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edible

ISSUE 30 • SUMMER 2016

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Maria AVA The Channel Islands Eyes On Hives Girls Inc. L O YA L T O L O C A L


MEET ME AT THE MART

CALYPSO ST. BARTH • GEORGE • HUDSON GRACE • INTERMIX • JAMES PERSE • KENDALL CONRAD LITTLE ALEX’S • MALIA MILLS • MATE GALLERY • MERCI TO GO • MONTECITO BARBERS MONTECITO NATURAL FOODS • ONE HOUR MARTINIZING • PANINO‘S • PRESSED JUICERY • READ N’ POST RORI’S ARTISANAL CREAMERY • SPACE N.K. APOTHECARY • TOY CRAZY • UNION BANK • VONS

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J U LY, A U G U S T, S E P T E M B E R

page 30

WIL FERNANDE Z

STE VEN BROWN

summer

page 34

Departments 8 Food for Thought

22 What’s Brewing

by Krista Harris

Transformational Coffee

10 Small Sips Third Window Draughtsmen Aleworks Lama Dog Brass Bear Brewing Picnic Perfect Vertical Tasting: Enjoy Cupcakes Cookiewiches 13 In Season

14 Seasonal Recipes Prosciutto and Melon Sweet Corn Cake by Krista Harris

18 Seasonal Recipes Then and Now by Krista Harris

page 20 4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

COLIN QUIRT

20 Drinkable Landscape Plum Shrub Cocktail Love by George Yatchisin

by Rosminah Brown

26 Edible Garden Extending Tomato Season

by Joan S. Bolton

30 In the Community Learning Life’s Lessons from the Ground Up by Jill Johnson

34 You Have to Ask A Taste of Off-Menu Items by Wil Fernandez

68 Event Calendar 80 The Last Bite Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder


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edible

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summer

J U LY, A U G U S T, S E P T E M B E R

Features 36 Eyes on Hives Citizen Scientists and the Mindfulness of Monitoring Honeybees 42 The Santa Barbara Syndrome Putting Fresh Local Produce Onto Grocery Store Shelves

page 16

by Nancy Oster

48 Santa Barbara Channel Islands by Urmila Ramakrishnan and Chuck Graham

56 History Goes to the Victor The Story of the Santa Maria Valley AVA by Sonja Magdevski

62 Bread: A Love Story

by Pascale Beale

Recipes in This Issue Appetizers and Salads 67 Fig Tapanade Crostini with a Watercress Salad 64 Pluot Bruschetta 14 Prosciutto and Melon

Vegetable Dishes 19 Green Beans with Pesto

Desserts 16 Sweet Corn Cake

Beverages ABOUT THE COVER

The flavors of summer in a dish of Prosciutto and Melon, see recipe on page 14. Photo by Colin Quirt.

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21 The Pisco Plum

COLIN QUIRT

by Jaime Lewis


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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STE VEN BROWN

Loyal to Local The recent introduction of the Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan seems to tie in nicely with this issue’s focus on local foods. One of our regular contributors, Nancy Oster, has been particularly interested in ways we can encourage more local food on our grocery store shelves, in our institutions and on our restaurant plates (which you’ll read about in this issue). One of the things that got us thinking about this subject was Professor David Cleveland’s talk at the 2011 Edible Institute that was held here in Santa Barbara. In addition to the light he shed on the lack of access to local food in our county, he made the point that we have a startling number of people who are without adequate food. The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County has been working diligently for decades on the issues of both hunger and access, so it’s not surprising that the Foodbank is one of the primary partners in bringing about this new Food Action Plan. In 1990, when I was a fledgling freelance graphic designer, I was hired by the Foodbank to produce their annual report. I remember going to their warehouse for the first time to meet with the staff. I was given a tour, and somewhere amidst the towering cases of canned goods and crates of bananas, I realized what an important role they played in providing food to many other local nonprofits. As I learned doing their report, it was a role that was sorely needed in our community, and demand was growing. Many years later, I was introduced to Erik Talkin, the executive director of the Foodbank, and what struck me after hearing him speak (besides his charming accent) was how much the Foodbank had changed over the years. What hadn’t changed was the increased need in our community. But instead of just responding to hunger, the Foodbank is now concerned with health, nutrition and education. Half the food they distribute now is fresh produce— often locally grown. For those of you who read the Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan (and I hope you all do), consider what actions you might take to contribute to our community. Buying and eating local food is a great way to start. I hope you’ll also join me in supporting the businesses in the pages of this magazine, as we appreciate their support in helping us get it into your hands. They are loyal to local, and we know our readers are, too.

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

Visit our website EdibleSantaBarbara.com Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest at Edible Santa Barbara and Twitter and Instagram at EdibleSB.

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

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SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHERS

Steven Brown & Krista Harris EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson Marsha Frankel DESIGNER

Steven Brown SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson

Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Rosminah Brown Sherrie Chavez Liz Dodder Wil Fernandez Chuck Graham Jill Johnson Jaime Lewis Sonja Magdevski Jennifer Olson Nancy Oster Colin Quirt Urmila Ramakrishnan George Yatchisin

Contact Us info@ediblesantabarbara.com

Advertising Inquiries ads@ediblesantabarbara.com Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

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Small Sips

New breweries to visit and a new way to enjoy wine this summer. by Krista Harris and Urmila Ramakrishnan

Draughtsmen Aleworks Goleta is quickly becoming a thriving beer scene and the latest addition is Draughtsmen Aleworks. They are brewing up some small-batch brews and pleasing locals with their IPAs, other ales and a robust and tasty porter. On Fridays and Saturdays you’ll often find a food truck on hand so you can have a bite to eat while you sample their beer. Draughtsmen Aleworks is located at 53 Santa Felicia Dr. in Goleta. Open Mon–Thu 2–8pm, Fri–Sun 11:30am–9pm. 805 387-2577; DraughtsmenAleworks.com

