

11. developing country 

6. rush over 

12. get off their backs 

B While You Listen ACTIVITY 1 Listen to each part of the audio and circle the correct answer.

What annoys Daniel a lot?

What bugs Lara?

a. salesclerks who think teens are all

a. when old people ask teens for help

troublemakers

b. salesclerks who think all teens want

to shoplift

c. salesclerks who

won’t help teens find things in stores Daniel

18

b. when old people won’t talk to teens c. when old people

think teens are going to hurt them

Lara

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

WORD BOX


name:

group:

What bothers Rollo?

What annoys Mr. MacDonald?

a. when police automatically think black

a. when his children get into trouble

kids are troublemakers

b. when police try to be friends with

black kids

c. when police don’t come to black

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

neighbourhoods

b. when his children go out for

Halloween

c. when people think his children and

other teens are all troublemakers

Rollo Mr. MacDonald

ACTIVITY 2 What do you hear in the audio? Put a ✔ in the appropriate column as you listen again. NOTE: Speakers may not use exactly the same words as in the chart. INFORMATION

Daniel says that he understands why salesclerks think all teens shoplift. Lara says that she and her friends wanted to help the elderly lady. Lara says the woman was happy they came to help her.

Yes, I hear that.

I’m not sure if I hear that.

No, I don’t hear that.

STRATEGY LISTEN FOR SPECIFIC INFORMATION

Focus on the specific information you need when you listen again to a text.

Rollo says that he and his friends have been stopped at least 10 times by the police. Rollo says he is not a troublemaker. Mr. MacDonald is proud of his children. Mr. MacDonald thinks most teens are good. CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

19


group:

name:

C After You Listen ACTIVITY 1 Put a ✔ beside the message the three speakers share.

  teens sometimes do get into trouble

  not all teens are troublemakers

  teens think people are unfair to them

ACTIVITY 2

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

What annoys you most about the way adults treat teens? Include examples you or someone you know has experienced.

TALK BOX TALK ABOUT IT

C1

Which audio segments do you agree with? Form a group and share your thoughts.

I hate / can’t stand it when … What annoys / bugs me is … I agree with … because … That doesn’t bother me so much.

How is it going? How are you doing with strategies?

How are you doing with the listening?

I listen for general information..................

I listen for specific information..................

I use the information to talk.......................

20


group:

Simple and Compound Sentences

6

TASK

name:

GRAMMAR

A Simple or Compound?

BO N U S

GRAMgeM29AR

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

ACTIVITY 1

pa

Are the sentences below simple sentences or compound sentences? Underline the correct answer. 1. I like pizza and ginger ale.

Simple sentence  Compound sentence

2. I like pizza, and I eat it every weekend.

Simple sentence   Compound sentence

ACTIVITY 2 Complete the statements. • A simple sentence has one

and one

•  A compound sentence has more than one

 .  , two

and a conjunction.

B How to Form Simple Sentences • A simple sentence can be very short, but it MUST contain a verb.

Stop it.    Keep quiet!

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

• A simple sentence always includes a verb, and it usually has a subject

(noun or pronoun). The complement, or “rest of the sentence,” gives information about the subject and verb. Sometimes, there is no complement. Subject

Verb

Rest of sentence

Music

helps

me relax.

Some music

bugs

me.

I

don’t like

music at all.

We

agree.

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

21


group:

name:

C How to Form Compound Sentences • A compound sentence is made of two or more simple sentences.

Each sentence expresses a complete thought. Simple sentence 1 + Donna is very smart.

Simple sentence 2 She also plays the piano.

D Understanding and Using Conjunctions • The two parts of a compound sentence are joined by a comma and a

conjunction.

simple sentence + comma + conjunction + simple sentence I watch TV on weekends, but I listen to music all the time. Conjunction

Purpose

and

joins two similar ideas

but

joins two contrasting ideas

or

joins two alternative ideas

so

shows a result

Example Our teachers are strict, and we have a lot of homework. I like math, but I really don’t like homework. We can study for the test, or we can watch videos. It bugs me to sit here, so I’ll move to another seat.

ACTIVITY 1 For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

Identify the sentences below as simple or compound. For each compound sentence, underline the conjunction and identify its purpose in the sentence. Example: I like James, and he likes me.

compound; joins two similar ideas

1. I am happy, and I want you to be happy too. 2. Her voice is really annoying. 3. Nassime loves novels, but Jake only likes comics. 4. I speak three languages.

