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ISSUE 26 • SUMMER 2015

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Gaviota Wine Without Water Home Off The Range Grunion E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K


Downtown Santa Barbara Wine Tasting Serving Family-Owned Handcrafted Bordeaux from Happy Canyon

Daily 12 – 6 Mention “Edible” for a 2 for 1 Tasting

813 Anacapa St

(805) 897-3366 GrassiniFamilyVineyards.com

Margerum & MWC32 Join us at our NEW SPACE in the El Paseo Courtyard • Offering limited, library and reserve wines

OUR TWO TASTING ROOMS

MWC32

MARGERUM TASTING ROOM

813 ANACAPA STREET (In the El Paseo Courtyard)

813 ANACAPA STREET (Adjacent to the Wine Cask)

Open Daily 12–6pm • Space available for private events • 805.845.8435 • MargerumWineCompany.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 1


2 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015


The Santa Rita Hills

• A TERLATO FAMILY WINERY •

to Santa Barbara

Join us at our new tasting room in downtown Santa Barbara or at our picturesque winery for a variety of special experiences.

Visit us San Roque Plaza ilfustino.com

Santa Barbara Public Market 888.798.4740

AND ENJOY 10% OFF YOUR PURCHASE!

Sta. Rita Hills: 5010 Santa Rosa Rd, Lompoc (800) 426-9463 Santa Barbara: 1114 State St, Ste 26, Santa Barbara (805) 770-7873

ILE’S A D S E D DAVI CIPE E R A D A MICHEL to

ARROYO GRANDE | BUELLTON | SANTA BARBARA LOS OLIVOS | WESTLAKE VILLAGE | SANTA MARIA

FigMtnBrew

FigMtnBrewSB

ma hilled Cla uce c le t t o b hire sa 1 32 oz. orcesters W . p s t 2 1 1/ juice esh lime r f p u c 2 1/ e . hot sauc 1 1/2 tsp e or to tast i powder chil 1/2 tsp. per ep Ground p rseradish ho 1/2 tsp. s (for ser ving) ge Lime wed i powder chil Salt and lass rim rg mixed fo our choice fy Garnish o ix z of the m Blend 6o f FMB “101” o with 10oz our Hoppy y Kölsch. Tr n or Danish ee Poppy Gr ces for an au Red hot s k! extra kic EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 3


edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

J U N E , J U LY, A U G U S T

LIZ DODDER

STE VEN BROWN

summer page 10

page 80

Departments 8 Food for Thought

22 Edible Garden

by Krista Harris

Oh, Grow Up: Vining Vegetables

10 Small Bites Community Seafood

Grunion Pale Ale Sunset’s Eating Up the West Coast Barbareño The Good Lion Vertical Tasting: Summer Thirst Quenchers

12 Edible Notables Saving Water in the Kitchen

15 In Season 16 Seasonal Recipes

Reach for the Sky

by Joan S. Bolton

26 New American Ramen by Rosminah Brown

30 The Honeybee by Bambi Edlund

68 Destination Guide and Maps 76 Event Calendar 80 The Last Bite Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

Water-Saving Salad Mediterranean Watermelon Salad

page 26 4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

ROSMINAH BROWN

20 Drinkable Landscape A Cocktail Winner by a Nose by George Yatchisin


Discover the new Seagrass and dine in casual elegance…

R E S T A U R A N T

We have a private dining room and can accommodate large groups. 30 East Ortega Street • Santa Barbara • 805.963.1012 SeagrassRestaurant.com

Organic, Farmers Market Driven Menu, Gastropub Inspired

Black Sheep is a local eating spot that was created on the premise of being different and being OK with it, let’s just eat, laugh and be merry.

Happy Hour 5 - 6pm private events

and

large groups

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SANTA BAR BAR A

®

J U N E , J U LY, A U G U S T

Features 33 An Unlimited Idea of Freedom

page 20

by Rosminah Brown

42 Wine without Water

by Wil Fernandez

46 Taste Sensations and Tannin Slayings

Recipes in This Issue Salads

by Rachel Hommel

18 Mediterranean Watermelon Salad 16 Water-Saving Salad

50 Home, Home Off the Range

Main Dishes

by George Yatchisin

56 G is for Grunion

64 Onion and Zucchini Tart with an Olive Crust 67 Ratatouille

by Nancy Oster

Desserts

2 Sunday Lunch in the Garden 6 by Pascale Beale

67 Lemon and Crème Fraiche Mousse

Beverages 21 Summer and Smoke

ABOUT THE COVER

A honeybee lands on a sunflower at Pacifica Graduate Institute. Photo by Erin Feinblatt.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

C AROLE TOPALIAN

summer


Building Peace of Mind. Awa rd Winni n g Bui lde r s S i n c e 19 86

> GiffinAndCrane.com |

(805) 966-6401 | License 611341


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

KELSE Y SKIVER

The Spill I didn’t live in Santa Barbara in 1969. But when I came here in 1983, the memory of the oil spill was still quite strong. The collective history of it seeped into my consciousness and over the years I learned about the relationship this community had with the petroleum deposits in our area. Part of becoming a Santa Barbarian was knowing about the double-edged sword that these natural resources brought to our community. We all learned quickly how to use baby oil to get the tar off our feet when we went to the beach. We participated in Earth Day celebrations and many of us started embracing alternative energy strategies, even if it was as basic as switching to low-energy light bulbs. And always the memory of that spill lingered. A couple years ago I met some fishermen from the Gulf of Mexico whose story of the BP oil spill was documented in the film Dirty Energy. They said to me, “Santa Barbara would never let something like that happen here.” And yet we have. The Refugio oil spill (or what should accurately be called the Plains oil spill) may not have near the quantity of oil as the one in the Gulf of Mexico or the one here in 1969, but it is devastating to our community nonetheless. Of course it affects our natural environment—the beaches, the wildlife and the ocean. But it also affects our local economy, tourism and our local seafood industry. Stephanie Mutz, who dives for urchin and is active in the fishing community, said the closures have been a huge blow. Although most of the spill is onshore, areas as far as 23 miles away are closed to fishing. Stephanie told me “the best thing anyone can do is to continue to buy Santa Barbara seafood. We are not catching any seafood in the contaminated area.” The fishermen’s ability to make a living is definitely compromised, but we can help by providing a market for local seafood. We can also visit the Gaviota coast. Writer Rosminah Brown has an article in this issue about the often overlooked treasures of Gaviota—the hikes, the views, the farm stands and picnic areas. And when we visit the Gaviota coast or any part of Santa Barbara County this summer, perhaps it’s a good reminder to strengthen our resolve to preserve and protect our natural resources. And it’s perhaps another reminder to embrace solar energy. Dave Davis, president of Community Environmental Council, has been quoted several times saying “When we have a huge solar spill around here, we just call it a nice day.”

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

For More Information

Visit EnvironmentalDefenseCenter.org and Community Environmental Council at CECSB.org. Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest at Edible Santa Barbara and Twitter and Instagram at EdibleSB.

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

edible

SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHERS

Steven Brown & Krista Harris EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITOR & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson Julie Simpson DESIGNER

Steven Brown SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson

Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Rosminah Brown Liz Dodder Bambi Edlund Erin Feinblatt Wil Fernandez Rachel Hommel Nancy Oster Carole Topalian George Yatchisin

Contact Us info@ediblesantabarbara.com

Advertising Inquiries ads@ediblesantabarbara.com Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

© 2015

edible Santa Barbara

®


LOMPoC

An exceptional wine tasting experience in the Sta. Rita Hills of Santa Barbara County

WINE Trail

E. Laurel Ave

WINE WINE GHETTO GHETTO

17 19

26

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N. 7th Street

LOMPoC Wineries

10

21 7 25 14

E. Chestnut Ave

LOMPoC Wineries

12

2

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Industrial Way

9 3

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18

8

N. 9th Street

N. D Street

23

N. E Street

4

N. F Street

E. Chestnut Ct

27

1 15 11

28

N. 12th Street

6

©2015 JEREMY BALL

24

E. Chestnut Ave

No one knows who coined the phrase “Wine Ghetto” first, but it clearly got its name from its no-frills, industrial center home. Initially, in The “Wine Ghetto” is affectionately named no-frills, industrial the late 1990s the area was usedfor for its wine production only, followed in the 2000s by the tasting rooms. center home. In later 1998, theearly Wine Ghetto launched with wine production

only, followed byThe theLompoc first tasting in has 2005. Wineroom Ghetto the largest concentration

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Now the Lompoc Wine Ghetto hasmaking one ofit an theeasy largest concentrations Santa Barbara County, destination of world-class, small-producer tasting rooms in Santa Barbara County, for your wine-getaway. making it an easy destination for your wine getaway.

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1 Ampelos Cellars

8 Fiddlehead Cellars

15 La Vie Vineyards

22 Samasara

2 Arcadian Winery

9 Flying Goat Cellars

16 Longoria Wines

23 Scott Cellars

3 Bratcher Winery

10 Holus Bolus/ Black Sheep Finds

17 Montemar

24 Stolpman Vineyards

18 Moretti Wine Co.

25 Taste of Sta. Rita Hills

19 Pali Wine Company

26 Transcendence

13 Kessler-Haak

20 Palmina Wines

27 Tyler Winery

14 LaMontagne Winery

21 Piedrasassi Wine & Bread

28 Zotovich Cellars

312 N. 9th St. 805 736-9957 AmpelosCellars.com 1515 E. Chestnut Ave., Unit B 805 737-3900 ArcadianWinery.com 1515 E. Chestnut Ave., Unit B 805 737-3900 BratcherWinery.com

4 Brewer-Clifton Winery 329 N. F St. 805 735-9184 BrewerClifton.com

5 Conarium Wines

1591 E. Chestnut Ave. 202 257-2171 ConariumWines.com

6 De Su Propia Cosecha

1501 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit A 805 345-9355 DeSuPropiaCosecha.com

7 Domaine de la Côte

1503 E. Chestnut Ave. 805 500-8337 DomaineDeLaCote.com

1597 E. Chestnut Ave. 800 251-1225 FiddleheadCellars.com 1520 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit A 805 736-9032 FlyingGoatCellars.com

1500 E Chestnut Ct. Unit F/G BlackSheepFinds.com 805 637-1005

11 Jalama Wines

308 N. 9th St., Unit C 805 735-8937 JalamaWines.com

12 JCR Vineyard

1500 E. Chestnut Ct. JCRVineyard.com 300 N. 12th St., Unit 1F 805 743-4107 KesslerHaakWine.com 1509 E. Chestnut Ave. 805 291.6643 LaMontagneWinery.com

308 N. 9th St., Unit D 805 291-2111 LaVieVineyards.com 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866 759-4637 LongoriaWine.com 1501 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit E 805 735-5000 Facebook.com/MontemarWines 1595 E. Chestnut Ave. 805 735-4400 MorettiWines.com 1501 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit C 805 735-2354 PaliWineCo.com 1520 E. Chestnut Ct. 805 735-2030 PalminaWines.com

13

1500 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit A 805 331-2292 SamsaraWine.com 316 N. F St. 805 736-6161 ScottCellars.com 1700 Industrial Way, Unit B 805 688-0400 StolpmanVineyards.com 1505 E. Chestnut Ave. 805 735-8774 TasteOfStaRitaHills.com 313 N. F St. 805 455-9589 TranscendWines.com 300 N. 12th St., Unit 4A 805 741-7281 TylerWinery.com

1501-1503 E. Chestnut Ave. 300 N. 12th St., Unit 1D 805 736-6784 805 736-1600 Piedrasassi.com ZotovichCellars.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 9


Small Bites Local Tastes

Places to go, things to eat and treats for your palate this summer.

Grunion Pale Ale An Alternative to Eating Grunion

In this issue, Nancy Oster writes about the Southern California summer ritual of grunion hunting. What she’ll also say is that experts say that the grunion’s numbers are decreasing. It’s illegal to catch them without a license, and it’s best not to catch them at all. Instead you might want to try Ballast Point’s summer seasonal beer, Grunion Pale Ale. It uses two new hop varieties for flavor, American Mosaic and Calypso, balanced with a bit of malty sweetness. Although not in the least bit fishy, the name is a fitting homage to a late-night summer beach rite of passage. Grunion Pale Ale is available in 12-ounce bottles. BallastPoint.com

Sunset’s Eating Up the West Coast Your Summer Guide Book

The Good Lion A Perfect Cocktail

The farm-to-bar-cocktail aficionados now have another watering hole to call their own. The Good Lion is a dedicated cocktail lounge, and their focus is on making seasonal freshly crafted drinks using local and high-quality ingredients. Watching their skilled mixologists behind the bar is half the fun. Deciding what to order is the hard part. And because you’ll probably want a little nibble with your drink of choice, they have a menu of Spanish tapas that are artfully created by neighboring restaurant Sama Sama. The Good Lion also does events and can provide cocktail catering anywhere in Santa Barbara County. The Good Lion is located at 1212 State St., Santa Barbara. Pictured above is Robb Laussen with a Bramble On cocktail. Open 4pm–1am daily except major holidays. 805 845-8754; GoodLionCocktails.com

10 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Brigit Binns’ latest book combines all the gorgeous photography of a travel book with a food lover’s array of mouthwatering recipes. It covers 75 restaurants from Southern California to Washington. She is an expert at finding the off-the-beaten-path locations that will appeal to the ultimate food road tripper. We’re partial to Route 2, which features recipes from Sides Hardware and Shoes, Bell Street Farm and Jocko’s Steakhouse. But don’t stop there, keep going up the coast as Brigit turns you on to incredible food experiences in Big Sur, Point Reyes Station and all the way up the West Coast. Sunset’s Eating Up the West Coast: The best road trips, recipes and restaurants from California to Washington by Brigit Binns, published by Oxmoor House. $22.95. BrigitBinns.com


vertical TASTING

Summer Thirst Quenchers

Barbareño

There’s nothing like something cold and carbonated on a warm summer day. We found four local brews that quench our thirst and satisfy our longing for something flavorful and refreshing that will pair with the foods of summer. Some of these are bottled, but look for them on tap as well. Each of their websites will give more information on availability.

Santa Maria–Style Tri-Tip

Cerveza de Fiesta

Summer is the time for barbecue, and we all have our favorite spots. One new restaurant has put such an innovative spin on this classic dish, it deserves its own shout out. Barbareño’s Santa Maria BBQ is a marvel of flavor and texture. The chef has come up with a way to use a combination of techniques — a sous-vide method for the ultimate tenderness and grilling over red oak for flavor. The result is fantastic. It’s complemented with pinquito beans and pico de gallo.

Telegraph Brewing Co.

Barbareño is located at 205 W. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara. Open for dinner Sun, Mon, Wed 5:30 –9:30pm, Thu–Sat 5:30 –10pm. They are also open for brunch Sat and Sun 9:30am–1:30pm. 805 963-9591; Barbareno.com

FMB 101

5% alcohol by volume Is there anything more representative of summer than Fiesta? Well, now we have a beer for that. It’s a Czech Pilsner–style lager that is refreshing after a long day of work, relaxing at the beach or riding up State Street in the Old Spanish Days parade. As you would expect, it pairs perfectly with fish tacos and Santa Maria– style barbecue. TelegraphBrewing.com

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 4.8% alcohol by volume What, a good craft beer in a can? Yes, indeed, and just right for outdoor activities this summer. This is a Kolsch-style ale that is cold conditioned like a lager. A great beer to take camping or to enjoy after a long hike. Pair with bacon-wrapped fish and corn on the cob cooked over a campfire. S’mores for dessert optional. FigMtnBrew.com

Community Seafood Support Your Local Fishermen

Visit CommunitySeafood.com for more details, recipes and profiles of local fishermen, such as Sam Shrout, pictured above.