Third Window Third Window Brewing Co. is housed within a recently restored feed mill originally built in 1904 and now also home to Potek Winery and Wildwood Kitchen. Third Window has a wonderful lineup of interesting beers: seasonal lagers, farmhouse beers made with locally sourced ingredients, Trappist-inspired ales, IPAs and indigenous seasonal brews reflecting Santa Barbara’s unique terroir. Kris Parker (grandson of Fess Parker) came up with the name Third Window to reference Saint Barbara. According to legend, she made her conversion to Christianity known by adding a third window to a tower as a symbol of the holy trinity. Third Window Brewing Co. is located at 406 E. Haley St. in Santa Barbara. Open Mon–Wed 1–9pm; Thu 1–10pm, Fri–Sat noon–11pm; Sun 11am–9pm. 805 979-5090; ThirdWindowBrewing.com

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Lama Dog Tucked away in the former Art Foundry is Lama Dog Tap Room + Bottle Shop— a 2,200-square-foot space dedicated to unique beers and small-batch wine. If you’re wondering why a beer and wine shrine has the name Lama Dog, it’s because owner Peter Burnham has an adorably huge Tibetan Mastiff named Lama. Peter has created a unique space that is both a taproom and bottle shop. And for guests hungry for more than just drinkable yeast, the new eatery Nook serves up globally inspired creations from Chef Norbert Schulz. Lama Dog also plans to offer classes for those who want to expand their beer knowledge and palates. Lama Dog is located in the Funk Zone at 116 Santa Barbara St. in Santa Barbara. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu–Sat 11:30am–midnight. 805 880-3364; LamaDog.com


vertical TASTING

Enjoy Cupcakes Cookiewiches Nothing screams summer more than ice cream cookie sandwiches. Enjoy Cupcakes has taken the ice cream out of the sandwich and created a decadent dessert that invokes the sweet flavors of summer without the fear of melting. Each one is a treat. And if you can’t eat a whole one, they are perfect for sharing. Or you could slice them in wedges and serve a sampling for dessert at your next dinner party… perhaps even accompanied by some ice cream.

Lemon Sugar Cookie

Brass Bear Brewing Serving their own beer as well as other craft beers along with wine, sparkling wine and cider, Brass Bear Brewing is another new addition to the vibrant Funk Zone scene. We love their dedication to local sourcing for the menu of skewers, salads, grilled sandwiches and cheese plates. Brass Bear Brewing is located at 28 Anacapa St. #E in Santa Barbara. Open Mon, Wed and Sun noon–9pm; Thu noon–10pm; Fri and Sat noon–11pm. 805 770-7651; BrassBearBrewing.com

Picnic Perfect Wine in a Can

We never thought we’d see canned wine, but it seems that there is a clearly defined niche for it. In this issue’s article about visiting the Channel Islands, you’ll read that all food and beverages have to be carried in and nothing can be left behind. If you have plans for a gourmet picnic, bringing wine in a can is a perfect solution. It’s easy to carry in a backpack, no corkscrew needed and super light to carry the empties back. So, we were happy to discover Nuclear Wine Company, which is based in Los Alamos and sources from sustainably farmed vineyards in California. They offer just two choices: Nuclear White, a Chardonnay; and Nuclear Red, a red wine blend. If you pour these wines into a glass, you will be hard-pressed to ever guess that they didn’t come from a bottle. But you can also take them where no glass is allowed—beaches, hot tubs, etc. And the kicker is that the wine tastes great. Nuclear White and Nuclear Red are $9 each for a 12-ounce can or $84 for 12 cans. You can find Nuclear Wine at Pico at The Los Alamos General Store located at 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, and you can order online at NuclearWines.com.

This sugar cookiewich filled with lemon buttercream and sugared lemon zest is on the lighter and airier side. It’s a balance of textures between the softness of the buttercream and the crunch from the sugar crystals. It would be delicious with some fresh strawberries. Or try pairing it with a cup of hot or iced green tea.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Have your cookie (dough) and eat it too. This chocolate chip cookie is filled with fudge and cookie dough, and you can see the chocolate striations when it is sliced open. The eggless cookie dough tastes like the real thing. Pair with a tall glass of ice-cold milk.

S’mores Cookie The dark cocoa cookie adds an elevated smoky depth that provides balance to a marshmallow mousse filling and buttered graham cracker crumbs. What a nice variation on a traditional s’more. Kudos to the marsh­mallow mousse, which is light, airy and reminiscent of campfires and ghost stories. Sit by the fireside and pair with an unsweetened spicy chai.

Chocolate Dipped Chocolate Chip Cookie The semi-sweet chocolate adds an extra lushness to what is already a delicious combination of chocolate chip cookie and brown sugar frosting. The filling is light and has a smooth texture with just a touch of contrasting sea salt. It would pair well with a strong cup of black coffee or a very dry hard cider. Enjoy Cupcakes has five varieties in total, including a nondipped version of the chocolate chip filled with brown sugar frosting and sea salt. Call 805 451-0284 to order or stop by the bakery inside the Santa Barbara Public Market on 38 W. Victoria St. Sun–Thu 11am–5pm, Sat 11am–6pm. EnjoyCupcakes.com.