22

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Compound sentence Donna is very smart, and she also plays the piano.


name:

group:

5. I like to do this. 6. There was a lot of snow last night, so I couldn’t get out the door this morning. 7. Come here. 8. I have to practise the piano now, or I won’t be able to go to the movie tonight.

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

9. The children next door are very noisy. 10. I speak English well, but I write it poorly.

ACTIVITY 2 Combine these simple sentences to make compound sentences that make sense. Write the letter of the matching sentence in the space provided.

WORD BOX a. so I never make donations b. but i don’t like to play 1. I love to watch football,

c. or we could stay at home d. and I’ll never go to one again

 .

2. It gets to me when charities compete, 3. I can’t stand dance shows,

 .

 .

4. Let’s go to the movie you want to see,

 .

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

23


7

TASK

group:

WRITE

name:

C3

What Bugs You? What Do You Appreciate?

ABOUT IT

1

A Choose a Topic

B Plan Your Text

• Your family: parents, sisters and/or brothers, grandparents and so on • School: what bugs you about it, or what you like about it • Your friends: praise for good friends, or what annoys you about them • Other:

STRATEGY PERSONALIZE THE WRITING PROCESS

2

Continue to use the steps of the writing process as long as you need to. Soon you can begin to personalize the process. If you think you can do this now, skip some of the steps. Find a system that works for you. But always make sure your final copy is as clear as possible.

3

A Prepare Your Final Copy Make sure your copy is neat

and easy to read.

Decide if you will rant or

rave or do a bit of both. Use expressions for giving positive and negative opinions.

A Write a Draft Write a rough draft.

Don’t worry about grammar or spelling. Just get your ideas on paper. Look at the next page for ideas on how to proceed.

B Revise and Edit Your Text NOW is the time to check

grammar and spelling. Check that your text makes sense. Show your work to a classmate or teacher to get feedback.

B Share Your Work Get into a group of four. Read your texts to each other. Ask questions. Decide which author has written the most convincing text. That author reads his/her text to the class.

24

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Choose a topic and write your rant or your rave. Put a ✔ in each box as you complete the steps.


MODELS

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Look at this example Your topic

• About … vampires

At this point, you don’t know if you like vampires or not.

• Hmmm, rant or rave … not sure yet.

Wrong spelling to be fixed later

Gets to me when they visit me at nite … or want to be friends … or go out for vampire activities

You DO like them in some circumstances.

• But so cool in movies … really like them in movies.

Oh, looks as though you don’t really like them.

Your final answer?

Not sure about vampires … Do I like them? Am I afraid of them?

You question your opinions about vampires.

• Well, I think vampires are not so bad …

When you write your text about vampires, you must decide if you are ranting, raving or doing a little of both.

OR Here is another example I think this is wrong … check later.

Don’t forget to find the calorie count for hot dogs.

• Rant … about hot dogs • Everyone like hot dogs … not me! They are disgusting. • Why? full of bad ingredients … toxic stuff … like eating leftover cat food • White buns … no nutritional value … can’t stand them • All condiments … mustard, relish, ketchup … full of sugar … gross • Tons of calories for nothing … • Banish hot dogs!

And another • About classical music … rave • My experience … taking piano lessons for six years. Love it! • Chopin my favourite • Need to practise a lot, it’s OK … • Makes brain work better … how do I know? After practising … think more clearly. • Like all music, but classical is the best. • Bug: people who hate classical How do music … never lissened to it. I spell • People should give it a chance. this?

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

25


group:

name:

GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY

The Simple Present and Sentence Structures

BONUS

GRAMMAR

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb to be. See page 11 if you need help.

is

My name

Jasmeen. I

15 years old. My sister

17 and she loves reality TV shows but I fan! These shows (neg.) there

like other TV shows. With reality TV, many kinds of shows with people in a house doing

stupid things—and then they There

voted off the show one by one.

outdoor versions of these shows as well. Sometimes,

the contestants

in a forest or a jungle and they have to do

things like eat worms. That

disgusting! If you ask me, there

no place for these shows on TV!

B Asking Questions with To Be Complete the questions with the verb to be. If the answer is negative, provide the correct answer. 1.

Is Jasmeen’s sister 15 years old? No, Jasmeen’s sister in 17. Jasmeen a fan of reality TV?

