Edible Santa Barbara Winter 2024

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edible

ISSUE 56 • WINTER 2024

®

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Tasting the Terroir

of Local Olive Oil

edible 15

YEAR ANNIVERSARY



The word is out …

Winner – Best Urban Tasting Room “A fabulous menu for dining all day and night, extensive outdoor seating, space for private parties for tastings, lunches, and dinners, and an enthusiastic and well-trained staff to educate and illuminate. With two brands to taste — Barden and Margerum — it is an experience like no other.”

Margerum’s Los Olivos Tasting Room

– Along with the wine, a medley of intriguing

food pairings will delight the palate. Expect quintessential wine-tasting accompaniments, as well as more unconventional offerings, such as sushi-centered bento boxes featuring bites of tender unagi sashimi, bluefin tuna with avocado and shiso leaf, and Dungeness crab with fragrant vanilla-bean sauce. Also noteworthy are Kumamoto oysters, perfectly paired with a glass of bubbly Barden Blanc de Blancs.

Margerum M5 Red Earns Prestigious Recognition as #17 in Wine Spectator’s Top 100 List

Recommended visit! Margerum Wine Company wines were served during former President Barack Obama’s White House State Dinner.

Doug Margerum has been nominated for Winemaker of the Year for the 23rd anniversary of Wine Enthusiast’s coveted Annual Wine Star Awards.

SMALL PRODUCTION. SAVORY EATS 19 East Mason Street, Santa Barbara 805.845.8435 2446 Alamo Pintado Avenue, Los Olivos 805.504.1209 www.MargerumWines.com


edible

edible

santa barbara

15

Year Anniversary

Winter 2024

page 22

LIZ DODDER

GEORGE YATCHISIN

®

page 56

DEPARTMENTS 6 Food for Thought

20 Seasonal Recipe

by Krista Harris

Chicory, Persimmon and

8 In Season 9 Edible for Kids Dinner on Domingos

A Red-Letter Cocktail Day by George Yatchisin

54 Support Local Guide

by Krista Harris

56 The Last Bite

by Krista Harris

18 Seasonal Recipe Ginger Syrup Espresso Ginger Soda by Krista Harris

KRISTA HARRIS

22 Drinkable Landscape

Red Cabbage Salad with Citrus Dressing

Sparkling Water Chocolate Cake with Peanut Butter Frosting

2 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

by Jane Chapman

14 Seasonal Recipe

16 Seasonal Recipe

page 14

Blue Cheese Salad

Pad Man Thet at Na Na Thai by Liz Dodder


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 3


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santa barbara

15

Year Anniversary

®

Winter 2024

24 Gather ’Round the Ranch Table

page 51

by Hana-Lee Sedgwick

28 Farming with a Purpose that Goes Beyond the Farm

by Jamie Edlin

32 Can Farming with Trees Save the Food System? by Lisa Held

38 Tasting Terroir by Theo Stephan

44 The Food Revolution Will Not Be Televised by Tracey Ryder

46 Foundation Stocks Culinary Building Blocks by Pascale Beale

RECIPES IN THIS ISSUE Soups and Stocks 26 Butternut Squash Soup with Sage 49 Chicken Stock 49 Roasted Vegetable Stock 53 Silky Cauliflower Curry Soup 49 Simple Vegetable Stock

Salads and Main Dishes 21 Chicory, Persimmon and Blue Cheese Salad 51 Citrus Chicken Tagine 15 Red Cabbage Salad with Citrus Dressing

Desserts 16 Sparkling Water Chocolate Cake with Peanut Butter Frosting

Beverages ABOUT THE COVER

18 Espresso Ginger Soda

Mission olives growing in Santa Barbara County

18 Ginger Syrup

by Deborah Chadsey.

4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

23 Your Beeting Heart Cocktail

MEDIA 27

FEATURES


FOXEN

®

V I N E YA R D & W I N E R Y

Celebrating 40 Years as Sustainable Wine Growers! Visit us at either of our tasting rooms! Open Daily | 7600 & 7200 Foxen Canyon Road | 805.937.4251 | www.foxenvineyard.com

Our winery is dedicated to crafting a small portfolio of wines from one remarkable vineyard.

6020 Foxen Canyon Road Open Daily: 10:00AM– 4:00PM

137 Anacapa St. Suite C Open Daily: 12:00PM– 6:00PM

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 5


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

edible ®

Crystal Clear

I

t’s our 15th anniversary, and we have much to celebrate. In 2009, when we published our first issue, the world was in the midst of a recession. We set out with the mission to tell the stories of our local food culture—highlighting the contributions of farmers, chefs, food artisans, winemakers and the many heroes in our community who are involved in bringing sustenance to our tables. Perhaps it was a difficult time to start, but I tend to think the time was right. We knew we had the support of the Krista Harris, from the first issue in 2009. Edible network of 80 or so magazines throughout the United States and Canada. Although we are independently owned and operated, we are all members of Edible Communities, which started in Ojai 22 years ago. And that support network has provided us with information, inspiration and deep, enduring friendships with our fellow publishers and the founders of Edible Communities, Tracey Ryder and Carole Topalian. If you have been a long-time reader of this magazine, you’ve seen us grow and adapt to the community around us. In addition to the magazine, we made forays into the digital world and hosted and participated in many local events. But our readers continue to clamor for the print magazine. In our recent reader survey, we learned that almost half of our readers had read all four of the last four issues, and 60% had read at least three of the previous four. An impressive 96% had taken action after reading the magazine, such as discussing or referring an article to a friend, preparing a recipe or visiting a place mentioned in an article or ad. In 2009, I wrote that I hoped Edible Santa Barbara would be the type of magazine that you would curl up on a comfortable chair with a local beverage and read cover to cover. I have heard from many readers over the years that they do just that. And I could not be more proud of the many writers and photographers who have won awards for their work in our magazine. Just this past November, we were thrilled to win two Best of Edible Awards at the Edible Communities annual meeting in Santa Fe. Kudos to Summer Staeb and Max Threlfall for Best Feature Photography for the article “A Soulful Connection to the Land” and Pascale Beale for Best Recipe Photography for her article “Herbaceous.” As I look ahead, I see new partnerships forming and bringing new voices to the magazine. I’m excited to see what the next 15 years will bring. A 15th wedding anniversary is traditionally celebrated with the gift of crystal. It’s clear to me that we should raise a glass to all our readers, contributors, advertisers and the members of our community who continue to bring sustenance to our tables. Cheers!

Krista Harris, Editor and Publisher Email us at info@EdibleSantaBarbara.com and visit our website at www.EdibleSantaBarbara.com 6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson DESIGNER

Steven Brown MARKETING & ADVERTISING

Tara Howard SOCIAL MEDIA

Liz Dodder Jill Johnson CONTRIBUTORS

Pascale Beale Jane Chapman Liz Dodder Jamie Edlin Lisa Held Nhatt Nichols Tracey Ryder Hana-Lee Sedgwick Carole Topalian George Yatchisin ADVISORY GROUP

Pascale Beale, Jordan benShea, Rosminah Brown, Janice Cook Knight, Katie Hershfelt, Jill Johnson, Nancy Oster ADVERTISING

ads@ediblesantabarbara.com Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.


P R E M I U M H E A R T

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E S T A T E - G R O W N S A N T A

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from the C O U N T R Y

D A I L Y O L I V O S

K O E H L E R W I N E R Y . C O M

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 7


in Season this Winter WINTER PRODUCE

YEAR-ROUND PRODUCE

WINTER SEAFOOD

Artichokes

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Halibut

Avocados Basil

Apples

Ridgeback shrimp

Mussels

Arugula

Rock fish

Broccoli rabe (rapini)

Beans, dried

Sardines

Brussels sprouts

Beets

Cabbage

Bok choy

Celery

Broccoli

Celery root

Carrots

Chanterelle mushrooms

Cauliflower

Cherimoya

Chard

Blood oranges

BLOOD ORANGES

Cilantro Citron Collards Dill

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Escarole

Spiny lobster CAULIFLOWER

Fennel Green garlic

YEAR-ROUND SEAFOOD Abalone (farmed)

Dates (harvested Sept/Oct)

Black cod

Edible flowers

Oysters

Kiwi

Kale

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Kumquats

DILL

Lettuce

Mustard greens

Mushrooms

Onions, green bunching Papayas

Onions, bulb (harvested May/June)

Parsnips

Oranges

Pea greens Peas, snap

Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Persimmon

Potatoes

Pineapple guava

KIWI

Rock crab BOK CHOY

Radicchio Romanesco

Shallots

Rutabagas

Spinach

Sapote

Sprouts

Strawberries

Squash, winter (harvested July/Oct)

Sunchokes RADICCHIO

Tangerines/Mandarins Tomatoes, hothouse Turnips

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Sanddabs Urchin

OTHER YEAR-ROUND

URCHIN

Eggs Coffee (limited availability) LEEKS

Dairy (Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads) Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil

Radishes Raisins (harvested Sept/Oct)

Pomelos

OYSTERS

Clams

Lemons

Limes

Sweet potatoes

White seabass

Herbs (Bay leaf, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Grapefruit

Spot prawns

Dandelion

Garlic (harvested May/June)

Fava beans

MUSSELS

HONEY

Meat (Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork) SPINACH

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat (Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct) Yams (harvested Aug/Sept) WALNUTS

PASTA


Dinner on Domingos

Activities, recipes, stories (and more!) created for family sharing Illustration adapted from Dinner on Domingos (Barefoot Books), written by Alexandra Katona and illustrated by Claudia Navarro

Abuelita’s home holds so many family stories... but Alejandra wishes she knew more Spanish. Can she find a way to make her own memories with her grandmother?

CUT ME OUT!

barefootbooks.com/dinner-on-domingos

is created in partnership with indie, award-winning, Concord, MA-based children’s publisher, Barefoot Books. Learn more by visiting www.barefootbooks.com.


Dinner on Domingos

LET’S EAT!

Spark Your Senses: Spice Tasting

Adult Helper Needed!

You’ll Need: • plain cooked rice, eggs, or popcorn • 5 different spices, in jars. Be careful handling anything really spicy!

oregano

cinnamon

thyme

rosemary bay leaves

1 Use your senses to explore the spices! First, give the jars a shake and test how they sound. Are there any really noisy spices?

2 Next, put your nose to work! Take the lid off the jars and smell each spice. Do you like the smell? 3 Shake a little of each spice out onto a plate for a closer look. Do you recognize any of them just by sight? 4 Rub a tiny bit of each spice between your fingers. What do they feel like when you touch them?

Play a Game: Guess That Spice!

5 Ask an adult to help you sprinkle a very small amount of each spice on rice, eggs, or popcorn. Make sure you have a glass of water handy and some plain unseasoned food to cleanse your palate! Now taste each spice. Which ones do you like?

Now it’s time to put your senses to the test! Players take turns closing their eyes. Can the player with closed eyes identify the spices by their sound alone? How about smell, touch, or taste?

FOR two or more PLAYERS

barefootbooks.com/ global-kids-deck

Learn about crafts, food, games, festivals, and ways of helping others around the world with 50+ hands-on activities.

CUT ME OUT!

Illustration and text adapted from Global Kids (Barefoot Books), written by Homa Sabet Tavangar and illustrated by Sophie Fatus

For centuries, people from different countries have used spices to change the tastes of the food they eat. Try using your senses to explore a variety of spices!

Are you passionate about children’s books that prioritize diversity, encourage critical thinking, and teach kids to protect the planet? Learn more about a Barefoot Books Community Bookseller! Visit barefootbooks.com/cb. f am i ly s h ar i n g | c r e a t e d f o r becoming


Traditional Ecuadorian Locro

Make warm family memories in the kitchen with this Ecuadorian potato and cheese soup, topped with avocado. Makes: 4 – 6 servings

Time: 1 ½ hours

Ingredients:

barefootbooks.com/dinner-on-domingos

1. Add the water to a large pot and bring to a boil. Meanwhile,

4 cups water

1 ½ – 2 lbs potatoes, washed, peeled, diced, and soaked in cold water (starchy varieties such as Russet or King Edward work best) 1 medium onion, chopped 3 or 4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

½ tsp salt 1 cup milk

2 tsp achiote (or annatto) powder or ¼ tsp turmeric and/or ½ tsp sweet paprika

Salt and pepper to taste 1 cup cheese, grated (white cheese such as Monterey Jack or Cheddar works best)

To serve: 2 avocados, chopped 2 cups lettuce, chopped (Romaine lettuce works well) 1 cup tomatoes, chopped

remove the potatoes from the cold water they're soaking in and rinse thoroughly. 2. Add the drained potatoes, onions, and garlic to the boiling water. 3. Reduce to medium-low heat, add ½ tsp of salt, then cook

for around 30 – 45 minutes or until the potatoes become very tender. While you’re waiting, have a dance party! (In between songs, check the potatoes.)