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in Season this summer Summer Produce Apricots Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Basil Beans, green Blackberries Blueberries Cabbage Cantaloupe Celery Cherries Chiles Chives Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Dill Eggplant Figs Grapefruit Grapes Lavender Limes Melons Mint Mustard greens Mulberries Nectarines Onions, green bunching Peaches Peppers Plums/Pluots Raspberries Squash, summer Strawberries Tomatillo Tomatoes Turnips Watermelon

Year-Round Produce

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Edible flowers Garlic

(harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(harvested May/June)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radish Raisins

Summer Seafood Halibut Rock fish Salmon, King Sardines Shark Spot prawns Swordfish Tuna, albacore White seabass Yellowtail

Year-Round Seafood Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sanddabs Urchin

Other Year-Round Eggs Coffee (limited availability) Dairy

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

(harvested July/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 13


seasonal

Recipes Prosciutto and Melon This is such a classic and simple Italian dish that it barely needs a recipe, more of a reminder that you should make it more often. And although it shines in its simplest form, you can always add optional garnishes. Makes 4– 6 servings 1 small melon (cantaloupe or honeydew, chose the most flavorful you can find)

Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped

3 – 4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto

2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche

Quarter the melon, scoop out the seeds and slice into wedges. Remove the skin and wrap slices of prosciutto around the middle of each wedge, leaving the ends exposed. Arrange on a plate and serve.

Salt and pepper, to taste

Some optional garnishes include a drizzle of olive oil (plain or lemon infused) and some freshly ground black pepper. The prosciutto is salty enough on its own, but those with a salt tooth won’t mind a sprinkling of coarse sea salt. A few basil leaves or microgreens for garnish will add a touch of green. And for a little extra indulgence, serve with a dollop of soft, fresh sheep-milk ricotta.

• A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion

— Krista Harris

Additions:

• A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce

COLIN QUIRT

Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add more seasoning or additions if needed.

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Create an open-faced or closed sandwich using additional mayonnaise on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such as a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. — Krista Harris


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seasonal

Sweet Corn Cake The sweetness of corn makes it a natural for desserts and a touch of lime and salt makes it even better. I got the idea of using freeze-dried corn from a recipe for Corn Cookies by Christina Tosi. She ground it up and used it to give an intense corn flavor to the cookies. This tea cake recipe uses both the ground-up freeze-dried corn and fresh corn kernels, making it a perfect seasonal recipe. Serve it plain right after baking with a cup of tea or dress it up for a dinner party dessert with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Recipes

Makes 9 servings 1 fresh ear of sweet organic corn 11⁄ 2 cups flour (all purpose or gluten free) 1

⁄ 2 cup organic cornmeal

3

⁄ 4 teaspoon baking powder

3 tablespoons ground organic freeze-dried corn 1

⁄ 2 teaspoon finely ground salt

1

⁄ 2 teaspoon kosher salt

8 tablespoons butter, at room temperature (1 stick) 1

⁄ 4 cup coconut oil

1 cup granulated sugar 3 large eggs (preferably local, free-range) 1

⁄ 2 cup whole milk

Zest of 1 lime Juice of 1 lime (about 2 tablespoons) 1

⁄ 2 cup powdered sugar

Vanilla ice cream, optional for serving Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, optional for serving

Line the bottom and sides of a 9-inch-square baking pan with parchment paper. Preheat oven to 350°. Cut the kernels off the cob and set aside for later. Put 3 tablespoons of the freeze-dried corn into a food processor or spice grinder and process until it is finely ground, almost powdery.

COLIN QUIRT

Whisk the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, the ground freeze-dried corn and salt together and set aside. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter, coconut oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, and beat until well incorporated. Add the flour mixture, alternating with the milk, until combined and then gently stir in the reserved kernels of corn. Pour into the prepared pan and bake for 35–40 minutes or until a tester comes out clean.

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Meanwhile, whisk together the zest and juice of the lime with the powdered sugar until smooth. Pour over the hot cake when it comes out of the oven. After it has cooled slightly, cut into nine squares. Serve each square by itself or with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and a touch of salt and freshly ground black pepper. — Krista Harris


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String Beans & Green Beans Then and Now

ecipes and our tastes have certainly changed over the years. I collect old cookbooks, but I don’t often cook from them. The recipes offer an interesting glimpse at what times were like but aren’t necessarily what I want to make with the seasonal produce I find at the market. For this issue’s Then and Now article, I found a recipe for String Beans in my 1936 copy of The Way to a Man’s Heart: The Settlement Cook Book by Mrs. Simon Kander. The funny thing about the recipe (aside from the notion that it might somehow pave the way to a man’s heart) is that we don’t really have string beans anymore. The varieties grown today have had the string bred out of them, and we usually call them green beans—though there are also yellow and purple varieties.

STRING BEANS THEN From The Way to a Man’s Heart: The Settlement Cook Book by Mrs. Simon Kander

by Krista Harris

String Beans Wash beans, remove strings, leave whole, or cut on slant in pieces, or use bean cutter. Cook in an open kettle in a large amount of rapidly boiling salted water only until tender (20 to 30 minutes). Drain and add White Sauce No. 2, page 117, or salt, pepper and butter.

This seems like a remarkably long time to boil green beans. Much of the flavor will be lost to the water, and adding white sauce won’t help much. The recipe provided for the white sauce sounds bland if a bit rich (it calls for butter and hot milk or cream), but I can’t help thinking that it won’t win over any modern man’s heart—or woman’s! Luckily, green beans are in season at the same time as basil, so pesto is the answer. In the small towns that dot the Italian Riviera you often find linguini with pesto that also has green beans and potatoes. In those towns, even the smallest deli or market will have jars of pesto for sale that are as good as homemade. But it’s easy to make pesto, and there are more variations of it than you can imagine.

COLIN QUIRT

The classic Genoese pesto uses basil, pine nuts, garlic, Parmesan cheese and olive oil. It’s easy to get creative and substitute other fresh herbs like parsley or arugula; other nuts such as walnuts or almonds; or you can make additions and deletions like skipping the garlic or cheese and adding lemon zest.

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There are some who say you must do it by hand and use a mortar and pestle (the very name pesto is derived from pestle). But in the spirit of modernity, I say use a food processor—it’s much easier and produces great results.