2.

No, Jasmeen’s sister a fan of reality TV?

3.

Yes, there many kinds of reality TV shows?

4.

Yes, 5. According to Jasmeen,

No,

26

a

eating worms great?

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

A Simple Present Forms with To Be


name:

group:

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

C Simple Present Forms with Other Verbs Subject

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

remember

where I put my tablet.

You

explain

the homework well.

He/She/It

helps

people understand.

We

deserve

this break!

You

joke

with the other group.

They

fix

computers for a living.

YES/NO QUESTIONS Auxiliary Do Does Do

Subject

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

belong

in this group?

you

fix

computers for a living?

he

help

people understand?

we

go

to science class now?

you

need

help?

they

travel

in the winter?

For the negative • Use don’t for I, you, we, they   • Use does/doesn’t for he, she, it

ACTIVITY 1 Complete the paragraph with the simple present form of the verbs in the Word Box. You may use a verb more than once.

Do

you

have

a grandmother? If so, what

you

of her?

she nice to you?

she

you on your birthday? Usually, grandmothers really their grandchildren. They

to make them happy

in all sorts of ways. My own grandmother winter. She

to Florida for the

there for four months, and I really

We

on Skype and I

She

a very nice belly laugh. When she

in April, the whole family

to find ways to make her laugh.

(neg.)

is that she always

• want • be • gather • like • spoil • love • talk • think

• stay • miss • has • try • come • go • have • fit

home

at her house. She

bagful of T-shirts for us that often (neg.) I (neg.)

her.

WORD BOX

a

very well. The thing to hug and kiss us.

we too old for that? She sure (neg.)

so! CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

27


group:

name:

ACTIVITY 2 Unscramble the questions. Find a partner and ask each other your questions. 1. members / in your / family / how many / are / there /? 2. have / any / brothers / do / you / or / sisters /? 3. old / siblings / how / your / are /?

5. anything / you / about / bug / does / your / family /? 6. cooks / in / your / who / dinner / house /? 7. a grandmother / or / do / have / you / a grandfather /? 8. do / live / where / you /?

ACTIVITY 3 Read the paragraph and underline all the verbs in the simple present.

Teen Talking Teenagers love to talk. They love to talk and text on their cellphones and online. I am a parent of two teenagers, so I wonder about all this talking. I just don’t get it. I looked at a survey of 300 teens to try to understand. The survey shows that teens talk about a number of issues. They talk about relationships with parents, friends and teachers. They talk about drugs and alcohol, especially if they know someone doing these things. Those are serious issues. But most of all, teenagers just want to know if others are up to something interesting. This is the most important subject to today’s teens. Now I understand.

28

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

4. like / you / to do / what / do / your family / with /?


name:

group:

D Simple and Compound Sentences ACTIVITY 1 Circle the conjunction that completes each compound sentence.

For more practice, go to the interactive activities.

1. You are not finished on time, (and / but / or / so) you will have to come back

tomorrow.

2. I remember where I put my wallet, (and / but / or / so) I still can’t find it. 3. The class needs to be quiet during the test, (and / but / or / so) everyone

can concentrate.

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

4. Kerry went to the arena, (and / but / or / so) she played hockey. 5. My favourite sport is ringuette, (and / but / or / so) it is not very popular.

ACTIVITY 2 Find one simple sentence and one compound sentence in Activity 3 on page 28. Write them below.

Simple sentence

Compound sentence

E Review Simple Present Forms ACTIVITY 1 Read the answer and then complete the question. QUESTION

ANSWER

1.

teenagers love to talk?

Yes, they do.

2.

do they talk?

They talk on their cellphones and online.

3.

does the parent wonder about?

The parent wonders about all the talking.

4.

the parent get it?

No, the parent doesn’t.

5.

does the survey show?

It shows that teens talk about lots of issues.

6.

they talk about relationships?

Yes, they do.

7.

do they talk about drugs and alcohol? They talk about this when they know of someone doing these things.

8.

do teens want to know most of all?

They want to know what their friends are doing.

9.

this the most important thing?

Yes, it is.

10.

the parent finally understand?

Yes, the parent does.

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

29


group:

name:

ACTIVITY 2 Complete the paragraph with the simple present form of the verbs in the Word Box. You may use a verb more than once.