Sour Opal

Firestone Walker Brewing Co. Barrelworks KELSE Y SKIVER

One of the best ways we know of to support local and sustainable fishing is to join Community Seafood. You sign up for a weekly or bi-weekly amount ranging from ½ pound to 4 pounds of fresh seafood that you pick up at one of their distribution points. There are locations in Goleta, Santa Barbara and Carpinteria, as well as points farther south. A one-pound share is $20. And for a little more you can even select a home delivery option. The seafood varies each week. This summer you can look forward to king salmon, opah, halibut, oysters, white seabass, rockfish, squid, mussels, black cod and yellowfin tuna.

6.8% alcohol by volume Wild and sour beers may be the up and coming thing, but Barrelworks has been quietly turning out these innovative beers for years. Sour Opal is their barrel-aged wild ale based on the Belgian “Gueuze” style. Wine lovers will appreciate its nuances and balanced flavors. We think it pairs well with appetizers and cheese platters, or just a fine summer day. FirestoneBeer.com

OG

Conscious Kombucha 0.17% alcohol by volume And now for something a little different— kombucha on tap. When you’re out for a beer, but don’t feel like having a beer, kombucha comes to the rescue. With only a small amount of alcohol it’s great for designated drivers, too. Conscious Kombucha comes in various seasonal flavors, but you can’t go wrong with their delicious classic made from a green tea blend. We’re so grateful that this fantastic locally made product is springing up on tap at so many local restaurants and bars. ConsciousKombucha.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 11


edible

Notables Saving Water in the Kitchen 5 THINGS YOU CAN DO RIGHT NOW by Krista Harris

Reuse and Recycle Water The Kitchen Faucet First, make sure your faucet doesn’t leak. If your leaky faucet drips at the rate of one drip per second it can waste hundreds of gallons per year. Check faucet washers and gaskets for wear and replace them if necessary. Or replace your faucet with one that has a faucet flow rate of 2.2 gallons per minute or lower. Some have a flow rate of 1.8 or 1.5 gallons per minute. Regardless of flow rate, there are many tasks in the kitchen that use a set volume of water, which is where the next tips come in…

12 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

What do you do with your vegetable rinsing water? Leafy greens and other vegetables are best washed in a bowl or tub of water, so it’s a simple matter to use that leftover water in your garden or to water potted plants instead of dumping it down the drain. You can let the water from a pot of water used for boiling vegetables or pasta cool and then use it for watering your plants. You can also capture water that you run while waiting for the water to get hot into a watering can or two. Depending on how far your sink is from your water heater that could be as much as 4–5 gallons of water. New home builders and renovators should consider putting in a gray water system or an on-demand recirculating pump.

Reduce Cooking Water Instead of boiling or blanching vegetables in large quantities of water, try steaming over a small amount of water. Pasta can be cooked in far less water than we previously thought. Instead of cooking a pound of pasta in 4–6 quarts of water, try reducing it to just 2 quarts. Harold McGee suggests starting it out in cold water and giving it an occasional stir to prevent sticking.


Wash with Less Using a dishwasher will most likely use less water than washing your dishes by hand. But there are plenty of variables. Older dishwashers use 8–14 gallons per cycle, while newer models use an average of 4 gallons, with some models using as little as 2 gallons per cycle. Keep your water use low by only running the dishwasher when it is full and wiping or scraping dishes—not rinsing them— before putting into the dishwasher. If you wash by hand, use a dishpan for soaking and another dishpan for capturing the water you use for rinsing. Be sure to use biocompatible soaps and detergents. You can then use the gray water to water your plants.

F R I E N D S • F L O W E R S • F A M I LY • F O O D • F U N

Enjoy Summer at the

7 Markets • 6 Days a Week Rain or Shine

What’s in your basket this week?

Eat Less Water Some crops require more water to produce than others. We can encourage farmers to plant and grow vegetables that use less water by buying those whenever possible. Root vegetables tend to require less water and many local organic farms use watersaving techniques on all the crops they grow. Ian Creelman’s research at UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School analyzed the water usage of crops in conjunction with a UNESCO Institute for Water Education study. Some of the fruits and vegetables that are considered less water intensive are: strawberries, watermelon, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, potatoes, broccoli, lettuce and carrots. Luckily those are some of our area’s best summer crops, so use them freely and try out the recipes on pages 16 through 18.

S AT U R D AY S

S U N D AY S

Downtown Santa Barbara

Camino Real Marketplace

Corner of Santa Barbara & Cota Street 8:30am – 1:00pm

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 10:00am – 2:00pm W E D N E S D AY S

T U E S D AY S

Solvang Village

Old Town Santa Barbara

Copenhagen Drive & 1st Street 2:30pm – 6:30pm

500 & 600 Blocks of State Street 4:00pm – 7:30pm

F R I D AY S

T H U R S D AY S

Montecito

Camino Real Marketplace

100 & 1200 Block of Coast Village Road 8:00am – 11:15am

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 3:00pm – 6:00pm

Carpinteria 800 Block of Linden Avenue 3:00pm – 6:30pm

facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket

www.sbfarmersmarket.org (805) 962-5354

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 13


in Season this summer Summer Produce Apricots Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Basil Beans, green Blackberries Blueberries Cabbage Cantaloupe Celery Cherries Chiles Chives Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Dill Eggplant Figs Grapefruit Grapes Lavender Limes Melons Mint Mustard greens Mulberries Nectarines Onions, green bunching Peaches Peppers Plums/Pluots Raspberries Squash, summer Strawberries Tomatillo Tomatoes Turnips Watermelon

Year-Round Produce

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Garlic

(harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Summer Seafood Halibut Rock fish Salmon, King Sardines Shark Spot prawns Swordfish Tuna, albacore White seabass Yellowtail

Year-Round Seafood Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sanddabs Urchin

Other Year-Round Eggs Coffee (limited availability) Dairy

Edible flowers Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(harvested May/June)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radish Raisins

Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

(harvested July/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 15


seasonal

Recipes

Water-Saving Salad After listing the crops that require less water to grow on page 13, it occurred to me that many of these would make a great salad. So, this simple salad uses 5 of the least waterintensive fruits and vegetables that the UNESCO Institute for Water Education study identified. I like the fact that these are all readily available from our local organic farms. Feel free to use whatever amounts you like to customize it to your taste. Makes 4 servings Some broccoli florets, cut into small bite-size pieces 1 head of lettuce A couple carrots A couple tomatoes, dry farmed if possible A cucumber or 2 1 tablespoon of your choice of vinegar 1

â „ 2 teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste Nasturtium blossoms, optional

Steam the broccoli florets over a small amount of water just until tender, but still al dente. Then use whatever water is left to water your plants. Wash the lettuce and spin dry. Use the same water to wash your remaining vegetables and then again water your plants with the leftover water. Slice the carrots, tomatoes and cucumbers and add to the torn-up lettuce in a large bowl along with the broccoli florets. Whisk the vinegar and mustard together in a small bowl and gradually whisk in the olive oil. Add a little salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle over the salad, toss, add a couple nasturtium blossoms from your garden if you have them and serve.

CAROLE TOPALIAN

— Krista Harris

16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015


SUMMER EVENTS RED, WHITE & BLUES / ALL FARM DINNER BACON & BARRELS AT BUTTONWOOD

To learn about our upcoming summer events visit www.buttonwoodwinery.com/events

WWW.BUTTONWOODWINERY.COM 1500 ALAMO PINTADO ROAD SOLVANG CALIFORNIA

FULL of LIFE

Flatbread Los Alamos, California

field baking since 2003

Restaurant, certified org anic frozen pizzas, field bakes and catering Food Artisan

w w w.Fu llO f Li f eFo o ds.co m

Restaurant

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 17


seasonal

Recipes Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. Mediterranean Watermelon Salad You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Surprisingly, watermelons are one of those crops that are lessMakes water-intensive to grow. And not surprisingly, it’s a 2 sandwiches popular salad ingredient all over the Mediterranean. If you 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped love the combination of salty and sweet, this is the perfect 2 tablespoons orand 1 tablespoon summer salad for mayonnaise you. It’s light refreshing,mayonnaise but the and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche flavors are bold. Feel free to adjust the amounts to suit your ownSalt tastes. As an extra bonus, it’s gorgeous looking and can and pepper, to taste be enjoyed al fresco. Additions:

Makes 4 servings • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped 1⁄ of a small watermelon, rind and seeds removed 2 celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped 1⁄ pound sheep-milk feta cheese 2 onion • A sprinkling of chopped herbs, such as parsley, basil, Handful of Kalamata olives,fresh pitted cilantro, chervil or tarragon

Handful of basil (optional)

• A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the ⁄ 4 of a small red onion, finely diced (optional) pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash Oliveofoil white wine vinegar 1

Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) Pepper

CAROLE TOPALIAN

Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Balsamic vinegar (optional)

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Additional pickled vegetables (optional) CutLettuce the watermelon into evenly sized bite-size cubes. Cut the feta cheese into slightly smaller evenly sized bite-size cubes. Slice the Combine thethirds, eggs, mayonnaise, additions olives in half or depending onseasoning how largeand they are. and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add Gently the watermelon, fetaifand olives in a serving bowl. Tear moretoss seasoning or additions needed. the basil and add to the salad. Add the finely diced red onion. Create anaopen-faced or closed sandwich additional Drizzle with little olive oil and grind a littleusing pepper on top. mayonnaise on each wouldn’t slice if you just mustard, Although you probably seelove thismayonnaise—or done in the Mediterranean, neither. Pickled a great as well, such as youorcan also add a littlevegetables balsamic make vinegar. The topping salad tastes best when a couple stalks ofbut Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. served immediately, it can be brought on a picnic if kept cold. — Krista Harris — Krista Harris


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Join us every Sunday morning for Ojai’s best Bluegrass while enjoying our bottomless champagne and mimosas! Live bluegrass music begins at 10:30am An endless bounty of food that includes a selection of traditional breakfast classics, a carving station with herb roasted prime rib of beef, farm raised turkey, artfully crafted salads of Farmer’s Market veggies and greens, artisan cheeses, succulent seasonal fruits, and raw bar with freshly shucked oysters and cracked crab. Indulge in a display of lavish desserts, including our chocolate fondue fountain and signature seasonal specials from our pastry chef. $49.00 per person / $24.50 ages 5-12 4 and under complimentary *excluding holidays

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 19


DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

A Cocktail Winner by a Nose

b y George Yatchisin

I

’d like to argue that smoke is a flavor. After all, much of what we taste comes from our sense of smell, and even vegetarians can weaken at their knees if there’s the scent of bacon in the air. Tell me that’s not smoky pork calling to some basic desire we all have had since we grunt-chanted around fires in caves eons ago. So my goal this summer was to give you as much smoke in a cocktail as possible. That means the base had to be mezcal, tequila’s artisanal cousin, cooked in an underground pit. While tequila must be made from blue agave, mezcal may come from a wide variety of agave, even if it’s generally espadín. There are

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

also regional issues about where tequila versus mezcal can come from — tequila may only be made in four Mexican states while mezcal can come from nine, including its current artisanal export hotbed, Oaxaca. One way to think of mezcal is by this analogy— Islay : single malt scotch :: mezcal : tequila. Burnt earth. Smoke. Wonder. You do need to forget all those old myths about mezcal—there shouldn’t be a worm, and even if there is one and you establish your cojones/drunkenness by forcing it down, you won’t hallucinate. Mezcal has become a bit hoitytoity, even: In a 2015 poll of the top 100 bartenders, Del Maguey Single Village Mezcal topped the World’s 50 Best Bar Brands report. There’s one problem with the wonderful Del Maguey line, though —much of it is so expensive, you will swear you’re hallucinating looking at the price tag. Instead, I’d like to suggest Bruxo No. 1 Espadín as a good brand with which to start. You can find it for $30 retail, so it won’t break your bank; it’s only 40% alcohol, so it won’t break your liver; and it’s flat out delicious. Even better, Bruxo is no brute, so you get that smoke in a smooth package. The trick for developing the cocktail, then, was how to add smoke to smoke. It’s summer, so of course my mind ran to the barbecue. While nothing beats a good Santa Maria– style tri-tip, people often forget the joys of grilling fruit, too. If you’re lucky enough to have a tree, or just wise enough to go to the farmers market (hello, Regier Family Farms!), summer means the height of stone fruit, in particular the peach. For our purposes, go with a ripe yellow varietal. Now, you could just grill peaches and serve them with ice cream (hello, McConnell’s!), or you could also grill them before the rest of your meal, since you’ll be using them for the Summer & Smoke. That is the one tricky part of this drink; you really need to plan ahead to get your fire roaring in time to make the drink components, then cook your dinner after a cocktail. Of course you could also plan ahead, do the fruit after your meal if your grill remains hot (and you’ve scrubbed off whatever else you’ve cooked, as even the best halibut or T-bone isn’t what the mixologist ordered as an under-flavor), and save it for the next night or two. One of the joys/terrors of smoke is it’s hard to shake, even if it’s been refrigerated (and let the fruit come to room temperature before you use it that second evening so it gets fuller-flavored). But there’s more smoke where there’s fire. Citrus grills nicely, too, so slice a few limes in quarters and let them get good grill marks; you can even BBQ the rind side if you have the time. As with the peaches, keep an eye on things, as you’re not trying to create a new drying technique — you’re going to want juice from all this smoky-good fruit. Give it a moment to rest off the fire, so it settles and is easier for you to handle without mitts. Feel free to do this with


more limes than you need for the drinks, as everything from a salsa fresca to a fish taco will appreciate a drip of smoky citrus. After all, half the fun of mixology is considering culinary spinoffs from what you’re concocting. There is one final trick to get more smoke into the drink, and this one involves actual smoke. You will be pouring the drink into old-fashioned glasses without ice, which means a good half the glass will be empty; well, at least empty of liquid. Because just before you pour in the shaken cocktail, take a rosemary sprig and set it afire—fresh ones will spark up a bit but not cook to a cinder. Quickly drop the sprig in the glass, where its smoke will catch and curl. The aromatics of this touch, especially with the extra room for your nose to dip in the large-ish glass, will be wondrous. There’s one last note from the testing kitchen. I really thought this drink could use a rim of sea salt and crushed rosemary, but this idea never quite worked. First, it meant one’s nose, so happy with toasty scents, got coated with green stuff on the glass. Second, it pushed the drink too much to its obvious cousin, the margarita. Summer & Smoke needs its own place in the pantheon, even if it’s not a classic. Yet.

A Trip to Italy , without the Jet Lag…

George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

Summer & Smoke Makes 2 cocktails 1 peach, sliced in quarters 4 limes, cut in quarters (separated) 4 ounces mezcal 2 ounces Grand Marnier 2 sprigs rosemary

On an oiled hot barbecue, preferably over mesquite, grill the peach quarters and 2 of the limes. The goal is to get some good char lines and flavor but not dry out the fruit, as you will want its juice in your drink. Let fruit cool a few minutes. Coarsely chop the peach pieces. Add to a cocktail shaker. Press the grilled limes to get 1 ounce of juice. Add to shaker. Rinse your fruit press, as the grilled lime will have left a carbony mess, and juice a second 1 ounce of lime juice from non-grilled fruit. Muddle the peaches in the juice, and be patient, as peaches slide, they don’t cling. Really break them down. Add the mezcal and the Grand Marnier. Add ice. Shake vigorously to chill and mix the fruit with the drink. Light both the sprigs of rosemary so they begin to burn/smoke but don’t blaze. Drop each one into an old-fashioned glass (6–8 ounces) and let the smoke pool a bit. Strain the drink from the shaker evenly into the two glasses over the rosemary sprigs.

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 21


EDIBLE GARDEN

Oh, Grow Up

Vining Vegetables Reach for the Sky

V. J. MAT THE W

by Joan S. Bolton

Scarlet runner beans grown on a pyramid-shaped bamboo frame.