1

⁄ 2 cup pine nuts

Pinch of salt and more to taste 1

⁄ 2 cup olive oil

1 cup Parmesan cheese 1 pound green, yellow or purple beans (or a mix of colors) COLIN QUIRT

Freshly ground black pepper

GREEN BEANS NOW Green Beans with Pesto This makes a great summer side dish for picnics and barbecues. Or to serve with pasta, cut the green beans into bite-sized pieces before sautéing. Then boil some pasta with a handful of small pieces of peeled potatoes. When the pasta is done, toss it with the green beans and pesto and you have an appetizer or main course. Makes 4 servings 1 small bunch basil, stems removed (about 25 leaves) 2 cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half

Put the basil, garlic, pine nuts, salt and olive oil in a food processor and process briefly, until combined. Add the cheese and pulse until blended. Taste and adjust with more salt or olive oil if needed. Set aside. In a large skillet, sauté the beans in some olive oil until tender and slightly browned. It might be just 5 minutes for the small haricot verts variety. For the larger green beans, sauté them for about 10–15 minutes and cover the pan for part of that time. Toss the beans with enough pesto to coat them generously. Grind some black pepper over them just before serving and garnish with leftover sprigs of basil. Krista Harris is the editor and co-publisher of Edible Santa Barbara. One her favorite things to do is to invent and reinvent recipes.

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DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

Plum Shrub Cocktail Love by George Yatchisin PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLIN QUIRT

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espite the joy stone fruit trees bring—apricots, nectarines, plums, oh my!—they hide a secret burden. When the crop comes in, every single fruit is ripe at exactly the same time. It’s like having to answer a question that’s never asked: What can one do when everyone you’ve ever been attracted to loves you at once? That’s why you need to turn that tree into a shrub. The idea goes back to pre-Revolution America, when all that fruit didn’t even have the chance to get refrigerated. So people developed shrubs —most simply a combo of fruit, sugar and vinegar—to preserve that fruit in a fantastic drinkable form. And as with most things tasty and liquid, shrubs have made a huge renaissance with the advent of the craft cocktail. (Shrubs also allow non-drinkers to enjoy some of the craft care of drinks without the alcohol punch—just use them in some soda water or tonic.) 20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Turns out we’ve got Santa Rosa plum trees in our yard, so I made sure to harvest enough for some cocktail exploration. You’ll find the shrub recipe at right, and note that it’s a cold shrub; some people suggest cooking the fruit and sugar, but I wanted a less worked-over product. Feel free to experiment on your own—just keep the fruit to sugar to vinegar ratio relatively even and it should end up delicious. You can even throw in other aromatics like herbs or ginger if you want. The Pisco Plum, then, already has a myriad of flavors at work just from the shrub, which flips and flops sweet and sour in tantalizing ways. The other two main ingredients also keep adding to the depth of this fascinating drink. It’s as if you can still smell plum blossoms on the nose, but then the smoky chili sneaks in, too, and the lime elevates the citrus characteristics of the pisco. Alas, that liquor —Peru’s national spirit, as it’s known north of the border —tends to be relegated merely, and I use that term advisedly as it’s a lovely cocktail, to the Pisco Sour (lime juice, simple syrup, egg white, bitters). But Peru is distilling piscos (they’re made from grapes, actually, so are a kind of white brandy) for export, now, that aren’t as bruising as some of the product we used to get. Check out Pisco Portón, for example (it’s also got a cool bottle). It adds a wide flavor array, from herbs to spice to citrus, and should be a favorite of anyone who is an adventurous tequila drinker.


The Pisco Plum Makes 2 cocktails 4 ounces pisco (Portón recommended) 2 ounces Plum Shrub (recipe follows) 2 ounces Ancho Reyes Chile Liqueur 1 ounce lime juice 2 lime triangles for garnish

Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Pour into 2 stemmed or ‘up’ glasses. Rim each glass with a lime triangle you’ve sliced and leave the lime on the rim.

Plum Shrub 2 cups quartered plums 2 cups granulated sugar 1 cup apple cider vinegar 1 cup red wine vinegar

Combine the plums and sugar, giving it a good stir to coat the plums, and store in the refrigerator for 2 days, covered. (Feel free to use the very jar you plan to store the shrub in when it’s complete.) Pour the contents into a colander and reserve the liquid, but mush it about (with the back of a spoon or a muddler) to get the fruit to express its juice. Into that juice add the 2 vinegars. Pour that into what will no doubt be a very full quart Mason jar and put it back into the fridge, taking it out every day or so to give it a good shake. After a week, taste it. It should be on a fine point of sweet-sour. If you’re happy with it, start making the cocktail, and if not, wait. It only deepens in flavor over time, and if kept sealed and refrigerated should last pretty much forever, if you don’t use it up in a month.

The drink gets a spectacular kick from the Ancho Reyes Chile Liqueur, a hot (in several ways) new product that finally solved the “can chiles work in a liquor without tasting like a fake infusion?” dilemma. Supposedly inspired by a 1920s Mexican recipe — can we ever read such a claim without assuming it’s marketing bluster?—it nonetheless brings both heat, mostly on the finish, that throat-warming moment, and smoke, as ancho chiles are a grill’s best spicy friend. Add up all the flavors and the plum fruit gets more and more complicated; it’s a drink to dive into and spend some time with, especially if you’re eating something barbecued for summer as you sip. And don’t skip the lime. Both the Ancho Reyes (kind of surprisingly, but that’s part of its charm) and the shrub bring a surprising amount of sweet, so the drink needs some more acid. And the lime plays off the pisco in lovely ways, complicating the citrus notes of the drink. George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