4. Once the potatoes are tender, use a wooden spoon to mash the potatoes slightly in the pot so that the soup becomes creamy. (Most of the potatoes will break down naturally.) Leave some chunks of potato as the different textures make it more interesting. 5. Reduce to a low heat, stir in the milk and the achiote powder, then cook for a few more minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. If the soup is too thick, add a bit more milk. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and stir in the cheese. 7. Immediately serve the soup into bowls. Add chopped avocado, lettuce, and tomato on top. 8. Gather friends and family around the table and enjoy your meal together!

Illustration and text from Dinner on Domingos (Barefoot Books), written by Alexandra Katona and illustrated by Claudia Navarro

is created in partnership with indie, award-winning, Concord, MA-based children’s publisher, Barefoot Books. Learn more by visiting www.barefootbooks.com.


Dinner on Domingos

ACTIVITY Create a Family Crest

, You ll Need:

2. Divide it into four quarters and decorate the border.

• markers

3. In the quarters, draw:

• large piece of cardboard

• your family members • a food you all enjoy • an activity your family likes to do together • a place you enjoy going together

You can also decorate items with your Family Crest

4. Display your crest somewhere you can all see it.

(such as journals or placemats) and give them to family

• scissors

members as gifts.

barefootbooks.com/ kind-kids

Discover 50 unique games, crafts, and mindfulness activities to help kids develop empathy and respect for themselves, their loved ones, and the wider world.

is created in partnership with indie, award-winning, Concord, MA-based children’s publisher, Barefoot Books. Learn more by visiting www.barefootbooks.com.

Illustration and text adapted from Kind Kids (Barefoot Books), written byDr. Helen Maffini and Whitney Stewart and illustrated by Mariana Ruiz Johnson

1. Draw a crest shape on a piece of cardboard and cut it out.

CUT ME OUT!

Spark conversations after your shared meal about what connects your family together and makes it special.


Raised With Care

®

All natural pork, beef and lamb raised sustainably and humanely by a

community of more than 600 independent family farmers and ranchers

to produce the highest quality meat.

100% Certified Humane® No antibiotics or added hormones—EVER No crates—EVER Raised outdoors and in deeply bedded pens 100% vegetarian feeds


seasonal

KRISTA HARRIS

Recipe

14 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024


CELEBR ATING 50 YE ARS!

Wi nery & V i ne ya rd s WINE TASTING

It is the easiest thing to slice up some red cabbage for a quick salad or slaw. I created this particular version to make use of the oranges or tangerines that are plentiful this time of year. I tend to use a red miso for the dressing, but feel free to experiment with other types of miso and adjust the seasonings to your taste.

WEDDINGS & EVENTS

PRIVATE TOURS

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. Los Olivos, CA 93441 www.zacamesa.com | (805) 688-9339

MAKES 2–4 SERVINGS

1 2 pound red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced

2 green onions, finely chopped 1 carrot, grated Zest and juice of 1 orange or large tangerine 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 2 teaspoons miso paste 1 teaspoon sesame oil Salt and pepper, to taste

Combine the cabbage, green onions and carrot in a large bowl. Add the zest of the orange or tangerine and then squeeze the juice into a small bowl. Add the vinegar, miso paste, sesame oil, a dash of salt and pepper to the juice and whisk until smooth. Add to the cabbage and toss to coat evenly. Taste and add additional salt and pepper to taste. —Krista Harris

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 15


seasonal

Recipe

This cake was inspired by Depression-era cakes that made do with water and oil instead of eggs and butter. It uses sparkling water to give it a little extra lift and lightness. The addition of apple cider vinegar also gives it a light texture. The cake itself is not very sweet, but the peanut butter frosting adds just the right touch. You can easily make the frosting dairy-free by using plant-based milk and butter. MAKES 1 (9-INCH SQUARE) CAKE (9 SERVINGS) 1 1 ⁄3 cups all-purpose flour

1 3 cup natural cocoa powder

1 2 teaspoon baking soda

1 2 teaspoon salt

1 cup sugar

1 3 cup coconut oil, warmed to its liquid state

1 2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup sparkling water 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

FROSTING

1 2 cup peanut butter, room temperature

4 tablespoons butter, softened 1 cup powdered sugar, sifted 2 tablespoons milk

1 2 teaspoon vanilla extract

While cake is cooling, add the peanut butter and butter to a bowl and combine. Sift in the powdered sugar and add the milk and vanilla. Beat with an electric mixer or in a stand mixer for 1–2 minutes, or until smooth. Spread the frosting onto the cooled cake. —Krista Harris

16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

KRISTA HARRIS

Preheat oven to 350°F and grease a 9-inch square baking pan. Sift the flour, cocoa powder and baking soda into a large bowl. Add the salt, sugar, oil, vanilla extract and sparkling water. Stir until smooth. Then add the vinegar, stir just until combined and then immediately pour into your prepared pan and bake for 35–40 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool completely in the pan.


The SBCC Promise The SBCC Promise has provided more than 7,000 local high school graduates with the opportunity to pursue their dreams at Santa Barbara City College. Photo: Nell Campbell

Created in 2016, the SBCC Promise covers all required fees, books, and supplies for two years, and is funded entirely by private gifts.

Your gift makes it possible. sbccfoundation.org | (805) 730-4401

ella & louie flowers for celebrations of all sizes delivering Santa Barbara and Santa Ynez www.ellaandlouie.com

Extra virgin olive oils, flavored olive oils, olive tapenades, table olives, gourmet vinegars, local food products.

Open Thursday through Monday 11am–5pm 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 olivehillfarm.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 17


seasonal

Recipe

I can never get enough ginger in my life. It’s wonderful in savory dishes, in sweet dishes, as tea and now my new favorite drink is soda with ginger syrup, preferably with a shot of espresso. MAKES 1 CUP 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup water 1 cup peeled, sliced fresh ginger

Add the sugar and water to a saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring continuously until the sugar is dissolved. Add the ginger, then reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let sit in the covered pan to cool for an hour. Strain out the slices of ginger, then bottle the syrup and use to make the following drink or store in the refrigerator. It will easily keep a couple weeks.

Add 1 shot of espresso to a glass of ice, stir to cool it down, then add a shot (about 1½ ounces) of ginger syrup and top with sparkling water, stir and serve.

KRISTA HARRIS

—Krista Harris

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024


Wine Shop & Bar

Featuring Santa Barbara County Wines Tuesday – Saturday 11am to 7pm

4177 State Street – 805-695-3003 – www.goodlandwineshop.com

FRESH LOCAL Support Local! Gift Certificates Available

We deliver directly to your door—the best our community has to offer: local organic produce, grass-fed meats, hormone-free poultry, local seafood, fresh baked pies and breads, cheeses, coffees, artisan food specialties created by local chefs and much more… • Subscriptions start at just $26 • Delivery options include weekly or every other week • Freedom to suspend your delivery • Weekly billing • Various box sizes available

Huge Variety of Local Foods!

ChocolateMaya.com

15 West Gutierrez Street • Santa Barbara, California 93101 Phone: (805) 965-5956

www.PlowToPorch.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 19


seasonal

GALLOIS PHOTO

Recipe

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024


by Jane Chapman

C

hicory is in season, and I couldn’t be happier. These hardy and slightly bitter lettuces are as delicious as they are gorgeous. Lucky for us, this time of year at our farmers market you will find a handful of the best varieties, such as Curly Endive, Puntarelle, Castelfranco, Escarole and Treviso Precoce. I have combined the Rosa and Chioggia chicories in this salad because of their dramatic rose-colored leaves, but feel free to use any variety that speaks to you. The Garden of….. and Roots Farms grow some of the best chicory in the country and are the stalls I visit first at our Saturday Santa Barbara farmers market. The bitter greens of the chicories pair beautifully with the sweet crunch of the Fuyu persimmons, the creamy and peppery finish of the blue cheese and the brightness of the pomegranate shrub vinaigrette. Bring vibrancy to your table during the winter months with this cheerful and satiating salad. MAKES 4–6 SERVINGS

FOR THE VINAIGRETTE

1 3 cup Pomegranate Sideyard Shrub (or substitute a mix of

FOR THE SALAD 1 head of Rosa Chicory 1 head of Chioggia Chicory 1 fennel bulb, thinly shaved 1 Fuyu persimmon, sliced

1 2 cup firm blue cheese, for garnish

Fresh dill, for garnish

Start by adding all the ingredients for the vinaigrette in a small mason jar and setting aside. Keep at room temperature until you are ready to dress your salad. Fill your sink with cold water and gently place your chicories head down. Arrange the lettuce on a towel to air dry. Rather than cutting the lettuce, I gently peel away each leaf after cutting off the root. Once the leaves are thoroughly dry and you are ready to serve, arrange the chicories, persimmons and shaved fennel in your serving bowl. Give your vinaigrette a generous shake to mix, and then dress your salad. Garnish generously with the sliced blue cheese and fresh dill.

red wine vinegar and apple cider vinegar)

2 3 cup olive oil

1 3 cup Dijon mustard

1 2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper

Jane Chapman is a Santa Barbara native, has a lifetime of experience in the kitchen and recipe development and has worked in the restaurant business for over 20 years. She prides herself on simple, delicious and approachable recipes to encourage the burgeoning home chef. Her newest venture, The Communal Table Santa Barbara, curates intimate events for women combining food and conversation. Her goal is to create authentic community and connection one meal at a time. To learn more or attend one of her events, visit www.CommunalTableSB.com.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 21


drinkable LANDSCAPE

A Red-Letter Cocktail Day WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY

George Yatchisin

A

lthough color symbolism appears simple at first blush, the more you think about it, the trickier it gets. Take blue. A blue sky is a traditional cue for optimism and hope. Yet when someone is feeling down, we say they are blue. And that’s before we even consider why suggestive language is called blue. You could write a whole book on blue—indeed, William Gass did back in 1975, On Being Blue: A Philosophical Inquiry. So I realize I’m going out on a limb if I make too much of this issue’s cocktail being red. But given it works for Valentine’s Day thanks to hearts and roses, it seemed a fitting concoction for winter. And even more importantly, it features a humble crop from the winter season—the lowly beet, which is even belittled by its Latin name, Beta vulgaris. Beets taste of the ground from which we pull them; that’s thanks to geosmin, a terpene with the formula C12H22O. I don’t really know what that means either. What I do know is the sweetness and earthiness in beets adds a basso profundo note to a cocktail. A quick scan of the Your Beeting Heart Cocktail will reveal it’s a margarita in bloody beet clothing, with a bit of a kick thanks to the Ancho Reyes liqueur. It is also almost startingly red, to the point it would make a good Halloween cocktail, too, when fall rolls back around. Infusing the tequila with beets is a simple process (see recipe), it just takes some time, so be sure to start the work on this drink at least a day prior. You definitely want to use a blanco tequila, too, as the clear color to start leaves more room for the red to take over. Using a caramel-colored reposado would lead to a muddier-looking product. Blanco tequila, since it’s unaged, brings agave powerfully to a mixed drink, too. 22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Do note that silver tequila and blanco are often used interchangeably as terms, and if anything the former just means they can charge more for it (you should just sip it). For mixology purposes a $30 or so bottle should be good enough; just be sure it’s made from 100% blue agave. You don’t need additives. I used a bottle of JAJA, a smooth, straightforward expression of tequila. The fresh citrus bill for the drink is crucial to provide the needed zip and lift, given all the earthiness the beets bring and, to be honest, amplify from the agave. Luckily, this time of year our trees and farmers markets are bursting with terrific tangerines of all sorts. That half ounce might not seem like it could make a difference, but it gives the drink a refreshing sweetness that keeps you sipping. Try it with only lime juice, and you’ll spot the difference immediately. (Not that the lime-only version would be unpotable.) Similarly, you could leave out the Ancho Reyes liqueur, but it provides a punch of warmth and a bit of smoke that helps clarify the drink—you don’t want your earthiness to go muddy. You really don’t want to skip the saline solution. First, it saves you from having to try to rim your cocktail with salt, which can be a messy procedure and can bring too much pucker to any particular sip, depending upon how thickly crusted your coupe ends up. Sure, a well-done salt rim can be attractive in that frost-on-the-window way (especially for a winter cocktail), but adding saline to the drink itself ensures that saltiness infuses the drink consistently. As Eater put it, “Simply put, salt makes ingredients taste more like themselves.” Plus it’s easy to whip up the solution and then have it on hand.