M

any summer vegetable plants tend to be on the big side, with each individual plant claiming a goodsized footprint on the earth. But if you’re cramped for space, consider going up instead. A number of summer veggies will vine, which provides an opportunity to train them to reach for the sky, rather than giving way to urban sprawl. Guiding your vegetables up offers a slew of benefits: • It conserves space, maximizing precious garden capacity. • It improves air flow, which helps to combat foliar diseases. • Flattening out the plants and bringing them to eye level makes it easier to control pests and affords multiple vantage points to

22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

watch hummingbirds, butterflies and beneficial insects work their magic. • Crops are easier to harvest. • The plants themselves will create pretty, temporary shade and screening. Whether you’ll conserve water is debatable. Lifting the foliage will reveal where to irrigate, rather than leaving you to guess where the stems and roots are, which can lead to indiscriminately showering a mass of vines. But with that improved air flow, the plants may dry out faster. Be sure to apply 2 to 3 inches of loose, organic mulch as a counterbalance.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 23


C AROLE TOPALIAN

How to Grow

Cucumbers growing on a trellis made with twine.

What to Grow Anything that you can string along a trellis is a good candidate. For starters, look for vining—rather than bush—varieties. Many of these will be heirlooms. With beans, for instance, pole and runner types produce vigorous vines from five to 10 feet tall and include such old-timers as Kentucky Wonder, French Fortex and Scarlet Runner. There are (who knew?) heirloom vining lima beans as well, including Christmas and King of the Garden. Cucumbers, too, come as both bushes and vines. Vining types, such as Orient Express, Homemade Pickles and Suyo Long, generally grow five to six feet tall. Climbing summer squash and zucchini may be another surprise. But there they are: Odessa, Tatume, Zucchino Rampicante and Tromboncino, heirlooms all. On the ground, the fruits may twist and turn. But hung on a trellis, they’re likely to straighten out. Melons are naturally inclined to vine. But they’ll require sturdier supports. Select daintier varieties such as two- to threepound Charentais melons, rather than 25-pound Moon and Stars watermelons. That applies to pumpkins, too. Cute, a 10-pound Sugar Baby is about as hefty as is practical to go. Both ornamental and edible gourds thrive on trellises. However, be warned that their vines may grow 20 feet long, so be prepared to snake them hither and yon through your trellising system. Technically, indeterminate tomatoes fall in the vining category as well. However, given their propensity for sending out bulk in every direction, they’re best contained in cages or grown outward from poles, rather than flattened against trellises. 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Training your summer vegetables to grow up is not nearly as complicated as establishing an espalier, which is often a multiyear project to grow long-lived plants along an extremely narrow plane. Nor is this the über-stylish method of vertical gardening used to display ornamental succulents in frames or hanging pockets, or to grow leafy greens in hydroponic towers. Instead, this is a straightforward, old-school technique to lift your seasonal veggies so you can grow more plants—still connected to the earth—in a limited space. For starters, you’ll need to set up a support system, typically consisting of some combination of trellises, poles or posts. Pre-made wood trellises are long-lasting and can serve more than one purpose. I have on hand several four- by eight-foot redwood trellises that I set on edge horizontally to support clambering summer beans and winter peas. I also lay the trellises flat over fallow beds to prevent our cats from using the exposed soil as a litter box. For a custom design to fit a specific space, poles or posts may be strung with twine, wire, heavy-duty fishing line, netting or lightweight wood lath. Designs abound on the internet for various permutations, including hinged, free-standing pieces that form a high, two-sided inverted ‘V’ over a bed, or more decorative or permanent trellises that cover a blank wall or attach to a fence. If you do grow against a wall or fence, leave a gap at least six to 12 inches wide to allow access for weaving the vines through the trellis and harvesting any fruit that dangles behind. Or, if you have kids, create a summer teepee out of eight-foottall bamboo poles. Splay the poles far enough apart that there’s room for the little ones to crawl in and play inside. Whatever your design, place the trellis in a spot that receives at least six to eight hours of direct sunlight. That’s the daily dose that most summer vegetables require.

As Your Vines Grow Depending on your particular veggies, you’ll need to train the vines as they grow. Cucumbers, for instance, are largely selfreliant, as they produce curling tendrils that they then use to hoist themselves toward the sun. But other summer vegetables require help. Once or twice a week, guide their branches through the openings of larger trellises, or use green stretchy tape or twine to tie them to whatever you’ve designated as supports. The goal is to keep the vines flat and growing both horizontally and upward. As your heavier veggies appear and begin to gain weight, attach flexible slings to the trellis to prevent the fruit from tumbling off. The slings may be composed of netting, green stretchy tape or even torn pieces of old T-shirts, if you like the look. At the end of the season, strip the foliage, yank out the plants and save whatever components you can for the following year. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


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New American Ramen Words and Photos by Rosminah Brown

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DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA

The Black Sheep The Black Sheep is the more casual bistro side of Seagrass run by the Perez family, although the food is no less meticulously prepared with quality seasonal ingredients. Their ramen is one of the most popular items on the menu and is available during all their service hours. The Shoyu ramen (pictured here) has slow-braised Niman 26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

R

amen has long been a popular meal of soup and noodles in Japan. Ramen captured our hearts when Tampopo hit the screen in 1985 and sent us racing to the nearest Japanese restaurant to satisfy our cravings after watching bowl upon bowl being slurped up. Cheap ramen fed us through college. Ramen is a bowl of comfort. And it’s getting better every day. We are starting to see more ramen available in a wave of restaurants of New American cuisine that celebrates our great melting pot of merging ethnicities and cultures. Whether it’s a traditional recipe, or inspired by one, we’ve found three restaurants in Santa Barbara County that regularly offer their take on a bowl of ramen, bringing together local, seasonal, fresh ingredients, quality sourced pork and eggs with perfect velvety yolks. We must give a shout out to restaurant Julienne for their ramen that appears occasionally on the specials menu or in their monthly community-supported cooking (CSC) program. Also to Chef Weston Richards at Les Marchands, who offered a variety of ramen throughout the weekends until this last spring. His house-made noodles and seasonal ingredients were wildly popular and we hope to see it again on the menu.Visit the spot closest to your neck of the woods, or take a noodle tour across the county—there’s a bowl available every night of the week except Monday.

Ranch pork belly, roasted shiitake mushrooms, bean sprouts, green onions, cilantro and an ajitama egg (slow-cooked so the yolk ends up silky rather than runny). Their broth comes from an 18-hour simmer of pork, chicken and wild boar using traditional broth ingredients of kombu, shiitake mushrooms and bonito. The Black Sheep uses its own favorite noodles from a Japanese purveyor in Los Angeles, bringing forth a perfect amount of chewiness and texture that a great bowl of ramen should have. If you enjoy your noodles even more toothsome, try their Tsukemen Tonkotsu Ramen. It has the

noodles served separate to the broth, so you can dip and slurp without letting the noodles get soft. Both the Shoyu ($13) and Tsukemen Tonkotsu Ramen ($14) are consistent items on the daily menu so you can get your ramen fix nearly every evening of the week. While most of the dishes at the Black Sheep are meant to be shared tapas style, the ramen is best as a full portion for one—it does get messy if you slurp properly! The Black Sheep 26 E. Ortega St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 TheBlackSheepSB.com Instagram @theblacksheepsb Open Tue–Sat 5–10pm, Sun 5–9pm


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Bacon & Brine Owners Chef Pink and Courtney Rae extend their Bacon & Brine philosophy of interconnected community and locally sourced ingredients with integrity by offering ramen as a special Saturday sit-down meal. For the occasion, they string up some lights, turn on the Japanese punk rock and present their version of a ramen haus outside in the Atterdag courtyard or inside their obliging neighbor’s shop if the weather isn’t nice. Chef Pink, who jokes that she can’t follow a recipe, varies it each week according to seasonality and availability. Since her sandwich shop is based on using the whole pig, the broth base dependably uses a pig head and trotters in a two-day simmer, and pork skin from her house-made bacon for an additional day, lending a deep flavor and smokiness to the resulting soup that is uniquely Bacon & Brine. The broth probably takes the most interpretive license of the 28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

lot compared to traditional Japanese ramen, because Chef Pink enjoys adding sweet floral elements to her dish, like leeks and thyme. The noodles come from an artisan producer in Los Angeles, known for working with independent chefs in their test kitchen to produce noodles that best complement each ramen recipe. As for the toppings, each bowl is finished with pickled mushrooms, a slowbraised pork from their shop’s current supply and a 55° egg, from a local chicken farmer or perhaps their own chickens in Los Olivos. The bowl pictured here has a special topping of a crispy fried pig’s ear and cilantro flowers. Ramen nights are by reservation only on Saturdays. They offer two seatings for 12 diners each, at 6:30 and 7:30pm. It is a simple service of ramen for $15, and it includes a spicy fermented condiment of Courtney Rae’s choice, like a pickle or spicy house-made kimchi. Bacon & Brine 453 Atterdag Square Solvang, CA 93463 Facebook.com/baconandbrine Instagram @baconandbrine Ramen night: Sat by reservation: seatings at 6:30pm and 7:30pm


GOLETA

The Outpost

New

New to the ramen scene and growing in popularity is the Outpost, the restaurant within the trendy, fun Goodland, a Klimpton Hotel, that’s reminiscent of the hipster scene of Palm Springs and feels like a year-round pool party. The Outpost already offers a menu containing a handful of Asian-inspired dishes like pork buns, so it’s no surprise they’re extending their offerings with tasty Japanese noodles as a specialty item. The ramen here is highlighted with fresh house-made noodles and tender braised pork belly with a six-minute egg. Each week, head Chef Derek Simcik and Executive Sous-Chef Thomas Paradise work out the week’s single ramen dish, which widely varies, so you can come back each week and likely experience a completely different recipe of ramen. They are experimenting with spicy Korean ingredients, or deeply flavored and long-simmered pork Tonkotsu, posting delicious shots on the Outpost’s Instagram feed. In this photo, the broth deviates from the ubiquitous pork base and is made of chicken and dashi, with marinated bamboo, bean sprouts and a pile of green onions, finished with a pinch of sesame seeds. Their ramen is only available on Sundays during their evening service that starts at 5pm and goes until the ramen sells out, so it’s best to get there earlier in the evening. Their bowls are $16 each, and a satisfying meal to be eaten in a hip, lively atmosphere with a full cocktail bar, truly an outpost in Goleta.

American

Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner and Weekend Brunch 805-684-6666 www.slysonline.com 686 Linden Avenue, Carpinteria

The Outpost 5650 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117 OutpostSB.com Instagram @outpostsb Ramen night: Sun 5pm until sold out

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Rosminah Brown is a Santa Barbara native who types fast and eats slow. She once jumped in the Neptune Pool at Hearst’s Castle. She is still upset that JR’s BBQ closed. You can read her blog at GutFud.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 29


� Honeybee

Honeybees are ƒe only insect ƒat produces food for humans WHEREVER

by Bambi Edlund

The smallest bee is the size of a fruit fly, the largest is the size of a plum.

One pound of honey = up to 10 million blossoms

If kept free of moisture, honey will never spoil.

FLOWERS GROW, THERE ARE BEES; WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE ANTARCTIC, THEY ARE PRESENT ON EVERY CONTINENT.

One foraging honeybee will only produce about 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey in her lifetime

Not sure if that’s a bee in your begonias? Bees have four wings, flies have two

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To evaporate any moisture, bees fan nectar with their wings, which creates honey

Honeybees are originally native to Africa, the Middle East, and Western Europe

When the god Re wept and his tears hit the ground, they turned into honeybees.

on a typical day, a queen lays |honeybee EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015 1,500 eggs

—Egyptian myth

A honeybee’s wings beat 200 times per second

Apis mellifera honeybee

Honey production in California has dropped significantly due to the drought.

One third of all the food we eat exists as a result of honeybee pollination

Bees gather propolis from the leaves and bark of trees and use it to seal holes in their hives. Propolis is antiseptic, and makes a beehive one of nature’s most sterile environments.

A typical hive produces up to 130 pounds of honey per year bambiedlund.com


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Come for our Estate wines, Stay for the out-of-this-world experience! Celebrating our Tasting Room’s first anniversary — October, 2014

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ALISOS CANYON ROAD

Just south of Los Alamos, Alisos Canyon Road joins Hwy 101 to Foxen Canyon Road. We’re halfway in between, 3.3 miles east of Hwy 101. Los Alamos

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Goleta

5668 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117 805.770.2730

Next to Panino, Across from Trader Joe’s

Downtown

331 Motor Way Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.845.5379 Corner of State and Gutierrez

La Cumbre

3849 State St. Suite i157 Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805.569.0011 In La Cumbre Plaza, next to Vons


An Unlimited Idea of Freedom Spending Time in Gaviota

Words and Photos by Rosminah Brown

“To begin with, you’ve got to understand that a seagull is an unlimited idea of freedom…” —Jonathan Livingston Seagull

G

aviota, which is Spanish for “seagull,” often escapes our attention because, compared to other parts of Santa Barbara County, it appears less hospitable, more isolated and rugged and simply a place we pass through. But its unique terrain differentiates it from the rest of the county, and in fact it is easily accessible from Highway 101. Most of its destinations are often within eyesight or earshot of the 101, making it simple and convenient to pull over and spend an hour or two exploring the area. At the far end of Gaviota we find one of the most significant features of Santa Barbara County, Point Conception, which the Chumash considered the Western Gate, or portal, for souls to

enter paradise. It is the point where the Pacific Ocean and the Santa Barbara Channel meet. The water and weather churn unpredictably from the convergence, but within our Channel we feel protected. Here is the iconic yet enigmatic Point Conception Lighthouse, unfortunately inaccessible to the public but standing as a symbol of the change in water temperature and climate. And perhaps it acts as a beacon of one of the last major stretches of undeveloped coastline. The Gaviota Coast Conservancy works diligently to maintain this piece of coast, where flora and fauna thrive quietly as we rumble by along the highway few miles away or as we pass through Hollister Ranch by train.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 33


Above: Gaviota Peak is the longest and most strenuous of the options, requiring sturdy shoes. It is six miles round trip, reaching an altitude of 2,460 feet. Below: One of Gaviota’s iconic bridges.

The Gaviota Tunnel has appeared four notable times in entertainment media. The best-known are in The Graduate and Wayne’s World 2, where the tunnel fictionally goes southbound. It appears in Sideways going in the correct northbound direction. Its fourth appearance, which escapes the eye of most except for video gamers, is in Grand Theft Auto V!

34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015


An adventure awaits, and it’s been right under our noses the whole time. The recent oil spill at Refugio may have sadly called attention to this strip of coast, but there’s no need to avoid it— just steer clear of any closed beaches. Bring some good shoes, sunblock and a hat. Pack a savory picnic and plan to pick up some additional ingredients from a handful of farms in the area. There is something for everyone, including beaches, state parks, easy hikes and more challenging altitude slogs, breathtaking views and a feeling that you’ve explored some hidden gems that you only had to drive a dozen or two miles to reach. Starting from the north, south, east or west does not matter, as Gaviota is a convenient area that most towns and roads funnel into. For the sake of organization, we will list points of interest going from Santa Barbara in the south towards Buellton along Highway 101 (which is really east to west), using right-hand turnoffs, then doing a loop and returning south along the coastal side. Most stops require turning straight off the highway.

Gaviota Peak, Trespass Trail and the Gaviota Hot Springs Exit Highway 1, the first exit north of the Gaviota Tunnel.