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W H AT ’ S B R E W I N G

Transformational Coffee in Goleta

Words and photos by Rosminah Brown

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ucked quietly back in a Goleta business park, a couple blocks off Hollister in Old Town, there is innovation brewing. Bona Fide Craft Draft is putting precisely brewed coffee on tap by taking the lessons learned from the past and making improvements. Kegging coffee to serve on tap follows what beer brewing has known for ages and where wine has been heading as well. Once prepared, it’s a race against time; oxidation and a handful of other chemical reactions make what was once aromatic coffee go stale. Bona Fide combines a fast brewing method to keep it at its freshest and kegs it for a cold coffee to be served on tap. Kegs are injected with inert nitrogen gas that not only removes oxygen from the keg but, being heavier than oxygen, adds a protective layer between the coffee and any residual or introduced oxygen. Their method keeps coffee fresh for at least 90 days, which means less goes to waste. Other coffees on tap typically go stale in under four weeks. There’s an additional benefit as well: Nitrogen adds a layer of texture to the coffee, not unlike a rich stout. Tiny bubbles effervesce as the coffee is pulled from the tap, infusing it with the sensations of silkiness, creaminess and a sweeter 22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016


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taste —without the need to add cream or sugar. This process can even be applied to other beverages on tap, such as tea, kombucha or yerba mate. Bona Fide can work with small- and large-batch roasters or cafés — anywhere that coffee is served. All it takes is about two and half pounds of coffee beans, and they can fill a keg that will provide 80 servings. The keg and tap process puts coffee more soundly in the realms of beer and wine, with craft quality coffee on draft being pulled in bars, restaurants, cafés and tasting rooms with consistent quality and freshness. John Goerke is behind this innovation, and he established Bona Fide in order to open his craft draft process to other companies. Coffee has been his passion for over 30 years, and in 1986 he co-founded the Caribbean Coffee Company in Goleta. After operating a wildly successful coffee cart at UC Santa Barbara, he and his partner opened the Santa Barbara Roasting Company in 1989, still in operation in downtown Santa Barbara. He sold his portion of the business in 1993 and concentrated solely on Caribbean and its wholesale business. In the mid-’90s he started introducing organic options. This year Caribbean Coffee celebrates its 30th anniversary and that’s a lot of time— and a lot of coffee — to provide the grounds for something new. For John, it was a transformative moment when his love of coffee and background research on cold coffee, kegging, brewing and stabilizing his product started coming together. He was inspired to make a difference and create something impactful. Bona Fide aims to work with large- and small-scale coffee suppliers alike, while their in-house line with Caribbean Coffee maintains fair trade and organic beans with plans for direct farmer agreements in the future. They follow the ethics of a “B Corp” or benefit corporation— adding social and environmental responsibility into their legally defined goals, and they seek to work with other B Corps. Caribbean has a longstanding policy of supporting nonprofits and fundraisers by providing fresh coffee or coffee products and sharing information and marketing on social media. They also strive to end single-use containers by producing glass “growler” jugs that can be refilled, and they have an active composting program for spent coffee grounds and coffee bean chaff at local farms. In the past year, Caribbean Coffee Company and Bona Fide Craft Draft have doubled their warehouse and production space, as well as doubled their staff to make way for their growing business. They remain wholesale producers and currently offer their craft draft at numerous “refilling stations,” including Santa Barbara City College and the Santa Barbara County Bowl. Their offices and warehouse also have a rotating lineup of beverages on tap in the front lobby so guests can walk in to refill growlers or just get a quick caffeine fix. It’s innovation brewing and a wake-up call all served up in a cup of delicious coffee. Rosminah Brown is a Santa Barbara native who types fast and eats slow. She once jumped in the Neptune Pool at Hearst’s Castle. She is still upset that JR’s BBQ closed. You can read her blog at GutFud.com. 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Is Bona Fide Craft Draft Part of the Fourth Wave? What’s coming next in the world of coffee? “Third Wave” is a recently developed term to describe the current rise of artisan coffee and its culture. It retroactively defines earlier waves of coffee trends in our modern history. The FIRST WAVE represents the mass entry of coffee into the American mainstream. Vacuum packaging, preroasting, grinding, sealing in tin cans and instant coffee came from the first wave, by companies like Maxwell House and Folger’s. It was cheap and easy to buy at grocery stores, moving a prior luxury good provided by roasters into the common household. The SECOND WAVE introduced specialty coffee, a reaction to the first wave that had sacrificed quality and taste for mass consumption. Espresso drinks arose and America embraced the café culture and went crazy for caffe lattes. This is when Starbucks became a worldwide corporate powerhouse with Peet’s not far behind. The THIRD WAVE brings the character of coffee back to center stage, with the origin of the bean, harvesting, roasting and brewing processes all treated and appreciated at the artisan level. It is a renaissance for coffee. Roasting is done in-house. Vintage brewing methods like Chemex and the pour-over (all forms of drip coffee) have come back with refinement and appreciation. The barista knows the source terroir and can pour beautiful latte art. Third Wave coffee recognizes flavor profiles and optimal serving methods, like wine or craft beer does. The big names here include Stumptown and Intelligensia and both were acquired in 2015 by Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Inc. As with the earlier waves, corporate consolidation and growth is a good marker for the Third Wave at its crest, and for the upcoming Fourth Wave to build its momentum on new opportunities. So what will be the FOURTH WAVE? If we’ve already brought coffee back to the basics and addressed our social and environmental consciences, the next step hints of something technology-based. This is where Bona Fide Craft Draft comes into play with their way to improve the variables of the process in the pursuit of great coffee.


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EDIBLE GARDEN

Extending

TOMATO SEASON by Joan S. Bolton P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C A R O L E T O PA L I A N

A

long-standing goal in my family is to serve fresh tomatoes on Christmas Day. We don’t always succeed in extending our harvest to the end of the year, but it’s a treat when we do. Most of my tomatoes for this year have been in the garden since April, and I have a few tricks for encouraging them to last. I also save space to plant cool-season tomatoes (yes, there really is such a thing) in August or early September.