Since you aren’t rimming with salt, and since the striking scarlet liquid in the glass should be the star, here’s a drink for which it’s worth skipping a garnish. I feel even better going garnishless after a recent visit to New York’s famed Dead Rabbit Pub that didn’t adorn any of their award-winning cocktails. Plus, for Valentine’s Day you can even say to you partner, “Who needs a distracting garnish when there’s all of your beauty for me to gaze at?” when you toast and win all sorts of points.

One of the “Top 15 Amazing Small Town Bakeries” in the U.S.! - Travel & Leisure

George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

RECIPE

Your Beeting Heart Cocktail MAKES 2

4 ounces beet-infused blanco tequila

ARTISAN BREAD HAND-MADE IN SMALL BATCHES

2 ounces Cointreau 1 1 ⁄2 ounces fresh lime juice

1 2 ounce fresh tangerine/Satsuma juice

1 2 ounces Ancho Reyes Verde

1 4 teaspoon saline solution

info@BobsWellBread.com • BobsWellBread.com

Add all ingredients to cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into two coupes. Consider no garnish (but you can use a lime wedge if you like).

Beet-Infused Tequila 750ml bottle of blanco tequila 5 ounces red beetroot, give or take (1 big beet)

Scrub, trim and peel the beet to be sure you’re not introducing dirt into your infusion. Chop beet up in ½-inch pieces, more or less— none of this is precise, you just want to give plenty of room for the booze to infuse. Note: After this chopping you will look like you’ve left a crime scene, so either wear gloves or wash vigorously immediately. Put the beet parts in a large mason jar and pour in the tequila. Screw on the lid and give it a good shake. Let sit at room temperature in a cool place for 24 hours.

Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment 388 Bell Street, Los Alamos, CA 93440 805.344.1900 CasaDumetzWines.com

Drain out the beets. You can use them in a very intoxicating adult salad, with tangerines, greens (arugula is good) and crumbled cotija cheese.

Saline Solution 50 grams Maldon sea salt 200 grams boiling water

Combine boiling water and salt and stir until salt dissolves. Let cool. Store at room temperature in a glass jar with lid.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 23


GATHER ’ROUND THE RANCH TABLE Elizabeth Poett’s cookbook features seasonal recipes interwoven with family traditions. WORDS BY

Hana-Lee Sedgwick

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Even if her name doesn’t immediately resonate with you yet, I’m confident that it will as soon as you feast your eyes on the recipes in her new cookbook, The Ranch Table: Recipes from a Year of Harvests, Celebrations, and Family Dinners on a Historic California Ranch. Growing up on the sprawling 14,000-acre Rancho San Julian in the Lompoc area—recognized as one of the oldest

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family-run ranches in California—Elizabeth embraced her days spent feeding cows, climbing trees and collaborating with her mom in the kitchen, creating both intimate family dinners and grand celebratory gatherings.

© BJ GOLNICK

ou don’t need to have deep roots in Santa Barbara County to know of seventhgeneration rancher Elizabeth Poett. Chances are, you’ve seen her at the Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market, where she sells grass-fed beef from her family’s ranch, Rancho San Julian. You may have read about her in the pages of Edible Santa Barbara. Or perhaps you recognize her from the Magnolia Network show “Ranch to Table,” which delves into her daily life and kitchen pursuits on the historic ranch that’s been in her family since 1837.

While she cherished her youth on the ranch, a desire to explore the world beyond the Central Coast led her to the Midwest for college then to bustling the cities of New York and Los Angeles. Elizabeth found city life to be “exciting and energizing,” she recounts, but couldn’t ignore the strong pull to return to her roots. So, in 2006 she moved back to the ranch to work alongside her father.

Just a year later, Elizabeth established Rancho San Julian Beef and secured a regular spot at the Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market, enabling her to connect customers directly to her family’s ranch-raised beef. Fueled by the relationships she formed with chefs, home cooks and food


enthusiasts, she next launched Ranch Table Gatherings, a series of immersive workshops and farm-to-table meals inviting guests to savor the ranch experience. “We invite people from across the country to partake in preserve-making, seasonal baking, or simply to enjoy a locally sourced meal and glass of wine under the wisteria-covered arbor,” writes Elizabeth. “Sharing our history and the ranch ethos with the wider community, while helping people foster a deeper appreciation for the connection between land and what they put on their plates, is truly rewarding.”

While The Ranch Table cookbook might seem an offshoot of her show’s success, Elizabeth had been nurturing the cookbook dream for nearly a decade. Her vision was to craft a cookbook that captured her life on the ranch while sharing the joys of cooking in tune with the seasons. The Ranch Table is that dream brought to life. Celebrating the beauty of gathering around a table with loved ones, The Ranch Table shares a year’s journey on the ranch, with chapters spotlighting seasonal events and inspirations, from springtime brandings to beach cookouts and festive holiday cookie bakeoffs. From the nutty Pistachio Breakfast Bread to the comforting Chile Relleno Casserole, the hearty Rancher’s Beef Chili to the fragrant Lavender Bee’s Knees, Elizabeth’s recipes bring forth the diverse produce and flavors of the region, while seamlessly weaving in her family’s timeless traditions. Some of the recipes have been handed down from her parents, grandparents and great-uncle, while others are inspired by her long history with farmers markets and her appreciation for cooking with the seasons. “On the ranch, things are constantly moving, growing and changing with every season,” she explains. “So, naturally, the recipes are deeply connected to the seasons, but it was also very important to me to utilize ingredients that are accessible and familiar. I focus on whole foods, for the best flavor, but I want people to feel like they have free rein to do what works for them.” She adds: “I learned from a young age that dinner is for everyone — it’s truly a communal experience — and that cooking

FRAN COLLIN

Elizabeth’s devotion to ranching, cooking, and sharing meals with friends and family eventually caught the eye of the Magnolia Network, which launched “Ranch to Table” in 2021. Now in its fourth season, “Ranch to Table” keeps audiences enthralled with Elizabeth’s approachable recipes, down-to-earth attitude about cooking, and snapshots of authentic Central Coast ranch living.

Elizabeth Poett.

can and should be a fun journey, not something to perfect or overcomplicate. My biggest hope for this book is that my family’s traditions and recipes will inspire people to build their own traditions with family and community. Cooking for others is a real gift, and I encourage everyone to find the joy in gathering around the table together.” Whether you’re a casual home cook or are planning a group feast, The Ranch Table is an ode to the warmth of crafting food with love and fresh ingredients. It welcomes you into Elizabeth Poett’s world— a world where cooking is an act of love and the dinner table is not just a place to sit, but a symbol of friendship, community and the rhythms of life. Hana-Lee Sedgwick is a Santa Barbara native who writes about wine, food and travel. As a freelance writer, editor and wine consultant, she happily spends her downtime eating, drinking and wandering, documenting it on her blog, Wander & Wine.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 25


© BJ GOLNICK

Recipe from The Ranch Table

Preheat oven to 350°F. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds and stringy membranes. Use the tip of a carving knife to put a couple of long, ½-inch-deep cuts into the flesh of each of the halves.

We grow a lot of different kinds of squash on the ranch, and after the fall harvest Katie and I store crates and buckets of them to cook with all winter long. I like to bring out the squash’s natural flavor by roasting it, then I simmer it with some fresh sage, which grows all year round in my garden. I also make this soup with other kinds of hard winter squash, depending on what I have in my pantry. MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

2 (3-pound) butternut squash 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 yellow onion, cut into 1 ⁄2 -inch dice

1 2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 1 ⁄2 quarts turkey or chicken broth (homemade or store-bought) 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 2 sprigs sage Ground black pepper Optional: 1 ⁄4 cup heavy cream

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Put the squash halves in a baking pan, flesh side up, and roast them for about 90 minutes, until you can split the flesh easily with a fork. Set the squash aside to cool until it’s no longer too hot to handle. When the squash is almost done, put the butter and onion in a Dutch oven or heavy-duty pot with ½ teaspoon salt and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is beginning to turn translucent, 5 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash halves with a large metal spoon (without taking the firm layer that forms on the top of the flesh) and add it to the pot. Add half the stock to the pot. Cook the mixture, breaking up the chunks of squash with your spoon, on medium heat until hot and steaming, 3 to 5 minutes. Use an immersion blender to purée everything, adding the remaining broth as you go. (Alternatively, transfer the mixture to a stand blender and process it until smooth, then pour it back into the pot and add the broth.) Stir in the brown sugar, add the sage and bring the soup to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low and let cook, stirring occasionally, until the sage’s flavor has perfumed the soup, about 10 minutes. Taste the

soup, add salt and pepper to taste, and stir in the cream (if using). Remove the sage leaves before serving. Recipe from The Ranch Table by Elizabeth Poett. Copyright © 2023 by Elizabeth Poett. Reprinted by permission of Magnolia Publications/ William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 27


FARMING WITH A PURPOSE THAT GOES BEYOND THE FARM WORDS BY

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Jamie Edlin


The distinctive stone entranceway of their property.

I

tell stories about farmers—about how, where and what they produce, as well as the journeys that led them to farming. Some were born into farming. Some felt destined to farm and began doing as soon as they could find an affordable a piece of land to plant. And some followed other career paths before pivoting later in life to realize their dream of farming. And then there are people like Laura Newman and Jim Tauber, who just happened to fall in love with a house in Los Olivos, California, that just happened to be sited on a seven-acre hillside property with a fruit orchard and a vineyard spread over three of the acres. Voila! A farm! By definition, “a farmer is any person engaged in the business of agriculture, whether for profit or otherwise, including the cultivation of land, the raising of crops, or the raising of livestock. Farmers play a major role in society; they feed us, some of them warm us and all are custodians of nature. Commitment goes way beyond their farms, crops and livestock; many play vital roles in their communities.” (LawInsider.com) Laura and Jim are the kind of farmers that feed us and warm us. They have great respect for nature and feel an overpowering commitment to give back to their community and to the planet. Honeybear Orchard wasn’t at all premeditated. The couple was simply looking for an occasional getaway from their busy lives in Los Angeles. In fact, they already had a second home in the Cuyama Valley, a little cabin situated on a remote 30 acres that Laura purchased long before she met Jim. Sadly, it was too rustic for Jim’s taste. And thus began the search for a more inviting property.

Laura and Jim with Honeybear, their Australian shepherd dog.