There are three great spots available at one stop, and you can attempt to visit all three, depending on time and your level of fitness, or just one or two. Each offers something unique. This exit has a dedicated off-ramp in both directions, which most use to drive along Highway 1 to Lompoc; but turn in the opposite direction, towards the mountains, then turn right and head parallel to the highway back towards the Gaviota Tunnel. It dead ends with a basic lot to park the car. There is a $2 state park fee, with envelopes provided which you deposit into a metal box at the trailhead. From here, you can pick your own adventure. Gaviota Peak is the longest and most strenuous of the options, requiring sturdy shoes. It is six miles round trip, reaching an altitude of 2,460 feet. Stay on the wide fire road trail, which will wind up the hills. There is nothing technically complex about this hike, but it is an upward slog in the summertime heat. Near the top the wide trail continues left along the coastal ridge of the Santa Ynez Mountains, while a smaller trail continues upwards to the right, at a steep but short incline—take this route and you will be rewarded with epic views. When you reach the peak you will see a sturdy metal can in the middle marked “Gaviota Peak.” Inside the can is a cache stuffed with journals and notebooks of past visitors. The hike takes about four hours and is best for those seeking a fitness

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challenge. There are other options that are easier hikes with equally pleasant rewards. Trespass Trail is a much simpler two-and-a-halfmile loop, that can be completed in under two hours at a leisurely pace. This trail is narrow and overgrows easily. Local hiking groups dedicate volunteer hours in some trail maintenance, but do anticipate having to push through encroaching branches and beware of poison oak. The trail ends when it loops back onto the wide trail that accesses Gaviota Peak. The Hot Springs trail is the easiest of all three to reach. Follow the main wide trail of Gaviota Peak from the trailhead for just a third of a mile until you see a small trail on the right hand side with a small creek. Follow this trail through the brush and the shade of trees for an additional few minutes until it ends at the sulfursmelling Hot Springs— more accurately described as tepid. Manmade concrete structures compose a rudimentary upper and lower pool. The upper spring is warmer and the more easily accessible of the two and is not deep. Continuing northbound Hot Springs. along Highway 101 is the hill climb, and once over it, watch for the Nojoqui Falls turnoff on the right hand side. This leads to Old Coast Highway, which is a delightful trip by car or bike in the back roads between 101 and Solvang and worth a pleasure drive by itself.

The Farm•Stead 2323 Old Coast Highway FarmSteadCA.com

The Farm•Stead’s Kunekune pigs. The pigs at this farm are a unique heritage breed from New Zealand. They are small pigs, which breed small number litters (not popular for conventional pork production) and were at risk of dying out. Their snouts are noticeably short, which make them more land grazers rather than soil rooters, so they are gentle pasture creatures. Their faces are also so endearingly cute that it might be hard to think that these pigs can become chops and sausages on our dinner table. They are available for purchase as both pets and pork through special arrangement at the farm.

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Formerly called Classic Organics, this farm changed in late 2014 to become a much more family-friendly destination. Visitors, especially those with children, can enjoy feeding a menagerie of animals, including llamas, goats, chickens and a rare New Zealand heritage breed of Kunekune pigs. Inside the farmhouse is a bucket of day-old greens that visitors are invited to feed to the animals. The farmhouse offers a daily selection of produce from its own fields, and on weekends (Friday–Sunday) they have Market Days, where additional local products are available such as olive oil, honey, soaps, pistachios, eggs and fresh bakery selections. The Farm•Stead is also a U-pick farm, listing out the current season’s freshest organic produce on a board inside the farmhouse. The popular item to pick is a basket or two of sweet strawberries. There are large picnic tables available to sit in the courtyard and watch the animals, and a


3.625" x 2.25"

washbasin to clean up your freshly picked produce. It is possible to spend a lot of time here, especially if you cannot get enough of the adorable Kunekune pigs and prancing llamas.

Nojoqui Falls Park 3190 Alisal Road

Farther into Old Coast Highway this park is the largest and most developed visitor area in Gaviota. Yet it still has an air of seclusion, being set far back in the rural hills. There are large grassy fields for baseball, ample parking and grill pits to accommodate visitors for big BBQs or short travel pit stops. It is not a long hike to reach Nojoqui (pronounced Na-HOwee) Falls, although in the summertime, and especially with the drought, the falls will be dry. Currently the falls area is closed due to a mudslide.

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Returning to Highway 101, less than a mile beyond the Old Coast Highway turnoff, is Santa Barbara Blueberries. It has been open to the public since 2006, providing 18 acres of U-pick blueberry fields and one acre of raspberry fields. Visitors take metal buckets out into the rows of bushes to pick fresh berries in the canyon surrounded by rolling hills of oaks and sycamores, or can opt to buy full baskets at the shaded farm stand. The blueberry farm is only open in the summer and is a popular destination for locals and tourists passing through. There is ample parking available as well as picnic benches. Santa Barbara Blueberries is about 15 miles south of Buellton, so it is possible to continue up 101 or turn around at this point and start heading back down the Highway.

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Gaviota Wind Caves.

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Gaviota Rest Stop On the south side of Gaviota Pass the first exit is the Caltrans Rest Stop. Although there is a rest stop on each side of the Highway, the southbound one offers the best views and recently reopened after a period of renovation. It is worth a stop here even if you don’t require a rest. And it is especially worth stopping here if you are local because for a brief moment of time, you become a tourist in your own backyard. At this rest stop you can feel like you’re discovering a whole new world. The dramatic rocky geography rises up here, displaying stark reddishyellow sandstone outcroppings dotted with native oaks and chaparral. It is reminiscent of the monumental nature normally associated with Utah and Arizona. It is not a view just for passing truckers and other distance drivers, it is our view too. The rest stop has sturdy concrete picnic benches offering steep canyon views to look up into, where we might feel dwarfed and insignificant in nature if it weren’t for the passing highway traffic reminding us that we’re mere minutes from civilization. It offers information about Gaviota, areas to exercise pets and, of course, restrooms.

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Gaviota Wind Caves Turnoff directly from 101 southbound

Located at the same turnoff as the state park campgrounds and beach is access to the Wind Caves. The trailhead is an easy walk from the state park parking area. And if you’ve paid the $10 use fee, just leave your car in this lot. But the fee is not required if you only want to visit the Wind Caves. Just before the park kiosk, take the right-hand road leading up the hill for about 1,000 yards and park in the open dirt lot. The Wind Caves trailhead starts at the metal gate. Overall, this is an easy hike, and more than half of it is a rough asphalt road that winds through golden hills running parallel to Highway 101. When the paved road ends, veer left onto the trail and start climbing. Stick with the most well-worn trails leading upwards. The Wind Caves are actually visible from the highway and during most of the hike. But you might not realize it the first time. Look for vertical rock faces and follow the trail that leads towards them. When you reach the large EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 39


Gaviota State Park and Beach Turnoff directly from 101 southbound

The Southern Pacific train trestle and concrete pedestrian bridge.

rocks, you’ll find passageways, carved by years of strong winds racing through the Gaviota canyons. The caves are fun to walk, crawl and climb through, and those seeking a greater challenge can scramble higher up the hillside. But it is fine to enjoy this easier set of wind caves. Thankfully, those who’ve chosen to leave their mark have opted to leave carvings rather than painted graffiti. The Wind Caves, for how easily accessible they are from the 101, remain very natural-looking. Returning from the Wind Caves, you will be ready to refresh yourself at the beach. This is a great time to admit it’s a good idea to pay the $10 state park fee to use their restrooms and relax at the beach. The fee helps fund these parks for all to use. If you already paid the $2 parking fee for Gaviota Peak and Hot Springs, keep that receipt and the assistant at the kiosk will reduce the usage fee to $8. 40 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Spanning the beach of Gaviota State Park is an iconic Southern Pacific trestle where trains pass every few hours. The entrance fee is $10, and camping is also available. Personally, I leave the camping to visitors from farther afield. Gaviota is particularly wind-prone and especially so at the campsite. If you do want to camp, consider a tent or camper that can handle strong winds. There is a small shop open here seven days a week, selling basic camping food and drink and simple campout supplies, like firewood and charcoal. The beach here is home to the Gaviota Pier, which used to have a crane for public use as a boat launch. Unfortunately, the pier was damaged in the storms of March 2014 and is closed indefinitely. Visitors can still see most of the pier and its one remaining hoist, but cannot walk on it. It is still very much a part of the landscape of this beach, along with the large train trestle spanning the beach.

Arroyo Hondo Preserve Tajiguas Landfill Exit on Highway 101

Arroyo Hondo is a 782-acre preserve located in a sandstone gorge in southeastern Gaviota. The canyon helps protect its flora and fauna from the summer heat, offering cool surroundings of ferns, native orchids and plenty of shade. The preserve’s visitors can easily spend a full day wandering the miles of trails, which offer views of the coastline and mountains. There are tables for bringing a picnic or enjoying a quiet read amidst the California scenery.


The preserve is formerly ranch land, with most of the hiking trails being old ranch roads. There are still ranch buildings on-site, including a well-maintained and picturesque adobe structure. In 2001 it was purchased by the Land Trust of Santa Barbara County, which organizes volunteer projects, docent training programs and works with Bren School of Environmental Studies and Management at UCSB to develop conservation programs. This is one stop in Gaviota that cannot be done without a little planning. The preserve is only open to the public on the first and third weekends of every month and is visited by making reservations at arroyohondo@sblandtrust.org or calling 805 567-1115. Visiting the preserve is free, with a suggested donation of $5 or $10.

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Gaviota Vista Point The last point south is the Vista Point. It is accessed directly from Highway 101/El Camino Real southbound, with easily visible signage and a moderately long offramp, plus a long onramp to get back on the highway. This stop is simply a paved road, where vehicles can pull over and park. It can be as short and sweet as parking a few minutes without leaving the car, or climbing out and taking a short walk. The view is of our beautiful coastline, stretching as far as the eye can see. It is very common to see dolphins or even whales. There are two bridges—the first a Southern Pacific train trestle worthy of a photograph or two with the Pacific Ocean as the backdrop. The other is a concrete pedestrian bridge that makes an easy walk for taking photographs of the trestle. If you’re lucky, an Amtrak train might pass through, offering an intense minute of ground-shaking before the sounds of the ocean and highway take over again. From here, you can return home, or move on to other parts of the county. Enjoy the journey!

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Rosminah Brown is a Santa Barbara native who types fast and eats slow. She once jumped in the Neptune Pool at Hearst’s Castle. She is still upset that JR’s BBQ closed. You can read her blog at GutFud.com

Resources Refugio Oil Spill Updates RefugioResponse.com

Hiking Hikespeak.com/trails/tunnel-view-trail-gaviota-state-park Hikespeak.com/trails/gaviota-peak-trespass-trail Hikespeak.com/trails/gaviota-wind-caves

State Park Camping Parks.ca.gov/?page_id=606

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WIL FERNANDE Z

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I

n Europe, wine grapes have been farmed without irrigation for thousands of years. In these regions, where every aspect of wine production is tightly regulated, the practice is outlawed under the belief that irrigation can be detrimental to quality. Some wine critics argue that using water as a substitute for rainfall is not a true expression of terroir, or a sense of place, in wine. That’s a debate that will continue indefinitely. In our relatively young wine region, as well as the rest of California, the vast majority of vineyards are irrigated. While grapevines require significantly less water than many other agricultural crops, the historic drought in California is putting every farm, vineyard and orchard under the microscope. Surprisingly, there are a handful of dryfarmed vineyards in Santa Barbara County that produce delicious wine in spite of this drastic water shortage.

“It makes no economic sense, but it makes damn good wine.”—Dick Doré Over the past year, I had the pleasure of spending some time with local dry farming pioneers Dick Doré and William “Billy” Wathen to learn more about what they are doing—without water — in the Santa Maria Valley. The two have been working together since 1985. They are co-founders and co-owners of Foxen Vineyard & Winery. Billy handles vineyard management and winemaking. Dick has stayed focused on selling the wine they produce. It is an ideal partnership, seemingly because they know how to stay out of each other’s way. While Foxen sources grapes from vineyards throughout Santa Barbara County, their own 10-acre Tinaquaic (think “ten o’clock”) Vineyard is perched 500 feet above their solar-powered winery on Foxen Canyon Road. They planted the vineyard in 1989 by gathering the leftover cuttings from historic Santa Barbara County vineyards using a method Dick affectionately refers to as “Volar de Noche” (fly by night). 44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015


KIRK IRWIN WIL FERNANDE Z

Dick Doré and WIlliam “Billy” Wathen.

A recurring element in many stories of their early days is Dick’s old orange pickup truck, which carried the cuttings up the mountain where they buried them 24 to 30 inches into the soil. 1989 and 1990 were relatively wet years, so the vines took off in the fertile soil that was the historic Rancho Tinaquaic, purchased in 1837 by English sea captain William Benjamin Foxen, Dick’s great-great-grandfather. When asked why they chose to dry farm, the answer was simple: They just don’t have access to water way up there. Relying only on the water that nature provides, the vines must be meticulously farmed by Billy’s vineyard crew. Special viticulture techniques, such as pruning back growth, are applied to maximize the plant’s limited energy and efficiency. Interestingly, the amount of fruit yielded per vine is actually determined the year prior, so they must constantly consider the big picture. If they overtax the vines this year, another small crop will follow, no matter how much rain falls. In an average year they farm two to three tons of grapes to the acre at Tinaquaic Vineyard. But in a drought year, especially following a drought year, grape yields can be disturbingly low. In 2014, Foxen harvested

less than a half-ton of grapes per acre. Billy enjoys working with the unique concentration and characteristics that come from the Tinaquaic Vineyard fruit, but Dick is always looking at the numbers. When asked about the vineyard, Dick says, with a smirk, “It makes no economic sense, but it makes damn good wine.” It turns out that no matter what the crop yield is, it still costs Foxen the same to farm the land. They produce anywhere from 500 to 2,000 cases a year of dry farmed Chardonnay, Syrah and Cabernet Franc from the vineyard. Those costs aren’t passed to the consumer, but imagine if they were! That would be an expensive bottle of wine. The two chalk it up to the romance of dry farming. It’s an interesting challenge for them, and so far the good years have made up for the bad. For the past two years, Wil Fernandez has been focused on increasing consumer appreciation for small-production wines by creating awareness of the agricultural aspects of winemaking. His crowd-funded multimedia project “VINTAGE 2014: the stories behind the vines” has received acclaim from national film festivals and international wine publications alike.

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Taste Sensations and Tannin Slayings A Journey Into Bridlewood Winery’s Salt Experience by Rachel Hommel P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E R I N F E I N B L AT T

Bridlewood Winery’s production facility.