Vining, or indeterminate, tomatoes don’t produce as many fruit at a given time. But the vines continue to grow, flower and ripen fruit for months. Only eventually do they succumb to frost, rain, cold soil or exhaustion. I grow both types. For traditional springtime planting, I choose indeterminates that promise to produce all summer. For late summer and fall, I plant determinates because their time to develop is limited.

Type Matters

Cool-Season Varieties

Tomatoes—and beans and peas—come two ways: as bushes and as vines. Bush, or determinate, types typically stand on their own. Their fruits ripen within a relatively short window and harvesting a wave all at once is useful for preserving or canning.

It’s late for growing tomatoes from seed for an August planting, so look for transplants at local nurseries. I avoid plants already bearing fruit. They’re not likely to last beyond summer. Instead, seek seedlings developed for cool, short growing seasons in Alaska, Czechoslovakia and Siberia. Their names

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often reveal their origins, such as Manitoba, Northern Delight, Oregon Spring, Scotia, Siberia, Stupice and Zaryanka Sunrise. I’ve had good luck with Bush Early Girl, too.

Location All tomatoes, including cool-season varieties, insist on at least six to eight hours of direct sun daily. Depending on the arc of the sun in your garden, your summer and late-season tomatoes might go in different places. Excellent drainage is critical. Tomatoes are at their best if the top inch of soil goes dry between waterings. Plants with constantly wet feet can produce watery, bland fruit and be more susceptible to disease and early death. It’s easy to control irrigation during our dry summers. I’ve found that being stingy with water extends the lives of my spring-planted tomatoes as well. But rains can cause the cool-season bushes to collapse. A good strategy is to plant in large containers filled with a fertile, fast-draining mix of potting soil and topsoil. Fifteengallon black plastic nursery pots are an option. They’re not attractive, but they’re functional. Their dark sides warm the roots during the day, while the soil drains faster than in the ground. Both attributes speed up growth and ripening. And if heavy rain is forecast, you can haul them under an eave or cover them temporarily.

Planting Time In August or early September amend the bed with rich, freshsmelling compost. In containers, any high-quality potting soil should be fertile enough. Then dig extraordinarily deep holes. Unlike other vegetables, tomatoes sprout new roots where their branches meet their stems. This is key to extending your plants’ lives. Match the level of the nursery pot and your tomato will produce a standard network of roots. But bury the first few sets of branches and you’ll potentially double or triple the root mass, making for a sturdier, more productive plant with greater longevity.

28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Because you’re leveraging those expanded roots, space your plants at least two feet apart or plant only one per container to avoid competition for nutrients. Irrigate your plants with drip hose or soaker hose, or by shaping substantial basins around each, then filling the basins with water from a bucket or a hose equipped with a shut-off valve. If the adjacent soil is dry, it may wick away what you’ve applied. That first, good soak may take several applications over several hours. Once the soil is saturated, apply an inch-thick layer of loose, well-aged compost, topper or decomposing straw to help insulate the soil from temperature swings, retain moisture and inhibit weeds. Water again to wet the mulch. At the outset, and depending on the weather, you may need to water daily. But as the plants grow and their upper leaves begin to shade their roots, start tapering off with a goal of watering every seven to 10 days by the time your plants begin producing fruit. The idea is to apply as little water as possible to intensify the flavor, but not so meager that the plants go into a tailspin and perish.

Care and Feeding Harvest consistently. After their initial push, your indeterminate plants may start looking punky. But if you let them go, the remaining fruit will over-ripen and set seed, prompting the plants to go into their inevitable decline. You must keep harvesting those leggy branches to promote further flowers and fruit. On the flip side—if temperatures drop and your determinate tomatoes stay green, clip whole branches and hang them in a dry room, out of direct sunlight, to encourage the fruits to ripen. I’ve had mixed results, but it’s worth a try. Some folks apply a mild solution of fish emulsion every six weeks to boost their summer tomatoes. I’m not that disciplined. However, I re-work the soil with every new crop, rotate my tomatoes every year and mulch with compost to maintain fertility during the growing season. Nonetheless, mild doses of fertilizer may keep your plants nourished, thereby helping them to keep growing. Products containing humic acid work well. Avoid fertilizers high in nitrogen, which promotes bushy, beautiful foliage at the expense of fruit. Slow-release, granular fertilizers may just sit during colder weather, so apply any nutrients then in liquid form. Also know that your cool-season plants may not look pretty, with their leaves and branches torn and tattered by December. But that matters little if you’re still able to pluck ripe, tasty tomatoes from your garden as late as the holidays. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


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IN THE COMMUNITY

Learning Life’s Lessons from the Ground Up

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The girls at Girls Inc. spend time in their new edible garden.

by Jill Johnson PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVEN BROWN

G

irls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara is in the business of planting the seed of opportunity and possibility in the minds and lives of local young girls. Their mission has been, and continues to be, to “Inspire All Girls to be Strong, Smart and Bold.” They have taken that belief and have started a “hands on” venture to help self-assurance blossom in their young wards. They have created a Girls Inc. Edible Garden. Installed last fall at the Girls Inc. Santa Barbara center at 531 Ortega St., it isn’t the largest of plots, but is a start. The girls are finding out that it doesn’t take a lot of ground for chili peppers, lettuce, tomatoes, artichokes, kale, Swiss chard and, of course, strawberries to grow. They even have milkweed to attract butterflies, which helps expose the girls to the life cycle of monarchs and the important role they, and other pollinators, play in agriculture and our natural surroundings.