A rural landscape topped Laura’s wish list. Jim agreed, though he required that it be an easy drive to and from Los Angeles and an easy walk to a good cup of coffee. They had visited the Santa Ynez Valley. It was rural enough. And yet cultured. It seemed a good place to start. After looking at several properties, they were introduced to a house in Los Olivos that immediately grabbed Laura. At first sight, there was an extraordinary stone entranceway that carried into the house, arching its way through the living room and

Opposite: Laura Newman and Jim Tauber in the vineyard.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 29


Honeybear along with their Corgi, Lefty.

wrapping around the fireplace, a dramatic ribbon of earthy tones and textures gathered from nearby Figueroa Mountain. “I could tell by the many details that whoever built the house built it with passion,” said Laura. “There was something magical about the place. And then we walked through the house to the rear and—lo and behold— there was a vineyard and an orchard. It blew our minds that we could possibly have a place with fruit already growing on it. The house was ranch style, not big, but I knew it was the house for us!” The year was 2016. The property in Los Olivos seemed the perfect retreat from the couple’s professional lives, she a former general contractor, he a former film studio executive, both now co-therapists specializing in couples therapy, a shift in direction made early in their relationship. While they each had fulfilling careers of their own when they first met, they had wanted something that they could create together. A shared interest in psychotherapy inspired their practice. If that was the second chapter in each of their lives, they were about to embark on the next. Spending as much time as possible in Los Olivos, their first year was devoted to renovating the house. They doubled the size of the orchard. They put in more fruit trees, including pluots, peaches, plums, nectarines, apricots, pears, persimmons, pomegranates and apples, all religiously farmed following sustainable and organic practices. Laura and Jim were diligent in learning about plants native to California and, over time, blanketed their grounds with sages, salvias and various native grasses. They ground up the jojoba beans to make jojoba oil from the old-growth bushes original to the property. Olive oils would follow. They were taking none of this casually. Intentionality is the word that comes to mind. This was the beginning of Honeybear Orchard, named after their Australian shepherd dog. “We were setting the stage for what we wanted to do with our newfound farm,” Laura said with a sigh. “But right in the middle of the renovation, Jim became very ill and was diagnosed with cancer. Not a curable cancer but one that’s manageable. It was a traumatic year, one that caused us to shift our focus and 30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

They added to the original orchard with a planting of 300 more fruit trees.

In addition to chickens, they have a few goats and a couple of donkeys.

The worm tea maker and compost help feed their farm.


ask ourselves how we wanted to live our lives. Who do we want to be, what do we want to do and where do we want to do it?” “My cancer diagnosis changed our perspective on life,” added Jim. “Life is short. We only have one, and we want to live it the way we want and where we want and that’s here on our farm. We’ve literally planted roots here.” Making Los Olivos their home, Laura and Jim began eyeing the neighboring two and a half acres. Three years later in 2020, they purchased the property and planted another 300 fruit trees, primarily stone fruits but also a field of Arbequina and Manzanillo olive trees. They bought a few goats, a couple of donkeys and some chickens. A farm! But they still couldn’t find a good cup of coffee in walking distance. The solution: open a coffee shop that offers a really good cup of coffee in downtown Los Olivos, an easy walk from the farm. Lefty’s, named for their Corgi, opened in November 2021. The shop is another opportunity for Laura and Jim to express themselves in the choices they make, in how they source their products and in how they run their business. Key to those choices—“local, organic, sustainable and small-scale.” They choose suppliers who are like-minded and committed to fair trade and organic sourcing. Lefty’s has—in many ways—become a vital community hub and host to various cause-worthy gatherings. As important, Jim has a good cup of coffee within reach. Again, intentionality. Lefty’s recently received B Corp Certification. The B in B Corp stands for “benefit for all.” Certification requires that businesses meet the the highest standards of verified social and environmental performances, public transparency and accountability to balance profit and purpose. Asked how many hours they have in their day (since I was apparently slighted with only 24), they exchanged looks and laughed, because they’ve obviously learned how to squeeze life out of every hour given to them. It’s clear that their sense of purpose goes way beyond their farm. Laura is a hands-on board member of Brave Trails, a nonprofit dedicated to LGBTQ youth leadership programs. And she is now at the helm of building the first-ever LGBTQ-owned and -operated camp and community space in Santa Clarita, California. Laura and Jim are also deeply involved with Feed the Valley, a nonprofit that supports employees of the restaurant industry. “Life is precious, which is why— over the past few years— we’ve been pursuing stuff with complete abandon,” said Laura. “As soon as Jim was feeling better, we decided to work with a winemaker and make our own Chenin Blanc. We expanded the farm. Planted more trees. We’re burying drip lines horizontal to the stone fruit trees to encourage root spread that should help the trees through drought years. We keep pushing to get more and more sustainable.” Laura continued to show me around as we strolled through the orchard and recently harvested grapevines. “We’re making our own compost to feed the five acres that are farmed. And to combat the constant pests, as well as to increase the nutrients in the soil, we brought in a professional worm tea maker to help formulate a recipe of compost, worm castings, fish emulsion, amino acids and soluble kelp brewed together in 300-gallon tanks for 24 hours before spraying. We now have a really robust

Lefty’s Coffee Co. in Los Olivos.

spraying schedule throughout the year. And it’s working. We had over 1,000 pounds of fruit this year as compared to the 100 pounds at the start.” Now firmly dedicated to farming organically and sustainably, Honeybear is free of all synthetic (chemical) fertilizers and pesticides. Laura and Jim have applied for organic certification, meaning that they will have finally met the strict standards of transitioning over three years to the USDA’s highly regulated organic practices in growing and processing their produce. And what are their plans for this bounty of fruit? The Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chenin Blanc grapes are under contract with local winemakers. The peaches, plums and other varieties will find an audience at Lefty’s, as well as at local farmstands and markets. And a portion of the produce is donated to Veggie Rescue, which then delivers the fresh fruits directly to nonprofit organizations, schools and others within the Santa Barbara County community who are struggling with food insecurity. Asking Laura and Jim if they had ever imagined themselves as the farmers they are today, Jim replied, “I’ve never been a country boy, but I now feel comfortable living on a farm, waking up at sunrise, putting on my farm clothes, feeding the animals and picking fruit. It’s an honor and a privilege.” “Life unfolds in ways you never imagine,” added Laura with a contented smile. “We wouldn’t have ended up with a vineyard and farm if we hadn’t fallen in love with the house. Feeling grounded since moving to the Santa Ynez Valley, I can be present and therefore of service to our farm and to the recipients of what we’re growing, to caring for a person with a chronic illness, to getting involved in local projects. This is where we now live. We want to use all our good fortunes to do right by the planet. We’re committed to our activism in making the world a better place by doing what we believe must be done.” Farming is only one piece of it. Jamie Edlin lives in the Santa Ynez Valley and heads Hollywood & Wine, a marketing agency geared to the wine and hospitality industries. She serves on the board of Woodbury University’s School of Media, Culture & Design, is the recipient of Women’s Economic Ventures’ 2019 Spirit of Entrepreneurship Award in Media & Communications and is co-founder of the Joseph Edlin Memorial Journalism Internship.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 31


Can Farming With Trees SAVE THE FOOD SYSTEM?

Unprecedented funding is flowing into a broad range of agroforestry practices, which can pull carbon out of the atmosphere and build farm resilience as the climate changes. B Y L I S A H E L D , S E N I O R S TA F F R E P O R T E R AT C I V I L E AT S I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y N H AT T N I C H O L S

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Fiddle Creek Portrait: At Fiddle Creek Dairy, Tim Crowhill Sauder, like other farmers starting with silvopasture, uses white plastic tubes to protect young trees from contact with cattle in the pastures.

F

iddle Creek Dairy sits at the top of one of the endless honey locust, mulberry, chestnut and persimmon trees that are rolling hills in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. On now maturing slowly in neat rows across 30 acres of pastures. the first day of spring, farmer Tim Crowhill Sauder Sauder’s system — where his cows will soon graze among looks from his sloped pastures out over the open fields that trees instead of in fully open pastures — is called silvopasture. extend in every direction. A bright red barn interrupts the long And it’s one of several practices that fall under a broader horizon. An Amish farmer rides a agricultural approach called plow behind a team of horses. It’s “Sauder’s system—where his cows will agroforestry, or farming with trees. a bucolic picture that belies the Farmers can plant trees and soon graze among trees instead of in fully landscape’s natural state. bushes in strips to prevent soil erosion “This was the great Eastern Woodlands,” says Sauder. “It wants to be a forest here.”

open pastures—is called silvopasture. And it’s one of several practices that fall under a broader agricultural approach called agroforestry, or farming with trees.

Centuries ago, Sauder’s Anabaptist ancestors arrived and, instead of learning from and alongside the Native peoples who had already developed techniques to farm within the forest, took the land and cleared the trees to grow crops and graze livestock. Now, Sauder sees its next chapter as both practical action and penance.

“I do it for the sake of my children’s future and for the sins of my ancestors,” he says, of the 3,500 young hybrid willow,

and provide habitat for wildlife (windbreaks and hedgerows), along streams to stop nutrient pollution (riparian buffers) or between rows of corn (alley cropping). These practices, long part of Indigenous farming, are taking root all across the country. In California, Rebekka and Nathanael Siemens graze sheep in their 2,000-tree almond orchard. On 18 acres in Wisconsin, the Midwest’s leading agroforestry nonprofit, the Savanna Institute, is growing chestnut, elderberry, black currant and black walnut trees between rows of organic soybeans.

Opposite: Alley Cropping: Trees or shrubs are planted in rows between crops like wheat or soybeans.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 33


Whatever the approach, more abundant plant life that stays put year after year, i.e., perennials, leads to healthier ecosystems that support biodiversity and store carbon. Indigenous cultures around the world, including Native American tribes, have long practiced various forms of agroforestry. And, as researchers, policymakers and governments look for effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build climate resilience on farms to secure the food supply, agroforestry is approaching a renaissance.

Funding Agroforestry as a Climate Solution Project Drawdown ranks silvopasture and alley cropping among its Top 20 climate solutions. In the latest round of reports published by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world’s top climate experts concluded that practices that store carbon dioxide are now critical to meeting climate goals. They found that scaling up agroforestry could meaningfully contribute to carbon removal while also helping farms adapt to climate risks.

to continue to expand funding for climate-smart practices. “When we did a pre-survey of farmers across the region, agroforestry was the No. 1 thing they were interested in doing. And the No. 1 practice they were interested in is silvopasture,” says Hannah Smith-Brubaker, executive director of Pasa Sustainable Agriculture, an organization that supports farmers in the Mid-Atlantic. Pasa was awarded a $50 million Climate-Smart Commodities grant to implement and expand agroforestry and other soil health practices on 2,000 small- and mid-size farms along the Eastern Seaboard, from Maine to South Carolina. Through a network of partner organizations, it will subsidize the cost of tree planting and offer technical support.

The Nature Conservancy’s project will tackle the same two challenges in additional regions. And covering the upfront cost is key, says Joe Fargione, the group’s North America science director. Fargione compares getting started in agroforestry to organic transition. Initially, farmers have to put money and “Farmers are stewards of time into going organic, they often photosynthesis, one of our oldest see lower yields as they work out “When we did a pre-survey of farmers and best technologies for getting the kinks and it takes three years across the region, agroforestry was the carbon out of the atmosphere,” Keefe before they are able to charge more Keeley told policymakers, government No. 1 thing they were interested in doing. for their crops. With agroforestry, officials and CEOs at the U.S. trees are expensive, other costs often And the No. 1 practice they were Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) arise in setting up the system and interested in is silvopasture,” biggest annual gathering this year. farmers won’t see benefits to their Keeley, the executive director bottom line until the trees mature, of the Savanna Institute, was invited to speak to highlight the which takes a minimum of three — and usually more like six USDA’s Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities program. to eight — years. “But one of the things that’s exciting about The agency awarded $3.1 billion in two rounds of grants last agroforestry is that… it’s profitable,” Fargione says. fall, including $153 million to projects focused specifically on The Need for Local Agroforestry Expertise agroforestry. (Additional broader projects also include elements of agroforestry.) At Fiddle Creek in Pennsylvania, Sauder is hoping the shade his The Savanna Institute is one of many organizations involved in a $60 million effort coordinated by The Nature Conservancy in 29 states. In the Southeast, Tuskegee University is leading two projects intended to help underserved farmers transition to agroforestry practices and to grow markets for their products. The Adirondack North Country Association will help women-owned farms measure the benefits of riparian buffers and cropland reforestation in New York, while Caribbean Integration Community Development will work with small coffee farms in Puerto Rico. In recent months, the USDA started making funds available from the Inflation Reduction Act designated for climate-smart agriculture—including agroforestry practices. Then, in late March, Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) and Senator Martin Heinrich (D-New Mexico) reintroduced the Agriculture Resilience Act. If included in the next farm bill, it would direct the USDA to establish three new regional agroforestry centers. As lawmakers prepare to write the 2023 Farm Bill, many are looking

34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

trees provide will improve grass growth and reduce stress on his cows, which is not only good for their welfare but also for milk production. During the hottest months, when pastures dry up, honey locust trees will drop edible pods; Sauder can also use a technique called pollarding to drop branches from the willows, providing the cows with extra feed at no cost. That will all become even more helpful as temperatures continue to rise. Still, on his own, Sauder didn’t have the cash to plant the trees until Austin Unruh made it possible. Unruh is the founder of Trees for Graziers, and he and his team have now completed about 20 silvopasture installations in Lancaster County, with more in the works. Key to his success has been access to public and private funds directed at reducing nutrient runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. (Pennsylvania is behind on its goals to reduce Bay pollution and is counting on 90 percent of future reductions to come from farms.) Unruh finds the funding for farms like Fiddle Creek and then brings his deep expertise to help farmers develop their systems.