S

alt. The most basic, yet essential, element of taste serves both a vital purpose in the human body and upon one’s palate. It is the original tastemaker, the culinary king. Bringing something new to wine tasting, Bridlewood Winery has created a Salt Experience—pairing premium salts with a selection of wines. From softening tannins to cutting acidity, the Salt Experience focuses on flavor, highlighting seasoning at its most primary level. The idea is to allow guests to more fully understand salt selection and how it relates to the power of seasoning for food and wine pairings. 46 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Eager for a new culinary adventure, I enlist some savvy wine connoisseurs to come along with me for this completely new concept in tasting. We head off for Bridlewood Winery, which is located not too far off Highway 154 between Santa Ynez and Los Olivos. The winery is set on over 100 acres, a former equestrian estate, and the drive up offers stunning scenery. When we arrive we meet Lindsey Jessup, Bridlewood’s wine education manager, our guide through the taste journey. Lindsey is a wine and culinary aficionado with a penchant for big smiles and laughter. Offering ample hugs and high-fives


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 47


along the way, her energy and enthusiasm is contagious, as is her The selected reserve reds include a wide taste spectrum, smalldedication to the craft. production wines limited to the tasting room. We are encouraged to savor the wine first and then to enjoy the different nuances of Showing us to our private tasting, she presents us with a the salt. Lindsey explains that salt, in relation to red wine, is the brochure entitled “Salt and Wine Dynamics.” Dynamics? Isn’t quintessential tannin slayer. Yes, slayer—softening out the bitter this a wine pairing? Welcome to Tasting 2.0, a salty restructuring and rough of our taste buds. characteristics Pairing usually that one might assumes a one-for-one experience on correlation between a the tongue. wine and the dish that In addition matches it. This is not to enhancing the case today. Red flavor, salt can with meat, white with make flavors veggies… no longer. pop, as we are I am eager to find out about to find more, diving into a out. world of minerality. The first It’s a complex system salt to pair is of tastes and flavors the Peruvian that can influence the Pink Salt. success of wine and Sourced from food combinations. a natural Our tasting today will spring 10,000 focus on salt and allow feet high in us to savor the most the Peruvian basic culinary element mountains, and its effect on this is not your flavor—heightening, typical kosher tempering, salt. Hand counteracting. harvested for After settling in over 2,000 at the private wine years, the counter, we are crystals have presented with three high moisture salts, crystal-like content and wonders of different light pink pigments, hues and color. Strong textures, beautifully in flavor, the displayed in copper salt is a great containers. We are seasoning salt, introduced to the from crusting three players: Peruvian a steak to Pink Salt, Hawaiian seasoning a Red (also known as sauce. Alaea) and Cyprus The Black Flake. These are second salt is all from Laguna Salt Lindsey Jessup, Bridlewood’s wine education manager. the Hawaiian Company’s line of Red, also known as Alaea, a traditional Hawaiian table salt used artisan salts. to season and preserve. Rich in trace minerals, this non-processed As it does with food, salt can heighten our perception of salt can be found in seawater. A small amount of harvested other flavors in wine —in this case tempering our impressions of reddish Hawaiian clay (Alaea) enhances the salt with iron oxide. bitterness and acidity in the wine. Lindsey explains the overall Offering a pleasant, unique flavor, the salt can be used while experience, which includes a three-wine reserve red flight, paired roasting or grilling meats. alongside the salts from bold to subtle.

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The third salt is Cyprus Black Flake, Mediterranean flake salt mixed with active charcoal. With large pyramid-shaped crystals, the charcoal acts as a natural detoxifier. Light and fluffy, the salt offers a mild taste, characteristic of Mediterranean salts. Popular for cooking and baking, the flake salt can be used to garnish fish and vegetable dishes. After being introduced to our salt competitors, we are ready to sip, dip and swish. Going down the line, mixing and matching is highly encouraged, as well as revisiting wines to reinvigorate the palate. Our first taste is Bridlewood’s 2012 GSM Blend, melding Grenache, Syrah and Marsanne. With aromas of strawberry and cranberry in the GSM blend, this wine is both rustic and ripe. Light, bright, this is the softest of the wines. The mellow Hawaiian Red salt naturally enhances this, aiding in bringing forth a stronger fruit component. Imagining myself in a French salon, I talk with Lindsey about the nuances in the wine, and about taste, fragrance and olfactory pleasure. Throughout the tasting, our geeky exclamations grow, as well as our appetite. Swirling our next wine, the 2011 Reserve Pinot Noir, releases strong flavors of cherries, berries and notes of pomegranate. With a sweet oak and spice, the wine offers soft, elegant tannins, lifting and heightening the fruit aromas, particularly with the Peruvian salt. And finally, the big, bold 2010 Block 7 Syrah. Tannin fans rejoice, the true taste test. With aromas of dust and smoke, this wine inspires the most noticebable reaction. By itself, the wine offers a full mouthful, a lingering finish of mocha and cherry, with a touch of Petite Sirah for enhanced structure. The Peruvian Pink Salt’s strong flavor is able to temper (or slay) the boldness of the tannin, while the light Cyprus Black Salt keeps the natural tannins alive and kicking. Lindsey, our gracious host and fearless leader, is not only an educator; she is a taste pioneer. Allowing the culinary curious to explore the dynamics of flavor, she embodies a new tasting ethos, adventurous and highly experimental. With glass in hand, we walk out onto the verandah, my head buzzing with thoughts of delicious recipes and salty offerings. Like a true star, salt plays to the audience, encouraging debate, culinary quibbles and, most importantly, fun. With a newfound appreciation for my kitchen’s most basic arsenal, I am inspired to re-create this at home. Wine + Salt. The perfect dynamic duo.

The winery is a former equestrian estate.

If You Go You can call in advance and reserve a unique “Salt Experience” for $25 per tasting or you can drop in and upgrade a Reserve Tasting for an additional $5 for an extra splash of wine and one of the three salts to sample and evaluate. Call 805 688-9000 for details or visit BridlewoodWinery.com. When not rallying for fair food, Rachel Hommel can be spotted at the farmers market, practicing yoga and dancing to the beet of life. Leading local food tours in town, she enjoys eating her way through Santa Barbara, one bite at a time.

You are encouraged to take notes on the tasting sheet.

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Home, Home Off the Range BBQ Boot Camp at the Alisal Ranch by George Yatchisin

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ALISAL GUEST R ANCH

“B

oot camp” tends not to be the most

ALISAL GUEST R ANCH

pleasant pairing of words. All sorts of notions might cross one’s troubled mind, from the existential, homicidal horrors of Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket to the aches of a week of workouts that seem to confuse the words pain and plan. Most of us don’t submit to boot camps willingly or in cheerful spirits. But then there’s the Alisal Guest Ranch and Resort’s BBQ Boot Camp, which you’ll wish was longer than its three quick days. I had the incredible good fortune to attend one this February and learn from master chefs Frank Ostini from the Hitching Post II and the Alisal’s Pascal Godé, plus eat and drink too much, toss horseshoes, play pool, shoot baskets, make my own spice mix, hear cowboy poetry and get the first saddle sores of my adult life. This article is a look back at that fabulous weekend, especially since it’s possible for you to sign up for the next one, happening October 28–30. Opposite and above: Horses are part of the experience at the Alisal Ranch.

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The stage is set for dinner.

Friday: Seminar and Dinner It’s important to set the scene if you’ve never been to the Alisal. While you approach it from the bustling aebleskivered-buzz of Solvang, it truly lives up to its name as a ranch. As you drive down Alisal Road to get there, your odometer seems as if it should add miles, subtract years. You might be met by a cheerful ranch hand with a cockatoo on her shoulder. Stable dust will quickly settle on your soul, as a corral of horses stare back at you. The back of the Santa Ynez Mountains roll and rise about you and your cottage will have porches front and back asking you to spend much time reading/gazing at the horizon. Firewood will be dropped off for your fireplace daily, and you’ll use it. But, if you’re here for BBQ Boot Camp, your fireplace will just be one of the many delightful smokes to please you. A late afternoon seminar will commence led by the affable Frank

52 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Ostini, wearing his trademark pith helmet, and Pascal Godé, who sort of looks like John Cleese, especially when he makes cracks like, “So you’re going to learn how to do American BBQ from a French chef.” The two take you through what fuels to use for your fire, how best to light that fuel, how to know when it’s ready for grilling. Frank is an advocate for coastal live oak (aka red oak), claiming it’s a denser wood that leads to a hotter fire. You also end up learning a secret history of BBQ on the Central Coast, as Frank explains his dad’s restaurant, the original Hitching Post in Casmalia, actually used red oak charcoal for years, but “that got harder and harder to get, so we eventually went to all wood.” Santa Barbara BBQ also has another unique tool—the very grills themselves. Frank expressed how hard it was to take his Hitching Post show on the national road as he couldn’t find the right equipment. While his grills are 18 inches deep or


STE VEN BROWN

Pascal Godé, executive chef at Alisal Ranch.

more, generally people across the country had Big Johns that are a mere four inches deep, and not adjustable. His grills have a cooking surface that can rise up and down for different heat application, a crucial part of his method. In fact, it’s sort of shocking how willing he is to give up secrets, such as that the Hitching Post flips meat a lot when it grills (as opposed to the traditional wisdom of only turning things once). The goal is to keep the juices consistently heading to the center of your protein. Both Frank and Pascal are big on basting, too, and provide you with a handy booklet full of recipes so you can do the same at home. Dinner that evening proves, unsurprisingly, that both chefs are masters. Pascal has all sort of goodies passed to start, including delicious sweetbreads (yes, you can grill them, at least if you’re French). Frank offers up all sorts of meat and fish and vegetables, including the classic H-P artichokes with smoked

Top: Bradley Lettau, executive chef at Hitching Post II; Krista Harris; Frank Ostini, winemaker and proprietor of Hitching Post II. Below: appetizers.

tomato mayo. If the food isn’t enough for you, the event likes to pair local breweries and wineries each night and this evening it’s Figueroa Mountain Brewing and Hitching Post Wines, with Frank’s partner Gray Hartley serving as a charming storytelling sommelier. He kindly wanders the dining room with large format, aged bottles, including a 2001 Syrah from Purisima Mountain, a wine they don’t get grapes to make anymore, and that fact will make you very, very sad.

Saturday: Breakfast Ride, Spice Blending, Dinner It seems only fitting that as a food writer I’m atop a horse named Tonto who takes every opportunity to munch at the weeds along our breakfast ride instead of trotting. That means I get plenty of practice reining him in, as our very helpful wrangler kept on me to keep on Tonto. But if you want to know what it’s like to briefly live in a John Ford film, here’s your chance to do so and end up eating the best flapjacks of your life.

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STE VEN BROWN

That’s the Alisal Breakfast Ride, and you don’t want to miss it. The views alone— glimpses of the mist breaking so the notso-distant mountains look like something developed in the dreamiest CGI lab, for example—are worth getting up early and the saddle sores you’ll earn. You end up at the ranch’s rustic adobe for a buffet feast, and are entertained by live music with jokes like, “Here’s a new song, it’s from 1870,” rope tricks and cowboy poet Chris Henrich, a living ode to the oral tradition. Then you ride back and Tonto doesn’t even complain that you weigh more after all that bacon, biscuits and gravy. That afternoon there’s a spice-blending seminar so you can make your own version 54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

ALISAL GUEST R ANCH

Cooking biscuits over a campfire.

The horses wait patiently during the morning breakfast.

ALISAL GUEST R ANCH

of the Hitching Post’s acclaimed Magic Stuff. A 24-foot-long table is filled with spices for you to mix, and you get all sorts of tips, like Pascal saying, “Use about 25% salt, and the rest aromatics and peppers,” and Frank stresses not to use table or iodized salt, for it’s not a great flavor. As per my wife’s idea, my mix is called Powdered Awesome, aimed at fish and vegetables: ground ginger, cumin, garlic powder, ancho chili pepper flakes, lemon pepper, celery salt, kosher salt and sea salt. I only wish I made more of it. The evening brings another dinner when guests get to grill their own or let the chefs do what they know best. That does lead to some friendly confusion as to whose New York strip or whose crazy-fresh salmon is getting cooked to what temp, but no one complains, especially with Firestone Walker Brewery and Ferguson Crest Winery (and it’s Pat Ferguson, not his daughter Fergie, pouring—it’s not that exclusive an event) generously pouring their local beverages. At this point all the attendees are trading tastes, stories, business cards, recipes, spice blends. And the next morning there’s one last repast in the Ranch Room, plus a chance to do one more quick hike or some fishing at Alisal’s lake. Or, if it was like the weekend we were there, it might rain, one more blessing bestowed on Santa Barbara.

Creating a custom spice blend.

If You Go The next BBQ Boot Camp will be held October 28–30, 2015, at the Alisal Guest Ranch and Resort. Package includes meals, workshops, activities, two nights’ accommodations, double occupancy. For details and availability call 805 688-6411 or visit Alisal.com. George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.


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G is for Grunion Myth or Magic? by Nancy Oster PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE HOWARD

A few scout fish arrive first to survey the beach.

I

t’s unseasonably balmy on the beach at midnight early in grunion season. I wiggle my toes in the foam from that last wave as I concentrate on the white curl of the next incoming wave, which looks large enough to wash right over my feet. Do I see moonlight reflecting off a school of silver-sided grunion as the wave crests? Yes! When the wave recedes, the beach is alive with thousands of iridescent sardine-sized fish dancing around my feet, piled so deep I don’t dare move even though they are tickling my ankles. They’ve come to spawn in the moonlight, leave their fertilized eggs in the wet sand at the

56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

uppermost edge of the high tide, then ride back into the ocean on the next available wave. Well, that’s what I thought was going to happen that night on the beach. But what actually happened was… nothing! Instead, I sat on the sand with my husband, Dave, and some friends waiting for each wave that glistened in the moonlight to deposit a few grunion scouts on the sand. Scouts report back to the gathering grunion that all is clear for a mass spawning, and a full-scale grunion run happens about 20 minutes later. But that night, not one scout appeared.


More grunion come onto the beach as the spawning gets underway.

Grunion Stories

California grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) are indeed unpredictable and mysterious. During the full and new moons from March through August, they gather offshore at sandy, gently sloping beaches along the California coast between Point Conception and Punta Abreojos, in Baja California.

I grew up near beaches in Southern California, but I had never actually seen a grunion in spite of many late nights spent on beaches with friends—uh, not that we were actually looking for grunion. In Southern California “going to watch the grunion run” was code for getting permission to stay out late at the beach with friends. For us, grunion were mythical creatures that only parents believed in. As we sat on the sand at Carpinteria Beach that night under the light of the full moon, we listened to our friends Mark Methmann and Gloria Jimenez talk about grunion runs they’d experienced on this same beach as teens. But then Mark mentioned they’d often tell tourists on the beach that the colorfully lit oil platforms were casinos they could get to by boats waiting at the end of the pier. The longer we waited, the more I embraced the myth theory.

But then this was the first run date of the season and grunion don’t usually run in Santa Barbara until late April, so we knew we were pushing it. We left at half-past midnight. A few days later, Ben Pitterle, director of Watershed and Marine Programs for Santa Barbara Channelkeeper, assured me that his first large run was at Carpinteria State Beach. He said, “People like to use the term ‘magical,’ and I guess that for lack of anything better, that’s what it feels like.” And fisherman Steve Escobar described the grunion magic he experienced at Port San Luis in the ’80s: “We filled up our pockets and any other containers we could find. They were everywhere.” Convinced that they do exist, I did more research on how to anticipate where a “pop-up” run might occur.

Where to Look for Grunion California grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) are indeed unpredictable and mysterious. During the full and new moons from March

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The female digs her tail down into the sand while the male curls around her.

through August, they gather offshore at sandy, gently sloping beaches along the California coast between Point Conception and Punta Abreojos, in Baja California. Occasionally, when the water is warm, they are seen as far north as Tomales Bay in Marin. This is the only time grunion are seen in a group. No one knows where they go when they’re not spawning. They probably spread out to avoid attracting predators. Runs occur up to two hours after the highest tide on nights just following the full moon or new moon. A grunion run schedule, published by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, is based on the time of high tide at the Los Angeles Harbor. Ventura high tide is about 10 minutes later, and Santa Barbara is 25 minutes later. Word is that the second and third nights listed in the schedule are the best. Which beaches will host a run is unpredictable. Even if you see scouts in a wave at a beach, they may not trigger a run. The likelihood of seeing a spawning run is less than 50% (in my case, apparently far less). Spawning runs can be short and sporadic or can last an hour or more and cover the entire beach. Only about 2% of the runs reach this level. The majority of the runs (about 90%) are reported along the Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego coasts.

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Spawning activity peaks April through June, with April and May observation-only, no-capture months.