WORD BOX

Stupid Things

• smoke • ask • stand • throw • hate • know • doubt • be • care • drop out • do • say • want • get

Why

people

stupid

things? Some people, mostly teenage boys, on overpasses and

things

at cars. (neg., contracted form) they kids

to kill people? Many of school. They

school

that

boring. They

fun and, for them, school homework. So they

to have not fun. Also, they a job at a fast-food restaurant and

all day long they

the customers, “

fries with that?”

that fun? I

it. And another thing: A lot of young people They

you cigarettes.

they can get cancer, but

they (neg., contracted form)

 .

How stupid is that?

GLOSSARY overpasses: noun a bridge that passes over a road or a railway drop out: verb to stop attending school

In your opinion, who wrote this rant? Explain your thinking.

• teenage girl   • teenage boy   • parent   • other

30

I think it is a(n)

because

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

that stupid?


name:

group:

ACTIVITY 3 Complete the paragraph with the simple present form of the verbs in the Word Box. You may use a verb more than once.

WORD BOX

Smart Things Many young people

smart things!

of many teenagers who

I

 , and they

(neg., contracted form)

smoking © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

They

stupid.

that they know how dangerous

it

for their health, so there

no excuse. One of them has an interesting saying: “It (contracted form)

the cigarette that

the smoking; you (contracted form) I

just the sucker.”

that. I heard about those kids who dropped rocks down

on cars, and I

that this is seriously stupid. But how many

kids

this regularly? I

there are only a small

handful, and the police probably

with them very fast.

And finally, dropping out of school: Well, yes, that stupid thing to do. There

a totally

far too many kids in Québec who

school early. After the first stage of excitement (freedom, they

!), they

themselves in minimum-wage

jobs with no future. Thankfully a lot of them school, and they I

to return to

in adult education programs. Often these

programs

better for them than regular high school. of one teen who dropped out of school at the age

of 16. Today he

• study • bet • do • decide • find • register • like • agree • deal • know • leave • be • smoke • say • think • go

to university where he

mechanical engineering.

GLOSSARY sucker: noun person who does something stupid; someone who inhales smoke or liquids minimum-wage: adj a very small amount of money per hour; lowest legal wage

In your opinion, who wrote this rant? Explain your thinking. 1. teenage girl

I think it is a(n)

2.   teenage boy

3.  parent

4.  other

because

CHAPTER 1

RANT OR RAVE?

31


group:

name:

GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY

Pet Peeves

BONUS

VOCABULARY

Work with a partner to complete the puzzle. 2

5

4   7

6  

3

8

10

9   12

11  13

15 14  16 17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

Across

Down

 1. school subject with numbers

 2. person who causes problems

 4. bother

 3. a common conjunction

 6. two sentences joined with

 5. understand

a conjunction

 9. deal with 11. something that bothers you 14. someone who works in a store 17. does not pardon errors 18. not just 19. old (for a person) 20. your parent’s parents 21. bug or pester

32

 7. distribute cards  8. take something without paying for it 10. have the same opinion 12. something done successfully 13. grown up and responsible 15. express a very strong opinion about

something

16. express a strong positive opinion

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1  


REFERENCE SECTION © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Essential Language Expressing Positive Opinions

Expressing Negative Opinions

I really like … That is great/fabulous. Awesome! Fantastic! I agree with … I think … is better than … I think … is the best.

I don’t understand why … I can’t stand … They’re not worth … What you did really bothers me. It really bugs me.

Conversational Connectors and Expression So, what about you? Are you sure …? OK, how about …? Really? And you? Are you kidding?

Asking for Help

Refusing Help

Could you help me …? Can you try this for me? Could you give me a hand with this? Would you please help me?

Sorry, I can’t …  No thanks, I’m fine. It’s too bad, but …  Unfortunately, that won’t be possible.

Asking for Suggestions

Making Suggestions

What do you suggest? What would he/she like to talk about? What about you? Do you have a suggestion for …?

I think you should …  Why not try …? How does … sound? I suggest that we …

Giving Warnings Watch out! Be careful!

You’d better not … It’s too dangerous.

Don’t believe everything you hear. Keep your eyes open.

REFERENCE SECTION

Essential Language

201


Answering Questions about the Future

Are you leaving tomorrow? Are you going next Monday? What will she do in June? So, who are you calling later?