Riparian Buffers: Trees and shrubs planted along waterways prevent runoff and provide wildlife habitat.

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Silvopasture: Animals graze in pastures planted with trees, which provide shade and extra feed.

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“There’s a lot of experimentation, a lot of farmers comparing notes, but very few agroforestry technical support people out there advising farmers,” says Pasa’s Smith-Brubaker. Unruh is the exception, and his knowledge of the local climate and landscape is critical. He knows exactly how much shade is good for cool-weather grasses that thrive in the MidAtlantic, but that calculation would be very different if he were helping a farmer plant trees between rows of corn in Illinois. “I would love to see every county have someone that can offer these kinds of technical services and consulting,” he says. “It’s something that needs to be done locally.” And while the Climate-Smart Commodities projects will train more experts and get a lot of farms planting trees, Unruh says agroforestry will only reach its potential if support for the approach is sustained over time. In his state, for example, silvopasture isn’t eligible for funding through existing conservation programs. But demonstrating and measuring the impacts over the next five years should help, he adds. Smith-Brubaker agrees. “Alley cropping wasn’t approved before, but we were able to do these demonstration sites and then have NRCS [the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service] agents come out, and now NRCS does fund alley cropping. We’re hoping the same will happen with silvopasture,” she says.

On its own, the acreage that will be affected by this new funding won’t be enough to make a huge dent in agriculture emissions, but Fargione says it will provide important data and tools that could spur future investment and growth, allowing it to scale up. The Nature Conservancy project, for example, will be measuring carbon stored in trees and soil on the farms while also working to develop an affordable measurement method. He says giving farms the tools to implement agroforestry practices and document the impacts will then allow food companies with net-zero commitments to buy from them. Either way, says Unruh, “It’s a drop in the bucket compared to how big agroforestry should be and what the opportunities are.” Beyond dairies like Fiddle Creek, there are also pastured poultry and hog farms that Unruh sees as having even more potential. Those have barely been considered. For now, spring is in full effect. Robins are flitting between grasses and still-thin branches speckled with buds. In about three weeks, Sauder says, the pastures will be ready for the cows For the first time since planting, a canopy will start to provide shade for the animals. While it will be far from a forest, the farm will inch closer to its roots — and toward a resilient future. This article was produced in partnership with Civil Eats.

After 15 years of sharing the stories of Santa Barbara County and its food and wine culture, our publishers are retiring, and we’re looking for the right person to take the helm. Edible Santa Barbara magazine provides a sense

of place and community by spreading the word about the farmers, ranchers, winemakers, chefs, brewers, markets and eateries that call Santa Barbara home. The magazine you hold in your hands has a loyal following of readers and the support of many local businesses and organizations. Edible publishers have a strong interest in local food and community and an entrepreneurial spirit. Edible Communities provides robust services and support, including a close-knit community of publishers nationwide. The license for this beloved food magazine in one of the most prestigious markets in the country is now available. If this sounds interesting to you, please get in touch with us at info@ediblesantabarbara.com.

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TASTING TERROIR WORDS BY

Mission olives, a California classic.

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Theo Stephan


THEO STEPHAN

Extra virgin EVOO fresh from the mill.

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ragrant like rose or citrus blossoms. Fruity— think guava, green apple, mango. Now spice it all up with notes of floral pink peppercorn, dense nutmeg, sagey white pepper. Which wines come to mind?

DEBOR AH CHADSE Y

Well, we’re not talking wine here, folks; we’re talking extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). It might come as a surprise that a “real” EVOO should have characteristics reflecting the environment, climate and soils of the particular ground from which its olives were harvested and pressed. Even the olive mill, if run by an expert miller, will instill enhancements on our palates only bounded by our own imagination. A reflection of flavor nuances may certainly remind us also of wines grown in the same region, thus making phenomenal pairings for cooking and truly tasting the diversity of our entire Santa Barbara and Central Coast terroir.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 39


THEO STEPHAN

DEBOR AH CHADSE Y

A mixture of mission, manzanilla and ascolano olives.

Dark purple olives.

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THEO STEPHAN

DEBOR AH CHADSE Y

Theo Stephan overseeing the harvest.

The olives are washed on the mill, seconds before pressing.


Digging In My journey into farming olives for olive oil began on an innocent vacation to Crete back in 1993. I often visit countries to experience local farmers markets, take cooking classes and learn new recipes. My parents are from northern Greece, and I was tucked away in that country’s southernmost locale, accessible by boat, donkey paths rimming the mountains, the cute tinkling of goat bells louder even than the sea sound of smoothed marbleized stones clinking lightly from the rippling waves to energize my mind. Conversation with a hotel owner I had befriended moved to food specialties of the region. We talked of smoked goat and tiny fried fish eaten whole, called whitebait. Of course, rich green horta (wild greens) and different preparation styles were mentioned, while we idly sipped frappés in a blistering sun. “Oh, you need to meet George,” said Alison. “Who’s George?” The next week, I was sitting in George and Christine’s living room looking out over a sea of olive trees, their shimmery leaves swaying along with the ocean beyond on the horizon, getting my first education on the Koroneiki varietal and… dirt! Whoever would’ve thought of the flavor of dirt? Sounds dangerous. But I could definitely taste what George was sharing with me back then. It never left my palate until… Fast forward to 1995. I was flying high, creating grand designs for Universal Studios Hollywood Theme Park and CityWalk. I was at the peak of my career, nobody could say no… but me. I ran out of gas turning in to Los Olivos on an escape mission from LA one dusty Thursday afternoon before heading “home” to Ohio. Embarrassed, I walked into town which had a gas station (where the general store is now) whose young attendants sprang at the chance to push some crazy woman’s rental Jag convertible into town while they pumped gas, and she flipped idly though Ranchland Magazine. There it was. Fifty acres in Los Alamos, a 1970s nondescript ranch that was most recently a veal farm. Nothing was growing on its rolling hills except running up the mile-long driveway were these oddlooking willow trees, branches dragging the ground. I called George in Crete. “Come back and I’ll help you,” came the reply. I couldn’t get there fast enough. A few weeks later I had procured Santa Barbara’s first commercial planting of 500 Koroneiki trees, bare root sticks, coming in with a license from a fruit tree importer I had met in the San Joaquin valley. Kismet. Oh, and those “willow” trees? Funny, they turned out to be Farga olive trees — a South American varietal with a story all their own. The people from whom I had purchased the rancho were Brits in Argentina in the 1950s, and they brought these olive trees with them on their way out of the Peron era. What lovelies they became when they were tended to and pruned.

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A Taste of Bare Roots

The olives are transported from grove to the olive mill within just a few hours.

His and Hers Come to 1998 with me. My first harvest of the Koroneiki fruit, all field blended with Mission and Manzanilla varietals of which I planted 1,500 trees, only because I knew they would do well in the region. After all, they were the only olive varietals growing at the time of which I was aware. Los Olivos had its own heritage with the Mission varietal, the blight that had killed most of the original trees in the late 1800s and so on… but still… I was looking to change up my life and possibly quit driving to LA all the time. The Ohio girl was longing for her roots. But why did her Koroneiki olive oil taste so different from his? It was fantastic, don’t get me wrong. But mine had distinct notes of sage and chaparral… was I making it up? George’s tasted like the Mediterranean to me: wildly fruity, a little salty, with notes of pistachio and even artichokes. What was I doing wrong? I won my first gold medal for my first harvest… so I was obviously doing something right. Still, I pressed on. George set me straight: “Your dirt is different.” EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 41


The Journey Beyond Dirt Geminis love education… and teaching. So I set out to taste every olive oil I could get my hands on. Trips to Italy, Spain, Greece and Northern California, which had a relatively established yet more recent history of making olive oil. UC Davis had just begun Olive Propagation and Sensory Olive Oil courses. I took every class I could get my taste buds into. My love for wine and my fine, great big Greek nose allowed me the luxury of divine olfactory sense. What George had introduced to me started to unfold clearly with each new variety I tasted. And how many there are! Over 1,500 varieties of olives exist at last count, with over 400 known varieties grown in Italy alone. Compare this to around 20 varieties grown in the Santa Barbara region now, circa 2023. People always ask: Do you grow green or black olives? Well, all olives start out green, then they turn purple before turning black. Harvesting certain varietals black means they’re well beyond their prime, resulting in a lifeless-tasting olive oil. But think of the last time you ate a green Kalamata olive—never! The answer to this never-ending quandary changes annually because I now am responsible for the procuring and bottling of over 15 varietals of local olives. Some become components of a blend and others are best bottled as monocultivars. Every year I taste, codify my taste bud articulation and change my mind (yet another Gemini attribute, of which I am quite proud). After all, if I were not open to changing things up, the olive oils in my lineup would get boring. And that’s not a word in my vocabulary.

Santa Barbara Specifics Take the challenge. Pour a couple ounces of EVOO from your cupboard into a dark, small glass if you have one. If not, a wine glass will do. Cup your hands around the glass to bring the oil to the temperature of your skin. Swirl and smell deeply. Take it all in. Close your eyes. Now allow the center of your taste buds to taste the oil. While it’s there on your tongue, smile with your teeth together and breathe in. This allows the oil to spray the back of your throat. What do you taste? If your oil is “real” EVOO you will have an essence of fruitiness up front, then a mid-tone, then a finish that is typically the terroir of the region from which the olive oil was produced. The reason I have said “real” in conjunction with “extra virgin olive oil” is because the EVOO in your cupboard could easily be years old, adulterated with another oil (please don’t say you buy “light” EVOO because there isn’t such a thing) or simply rancid. If it’s peanutty or greasy, use it to get the tar off your feet after a day on our beloved Santa Barbara beaches. Don’t cook with it! Now try a local EVOO. There are several local producers and they’re all really good, just different! Like wines, it is wonderful to have a choice of varietals, pressing styles and, yes, dirt, AKA terroir. There should always be a harvest and/or bottling date and/or a “use by” date on the bottle. Center: Harvest takes place in late fall or early winter.

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Think big and broad when you’re tasting fresh olive oils and expressing their finishes. How many different fruits can you taste? What is the spice on the finish? Every real olive oil will ultimately finish with a peppery tickle on the back of your throat, which is the polyphenols talking to you, sometimes even making you cough. No, you don’t have Covid… you have real EVOO!

Wake Up Your Cooking Helloooooo! Is there anybody in there? I am so tired of wine getting all the terroir attention. I’m sorry but wine is next to nothing without food. There, I’ve said it. Wine and food were made to go together since the beginning of time. And you know what? Nothing brings out the flavor in food like fat and acidity. Nobody likes to hear that… I mean, who wants to say they enjoy eating fat? Or even acknowledge acidity factors in wine? Think about it. What makes the Mediterranean Diet so popular is not only the fact that it is consistently voted the number one way to eat by major medical associations but the larger factor is without a doubt F L A V O R. Mediterranean food tastes wonderful! Why? Because of the olive oil. And what makes a real extra virgin olive oil taste so good? Terroir. I challenge you to swirl, taste and slurp every fresh olive oil you can get your taste buds on. You don’t have to thank me. Just remember me, please. Theo Stephan founded Global Gardens in 1998 as Santa Barbara’s first EVOO producer. She is a Certified Olive Oil Sommelier, teaching tasting and cooking classes globally, specializing in Caliterranean flavors.