A Step Closer Research led me to Karen Martin, PhD, a biology professor at Pepperdine University who has done extensive research on grunion. Karen invited Dave and me to join her during the new moon at a surfing beach in Malibu that is popular with grunion. Right away Karen and some of her students spotted a few Great Blue Heron and Black Crested Night Heron at the water’s edge, watching the outgoing tide for grunion. In the distance we saw them snatch something from the sand and swallow. Karen handed me her night vision scope so I could see my first grunion flipping about the sand at the herons’ feet, easy prey for hungry heron. We kept our distance because loud noise and flashing light can prevent a run. Perhaps no scouts made it back to give a favorable report because an hour later, there were no more grunion on the beach.

Grunion Greeters Project Karen oversees a group of volunteer “citizen scientists” up and down the coast who report grunion beach activity using an online questionnaire. Anyone can participate; reports of


no activity are as important as run data. A run on East Beach in Santa Barbara was reported the next night—a run we missed. She put me in touch with a few of her colleagues closer to home. One was Steve Howard, a fisheries biologist who lives in Ventura. Steve offered to meet us at San Buenaventura Beach during the full moon so he could show us what to watch for. The moon lit a glittered path across the water and onto the sand. As we walked along the water’s edge, we watched for scouts in the surf. I submitted a report of two scouts that night, no run. The next night at Carpinteria Beach, we saw 10 scouts hit the beach, no run. On the third night the waves were rolling grunion onto the beach when we arrived at East Beach at midnight. Finally, a spawning run! For about 10 minutes 30 to 100 grunion washed up on different parts of the beach.

However, hatching is delayed until the next spawning cycle, when high tide waves reach the nest. The agitation of the water triggers the eggs to hatch as they wash out to sea. If a high tide wave doesn’t reach a nest, the embryos can survive on the yolk up to 35 days, until the next high tide moon phase. At some aquariums — like the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro — you can experience the hatching process up close. You are given a jar with ocean water, a few eggs and a little bit of sand and told to shake the jar gently. The eggs hatch within a couple of minutes. Then you can release them into the receding waves. Your hatchlings will live in the kelp near the shore, eating plankton, for about 40 days before venturing out further into the ocean.

To Eat or Not to Eat

Fewer than 1% of the fertilized eggs survive to maturity (one year). Grunion are part of the marine food web. Their eggs are Do Grunion Really Dance? feasted on by shorebirds, beetles, sandworms and flies. No. Nor do they have feet to run. They flip, flop and appear The hatchlings and adult fish are eaten by marine mammals to leap forward as they come onto the beach and again when such as dolphins, seals and sea lions. The gathering grunion they head back to catch a attract predator fish such as receding wave. Their slender thresher sharks, kelp bass, Karen Martin is currently studying bodies reflect silver-white in the corvina and croaker. Halibut, moonlight, flashing like lanterns guitar fish and squid have the population numbers and as they flip. Up close they have been seen following grunion encourages beach goers to iridescent bluish-green backs right onto the beach. Heron, with silver-blue stripes on the greet—not eat—the grunion they snowy egrets and western sides. They range from five to gulls show up at the water’s see. She points out that you do not seven inches long, depending edge for grunion appetizers on need to buy a fishing license if you on age. spawning nights. They come in on the Even cats, skunks, raccoons are just observing. largest waves of a set, to get as and ground squirrels get into far up the beach as possible. the act. But humans have the The female digs her tail into the sand. She wiggles in up to her most potential impact. Grunion have been gathered and eaten pectoral fins to deposit up to 3,000 bright orange eggs. One or by humans for thousands of years. However, unregulated fishing more male grunion arch and curve around her, emitting seminal and the increase in human population put the grunion into fluid that travels down her body to fertilize the eggs. While the decline in the 1920s. males head for the next available female, this female wiggles In 1927, seasonal restrictions were established for their out of the sand and flops back toward the waves. Her work for protection. Today it is illegal to take any grunion during April this moon phase is done. But she may spawn six to eight times and May, their peak spawning period. Although there is no limit, per season. commercial fishing is illegal and anyone over 16 must have an ocean fishing license. It’s illegal to use anything but your hands Growing a Grunion to collect grunion—no nets or scoops to gather them. Fertilization and incubation take place in the warm, moist Still the numbers appear to be declining. Beachfront sand nest. At first, all that’s visible is the orange yolk of the properties, walls and commercial lighting have reduced the eggs, which is easy to spot, but will provide the embryo’s food amount of beach suitable for spawning. Beach maintenance was source. Within 12 hours, the single cell multiplies to thousands a recent concern, but equipment operators now stay above the that envelop the yolk, making it less visible to predators. At 16 high tide mark to avoid disturbing the eggs. hours, the outline of the embryo is visible and at two days the Karen Martin is currently studying the population numbers eyes develop. On day three, the head and tail are moving. On day seven, the fish is ready to hatch. and encourages beach goers to greet—not eat—the grunion

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they see. She points out that you do not need to buy a fishing license if you are just observing.

Observation Tips Wear warm clothes but expect to get wet. Do not build a fire— flickering light alerts the scouts to danger. Remain still until the wave breaks. Loud noises and lots of activity can cause the grunion to abort or shorten their run. Flashlights also scare the fish, so use them only after the wave recedes. Better yet, allow your eyes to adjust to the darkness. The moonlight reflects off the fish. And—most important— be patient. Grunion are real and quite magical… just a bit shy.

Carpinteria City Beach Linden Ave. Carpinteria 805 684-5405

Carpinteria State Beach At the end of Palm Ave. Carpinteria 805 684-2811

Depressions Beach 6503 Del Playa Dr. Isla Vista State Land

East Beach Nancy Oster believes in grunion magic and plans to spend many more late nights waiting for that really big run.

To Learn More

1113 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Santa Barbara City Beach 805 564-5418

El Embarcadero Beach Access

Grunion.org

El Embarcadero Rd. and Del Playa Dr. Isla Vista County Beach

Cabrillo Marine Aquarium

Goleta Beach Park

Grunion Greeters Project

Meet the Grunion program is under ‘Education’ at CabrilloMarineAquarium.org

Birch Aquarium, Scripps, UC San Diego Grunion Run information is under ‘Education’ and ‘Public Programs’ at Aquarium.ucsd.edu

Venice Oceanarium Check ‘Events’ for grunion parties at VeniceOceanarium.org

Santa Barbara Beaches

5905 Sandspit Rd. Goleta County Park 805 568-2461

Leadbetter Beach 801 Shoreline Dr. Santa Barbara City Beach 805 564-5418

Lookout Park Beach

Here is a list of beaches in the Santa Barbara area. There is no guarantee of a run in a specific area of any beach. They like sandy (not rocky) beaches with a gentle slope and rolling waves. They often show up near freshwater outlets such as rivers, creeks and storm drains and where the beach curves so the waves converge with a swirl. Check out the beach during the day to see if parking will be available nearby at night. For more information on specific beaches go to CaliforniaBeaches.com/central.

Evans Ave. and Wallace Ave. Summerland County Park

Arroyo Burro Beach Park (AKA Hendry’s)

Refugio State Beach

2981 Cliff Dr. Santa Barbara County Beach 805 568-2461

10 Refugio Beach Rd. Goleta State Park 805 968-1033

Butterfly Beach

Rincon Beach County Park

Loon Point Beach 2781 Padaro Ln. Carpinteria

Padaro Beach

Padaro Ln. and Santa Claus Ln. Carpinteria

Butterfly Ln. and Channel Dr. Montecito County Beach 805 568-2461

Hwy. 101 at Bates Rd. Carpinteria 805 568-2461

Campus Point Beach

State St. and W. Cabrillo Blvd. Santa Barbara City Beach 805 564-5418

Lagoon Rd. Isla Vista State Land

West Beach


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Sunday Lunch in the Garden by Pascale Beale

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C A R O L E T O PA L I A N

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My English childhood was dotted with epic walks—where we would traipse across the heath in London—only to return home to huge, warming Sunday lunches complete with a roast leg of lamb, spuds and a large green salad followed by apple crumble topped with luscious cream. All sorts of friends would turn up during the course of the afternoon, pull up a chair and partake in whatever stage of the meal we happened to be in at that moment, a revolving meal that lasted hours where people occasionally sloped off to have a little snooze, to re-join the meal later on. This tradition has percolated down over the years in different towns and countries, but the essence remains the same: Gather friends together, eat good food, laugh a lot, relax.

Perhaps this is why, over time, it became a favorite dish of mine. Many times I made it to feed my fellow students at university in London whilst we crammed for exams, over— what else?—lunch. I still have the old oak table we sat at. It’s hard to believe now that six or seven of us could fit around this small table, but we did, discussing all the topics of the day; to take part in the “ban the bomb” marches that swept the British capital, strikes, elections, where to go during the long summer break and how on earth were we going to get through all the work we had piled up in front of us? We felt that we were in the midst of “everything important happening in the world” and would convene weekly, if not more, to debate, and to eat.

These meals have evolved over time. The food served was a There were meals made memorable by heated differences of opinion; meals made touching by reflection of the climate and locale. announcements of betrothals; and When visiting France the meals We felt that we were in the meals made melancholy by the loss took on a decidedly Mediterranean midst of “everything important of one of our own. To this day, when bent. In the summer we’d sit under we gather together again, those meals the trailing vine that covered the happening in the world” and shared around that table always come terrace outside the kitchen of our old would convene weekly, if not up in conversation and inevitably farmhouse. On the table you’d find more, to debate, and to eat. someone will mention that tarte. plates of melon with prosciutto, local goat cheese, pâtés from the market and fresh tomatoes with basil and a drizzle of olive oil. Simple food infused with sunshine. Once a year we would have a giant meal in the garden to celebrate my brother’s birthday. The morning always began with decorations, particularly the hanging of a large canopy over a swath of the garden and over the old tile-covered well that stood center stage and served as a vast tabletop. Next would come the preparation of all the dishes, which usually included salads, pâté en croûte, ratatouille and tarte à l’onion. Everyone would help themselves, find a spot on the blanket- and rugcovered lawn and eat al fresco amongst the pillows. A modern Dejeuner Sur l’Herbe (without the naked people!). This meal was one of our summer highlights and whenever I subsequently ate tarte a l’onion I’d be transported back to the dappled sunlight of those festive afternoons.

Like a treasured talisman, this dish has accompanied me on my travels around the planet. When I arrived in Los Angeles it was my go-to dish. On Sundays, after an energetic game of beach volleyball with a gaggle of expat friends, we’d drive back to the house and cook together, barefoot from the sandy beach. We’d make roast chickens, ratatouille and a large green salad. Provence in California. I felt at home. As with many food-obsessed immigrants, I soon discovered the local treasures of the farmers markets filled with bok choy, daikon, pomegranates, persimmons, pluots, watermelon radish, curly kale and golden beets—vegetables that I had not known, let alone savored, in Europe—and I delved into them with gusto, making new salads and other lunchtime treats for our friends and family’s weekend repast. My go-to dish was—for a long time—put aside… until recently, when I taught a class at Buttonwood Farm and Winery in the Santa Ynez Valley.

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The event took place in a private garden, steps from the tasting room. Tables had been set under trees adorned with produce from their farm in the form of zucchini, large onions and grape vines. A warm, scented breeze drifted across the bucolic setting as guests sampled the wine and tasted the salads. It was a picturesque and enchanting afternoon. It made me think of Provence and our old farmhouse and of all the Sunday lunches shared on the terrace by the kitchen. I had the added treat of taking home the freshly picked zucchini and onions from Buttonwood after the event. As I unpacked the vegetables in the kitchen it occurred to me that I could make an onion tart—a nostalgic nod to summers past—but this time with a twist. There were lots of zucchini, so what about grilling them and adding that to the tart? Of course, if I was about to make a large onion tart I’d need lots of people to share it with. The next day the house filled up with friends bringing wine, cheese, fruit and other delicacies to share. We set up tables in the garden. I made the new version of the onion tart and a big dish of ratatouille. We sat in dappled sunlight, ate good food, discussed local politics, the drought and upcoming summer plans. We laughed a lot. Some of us had a snooze in the shade. I felt as though I had come full circle: a Provençal afternoon on the American Riviera.

completely soft and slightly golden. This will take at least 15 minutes. Be patient with the onions as you do not want them to burn, which they tend to do if you turn the heat up too much. Once cooked you can leave the onions in the pan until you are ready to finish the tart. Place all the zucchini slices in a large bowl. Drizzle some olive oil over the top, add a sprinkling of salt and some pepper. Toss so that the slices are lightly coated. Heat a grill pan over high heat. Once hot, add the zucchini slices and cook for 1–2 minutes on each side. The zucchini should be just cooked through. Be careful not to burn the slices. You will probably have to do this in 2–3 batches. Place the cooked slices on a platter.

FOR THE PASTRY 9 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour (approximately 11 ⁄ 2 cups) 5 1 ⁄ 2 ounces (11 ⁄ 4 sticks) slightly softened butter, cut up into small pieces 1 large egg Zest of 1 lemon Pinch of salt 1

RECIPES Onion and Zucchini Tart with an Olive Crust The tart is made in two parts: preparing and cooking the vegetables and preparing and cooking the dough. You can also make a classic tarte à l’onion and not add any zucchini to the tart. The choice is yours. Makes 8–10 servings FOR THE VEGETABLES

⁄ 2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped

Preheat oven to 400°. Butter an 11- or 12-inch tart pan with a removable bottom. Place all the ingredients into a food processor and use repeated pulses until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs, then use longer pulses until the dough forms a ball in the bowl of the food processor. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 20 minutes before rolling out. Place the unwrapped dough on a lightly floured work surface. Roll the dough out to a ¼-inch thickness and to a circle that is

Olive oil

larger than the tart pan. Line the tart pan with the dough, letting

6 –7 medium to large yellow onions, peeled, halved and finely sliced

any excess drape over the edge.

Salt and pepper

Fold the excess dough over the olives so that they are completely

6 large zucchini, ends trimmed then cut on a bias in thin slices (you can also use different varieties of zucchini and squash for this)

encased.

Pour a little olive oil into a large skillet or saucepan placed over medium heat. Add the onions, a large pinch of salt and 5–6 grinds of black pepper, stir frequently and cook until the onions are

Place the chopped olives all around the perimeter of the tart.

Prick the dough in the bottom of the tart using the tines of a fork. Cover the dough with the caramelized onions, smoothing them out so they form an even layer. Bake in the center of the oven for 30 minutes. The crust should be golden brown. Heap all the zucchini slices on top of the onions and then return the tart to the oven for 3–4 minutes more. Serve while still warm.

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Ratatouille Ratatouille, like the tart, is the epitome of Provençal fare. The dish originated in Nice. My grandfather’s family comes from the same part of the world and our family recipe has been passed down through generations. My mother taught me to make this dish. Ratatouille is traditionally made with the addition of red and green peppers. They are thinly sliced and also cooked separately before adding to the onion mixture, usually after the zucchini but before the tomatoes. I prefer to make it without the peppers. There are many recipes for cooking ratatouille, each varying in the order that one cooks the vegetables. Purists insist (as my great-aunt did) that each vegetable is cooked separately before being mixed in with the onions as this seals in the taste of each vegetable. I absolutely agree and believe that it’s worth the extra effort to prepare it this way. One last note: Do not cover your ratatouille as this will cause too much moisture in the dish. Makes 8–10 servings 4–5 medium yellow onions, cut in half and then thinly sliced 1 large or 2 medium aubergines (eggplant), thinly sliced and cut into small cubes 4–6 courgettes (zucchini), cut into quarters lengthwise and then into small cubes

Lemon and Crème Fraiche Mousse

8–10 medium tomatoes (Romas work well), quartered and diced

This mousse is very light and pairs well with fresh berries or grilled peaches, apricots or pluots. I like to serve it with a little shortbread too.

3 cloves garlic, either finely chopped or crushed

Makes 8 servings

Olive oil

12 fluid ounces whipping cream

Salt and pepper

3 ounces sugar (½ cup)

1 bay leaf

Zest and juice of 2 lemons

In a large heavy-bottomed saucepan pour a little olive oil and then add the chopped onions. Cook until soft and lightly browned, about 10 minutes.