Definitely. / Probably. / No way, because …  No, I can’t go. / Yes, I will be going …  She will … I am calling … / I am going to call …

Asking for Advice/Help

Offering Advice/Help

Can you help me? How would you do this? What should I do? Could you give me your feedback on this?

What can I do to help? Let me tell you what I would do. You should … Here’s my suggestion.

Agreeing

Disagreeing

That’s right. I agree. / I agree with … I think so, too. We think you’re right. Me, too! Exactly!

I really hate/dislike … … really bugs me. / It bugs me when … I can’t stand … I disagree with … It annoys me when … It bothers me when …

Permission

Capabilities

May I (formal) / Can I (informal) …? Is it OK if I …? Yes, go ahead. Sure, no problem. No, you can’t.

Are you good at …? Do they know how to …? I can/can’t … She’s/He’s good at  …

Politely Interrupting a Conversation Excuse me. Sorry to interrupt, but … Before you continue …

202

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Asking Questions about the Future


Hello.

Talking on the Phone

Hello. May I speak to Marc, please?

Who is this? Oh! Hi, Kendra. It’s Tom. What’s up? Marc isn’t here right now. Can I take a message? © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

One moment. Just let me get a pen. OK … I’m ready. Is there anything else? No problem. Bye.

It’s Kendra Hall from school. Not much. Yes, please. Please tell Marc to meet me at Sara’s house tonight at 8:OO p.m. No, that’s it. Thanks a lot. Bye, Tom.

Asking for Information Yes/No questions

Information questions

Are you an only child? Does he have a dog? Did we have a test yesterday?

What happens next? How many sisters do you have? When do you play video games?

Asking about a person

Answering

Do you know …? Who is …? Where does he/she live? How tall/old is …? What colour is his/her hair? Can you describe him/her?

Yes, I do. / No, I don’t. This is … / She is … He/She lives … He is 165 cm tall / 15 years old. His/Her hair is … He is tall/short. She has brown/blonde hair.

Asking about a past event

Answering

Did you see anything? Were you alone? What happened? Where were you …? How did it happen? When did you arrive? Who was that?

Yes, I did. / No, I didn’t. Yes, I was. / No, I wasn’t. There was a robbery/fire. I was in … I don’t know. I think … I arrived at … That was … REFERENCE SECTION

Essential Language

203


Instructions and Classroom Routines Open your books to page … Look over the questions … Read the … Take out your notebooks. Write this down.

You have … minutes to do this. I would like to work with … Say it in English, please. It’s your turn. Can I borrow a …?

1

3

Getting organized

During the activity

Do you want to be on our team? Who wants to be … the team leader/  secretary/spokesperson? Let’s do … / Let’s go … / Let’s try … How about …? Would you like to …?

I think this is a good idea. Do you all agree? I/We do/don’t. What’s your opinion? We should try … No, that doesn’t work / make sense. OK, here’s the final decision. Write that down.

2

4

Making sure you understand the activity

Giving encouragement and praise

Let’s read the instructions first. What does that word mean? What are we supposed to do here? We have to get/do/find …

Good work, everyone! Interesting idea! Sweet! What a great idea! We’re almost finished. Hang in there. Good point. We’re doing well.

204

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Team Talk


Strategies and Tools THE RESPONSE PROCESS

C2

1 © 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Explore the text • Look at the title and illustrations. • Look for words you know. • Predict what the text is about. • Use resources for words you do not know. • Read each sentence. Stop and ask yourself if you understand it. • Use other helpful strategies for exploring a text.

STRATEGY

1 • Predict

Based on what happened before, I think …

In this context, the word means … • Use context cues

To be a better reader, keep a reading log. • Read a paragraph or a short section. • Take notes like these. • Skim

The title and the photos tell me that … otes • Take n

? I just read id d t a h W Keywords: k up: eed to loo n I s d r o W people: Important ideas: Important ask about: to d e e n I Things

• Organize information

REFERENCE SECTION

Strategies and Tools

205


Dependents are friends who stick to you like glue. They always want to be with you, every moment of the day. As soon as you are apart, dependents will immediately call or text you.

STRATEGY

2

2 • What did you discover as you explored the text? • What was interesting to you?

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

• Scan for specific information

Respond to the text

3

3 Connect with the text

• Compare

• Do you identify with something or somebody in the text? • How do you feel about the ideas in the text? • What is your opinion about the ideas in the text?