LOCAL OLIVE OIL RESOURCES You can find many places to buy and taste olive oil in Santa Barbara County. A few that offer local olive oil are:

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700; www.OliveHillFarm.com

Rancho Olivos 2390 N. Refugio Rd., Santa Ynez 805 686-9653; www.RanchoOlivos.com

Global Gardens 3570 Madera St., Santa Ynez 805 686-4111; www.GobalGardensOnline.com

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In addition, you can often find local olive oil at the Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market (SBFarmersMarket.org) and many local wineries and farms also bottle and sell olive oil from the olive trees grown on their estate. If you are interested in growing olive trees for your own olive oil production, you might check out the services of Olives Unlimited (www.OlivesUnlimited.com), which offers harvest and milling services throughout California.

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Will Not Be Televised Farm to Table grows up; past and present leaders reflect on the promise and reality of the movement WORDS BY

mall actions can lead to big changes. But we must act. (And if you’re not familiar with the televised revolution reference, it’s to Gil Scott-Heron’s satirical poem and song from the 1970s. It’s relevant. Especially now.) What ScottHeron was getting at is this: When the revolution is upon us and it’s time to make real change, we’re going to have to be active participants in it—no watching from the sidelines. Once upon a time, in the world of food, a revolution was quietly brewing. It began as a whisper among a few passionate souls who dreamt of a better way to nourish themselves and their communities. Little did they know that their collective efforts would ignite a movement that would transform the culinary landscape forever. This is a highlight reel of the past 25 years of the farm-to-table, “good food” movement. Alice Waters, the visionary chef and founder of Chez Panisse, stands at the forefront of this movement. She believes that the key to good food is sourcing locally, seasonally and sustainably. With the launch of her iconic Berkeley restaurant, Waters set the stage for a new era of conscious dining. 44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Tracey Ryder Her philosophy attracted a following of like-minded individuals who shared her passion for fresh, wholesome ingredients and the importance of community connection. Meanwhile, Niman Ranch, originally led by Bill Niman, and later, Paul Willis, championed sustainable farming practices and humane animal husbandry. They believed that the key to delicious meat was raising animals in a manner that respected their natural instincts. Today, by partnering with a network of more than 500 independent family farmers, Niman Ranch offers an alternative to industrial agriculture, providing eaters nationwide access to delicious and ethically raised meat. As the movement gained momentum, a new generation of culinary pioneers emerged. Sean Sherman, known as “The Sioux Chef,” drew inspiration from his Indigenous heritage to revive traditional Native American cuisine. He reintroduced ancestral ingredients and techniques, reclaiming a narrative long lost in mainstream food culture. Sherman’s work shed light on the importance of honoring and preserving culinary traditions, particularly throughout Indigenous communities.


Adrian Lipscombe, a chef from Texas, fought to bring attention to the significant contributions of Black farmers and foodways. She challenged the narrative surrounding Southern cuisine and highlighted the rich history and diversity within African American culinary traditions. Lipscombe’s advocacy paved the way for greater recognition and support of Black farmers and food entrepreneurs, and is still going strong today. In 2013, the Zero Foodprint initiative, founded by chef Anthony Myint and his partner Karen Leibowitz, took the movement even further. Recognizing that the restaurant industry was a significant contributor to climate change, they devised a system to help restaurants measure and reduce their carbon footprints. Through collaboration with farmers and carbon offset projects, Zero Foodprint aimed to make the food system carbon neutral, creating a path towards a more sustainable future. “When I learned about regenerative agriculture it became clear to me that society was at the start of a major paradigm shift, like how with renewable energy everything would eventually change,” Myint reflects. Inspired by the possibility, Myint and Leibowitz opened their celebrated farm-to-table restaurant The Perennial, sourcing from regenerative farming leaders in the region. “We hoped we could start an optimistic and delicious revolution,” Myint explains. However, the couple came to “the hard but important realization” that their restaurant’s procurement practices weren’t moving the needle far enough or fast enough in the face of the climate crisis. They closed their restaurant in 2019 and flipped their theory of change to launch Zero Foodprint, a nonprofit organization mobilizing the food world around agricultural climate solutions. Zero Foodprint works with restaurants to add a small surcharge to diner checks—pennies per meal—to fund regenerative agriculture practice adoption on the ground. “It’s a way to actually vote with your dollar to grow better ingredients and restore the climate.” Influential author and food writer Mark Bittman, a vocal advocate for sustainable, plant-forward eating, believes the food movement has matured, suggesting a manifesto that resonates with a growing number of people who seek to align their food choices with their values. “More people are recognizing that you can’t ‘fix’ food without fixing a number of other things,” Bittman says, citing food’s impacts on the environment, labor and food access, among other issues. “It seems that people who prioritize ‘good food’ recognize that you cannot buy your way into a better food system, that alliances are needed to address inequities and unfairness on many different levels. Very few people—even me!—would have said this 10 years ago.” For Paul Willis, founder of the Niman Ranch Pork Company, memories of the past 25 years of experiences rise to the surface during our conversation. Willis first recalls a late lunch at Zuni Café shortly after his pork had been added to the menu in the mid-’90s and the chef, Marsha McBride, came out of the kitchen to say it was the best she had eaten in her entire life. “It was a wonderful thing to have happen to a farmer— especially back then,” says Willis.

He then reminds me of the seminal food publication, which launched in 1986: The Art of Eating, published by Edward Behr. On the pages of issue 51, 1999, Behr penned the story, “The Lost Taste of Pork,” which focused on Willis’s farming methods and the resulting quality and flavor of his pork. Behr wrote: “Decent, pleasant farming methods, good flavor in meat, and the supermarket can fit together. Even the family farm can have a place… A pasture like Paul Willis’s, where you can stand surrounded by green fields, contented animals, and fresh clean air, really is the way farming can be.” Willis also points out that Niman Ranch has played other roles that have benefitted the food system—including being an alternative to the dominant industrial method of raising pigs in confinement—by providing fair pay and market access otherwise unavailable. “Without Niman Ranch, most of our farmers would not be farming.” A 2021 economic impact analysis found that Niman Ranch generates 150 percent more jobs and 50 percent more economic value for rural farming communities as compared to conventional pork production, per 100,000 pigs raised. As Niman Ranch farmer Ron Mardesen says, “Niman Ranch gives me the chance to plan for the future of the farm, instead of worrying about there being a future for the farm.” Over the past 25 years, the farm-to-table, “good food” movement has made significant strides. Consumers are increasingly aware of the importance of supporting local farmers, eating seasonally and making sustainable food choices. Farmers’ markets have become bustling hubs of activity, connecting urban dwellers with the bounty of the land. However, challenges remain. The movement still grapples with issues of accessibility and affordability. Good food shouldn’t be a privilege reserved for the few, but rather a right for all. Efforts to address food deserts and inequities in the food system are ongoing, with organizations working tirelessly to create solutions. Furthermore, climate change poses an existential threat to the movement. Extreme weather events and shifting growing seasons disrupt the delicate balance of our food systems. Farmers and chefs must adapt and find innovative ways to mitigate the impact of climate change on agriculture. As the next generation steps forward, armed with the wisdom of their predecessors, they carry the torch of this movement into the future. They are driven by the belief that good food has the power to heal not only our bodies but also our communities and the planet. And so, the food movement continues to evolve, guided by the passion and dedication of individuals and organizations like Alice Waters, Niman Ranch, Sean Sherman, Adrian Lipscombe, Mark Bittman, Zero Foodprint and countless others. Together, they weave a tapestry of sustainability, flavor and justice, forever changing the way we eat and nourish ourselves. Tracey Ryder is the founder of Edible Communities—the nation’s largest media company dedicated to the sustainable food movement. Edible Communities currently publishes nearly 80 titles across North America and won the Publication of the Year Award from the James Beard Foundation. Edible Communities reaches 20 million readers each year. In 2022, the company celebrated its 20th anniversary.

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PASCALE BE ALE

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Foundation Stocks Culinary Building Blocks WORDS BY

L

OS ANGELES, late 1980s—After finishing business school in London, I came to Tinseltown to work in the property development business. If I wasn’t working, I spent my hard-earned dollars on discovering restaurants, as my passion lay in the kitchen and fine cooking. Through sheer good luck and a family relationship, I turned up very early one morning in Michel Richard’s spotless kitchen at his then-flagship restaurant, Citrus, for a mini “stage.” Over the next 72 hours, I learned two essential lessons. The first was that the restaurant business is a life of unending hard work, surviving on thin margins. The second, more importantly for me personally at that time, I realized that although I was then a good home cook, any illusion I had that I could do something professionally with food fell to pieces in my first 10 minutes in his kitchen. I arrived as the maître saucier and French chef de cuisine monitored his stocks. “Who are you?” he asked. “Michel said I could do a stage starting this morning,” I replied. “Is he here?” “Non, not right now,” said the chef as he looked me up and down. “You’re with me this morning.” Nodding to the six large, steaming pots on the massive stoves, he grabbed a handful of small spoons. “Taste it and tell me what it is,” he said, handing the first spoon to me. He tasted as I did. My mind went blank. The aroma and flavor were so familiar, but I couldn’t spell it out. “Alors—so?” I shook my head. He gave me a pitying look. He took the lid off the next pot. “This one?” “Fish stock,” I replied confidently. He shook his head, “Non!” “It’s not fish stock?” I asked; I was genuinely confused. “It’s a crustacean stock—you should know the difference.” He stepped up to the next pot. “This?” I’ll save you the rest of the excruciating details; suffice it to say I failed the taste test for every one of them. The last stock, made with olives, was extraordinary in its depth of flavor and intensity. He reduced my sense of knowing about basic stocks to nothing. It was a completely humbling experience. I left simultaneously deflated and enthusiastic, if that’s possible. I would have to do better.

Pascale Beale He took pity on me then and asked if I had had breakfast or a coffee. I shook my head, not entirely trusting that I could speak without a wobble in my voice. He handed me a strong espresso and a piece of baguette, sighed, and said, “Let’s start again—what’s your name?” This was my introduction to creating more refined food, and it all began with stocks. Three days later, I left the kitchen armed with more culinary know-how, a few unique recipes up my sleeve, a small coterie of new friends and a long list of essential techniques I had to learn to become a better cook. “It all begins with the foundations,” he had said, les fonds or fonds de cuisine. Like the foundation of any structure, stocks are the building blocks of cooking for sauces, soups, stews and braises. I had long made a basic chicken stock, but there was evidently more to it than that. I plunged into cookbooks, consulting the culinary masters on the subject: Escoffier, Raymond Oliver, Julia Child and many more. Essentially, they all said the same thing: Use the best ingredients you can find to make the freshest, cleanest stock (or broth) possible. With that in mind, I started my stock education, and the fundamentals came down to these salient points: Stocks are clear liquids that result from gently simmering bones, meat or fish and vegetables in water, usually with aromatic herbs and spices. There are four principal stocks: beef, chicken, fish and vegetable. Beef stocks are made with beef knuckles, joints and feet to achieve a rich flavor and velvety texture. Sometimes referred to as fond brun, this stock is golden to deep mahogany in color, created by roasting bones and vegetables to intensify their flavor. Beef stocks are an elemental part of dishes like pho, short ribs and French onion soup and are used in braised dishes to add depth of flavor. These stocks take 6 –24 hours to develop their rich flavor profile. Chicken stocks are usually made with uncooked chicken carcasses, chicken legs or feet and a mirepoix (a chopped mix of onions, carrots, leeks and celery). However, you can also use the carcass from a previously roasted chicken (you can freeze the EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 47