6 ounces crème fraiche

Whilst the onions are browning, in a large frying pan or heavy skillet pour a little olive oil and sauté the chopped aubergines (eggplant) until lightly browned. about 8–10 minutes. Once cooked, add the aubergines to the onions. Add salt and pepper to taste. In the same frying pan/skillet pour a little more olive oil and add the courgettes (zucchini). Cook until lightly browned, approximately 5–7 minutes. Once cooked, add these to the onion mixture. In the same frying pan/skillet add a touch more olive oil and cook the tomatoes over high heat with the garlic for 2–3 minutes—letting any excess water from the tomatoes evaporate. Add the tomatoes to the onion mixture. Cook all the vegetable together for a further 30–45 minutes, adding salt and pepper to your liking and adding the bay leaf, which should be removed just before serving. It is also excellent served cold the next day.

1

⁄ 2 teaspoon vanilla paste or the paste from 1 ⁄ 2 vanilla pod

The whites of 3 large eggs

Pour the whipping cream into the bowl of a standing mixer. Whisk until the cream starts to thicken a little. Add the sugar, lemon zest and juice a little at a time, whisking continuously, so that the cream is nice and thick. Gently fold in the crème fraiche and the vanilla paste. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites until they hold soft peaks. Gently fold the egg whites into the cream base. Spoon the mixture into eight glasses or glass bowls and refrigerate for three hours.

Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons and Salade. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com

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edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

DES TINATION GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food traditionand lifestyle. This summer we’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Destination Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Restaurant 2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and award winning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Restaurant one of the most sought after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976. Open daily 11am–4:30pm.

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 45 Industrial Way 805 694-2252 FitMtnBrew.com Dedicated to creating high quality balanced beer, FigMtnBrew has six taprooms along the Central Coast. Featuring pints and beer tasting, gastropub fare, events, live music, beer “to go” and more.

The Hitching Post II 406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving woodgrilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

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Winfield Farm Mangalitsa PO Box 336 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Farm Mangalitsa pork. Order online or savor the flavor at Full of Life Flatbread, Los Alamos; Industrial Eats, Buellton; or Root 246 Restaurant, Solvang.

Carpinteria Casitas Valley Farm & Creamery 4620 Casitas Pass Rd. (Hwy. 150) 805 649-8179 CasitasValley.com A multi-enterprise system using Permaculture principles to provide our local community with certified organic crops, artisan crafted cheese, and sustainably raised, heritage pigs. Farm stand open Sat–Sun 11am–4pm.

Giannfranco’s Trattoria 666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm. Closed Tuesday.

Sly’s 686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat– Sun 9am–3pm.

Goleta Bacara Resort & Spa 8301 Hollister Ave. 855 968-0100 BacaraResort.com Nestled on the bluff and beaches of the Gaviota coast, Bacara offers relaxed luxury and incomparable natural beauty. Additional features include a four-story spa, wellness center, zero-edge saline swimming pools, restaurants, lounges and tasting room.

Backyard Bowls 5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Goodland Kitchen & Market 231 S. Magnolia Ave. 805 845-4300 GoodlandKitchen.com The Goodland Kitchen is a quick service café specializing in delicious, well-prepared, affordable breakfasts and lunches, served outside under the magnolia tree. Food prepared fresh daily, in small batches with ingredients from local farmers, to provide an exceptional and unexpected culinary experience in the heart of Old Town Goleta. Enjoy breakfast and lunch, indoors or outside on the patio, Mon–Fri 8am–2:30pm.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods 115 E. College Ave., #10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com When traveling along the Central Coast, complement your experience at Central Coast Specialty Foods. Enjoy a delicious selection of gourmet cheese, charcuterie, olives, wines and beers and deli sandwiches.


Lompoc Wine Trail

Casa Dumetz

Easily accessible from anywhere in Santa Barbara County, the city of Lompoc offers the famous Wine Ghetto with over 20 wineries within one location, along with other urban wineries making world-class wines in many different styles. Addresses and contact information can be found on the Lompoc Wine Trail ad on page 9.

388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com

Longoria Wines 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866 759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria is a pioneer artisanal winery producing acclaimed wines from the finest local vineyards for over 30 years. Visit the winery tasting room in Lompoc, open Fri–Sun 11am–4:30pm.

Sanford Winery & Vineyards 5010 Santa Rosa Rd. 805 735-5900 SanfordWinery.com Located in the heart of Santa Rita Hills, Sanford offers the complete winery experience with daily tastings, tours and private adventures. Open Sun–Thu 11am–4pm; Fri–Sat 11am–5pm.

Los Alamos Bell Street Farm Eatery & Market 406 Bell St. 805 344-4609 BellStreetFarm.com This cozy and delicious eatery is surrounded by gorgeous vineyards and farmland. Award winning cuisine and sophisticated yet comfortable design, a distinct environment to enjoy a meal, snack or wine tasting for residents and visitors alike. Assemble your own picnic baskets and accessories for creating a portable meal, as well as gifts and merchandise from local artisans and some of the best of California.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com Bob’s Well Bread is about great bread, made the oldfashioned way—handcrafted in small batches and baked to perfection in a custom-built, stone-deck oven. Stop by their bakery for baguettes, croissants, bagels and more. Closed Tue and Wed.

A boutique winery specializing in Rhone varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com On weekends Full of Life Flatbread converts their production flatbread bakery space into a restaurant and offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm.

Martian Ranch & Vineyard 9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11am–5pm. Taste their estate grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-thisworld experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends.

Municipal Winemakers 425 Bell St. (Alamo Hotel) 805 931-6864 MunicipalWinemakers.com After spending their formative years traveling and studying terroir and techniques, Municipal Wine is now working hard to make honest, interesting and delicious wines for the people of this world. They do this with love—carefully and slowly. Open Fri–Sun 12pm–7pm.

Los Olivos Alta Maria Vineyards 2933 Grand Ave., Ste. A 805 686-1144 AltaMaria.com Striving to make the best wine possible in a conscious manner, Alta Maria Vineyards utilizes organic and sustainable techniques along with conventional methods that leave no indelible mark on the people, places

and products around them. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm. Native9 is offered for sale daily and can be tasted during Heritage Tastings.

Global Gardens 2450 Alamo Pintado Rd. 800 307-0447 GlobalGardensOnline.com Global Gardens is Santa Barbara County’s premier Certified Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil producer. Visit their demonstration farm and tasting bar for their signature tasting palette of over 12 tastings, education, worldly recipes and more. Fri–Sun 10am–4pm or by appointment.

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 2446 Alamo Pintado, Suite C 805 694-2252 FitMtnBrew.com Dedicated to creating high quality balanced beer, FigMtnBrew has six taprooms along the Central Coast. Featuring pints and beer tasting, gastropub fare, events, live music, beer “to go” and more.

Longoria Wines 2935 Grand Ave. 866 759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria is a pioneer artisanal winery producing acclaimed wines from the finest local vineyards for over 30 years. Visit their tasting room in downtown Los Olivos, open daily from 11am–4:30pm.

Los Olivos Wine Merchant & Café 2879 Grand Ave. Los Olivos 805 688-7265 LosOlivosCafe.com Serving local, organic and sustainable wine country cuisine for the past 20 years. Stellar selection of local wines, all offered on their award-winning wine list and for take home prices.

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 69


Qupé 2963 Grand Ave. 805 686-4200 Qupe.com One of California’s original Rhône Rangers, Bob Lindquist has been a visionary pioneer of cool-climate Syrah for over 30 years. Qupé is a benchmark producer of Chardonnay and Rhône varietals from the cool growing areas of California’s Central Coast. Cool climate wines of character since 1982.

Sanger Family of Wines 2923 Grand Ave. 805 691-1020 SangerWines.com Sanger Family’s three-brand portfolio, which includes Consilience, Marianello and Tre Anelli, offers wines made from nearly 20 locally-grown grape varieties. An Old World wine experience, crafted using a modern Central Coast approach.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, our family-owned winery has been dedicated to crafting some of Santa Barbara County’s most distinctive wines.

Montecito American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Here’s The Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s The Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan.

Tecolote Bookstore 1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977 Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon–Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun.

Santa Barbara Backyard Bowls 3849 State St 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Il Fustino 3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and

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freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for lunch and dinner. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

Whole Foods Market 3761 State St. 805 837-6959 WholeFoodsMarket.com Founded in 1980 in Austin, Texas, Whole Foods Market, a leader in the natural and organic foods industry and America’s first national certified organic grocer, was named “America’s Healthiest Grocery Store” in 2008 by Health magazine.

The Winehound 3849 State St. 805 845-5247 TheWinehound.com The award-winning Winehound features the world’s best wines—from the everyday to a luxury cuvée—all top dogs, no mutts. Open Mon–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun noon–6pm.

Santa Barbara– Downtown American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat Wine Tasting Room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com Known for world class Chardonnays and Pinots, Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

The Black Sheep 26 E Ortega St. 805 965-1113 TheBlackSheepSB.com The Black Sheep offers a casual gastro pub setting with local farm-to-table cuisine. Open Tue–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 5–9pm.

Book Ends Café 602 Anacapa St. 805 963-3222 BookEndsCafe.net Book Ends Café offers unique handcrafted sandwiches and seasonal selections of farm-fresh salads, quiches and treats, all prepared with ingredients sourced from local farmers. Enjoy organic, fair-trade coffee while sitting on the secret and tranquil rooftop patio. Open Mon–Thu 8am–6:15pm. Fri–Sat 8am–2pm.

Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “as-freshand-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.

C’est Cheese 825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Mon-Sat 7am–6pm; Sun 8am–3pm.

Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 29 E. Victoria St. 805 957-2020 CaDarioPizza.net Located just steps away from Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery, Ca’ Dario Pizzeria offers a casual, urban atmosphere to enjoy authentic pizzas, salads and appetizers. The 30-seat restaurant boasts a welcoming bar, perfect for enjoying local or Italian beers on tap. Open for lunch Mon–Sat 11:30am–2:30pm; dinner Mon–Sun 5–9:30pm.

Cebada Vineyard & Winery 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 735-4648 CebadaWine.com Cebada vinifies estate-grown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. This boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundian style wines. Enjoy their hand-crafted vertical wine tasting in La Arcada Plaza.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya scours the world for pure, luscious chocolates and offers incredible savory bars, truffles, bonbons and gift baskets as well as a wide choice of organic and fair-trade chocolate products. Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat 10am–5pm; Sun 10am–4pm.


Destination Maps

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1. Central Coast Specialty Foods 2. Lompoc Wine Ghetto 3. Other Lompoc Wineries

1. Valley Brewers 2. Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 3. Fresco Valley Café 4. Solvang Visitors Bureau 5. The Good Life 6. New Frontiers 7. Buttonwood Farm and Winery

(see page 11 for more detailed map)

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Cielito Restaurant

Margerum Wine Company

Seagrass

1114 State St. 805 965-4770 CielitoRestaurant.com

813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com

30 E. Ortega St. 805 963-1012 SeagrassRestaurant.com

A Santa Barbara take on the flavors of Latin America and Mexico, featuring the freshest and most sustainable of Central Coast ingredients, over 90 tequilas, with enticing libations and innovative cocktails, in addition to an impressive selection of mezcal and exciting local spirits. Providing both Santa Barbara locals and visitors with an unparalleled and memorable dining experience. Latin American inspired, Santa Barbara realized. Weekend Brunch. Happy Hour. Dinner.

Margerum Wine Company is committed to creating handcrafted wines using only the highest-quality grapes so that they can make wines that are indicative of the place where they are grown. They have two tasting rooms located in the historic El Paseo complex: Margerum Tasting Room and MWC32, which features their reserve and limited production wines. Open daily noon–6pm with the last tasting at 5:30pm.

Seagrass offers a fresh Santa Barbara Coastal Cuisine fine dining experience, procuring the highest quality ingredients available and superior local bounty. Open Tue–Thu 5:30–9pm; Fri–Sat 5:30–10pm, Sun 5:30–9pm. (desserts and drinks until 10:30); Thu–Sat 11am–11pm; closed Mon.

Equinox Naturopathic Medicine 924 Anacapa St., Ste. B3 805 560-0111 EquinoxNatMed.com Providing natural health care for the whole family. Combining the science of modern medicine with the wisdom of traditional healing to help restore balance and optimize health and wellness using nutrition, botanical medicine, supplements, homeopathy, biotherapeutic drainage and lifestyle counseling. Located in the historic Lobero Building.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm; Sat 10–5pm; closed Sun.

Grassini Familiy Vineyards 813 Anacapa St., #6 805 897-3366 GrassiniFamilyVineyards.com Grassini Family Vineyards is a family-owned and operated estate winery specializing in handcrafted limited production Bordeaux wines, including Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc. Their tasting room, located in the historic El Paseo, is open daily noon– 5:30pm.

The Hungry Cat 1134 Chapala St. 805 884-4701 TheHungryCat.com Chef /Owner David Lentz creates a new American Seafood sensibility, inspired by his Maryland roots, incorporating sustainable, seasonal fish, shellfish and produce into his weekly changing menus. This Santa Barbara location brings it all together with its urban setting, complete with signature raw bar, perfectly mixed artisanal cocktails and camaraderie at the bar and tables.

Il Fustino 308 W. Victoria 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Isabella Gourmet Foods 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 585-5257 IsabellaGourmetFoods.com A boutique artisan grocery combining the down-home charm of an East Coast general store with an upscale West Coast setting and featuring locally made smallbatch foods. Open Mon–Fri 9am–6pm; Sat 10am–6pm; Sun 11am–5pm.

72 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara, California in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: From scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients, from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year, sweet legacy of keeping it real.

Plum Goods 909 State St. 805 845-3900 PlumGoodsStore.com Santa Barbara’s own eco-chic boutique offering handcrafted, fair trade, upcycled, simply inspired gifts, goods, furniture, lighting and art. Winner of Best Gift Store in SB! Open Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat 10am–7pm; Sun 11am–5pm.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for lunch and dinner. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Sama Sama Kitchen 1208 State St. 805 965-4566 SamaSamaKitchen.com Sama Sama creates meals inspired by Indonesian food and local farms and markets. Their food and cocktail menu is constantly changing depending on the availability from local sources. They are locally owned and operated and part of the Shelter Social Club family. Lunch Mon–Wed 11am–2pm. Dinner Mon–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 5–9pm. Happy Hour Thu–Fri 4–5pm.

Sanford Winery & Vineyards 1114 State St. 805 770-7873 SanfordWinery.com Enjoy daily tastings and private experiences in a beautiful tasting room in downtown Santa Barbara in the historic La Arcada Plaza. Open Sun–Thu noon–6pm, Fri–Sat noon–7pm.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia strives to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Dinner and cocktail hour Tue–Sat 4–9pm; breakfast and lunch Tue– Sun 9am–2pm.

The Wine Cask 813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

Santa Barbara – Funk Zone Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 137 Anacapa St., Suite F 805 694-2252 FitMtnBrew.com Dedicated to creating high quality balanced beer, FigMtnBrew has six taprooms along the Central Coast. Featuring pints and beer tasting, gastropub fare, events, live music, beer “to go” and more.

Municipal Winemakers 22 Anacapa St. 805 931-6864 MunicipalWinemakers.com After spending their formative years traveling and studying terroir and techniques, Municipal Wine is now working hard to make honest, interesting and delicious wines for the people of this world. They do this with love—carefully and slowly. Open Sun–Wed 11am–7pm; Thu–Sat 11am-11pm.