I had the same problem. But I am different from that character.

4 Go beyond the text • How does it connect with your world?

If this happenned in our school …

5 Use resources • Do you use these resources? – vocabulary in the chapters – an English learner’s dictionary – input from your classmates – input from your teacher

206

4 • Go beyond the text


THE WRITING AND PRODUCTION PROCESSES Writing Process

STRATEGY

1

• Plan • Use what you know

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Prepare to write • Read the instructions. • Stay cool. Don’t be nervous. • Organize your ideas. • Take notes. • Write down some ideas. • Decide on the type of text you will write.

2 Write a first draft • Prepare your first draft. • Refer to the model and instructions. • Ask for help if you have a problem.

3 Revise

• Focus your attention • Take notes

Publish • Write the final copy. • Present it to the class or to your group.

Production Process

1 Pre-production • Brainstorm to find a topic. • Recall what you already know about the topic. • Do some research. • Select the kind of text to produce: poster, computer slideshow, webpage. • Make an outline.

• Ask for help

Can you help me?

2 Production

How do you say …?

• Create the text. • Use a writing process. • Add illustrations, narration, titles and other features. • Cooperate

3

• Use a checklist. • Check your writing. Are the ideas clear? • Use grammar and spelling references. • Make corrections. • Ask a classmate to read your text.

4

C3

Post-production • Revise the text. • Add final touches. • Present the text to the class.

• Check your work

Don’t forget to u these resourc se es: • grammar in the chapters, bo nu s and referen ce sec tions • vocabulary in the chapters

REFERENCE SECTION

Strategies and Tools

207


Grammar THE SIMPLE PRESENT To Be NEGATIVE

Rest of sentence

Subject + verb + not

Rest of sentence

I am/ I’m

happy.

I am not / I’m not 

happy.

You are / You’re

scared.

You are not / You’re not / You aren’t

scared.

He/She/It is / He’s/She’s/It’s

at home.

He is not / She’s not / It isn’t

at home.

We are / We’re

best friends.

We are not / We’re not / We aren’t

best friends.

You are / You’re

on time.

You are not / You’re not

on time.

They are / They’re

older than me.

They are not / They’re not / They aren’t

older than me.

Other Verbs AFFIRMATIVE

Subject

NEGATIVE

Verb

Rest of sentence

Subject

Do + not

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

like

hockey.

I

do not / don’t

like

hockey.

You

walk

slowly.

You

do not / don’t

walk

slowly.

He/She /It

runs

fast.

He/She /It

does not / doesn’t

run

fast.

We

live

there.

We

do not / don’t

live

there.

You

need

water.

You

do not / don’t

need

water.

They

speak

Italian.

They

do not / don’t

speak

Italian.

QUESTIONS IN THE SIMPLE PRESENT To Be YES/NO QUESTIONS

Verb

Subject

INFORMATION QUESTIONS

Rest of question

Question word

Verb

Subject

Rest of question

Am

I

pretty?

Why

am

I

here?

Are

you

sure?

How

are

you

now?

Is

he/she /it

prepared?

Where

is

he/she/it?

Are

we

there?

When

are

we

playing?

Are

you

ready?

What

are

you

wearing?

Are

they

coming?

Who

are

you

going with?

Other Verbs YES/NO QUESTIONS

Do/does

Subject

Verb

INFORMATION QUESTIONS

Rest of question

Question word

Do/does

Subject

Verb

Rest of question

Do

I

wait

here?

Why

do

I

like

ringuette?

Do

you

like

them?

How

do

you

do

that?

Does

he/she/it

need

more?

When

does

he/she/it

perform?

Do

we

look

too old?

What

do

we

do

Do

you

like

carrots?

Where

do

you

perform?

Do

they

know

Ian?

When

do

they

sell

208

for fun? tacos?

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

AFFIRMATIVE

Subject + verb


QUESTION WORDS

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Question word

Use for …

Example

Who

A person

Who is Sarah talking to?

What

An object, animal, colour, time, etc.

What colour do you like?

Where

A place

Where does Sami live?

When

A time or date

When does the concert start?

Why

A reason

Why do you want to read it?

How much

Cost Quantity: non-countable noun

How much does that car cost? How much soup is in the pot?

How many

Quantity: countable noun

How many books do you own?