The garden not only serves to educate the girls about making healthy food choices but how those choices affect the environment and their bodies as well. It also introduces them to foods that they might never have encountered before, or that might look a bit intimidating. Swiss chard, at first introduction, does look like a Crayola box exploded over some green celeryesque leafy thing. They are also learning that, even though we are in bucolic Santa Barbara, there are seasons and some plants are simply not available all year. And that creepy-crawly bugs and wiggly worms are often helpful to the garden. The vision for the garden came from a member of the Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara’s 100 Committee, Leslie Cane Schneiderman. Leslie served as the chair for the 2015 Scholarship Luncheon and had a thought about having a garden theme for the event. She visited with Phylicia Bulmer of Organic Soul to learn more about her business and the work she was doing EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 31


The girls work as a team to plant tomatoes and care for the garden.

32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016


at the SCS Garden Project at Sycamore Canyon School, an elementary school in the Dos Vientos area of Newbury Park. They had discussions not only of the luncheon theme, but of a little “garden area” at the Santa Barbara center that could use a little spiffying up and be put to a productive use. With the support of Leslie and the Girls Inc. staff, Phylicia took on the role of mentor and sponsor of the garden project. Young Construction created the garden plan, designing it so that it could be implemented in segments. They, along with a handful of volunteers and with the help of other local businesses including Central Coast Real Estate, Karl Funk Construction, Construction Plumbing, Wilson Landscaping, All Around Landscaping, Hayward Lumber and Deckers Brands, set about renovating the space. With Phylicia providing the original seedlings, the garden has taken root. What also has taken hold with the advent of the garden are life lessons that each girl who participates in getting her hands dirty will take with her for the rest of her life and will serve her well in whatever path she pursues:

A Trip to Italy , without the Jet Lag…

Have Patience It takes time for plants to grow into something special. They are the result of time spent watering, pruning and caring for them. The wait is deliciously worth it.

Know Your Limits It takes the right soil, the right environment and the right season for plants to grow and flourish. Often we have to find the right environment and place for ourselves to be successful.

Variety is the Spice of Life It’s also healthier. Why plant—or eat—just one variety of vegetable? Planting a variety of crops and rotating them seasonally is better for the soil, and eating more than one type of fruit or vegetable is healthier.

There are No Guarantees We may plant the seeds and nurture them, but there are no guarantees that they will grow as we had planned. And, that is OK.

Expect the Unexpected Often when working in the garden you encounter things that take you by surprise. A flower blossoms where you didn’t plant one or you accidentally come across an animal taking shelter under the leaf of a plant that you just harvested. Enjoy the little surprises that life presents. Leslie Cane Schneiderman came up with the tagline for the luncheon event, which holds true for the garden as well: “Together we plant the seeds of hope and the promise of what she can become.” She said, “The progress we have achieved is a true group effort. I think the tagline above really says what it is that inspired us.” The “little edible garden that could” might just inspire a whole new generation of Santa Barbareñas. Jill Johnson is an artistic soul with an inquisitive mind and a hearty appetite for life… and food. You can find her musings on spilled milk and cookie crumblings at her blog, CookiesInHeaven.blogspot.com.

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You Have To Ask A Taste of Off-Menu Items in Santa Barbara County Words and photos by Wil Fernandez

S

ecret menus aren’t new and some aren’t so secret.

By now, most Californians know where they can order their fries “Animal Style” and not get funny looks from other customers in line. What you may not know is there is a bounty of off-menu items available right in your backyard. As the saying goes, all you have to do is ask.

Shrimp and Pancetta Pizza

Stoney Honey Grappa

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Industrial Eats

The first time you enter Industrial Eats, you may be slightly confused by the deli-style ordering system. But just queue up next to the deli counter and start browsing the menu handwritten on rolls of brown paper pasted along the wall. The menus include “pizzas,” “sandwiches” and “edibles,” which encompasses virtually anything other than a pizza or sandwich. Portions on this last menu are large enough for one serving, but perfect for sharing two or three with a friend. Everything is cooked directly on stone or on cast iron in their two wood-fired ovens. You can watch from any table or pull up a stool to the bar for a front-row seat. While the menu changes regularly, a few items keep the locals coming back. One of these is the pancetta-wrapped white shrimp in a savory butter sauce with large slices of garlic and fresh red chili pepper. Normally listed on the “edibles” menu, it is usually served over toast. But regulars had a hard time leaving a drop of sauce on their plates. When a customer asked if they could have the dish served on a pizza crust instead, the alwaysaccommodating husband-and-wife team of Jeff and Janet Olsson gave it a shot. Today, the dish is popular enough with those in the know that when you order “shrimp pizza,” you’ll earn a knowing glance from the staff and maybe a quizzical look or two from the Angelenos waiting behind you in line. 34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Far Western Tavern

A quintessential Santa Maria–style barbecue restaurant in the rural town of Orcutt, the Far Western Tavern has been grilling local meat over red oak for almost 60 years. While the traditional relish tray and bay shrimp cocktail may sound like fare offered at other local steakhouses, their menu goes deep into local cuisine popularized by 19th century rancheros. After delving into an order of sweetbreads, go out on a limb and try some mountain oysters and always try a side of pinquitos, small pink beans native to the Santa Maria Valley. When you’re done, surprise your server by asking for a glass of Stoney grappa—not listed on any menus and kept behind the bar for a select few. A collaboration with Riverbench Vineyard, this secret concoction was made for members of the local Swiss-Italian family that started the restaurant in 1958. It’s made like traditional grappa by distilling the skins, pulp, seeds and stems remaining from winemaking. The mixture is then infused with juniper berries and lemon verbena during the distilling process. A touch of honey from nearby Righetti Ranch makes this sipper a delightful afterdinner digestif.