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PASCALE BE ALE

bones for later use) to make stock after removing any remaining meat. The bones are full of collagen and result in a nutritious gelatinous finish. This silky stock is the foundation for many soups, for cooking pasta and risotto, for poaching and for myriad sauces. An excellent light chicken stock can be made in two hours. Fish stock (or fish fumet) is quick to make, usually in about 30 minutes or less. However, it is delicate; overcooking will dissolve the calcium in the bones, resulting in a cloudy, chalky stock. It is made by very gently simmering fish bones in water with aromatics such as leeks, carrots and fennel and herbs such as parsley and tarragon. Fish stocks are used for poaching fish, making soups and for cooking rice, risotto and pasta in seafood dishes. Vegetable stock is versatile, inexpensive, quick and easy to make. Using a foundation of onions, leeks, carrots and celery, other vegetables and trimmings can be used in all manner of soups, sauces and as the cooking liquid for pasta and grains and can be used as a healthy alternative to meat- or poultry-based stocks. It is an excellent way to use vegetable trimmings. I like to save all the carrot peelings, onion skins, leek greens and parsley stems by popping them all into a large freezer bag as I prepare food during the week. When I’m ready to make stock, I have all the ingredients ready and can simply tip them into a large stockpot and cover the vegetables with cold water. Thirty to 40 minutes later, I’ll have a lovely, clear, bright vegetable stock. Simmering is the key! The gentle cooking of all these stocks is the recipe for a successful stock. Boiling bones causes the albumin in them to be released too quickly, resulting in a cloudy, sometimes chalky stock, which is also why only cold water should be added to the ingredients when you start your stock. Simmering will allow any impurities to rise to the top of the stockpot. It looks like an unappetizing, scum-looking, grey foam. Carefully remove this from the stockpot. After 40–50 minutes, there should be none left. Cook the stock uncovered, reducing the chance that the stock will boil. Finally, stock and broth are technically different (except for the vegetable version), although they are often interchangeably used in recipes. Stocks are made with bones and have a more gelatinous texture. They are also unsalted. Broths are made with meat (or fish) and are more liquid. (For a detailed breakdown of the science behind making stock, Harold McGee’s book On Food and Cooking provides an in-depth analysis of the processes involved.) SANTA BARBARA, 2023 —More than three decades have passed since I stepped tentatively into that restaurant kitchen. I have cooked thousands of meals since then and discovered new cuisines, techniques and foods, but the foundation of all I do has its roots in the stocks I learned to make then. There is always a batch of frozen vegetable and chicken stock in my freezer and a bag of trimmings ready to use for the next pot. As Thomas Keller, famed chef of The French Laundry, said, stocks are “the base for everything else you’re going to do. And that’s why it’s so valuable to learn how to do this and so valuable to have it at home. It’s a life changer.”


RECIPES

Fresh Stocks are a vibrant foundation to

Preheat oven to 350°F.

any soup, stew, tagine or sauce. A stock that is

Pour the olive oil into a large roasting pan and add the carrots, celery, onions and leeks into the pan, toss to coat with a little olive oil and then roast for 45 minutes.

full of flavor, made with fresh ingredients, will improve any dish—and most stocks are easy and economical to make. Use simple vegetable stock when cooking rice, risotto or couscous to enhance the grains, and the roasted stocks add depth and richness of flavor to all manner of soups and stews. They are truly worth the effort.

Simple Vegetable Stock MAKES 2 QUARTS (8 CUPS)

2 large onions, peeled and diced 4 carrots, peeled and diced 2 leeks, carefully cleaned, trimmed and quartered lengthwise 1 celery stalk, diced 2 1 ⁄2 quarts cold water

Place all of the vegetables in a large saucepan and pour in 2½ quarts of cold water. Bring to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl, but do not press down on the solids as this will cause your stock to be cloudy.

Roasted Vegetable Stock MAKES 2 QUARTS (8 CUPS)

2 tablespoons olive oil 4–5 carrots, peeled and diced 3 stalks celery, diced 2 large onions, peeled and diced 2 leeks, carefully cleaned, ends trimmed and quartered 3 quarts cold water Bouquet garni (1 bay leaf, 6–8 stems parsley, 6–8 stems fresh thyme, all loosely tied together with kitchen twine) 3 good turns of fresh ground pepper

Fill a 4-quart stockpot¾ full with cold water, and then add the roasted vegetables, bouquet garni and pepper. Simmer for 45 minutes. Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl.

Chicken Stock MAKES 2 QUARTS (8 CUPS)

2–3 pounds chicken parts (such as legs or backs or chicken bones), or the carcass of a roasted chicken 2 ribs celery, diced 4 carrots, peeled and diced 3 large onions, peeled and diced 4 leeks, carefully cleaned, root end trimmed and quartered lengthways 4 turns fresh pepper Bouquet garni (1 bay leaf, 6–8 stems fresh thyme and stems of 1 bunch of parsley, all loosely tied together using kitchen twine) 3 quarts cold water

Place all the ingredients into a large stockpot over medium heat. Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 1½ hours. During that time, use a large spoon to carefully remove the scum (grey foam) that sometimes comes to the surface of the stock. It is very important to do this regularly during the first 45 minutes of cooking to keep a good clean flavor in your stock. After 1½ hours, remove from the heat, let cool and strain the stock. When you are straining the stock, do so carefully, avoiding pressing down and squashing the meat and vegetables in the strainer. Your patience in letting the stock filter naturally through the strainer will be well rewarded with a good, clear, fresh-tasting stock. The stock will keep in the fridge for 2–3 days. This stock freezes well. Use different size containers. If you are using glass jars to freeze your stock, make sure you leave at least 1½ inches of space between the top of the stock and the lid, as the stock expands as it freezes. If you overfill the jar, it will crack in the freezer. Your stock can be kept frozen for 3 months.

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RECIPE

Citrus Chicken Tagine

with Apricots and Golden Raisins I have delved into the world of Moroccan and North African cuisine, reading about sumptuous dishes in books by Claudia Roden, Paula Wolfert, the Maloufs and Clifford A. Wright. I’ve been inspired by their culinary journeys and revel in the fragrance and spices of the African continent. After making a batch of ras al hanout, a spice mix that means “best of the house,” I thought I’d try combining it with some curry powder to make a tagine with an African-Asian spice fusion. The aroma drifting across the kitchen as this simmered was mouthwatering. The result produced a chicken that melted off the bone with plump, juicy, succulent fruit. This dish has become a family favorite.

MAKES 8 SERVINGS

1 heaped teaspoon curry powder

1 2 teaspoon ras al hanout spice mixture

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 4 cup orange juice

8 chicken legs or a combination of legs and thighs 4 cups chicken stock Salt and black pepper Olive oil 2 large onions, peeled, halved and sliced 25–30 dried apricots 1 cup golden raisins 2 small, preserved lemons, roughly chopped 4 oranges, peeled and sectioned

In a large bowl, combine the curry powder, ras al hanout and olive oil to form a thick paste. Stir in the orange juice. The mixture should be quite thick. Add the chicken and coat all sides. Let the chicken marinate for at least 30 minutes. (This can be done up to 8 hours in advance.) Pour 1–2 tablespoons olive oil into the base of a tagine with a cast-iron bottom (or a Dutch oven, but not a clay-bottom tagine) over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until golden, about 6–7 minutes. Add the marinated chicken legs and brown on all sides, about 3–4 minutes per side. Pour in enough chicken stock to come halfway up the sides of the chicken (depending on the size of your pan, you may have some stock left). Add the salt and pepper and cover with the tagine lid. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes. Add the apricots, golden raisins, preserved lemons and the oranges to the tagine and stir, turning the chicken legs once or twice. Replace the lid and cook for an additional 40 minutes, or until the chicken is tender and meat is almost falling off the bone. Serve with plenty of the pan juices, the fruit and onions. I like to serve this dish with couscous.

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Silky Cauliflower Curry Soup

with C rispy Shaved Brussels Sprouts MAKES 8 SERVINGS

FOR THE SOUP 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped 2 leeks, ends trimmed, cleaned, white and light green parts finely chopped 1 tablespoon curry powder 2 heads cauliflower (2 pounds each), core removed, separated into florets Salt and pepper 8 cups vegetable stock

FOR THE BRUSSELS SPROUTS Olive oil 1 pound Brussels sprouts, finely sliced using a mandoline Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives Zest of 1 lemon

1 3 cup crème fraîche

Pour the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, leeks and curry powder and cook for 4–5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are softened. Add the cauliflower, a good pinch of salt and 10–12 grinds pepper, and continue cooking for 2 minutes. Add the vegetable stock to the saucepan and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20–25 minutes. Remove from the heat and purée the soup using an immersion blender. For a smoother texture, pass it through a fine-mesh sieve. Cover and keep the soup warm until ready to serve. Pour a little olive oil into a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts, a good pinch of salt and 4–5 grinds pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until the sprouts are golden brown. Add the chives and lemon zest and toss to combine. Serve the soup in warmed soup bowls. Place a dollop of crème fraîche in the center of each bowl and top with a spoonful of the crispy Brussels sprouts. Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons, Salade II, Les Fruits and Les Legumes. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

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STEVEN BROWN

COLIN QUIRT

CAROLE TOPALIAN

edible

SANTA BARBAR A & WINE COUNTRY

SUPPORT LOCAL GUIDE

Now more than ever, it’s important to seek out and support local businesses. Here is our guide of the current advertisers that we fully support and hope you will, too. Visit the websites to get more information about what they offer and any updated hours of operation.

Farms & Ranches Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 www.WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Farm Mangalitsa at these special places: Niner Wine Estates in Paso Robles, Pico at the General Store in Los Alamos, and we’re delighted to announce our new relationship with Michelin star restaurant First and Oak at the Mirabelle Inn in Solvang. You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

Food & Restaurants Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St., Los Alamos, CA 805 344-3000 2249 Baseline Ave., Ballard, CA 805 691-9549 www.BobsWellBread.com Now in two locations with convenient online ordering, Bob’s makes bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive” —signature Pain au Levain, awardwinning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indoor-outdoor picturesque café. Los Alamos: Thu–Mon 7am–4pm. Ballard: Thu–Mon 8am–4pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St., Santa Barbara 805 965-5956 www.ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Conexion, including small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and exotic findings from their travels overseas. Mon– Tue and Thu–Sat noon–5pm, Sun noon–4pm. Closed on Wednesday. 54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Global Gardens

Rancho Olivos

3570 Madera St., Santa Ynez 805 686-4111 www.GlobalGardensOnline.com

2390 N. Refugio Rd., Santa Ynez 805 686-9653 699 Embarcadero #4, Morro Bay 805 686-9653 www.RanchoOlivos.com

Global Gardens grows, produces and sells awardwinning organic olive oils, balsamic vinegars, organic mustards, snacks, gift baskets and more. Santa Barbara’s first extra virgin olive oil producer since their first harvest in 1998. A true family business with expert knowledge and love for the land.

New Frontiers Natural Marketplace 1984 Old Mission Dr., Solvang 805 693-1746 www.NewFrontiersmarket.com New Frontiers is in the business of providing naturally delicious foods of the freshest and highest quality, as well as a full array of other choices for healthy living. Visit their website for menus, special savings and coupons. Open daily 7am–8pm.

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 www.OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 www.PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun! Subscriptions start at $25.00.

Located in Santa Ynez, California, Rancho Olivos creates distinctively fresh handcrafted artisan extra virgin estate olive oils that enhance the flavors of fine foods. You can visit them in Santa Ynez or Morro Bay or shop online.

Wine & Beer Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 963-7999 www.AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots, yet other varietals are available. Jim Clendenen made wines of vision and character for over 30 years. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines on hand. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm. Outdoor wine tasting daily. Reservations recommended.

Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St., Los Alamos 805 344-1911 www.BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Dim Sama’s menu. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment only.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-1900 www.CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment.


ROB HATHERILL

Foxen Vineyard & Winery

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery

7600 Foxen Canyon Rd., Santa Maria 805 937-4251 www.FoxenVineyard.com

137 Anacapa St., Ste. C., Santa Barbara 805 324-4100 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd., Santa Maria 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com

The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open daily.

Goodland Wine Shop & Bar 4177 State St., Goleta 805 695-3003 www.GoodlandWineShop.com The shop offers locally produced wine and beer, as well as kombucha and mead. Glasses of wine and snacks are available at their wine bar. Check their website for winemaker events, held on Tuesdays at 6pm. The shop is open Tue–Sat 11am–7pm. Happy Hour Wed–Thu 5–7pm.