THE SIMPLE PAST To Be AFFIRMATIVE

Subject

Verb

NEGATIVE

Rest of sentence

Subject

Verb + not

Rest of sentence

I

was

late.

I

was not / wasn’t

late.

You

were

happy.

You

were not / weren’t

happy.

He/She/It

was

in the schoolyard.

He/She/It

was not / wasn’t

in the schoolyard.

We

were

at the gym.

We

were not / weren’t

at the gym.

You

were

next in line.

You

were was not / weren’t

next in line.

They

were

at the skate park.

They

were was not / weren’t

at the skate park.

Other Verbs AFFIRMATIVE REGULAR VERBS

Subject

Verb

IRREGULAR VERBS

Rest of sentence

Subject

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

danced

all night.

I

left

at 10:00.

You

liked

the video.

You

sent

a package.

He/She/It

jumped

in the air.

He/She/It

sat

on the chair..

We

talked

about her.

They

ran

for two hours.

You

visited

Grandma.

You

stood

at the bus stop.

They

worked

last night.

They

bought

a house.

NEGATIVE REGULAR VERBS

Subject

Did + not

Verb

IRREGULAR VERBS

Rest of sentence

Subject

Did + not

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

did not / didn’t

walk

to school

I

did not / didn’t

hide

the presents.

You

did not / didn’t

talk

too loud.

You

did not / didn’t

drink

your water.

He/She/It

did not / didn’t

work

yesterday

He/She/It

did not / didn’t

bleed

very much.

We

did not / didn’t

help

them.

We

did not / didn’t

bring

the program

You

did not / didn’t

wait

long.

You

did not / didn’t

tell

the truth.

They

did not / didn’t

turn

the corner.

They

did not / didn’t

catch

the thief.

See the list of common irregular verbs by sound and spelling on page 219.

REFERENCE SECTION

Grammar

209


QUESTIONS IN THE SIMPLE PAST To Be Subject

INFORMATION QUESTIONS

Rest of question

Question word

Verb

Subject

Rest of question

Was

I

late?

Where

was

I

going?

Were

you

in town?

Who

were

you

thinking of?

Was

he/she/it

at home?

Where

was

he/she/it

yesterday?

Were

we

invited?

What

were

we

waiting for?

Were

you

early?

Who

were

you

upset with?

Were

they

home?

How

were

they

treated?

Other Verbs YES/NO QUESTIONS

Did

Subject

Verb

INFORMATION QUESTIONS

Rest of question

Question word

Did

Subject

Verb

Rest of question

Did

I

ask

that question?

How

did

I

miss

that question?

Did

you

like

the play?

Where

did

you

go

last night?

Did

he/she/it

need

more?

When

did

he/she/it

go?

Did

we

follow

the signs?

What

did

we

miss?

Did

you

watch

the movie?

Who

did

you

see

yesterday?

Did

they

include

everyone?

Why

did

they

say

that?

THE FUTURE Understanding and using will and be going to Will is used • to express or ask about a voluntary action that you intend to do in the future. I will help you learn how to skate tomorrow, OK? • to express or ask about a promise in the future. Yes, I will drive very carefully.

Be going to is used • to express or ask about a plan in the future. We are going to meet tomorrow.

Both will and be going to are used for predictions. I believe he will score a goal. I believe he is going to score a goal.

Will AFFIRMATIVE

Subject

Will

Verb

NEGATIVE

Rest of sentence

Subject

Will + not

Verb

Rest of sentence

I

will

try

to learn it.

I

will not / won’t

try

to learn it.

You

will

like

our new bike.

You

will not / won’t

look

our new bike.

He/She/It

will

answer

my question.

He/She/It

will not / won’t

answer

my question.

We

will

leave

soon.

We

will not / won’t

leave

soon.

You

will

like

the surprise.

You

will not / won’t

like

the surprise.

They

will

return

tomorrow.

They

will not / won’t

return

tomorrow.

210

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YES/NO QUESTIONS

Verb


Will INFORMATION QUESTIONS WITH WILL

QUESTIONS WITH WILL

Will

Subject

Rest of question

Verb

Affirmative answer

Negative answer

Subject

Rest of question

Verb

Will I

see

the game?

Yes, I will.

No, I won’t.

Who

will I

meet

next?

Will you

help

me?

Yes, I will.

No, I won’t.

What

will you

say

to them?