Reds Bar & Tapas 211 Helena St. 805 966-5906 RedsBarAndTapas.wordpress.com Located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone, offering a tapasstyle menu, full bar and wide selection of cervezas and vinos. Enjoy a glass of wine and a cheese plate on the charming al fresco patio. Hosting live entertainment and eclectic events weekly. Open Tue–Fri at 3pm; Sat–Sun at 1pm; Happy Hour Tue–Fri 3pm–7pm.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 137 Anacapa St., Suite C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com Riverbench Vineyard was established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara, California.

Santa Barbara – Mesa Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated


Destination Maps 2

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21. The Wine Cask 21. Grassini Family Vineyards 21. Au Bon Climat 21. Margerum Wines 22. The Black Sheep 22. Seagrass Restaurant 23. McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 24. Book Ends Café 25. Telegraph Brewing Co. 26. Renaud’s, Loreto Plaza 27. Il Fustino 28. Whole Foods 29. The Winehound 30. Backyard Bowls, La Cumbre 31. Mesa Produce 32. MesaVerde Restaurant 33. Lazy Acres

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1. Municipal Winemakers 2. Riverbench Winery 3. Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 4. Reds Bar and Tapas 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB 6. Chocolate Maya 7. Grapeseed Co. 8. Plum Goods 9. Hungry Cat 10. Scarlett Begonia 11. Bouchon Santa Barbara 12. SB Public Market 12. Il Fustino 13. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 14. Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 15. Sama Sama 16. Sanford Tasting Room 16. Cielito Restaurant 16. Isabella Gourmet Foods and Cebada Vineyards Tasting Room 17. American Riviera Bank 18. Equinox Naturopathic Medicine 19. Sojourner Café 20. C’est Cheese

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to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm; Sun 7am–10pm.

Mesa Produce 2036 Cliff Dr. 805 962-1645 MesaProduce.com A local “mom and pop”-owned produce stand offering farmer-direct produce at competitive prices. Although seasonal local products are their focus, they also carry a full line of produce items. Handmade jams sourced from Santa Barbara County, no-pesticide fruits, local organic produce, olives and olive oils, organic nuts and raw honey. Open Mon–Sat 10am–7pm; Sun noon–6pm.

MESAVERDE 1919 Cliff Dr. 805 963-4474 MesaverdeRestaurant.com MESAVERDE, a plant-based restaurant in Santa Barbara, fuses Mediterranean flavors and fresh ingredients to establish a taste reaching beyond simple expectations. They offer locally sourced produce and raw vegan desserts. House-made kombucha, cold-pressed juices and almond milk are made daily.

Santa Maria Cambria Estate Winery 5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com Family-owned, sustainably-farmed, estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery

SY Valley Kitchen

7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com

1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com

The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations.

This inviting farmhouse features modern Northern Italian dishes by Chef Luca Crestanelli including home-made pastas, pizzas, chicken, lamb and steak from the wood-fire oven. Dazzling cocktails are crafted by Alberto Battaglini.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery

Solvang

6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com Riverbench Vineyard was established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara, California.

Santa Ynez Rancho Olivos 2390 Refugio Rd. 805 686-9653 RanchoOlivos.com Located in beautiful Santa Ynez, Rancho Olivos creates distinctively fresh artisan extra-virgin olive oils from their sustainably grown Italian and Spanish varietals of olives. Open for olive oil tasting daily noon–4pm.

Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company 1095 Meadowvale Rd. 805 691-9448 SantaYnezCheeseCompany.com Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company is your local shop for cut-to-order cheese and charcuterie. Grab a picnic basket or a custom charcuterie box to enhance your wine tasting experience!

Source Guide Bragg Live Food Products Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Drake Family Farms DrakeFamilyFarms.com Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

Giffin & Crane General Contractors 805 966-6401 GiffinAndCrane.com At Giffin & Crane General Contractors, Inc., each project is unique, whether it’s a simple remodel or an extraordinary architectural estate. Working closely with their clients to fulfill their clients’ dreams, they are committed to providing the best workmanship, on time and in budget.

74 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

Harvest Santa Barbara 805 696-6930 HarvestSantaBarbara.com Delivering freshly harvested wholesale produce— sourced directly from local family farms to schools, restaurants, hospitals and retail businesses. Their mission is to be the catalyst for a healthier, more sustainable food system by strengthening the ties between farmers and the community.

Heritage Grain Alliance Heritage Grain Alliance is a partnership of farmers, millers, bakers, brewers and food lovers who share equipment, resources and information in order to bring locally grown ancient grains to Southern California and the Central Coast.

Jimenez Family Farm 805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Morris Grassfed 831 623-2933 MorrisGrassfed.com Providing 100% grassfed and finished beef to customers throughout California. Processed in USDA inspected facilities, cut and wrapped by small-scale

Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

The Good Life 1672 Mission Dr. (Hwy. 246) 805 688-7111 TheGoodLifeCellar.com A craft beer and wine cellar featuring California craft beers and Central Coast wines. Open daily Sun–Thu noon–9pm; Fri–Sat noon–11pm.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Succulent Café in the heart of Solvang serves comfort and artisan food prepared with seasonal, local, farm fresh ingredients, focusing on flavor, elegance and balance. Great local wines and beer on tap.

artisan butchers and delivered directly at pre-arranged delivery locations throughout the year. Family owned, they practice holistic management on the rangelands they manage.

Ojai Valley Inn and Spa 905 Country Club Rd. 855 417-4652 OjaiResort.com Rediscover The Oak, famed dining on the terrace at Ojai Valley Inn & Spa. The Oak’s executive chef has introduced a newly transformed menu that continues the Inn’s rich culinary tradition. Take a front row seat for new, mouthwatering specialties and reimagined classics.

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market 805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Eight markets, six days a week. See schedule on page 13.

Valle Fresh 805 865-2282 ValleFresh.com Specializing in hand-crafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans, Valle Fresh is a family owned catering company that has a zeal for the food and services we provide. Chef Conrad Gonzales offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more.


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SWUIM NM T EERR EEDDI IBBLLEE EEVVEENNTTSS S AT U R D AY

S U N D AY

JUNE

JUNE

Red, White & Blues Concert

Big Bang Brunch

2–6pm at Buttonwood Farm Winery It’s the 20th anniversary of this summer concert at the vineyard pond featuring both Buttonwood and Longoria wines. Local blues favorite The Stiff Pickle Orchestra will kick off the concert, which will feature Arthur Adams and his Blues Band (back by popular demand!). $57.69 includes concert and 2 glasses of wine; visit ButtonwoodWinery.com for more information.

11am–3pm at Riverbench Winery in Santa Maria

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Chef Becky Reams will be at Riverbench for two four-course brunches paired with Riverbench still and sparkling wines. Enjoy a phenomenal meal in the Riverbench garden with gorgeous vineyard views. 30 seat limit; sold on a first come, first served basis. $65; for more information visit Riverbench.com.

S AT U R D AY

T U E S D AY

JULY

JULY

Red, White and Blues

Edible Santa Barbara Supper Club

4

JU LY

7

Noon–3pm at Zaca Mesa Winery Celebrate Fourth of July with an AllAmerican BBQ and live music with the Pacific Coast Blues Band. $15 per person. RSVP with Angela Harrison at 805 6889339 x311.

At MESAVERDE, Santa Barbara Join us for an intimate Edible Supper Club at MESAVERDE. Chef Christopher Rayman has developed an innovative plant-based menu that features fermented and cultured ingredients. For tickets and more info, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

S U N D AY

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

JULY

JULY

JULY

Los Angeles Fermentation Festival

Mid-Summer Night’s Bacon Dinner in the Barrel Room

Bacon & Barrels Grand Tasting

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17

11am–4pm, Venice Arts Plaza, Venice

5–9pm at Buttonwood Winery Enjoy a multi-course dinner featuring bacon or pork belly in each course, all paired with estate-grown Buttonwood Farm wines and set in the ambiance of Buttonwood Winery’s barrel room. For details and tickets, visit BaconAnd Barrels.com.

Featuring more than a dozen fermented foods experts, hands-on demonstrations, children’s passport program, home fermenter Screamin’ Pickle Contest, culture petting zoo, farm-to-bar area and 40+ fermented foods artisans. For more info and to purchase tickets, visit FermentLA.org.

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Noon–5pm at Buttonwood Winery Everything’s better with bacon, right? Local restaurants, breweries and distilleries to “praise the lard” in this annual paean to pork that will be held this year at Buttonwood Winery in the field just north of the peach orchard. For details and tickets, visit BaconAnd Barrels.com.

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

F R I D AY

JULY

JULY

JULY

JULY

Los Alamos Third Saturday Evening Stroll

Chicken Dinner at Bell Street Farm

Bob’s Well Bread Third Saturday Supper Club

Star Party!

5–8 pm, downtown Los Alamos The Los Alamos merchants on Bell Street invite everyone to join the fun and experience Los Alamos community charm first hand with its new Third Saturdays program. Ongoing. For more information call 805 344-1900.

5:30pm and 7:30pm at Bell Street Farm On the third Saturday of each month, enjoy a prix fixe dinner at Bell Street Farm. Endless antipasti bar, family-style rotisserie chicken dinner with roasted vegetables and potatoes, a cookie plate or affogato. $48 per person, not including tax or gratuity. For reservations, 805 344-4609; BellStreetFarm.com.

5:30pm at Bob’s Well Bread July’s theme for this dinner will be a salute to all that is local in Santa Barbara County, sourcing the finest that is local and seasonal from farmers to butchers and creating a summer’s night dinner to remember. Reservations required. For more info, call 805 344-3000 or email info@bobswellbread.com.

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76 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

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5:30pm at Buttonwood Winery Back by popular demand, the guys from the Santa Barbara Astronomical Unit will be bringing the big telescopes to Buttonwood for an evening of stargazing. We’ll begin on the patio as dusk approaches with a light supper and wine, then trek out to the orchard meadow to see what is in our beautiful night sky. Always SO fascinating!


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com W E D N E S D AY – S U N D AY

AUGUST 5–9 Old Spanish Days Fiesta A celebration of Santa Barbara’s heritage, through music, parades, fiestas, dancing and family events. Serious foodies frequent the mercado at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church with its wide array of authentic Mexican cuisine and entertainment. Full listing of events can be found at OldSpanishDays-Fiesta.org.

F R I D AY

F R I D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

Olde Town Market

Carpinteria First Friday

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5pm–7pm in Lompoc

5–8pm Friday, held around Carpinteria

Head to the 100 block of South H Street for an evening market with vendors, food booths, a farmers market, free activities for kids and live music. Ongoing through August 21. For more information call 805 736-4567.

Spend the first Friday of every month discovering Carpinteria’s quaint shops, locally brewed beer, live entertainment, sweet deals, delicious food and art walks.

S AT U R D AY

F R I D AY

F R I D AY – S U N D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

National Creamsicle Day

California Culinary Retreats All-inclusive Italian Cooking Weekend

A U G US T

8

14

In The Vineyard & On The Farm Dinner

11am–6pm at the Riverbench Winery Tasting Room, Santa Barbara

4:30pm at the Bernat Family Vineyard

This custom pairing pairs Koval Confections Creamsicle Fudge with Riverbench Chardonnays and a Happy Fruity Riesling at the end. Exactly what you need to cool, refresh and relax you on a hot summer day. $17 at Riverbench’s Funk Zone tasting room. Riverbench.com.

Dine with Bernat winemaker Sam Marmorstein and farmers Debby and Shu Takikawa, right at the source. The farm-based menu created by Los Olivos Café’s Chris Joslyn will be accompanied by Bernat Wines. $125 (all inclusive). Reservations required; 805 757-1435 or email info@BernatRetreats.com. S AT U R D AY

AUGUST

15

Surf ‘n’ Suds Beer Festival Carpinteria State Park’s Linden Field The “Beer Festival with a Surf Twist” includes over 55 craft breweries and wineries, local surfboard shapers, plenty of food trucks, live music by Cornerstone, Afishnsea the Moon and The Olés. $65 for VIP and $50 for general admission. For tickets and additional info, visit SurfBeerFest.com.

Friday 4pm–Sunday 2pm, Montecito This all-inclusive retreat is designed to introduce you to both modern and classic Italian cooking techniques, from gnocchi to ravioli to scallopini to tiramisu, and providing you with hands-on experience. For more info and booking, visit CaliforniaCulinaryRetreats.com.

S AT U R D AY

W E D N E S D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

Los Alamos Third Saturday Evening Stroll

Buttonwood All Farm Dinner

Solvang Third Wednesday

5:30pm at Buttonwood Winery, Solvang Beginning with passed appetizers, Button­wood’s farm-to-table feast takes place pond-side in the middle of their 39acre vineyard and will feature farm-raised meat, farm-grown fruits and vegetables, as well as their award-winning wines; everything on the table raised, grown and produced on Buttonwood Farm. $135; for reservations visit allfarmdinner. eventbrite.com.

3–7pm in downtown Solvang Stroll through the lively streets of Solvang while tasting at five participating wine or beer tasting rooms. $20 includes the tastings, a specialty logo glass and a map to help you navigate your way through all the fun. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit SolvangThirdWednesday.com.

S AT U R D AY

15

5–8 pm, downtown Los Alamos The Los Alamos merchants on Bell Street invite everyone to join the fun and experience Los Alamos community charm first hand with its new Third Saturdays program. Ongoing. For more information call 805 344-1900.

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S AT U R D AY

S U N D AY

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

FigtoberFest

Santa Barbara Fermentation Festival

12

SE PT E MBER

14–16

FigtoberFest will take place at Figueroa Mountain Brewing Company’s Santa Barbara, Buellton, Santa Maria, Arroyo Grande and Westlake Village taprooms featuring live music, German food, contests, games and more to celebrate Oktoberfest. Try our Oktoberfest beer available for a limited time! Visit FigMtnBrew.com for more info.

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11am–5:30pm, Rancho La Patera & Stow House, Goleta Featuring more than a dozen fermented foods experts, hands-on demonstrations, children’s passport program, home fermenter Screamin’ Pickle Contest, culture petting zoo, farm-to-bar area and 40+ fermented foods artisans. For more info, visit FermentSB.org.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2015 | 77


78 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015


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the last Bite Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

Grilled Avocado at Mattei’s Tavern What started as an experiment in cooking California’s signature fruit quickly became Chef Robbie Wilson’s signature dish. The Grilled Avocado with Ponzu sauce and fresh wasabi at Mattei’s Tavern in Los Olivos stemmed from Wilson’s love for tempura-fried avocado, and is now the dish that every table wants. Wilson wanted to do something entirely new with local produce, and dreamed of an avocado dish to be eaten with a fork— something savory and something very California. Grilling it over red oak on the restaurant’s 1889 grill was right in line for this historic landmark. Wilson says the trifecta of smoke, acid and the fruit’s buttery texture is what makes this simple, yet adventurous dish.

LIZ DODDER

He only uses Hass avocados from Bliss Organics in Carpinteria because of their large size and superior taste— Hass avocados have higher fat content and larger yields and make up 90% of California avocados. Bliss also grows different varieties that produce fruit year-round, keeping Wilson’s most-popular dish always in-stock and always local.

80 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2015

To grill the avocado, Wilson halves it and scoops out each half, then brushes each side with olive oil, salt and pepper. Make sure the grill is hot— as hot as possible. Place the halves crater side down on the grill for 2 to 3 minutes or until they easily release from the grill. Turn them over on their backs for just a minute, then remove and sprinkle again with olive, salt and pepper. Fill each crater with a Ponzu sauce of equal parts soy sauce and acid (rice wine vinegar + citrus juice), nori (seaweed) and garlic. Serve with freshly grated wasabi. If you can’t find fresh wasabi, Wilson says don’t use the dyed green stuff; instead, use thinly sliced local hot chiles and float in the Ponzu. Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com


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Edible Santa Barbara Summer 2015  

Celebrating the local food and wine of Santa Barbara County.

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