Koehler Winery 5360 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos 805 693-8384 www.KoehlerWinery.com Koehler Winery crafts premium estate-grown wines from the heart of Santa Barbara wine country. Situated on the celebrated Foxen Canyon Wine Trail, Koehler Winery is located in one of California’s most diverse and distinctive growing regions. Koehler Winery’s rusticinspired tasting room and estate grounds are open daily 10am–5pm.

Margerum Wine Company

19 E. Mason St., Santa Barbara 805 845-8435 2446 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos 805 504-1209 www.MargerumWines.com Located near Santa Barbara’s waterfront across the street from Hotel Californian, Margerum Wine Company offers tastings or wines by the glass in their expansive tasting room or on the heated patio. An indoor mezzanine can host private events. All complemented with a simple fare menu—cheese and charcuterie, pizzas, paninis, salads and other foods to complement the wine. Or visit the tasting room in Los Olivos which offers bento box food and wine pairings and oyster and sparkling wine pairings with reservations in advance. The winery in Buellton is open by appointment.

Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara.

Roblar Winery 3010 Roblar Ave., Santa Ynez 805 686-2603 www. RoblarWinery.com Nestled in an oak tree-studded 40-acre vineyard located in the heart of Santa Barbara County, Roblar Winery and Vineyards reflects the spirit of Santa Ynez Wineries—rustic, authentic and bold. They have a diverse lineup of delicious wines, farm-to-table paired delights, a locally sourced food menu, and a fantastic estate-driven experience. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos 805 688-9339 www.ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, Zaca Mesa Winery has crafted distinctive wines from their unique mesa-top vineyard. As an early pioneer of the region, they now have 150 acres planted, specializing in the production of estate-grown Rhône-style wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm. Call for more information on winery tours and private event space.

Specialty Retail ella & louie www.EllaAndLouie.com Floral designer Tracey Morris has two great loves: flowers and people. Relying on more than 25 years of design experience, Morris helps clients celebrate their big occasions with exquisite and expressive floral arrangements. Ella & Louie produces a range of looks from classic elegant designs to unusual and stylish. Local delivery.

Services and Organizations American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito, 805-335-8110 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com 1033 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 965-5942 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Montecito branch open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm. Santa Barbara branch open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Heritage Farmland Touring Company www.HeritageFarmlandTours.com Heritage Farmland Touring Company specializes in international travel and tours to heritage farmland sites in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Europe. Whether you are looking for lessons on agricultural history, food literacy, artisanal farm-to-table culinary experiences or exploring vast farm estate and garden properties, Heritage Farmland Tours is the perfect opportunity. Learn about heritage crops and livestock breeds and taste mouthwatering local artisanal food and drink made on heritage farms.

SBCC Foundation 805 730-4401 www.SBCCFoundation.org The SBCC Foundation has provided Santa Barbara City College with private philanthropic support for over 45 years, serving as the vehicle through which individuals and organizations may invest in the college and its students. The Foundation provides more than $5 million annually for the SBCC Promise, student success programs, scholarships, emergency grants and more— supporting SBCC students as they prepare for careers, transfer to four-year universities and pursue lifelong learning goals.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2024 | 55


THE

LA

ST

Winter’s Don’t-Miss-Dish

Pad Man Thet (Wok-Fried Sweet Potato) at

W

e’ve all enjoyed the sweet-sourspicy-salty treat that is Thai cuisine. It’s the perfect comfort food, with complex flavors and textures and so popular that it easily serves as the perfect date-night dinner, quick takeout or end-of-the-weekend leftovers from the fridge. But Na Na Thai in Buellton is cooking up Bangkok street food like you’ve never had, and it will surprise even diehard Thai food fans. Husband-and-wife team Nik and Ashley Ramirez opened in Buellton earlier this year, after a successful run of cooking Thai food pop-ups with their friends at Bar Le Côte in Los Olivos. Now, we can all tickle our Thai taste buds Monday through Friday, at both lunch and dinner service. And recently they announced that you can get it delivered to Buellton, Santa Ynez, Los Alamos and Los Olivos. Chef Nik’s kitchen makes all the curries, soups, marinades and sauces by hand, using a mortar and pestle instead of using modern appliances, to preserve the techniques of the 56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2024

Na Na Thai

past. This, along with real Thai spices, peanuts, chilis, fish and soy sauce, keeps the dishes authentic. And delicious. Nik and Ashley buy most of their produce, whatever is in season, from farmers markets all over Santa Barbara County: fruit, vegetables and herbs from Finley Farms, pork and other meats from Motley Crew Ranch, plus sweet potatoes from Milliken Family Farms, which happen to be their favorite. The sweet, tender tubers are perfect in this Northern Thai wokfried dish with shrimp paste, crispy shallots, garlic and chili. Winter squash would also work, so watch for this special at the restaurant throughout the season. To make Pad Man Thet, prepare the crispy shallots the day before (or buy pre-made crispy shallots): Thinly slice a few shallots and season them with salt. Refrigerate them overnight on a tray of paper towels. To make the paste, pound half a shallot and 1 Thai chili with a mortar and pestle until broken down. Add 1 head of garlic and 1 teaspoon gapi (Thai shrimp paste) and

continue until a paste is formed, about 1 tablespoon. Peel 1 sweet potato (or winter squash), and blanch in boiling water for about 1 minute. It should be slightly tender but still firm raw. Slice into rounds. Heat about 2 tablespoons of pork fat in a wok on high heat. Add the sweet potato slices and sauté for about 2–3 minutes, until seared on all sides, then add the paste and cook about 30 seconds. Add 2 cups pork stock, 1 teaspoon sugar and 1 teaspoon oyster sauce. Let this simmer about 5 –10 minutes, until it’s reduced to a glaze. Transfer to a plate. Heat more pork fat in another pan and fry some salted shallots to put on top and serve. Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). www.CaliCoastWineCountry.com


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Spring 2009 / Number 1

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Summer 2009 / Number 2

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Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Fall 2009 / Number 3

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Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 8 • WINTER 2010 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

An Interview with

Michael Pollan Sustainable Seafood Fairview Gardens A Culinary Journey The Pod Squad Whitcraft Winery

Heirloom Heaven Abalone Palmina Winery The Hidden Promise of Suburbia Food from the Hearth

Local Honeybees Culinary Bootcamp Edible Landscape Thanksgiving Santa Barbara Channel Seafood

Chocolate: From Cacao Bean to Confection Salmon A Seasonal Stew Endless Pastabilities

Eggs Backyard Chickens Beekeeping Salt: The Essential Ingredient Artichokes Community-Supported Agriculture

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Grass-Fed Beef In the Kitchen with Bradley Ogden What the Kids Are Growing Canning Farmers Market

Wine Caves: Down to Earth Stone Fruit Recycling Edible Flowers MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 9 • SPRING 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 10 • SUMMER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 11 • FALL 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 12 • WINTER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Where’s the

Winter Blossoms

Scoop?

Unsung Heroes

Bob and Ellie Patterson’s Artisanal Gelato and Sorbet

Croissants! Salt of the Sea Sorrel and Rhubarb The Rituals of a Meal

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Lompoc Wine Ghetto Culinary Lavender Pasta and Water

Pistachio Harvest La Huerta Mission Gardens Farmer to Table

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Santa Barbara

ISSUE 18 • SUMMER 2013

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 19 • FALL 2013

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

EAT DRINK

Nothing Like Chocolate The Lazy Gardener

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Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Maria-Style Barbecue Lompoc Beans Ice Cream

Regenerative Earth Farms Aquaponics Exotic Edible Trees

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

The COOKS Issue

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Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

COOKS ISSUE Sauvignon Blanc Coffee: Grown in Goleta Eating Acorns

Giannfranco’s Trattoria Culinary Inspirations Edible Mushrooms

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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Santa Barbara

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ISSUE 24 • WINTER 2014

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Santa Barbara

The Art of Small Farming Tending Henry The Perfect Salad

The New Solvang The Thrill of the Grill All Aboard to Carpinteria

The Season for Persimmons Eating Lotus Santa Maria Agriculture

Fine Chocolate Solvang’s Kringle and Crown Do Your Kids Cook?

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Anniversary Issue

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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THE

Eating in Los Alamos Market Walk with Patricia Perfect Picnics

Guerilla Brewing and Feral Fermentation

Funk Zone

For Love of Pinot The Art in Artisan Bread Zaca University

ISSUE 25 • SPRING 2015

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE 20 • WINTER 2013

Santa Barbara

ISSUE 16 • WINTER 2012

Santa Barbara

Diving for California Gold Fish on Friday Fisherman’s Market

ISSUE THE BE L LY O F TH E

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 15 • FALL 2012

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Wild Yeast Bread Profound Pairings A Passion for Spices

LIVING BEER

LOCAL

WINE & BREAD ISSUE

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Biodynamics

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Eating Daylilies

Almonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend

of the Harvest

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

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Santa Barbara

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

One of TIME magazine’s “100 most influential people of 2010” talks to us about his garden, cooking and his upcoming lecture in Santa Barbara

ISSUE 28 • WINTER 2015

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Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

The COOKS Issue

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Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 32 • WINTER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday ISSUE

EAT DRINK

LOCAL ISSUE

The

Building

Food

COOKS

Communities

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Strawberries: A Love Story The Pig Next Door Decorative Eggs

Gaviota Wine Without Water Home Off The Range Grunion

The Shrimping Life Unleashing the Yeast Savoring Wildlands

Interwoven: Santa Maria In Search of Masa Chef Justin West

The Tiny Mess A Big Taste of a Small Town No Cider House Rules

Santa Maria AVA The Channel Islands Eyes On Hives Girls Inc.

The Papaya Man Santa Ynez AVA Cottage Industry

The Fervor for Fermentation Year of the Rooster The Apiary

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Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Bringing the Homestead

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Home

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Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE

Harvest

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

In Search of

GUIDE

Urchin

Farm

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Local Sea Renewal and Rebuilding

Renewal and Rebuilding

A Passion for Peaches Happy Canyon AVA The Beer Trail

A Sicilian Christmas Reverie Loyal to the Soil Fairview Gardens

Cookbooks: Culinary Journeys Teach Kids to Cook Blue Sky Center in Cuyama

A Love Letter to Los Olivos From Grape to Great Winemaking Takes a Journey

Barbara County in this Issue A Love LetterSanta to Los Olivos From Grape Farm to GreatGuide Winemaking Takes a Journey

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

& Holiday ISSUE

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity L O YA L T O L O C A L

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Funghi e la Cucina Italiana Talking Shiitake Jetsetter of the Vines Comfort Food

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Wine Issue Te n G lasse s Ce le br atin g Te n Ye ar s

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Sustainability Issue

Meyer Lemon Tart at the Stonehouse

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity T E N

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I Sea Olives Drinking the Landscape Everything But the Bird Dry Hopped Wine

Wishful Recycling Wine Trailblazers A Beer in Every Kitchen Noey Turk

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Nourish & Nurture

Cooks

San Ysidro Ranch

Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier

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Brunch Home Winemaking Brings Community Together Compost Isn’t Sexy, and Yet… Alcohol-free Alternatives to Wine for the Sober Curious Crowd Herbacious L O YA L

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Gather. Nurture. Feed. Repeat. From Garden to Breadboard Baking Bread with Wild Yeast A Taste of Macedonia in Los Alamos Building a Better Meat System

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Finding Solutions to Food Waste

Rosé: Life Seen Through Pink Colored Glasses L O YA L

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Pearl Munak Rethinking Hunger Purple Urchin The Sea Cellar Nurturing Nature

Day Trippin’

Food Security and Cooking from Scratch Nine New Santa Barbara County Wines

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The Digester: Organic Waste Earns Its Keep Life in the Vines: Dormancy

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THE Wine ISSUE Wine Label Artwork Contest Tips for Storing Your Wine at Home Schiacciata con l’Uva Celebrating Alisos Canyon AVA Picnic on the Riviera L O YA L

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Quick turmeric preserved citrus gremolata

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with harisa and cilantro-pepita pesto

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Three Santa Barbara County Vineyards Mark 50 Years

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It’s Time to Make Food Decisions with the Climate Crisis in Mind A Sweet Season

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Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Tasting the Terrior

of Local Olive Oil

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