When

will he/she/it be

ready? tonight?

Will he/she/it travel?

© 2018, Les Éditions CEC inc. • Reproduction prohibited

Question Will word

Yes, he/she/it will. No, he/she/it won’t.

Will we

find

the answer? Yes, we will.

No, we won’t.

Where

will we

sleep

Will you

go

soon?

Yes, we will.

No, we won’t.

When

will you

return to Spain?

Will they

cook

dinner?

Yes, they will.

No, they won’t.

Why

will they

go

there?

Be Going To AFFIRMATIVE

Subject + to be

Going to

NEGATIVE

Rest of sentence

Subject + to be + not

Going to

Rest of sentence

I am / I’m

going to

jog.

I am not / I’m not

going to

jog.

You are / You’re

going to

sell them.

You are not / You’re not / You aren’t

going to

sell them.

He is / He’s

going to

drop it.

He is not / He’s not / He isn’t

going to

drop it.

We are / We’re

going to

study.

We are not / We’re not / We aren’t

going to

study.

You are / You’re

going to

win.

You are not / You’re not / You aren’t

going to

win.

They are / They’re

going to

drive.

They are not / They’re not / They aren’t

going to

drive.

       211   

QUESTIONS WITH BE GOING TO

Question word

To be

Subject

Going to + verb

Rest of question

When

am

I

going to have

a turn?

Why

are

you

going to ask

for more time?

Is

he/she/it

going to catch

the mouse?

are

we

going to watch

the movie?

Are

you

going to know

soon?

are

they

going to get

to your house?

When How

THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS Understanding and using the present continuous Look at the examples. Don’t bother me. I’m studying for my exam. • Here, an action is in progress. The action began before the present moment and will end sometime later. I can’t go to the movies next Saturday. I’m studying for my exam. • Here, the action will happen over a period of time in the future, on Saturday. It is quite definite that the action will happen.

How to form verbs in the present continuous • The present continuous is made up of two parts: auxiliary to be + verb that ends in -ing REFERENCE SECTION

Grammar

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2 FOR STUDENTS Content Workbook

CHAPTERS

• six stimulating and level-appropriate themes designed for all three ESL competencies

• 12 reading texts • a variety of tasks and activity types • videos and audios that include authentic and engaging material

• integrated grammar in chapters and follow-up in the Bonus section

BONUS

• autonomous grammar and vocabulary activities to review chapter content and reinforce the writing competency • fun crosswords, word searches and quizzes to motivate and keep students engaged

REFERENCE SECTION

• lists of Essential Language for oral interaction • visual overviews of the response, writing and production processes

• at-a-glance charts of the grammar covered in the chapters as well as other pertinent grammar points for the level

FOR TEACHERS

Teacher’s Resource Book • pedagogical notes and answer keys • transcripts for videos and audios • a complete evaluation package with point-by-point grammar quizzes, evaluation sheets and three evaluation situations • a CD and DVD set for the viewing and listening tasks, and the evaluation situations

This new edition has been considerably updated to provide more comprehensive, competency- and grammar-based material for the Core ESL program in Cycle One, Secondary Two.

New to Jump In 2 3rd Edition! • simplified page

layout and instructions to facilitate learning • a new theme, a new video and several new readings • twelve true reinvestm ent ac tivities • comprehensive gramm ar and vocabular y practi ce for autonomous learning • additional oral intera ction ac tivities for practi sing the Func tional Language fou nd in the Progression of Learning • optional on-screen su btitles for videos • More than 300 FREE interactive ac tivities on vocabular y, comprehension and gra mmar

DIGITAL VERSIONS Teacher’s Resource Book

For in-class use and correcting, the digital version allows you to: • project, take notes and flip through the entire content workbook • show the answer key, question-by-question • access all reproducible material • share teacher’s notes and documents with your students using the digital workbook • correct your students’ answers directly on their digital workbook • access all videos and audios • work in the digital teacher’s book without connecting to the internet • save voice recordings in an audio player • follow your students’ results in the interactive activities with the MyCECZone dashboard

Content Workbook for Students The digital workbook allows students to: • flip through the book, take notes and write in their answers • access videos and audios in the chapters • use the workbook without connecting to the internet • save voice recordings in an audio player • do more than 300 FREE interactive activities

Jump In 2, 3e Éd.  
Jump In 2, 3e Éd.