The Beast

Full of Life Flatbread LOS ALAMOS

This iconic Central Coast restaurant doesn’t really need to have off-menu items—they change their menu weekly based on what looks good at local farmers’ markets. Full of Life Flatbread is so ingrained in local culture, most simply refer to the popular meeting place as Flatbread. In the center of the dining room is a very large wood-fired oven, where everything on the menu is cooked. On winter days the oven provides a cozy, warm hearth. In the summer, the large barn doors are swung open to the garden, bringing a pleasant breeze into the environs. At least two new specialty flatbread pizzas are available each Thursday through Sunday. Ordering half of each on one flatbread is a smart move and is usually encouraged by the staff—you never know when you’ll get to try it again! With menus changing weekly, don’t count on many items sticking around. But one item that has made the cut for over a decade is their “Los Alamos S’more,” a homemade marshmallow square on a delicious flourless chocolate cookie. If that isn’t indulgent enough for you, ask for “The Beast” and they will replace the cookie with another cocoa-infused dessert: a gooey brownie. The result is a marshmallowencrusted brownie, perfectly toasted next to the wood fire while you watch.

Murray River Sea Salt Brown Butter Cookies Metropulos Fine Foods Merchant SANTA BARBARA

Tucked away on Yanonali Street in the Funk Zone, Metropulos gives foodies the experience of a proverbial kid in a candy store. The shelves are stocked with hard-to-find gourmet ingredients from spices to pasta. Like Industrial Eats, Metropulos also has deli-style ordering and a few self-service tables inside and on an outdoor patio. The menu features a wide variety of specialty sandwiches, but they regularly highlight fantastic specials like their gyros. The refrigerator is filled with enticing bottled beverages, such as multiple ginger brews and small-batch sodas. But no visit to this gem is complete without a trip to the rear, where the baked goods await. Inside a small, clear container on top of the counter you’ll find one of the most spectacular confections you’ve ever put in your mouth. With just a few ingredients—flour, butter, sugar, vanilla and pink sea salt—these brown butter cookies have a delicate texture that simply oozes with flavor as they melt away on your tongue. A word to the wise: If you pick up some to go, don’t set the little paper bag down on anything that you wouldn’t want completely saturated with butter. Originally from the East Coast, Wil Fernandez relocated from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara County to immerse himself in the food, wine and natural beauty of California’s Central Coast. He produces short films, dabbles in photography and collaborates with food and wine producers on creative projects.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 35


Eyes On Hives Citizen Scientists and the Mindfulness of Monitoring Honeybees by Jaime Lewis PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER OLSON

O

ther than the constant hum of a few busy beehives, all is quiet in Kelton Temby’s downtown Santa Barbara garden. “I like sitting with a cup of coffee and watching my bees in the morning,” says Temby, a soft-spoken robotics engineer who grew up among a family of beekeepers in his native Australia. “When you start beekeeping, you connect with your creatures as the custodian of their existence. You start to notice what’s flowering. You start paying attention to the bigger picture. That’s the incredible thing beekeeping does for people: It cultivates mindfulness.” Mindfulness is, in fact, the idea behind Eyes On Hives, a system that Temby created to track the health of beehives via The app portion of Eyes On Hives. video analytics. Temby originally came to UC Santa Barbara in 2010 to study engineering on a year-long foreign exchange program, but the area’s innovative, conscientious community compelled him to stay for good. After graduation, he moved into the healthcare field as a robotics engineer helping physicians to treat patients remotely. It was from his experience with “telemedicine” that Temby first had the idea for Eyes On Hives. “Seeing one-third of our bee colonies dying every year for 10 years, I thought, ‘Why don’t we have the same healthcarelike approach to beekeeping? Why don’t we use remote technology to give beekeepers insights into bee health?”

As he researched approaches to stabilizing bee populations, Temby found biologists attempting to breed stronger bees and beekeepers trying to manage their bees’ exposure to pesticides. But no matter the measures they took, it was always a surprise when a healthy colony they’d inspected two or three weeks prior collapsed. “As someone who’s used to dealing with real-time monitoring in medicine, I wondered what happened in the in-between time. At what point did the hives collapse? Yesterday? A week ago? I saw that, by using real-time data collection and monitoring the hives, we could help beekeepers understand exactly what changed and when.” And thus, Eyes On Hives was born. The Eyes On Hives system comprises two parts: a device that resembles a radar gun and an app. The device is a camera with a small computer behind it that, when positioned in front of a hive, uses infield video analytics to recognize what a bee looks like and to count those flying in front of the hive. The app then stores and collates the information transmitted by the device in real time. The system retails for $300, with a $10 monthly fee for use of the app. (“It’s like the Netflix of bees,” Temby jokes.) On his iPhone, Temby taps the EOH app and pulls up a high-quality video of his hives, abuzz with activity. Viewable from anywhere in the world, EOH video check-ins total 400 per day. Temby shares that just last week, ants attacked the hive we’re watching—a fact he discovered remotely via EOH.

Opposite: Kelton Temby, creator of Eyes On Hives, with his bees.

36 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 37


The Eyes On Hives device is comprised of a camera with a small computer behind it that is positioned in front of the hive.

“I made some adjustments to the hive stand to better enable the bees to fend off the ants. I wouldn’t have caught that issue had it not been visible through the time lapse I see here.” Temby beta-tested Eyes On Hives with local beekeepers and beekeeping associations, and later launched a capitalraising campaign on Kickstarter. The product’s ability to

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

quantify and analyze hive health appealed to hobbyists, researchers and commercial beekeepers alike. Last December, the Kickstarter project reached 150% of its goal and, today, the product is available for purchase on Indiegogo. To date, EOH has 35 systems installed across the U.S. and Canada with requests for units coming from as far away


Rainbow carrots with beet yogurt and herb oil.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 39


Kelton Temby finds pleasure in connecting with his bees.

as France and New Zealand. As of March, EOH had 550,000 videos of users’ hives—a huge data set to which Temby and his now-six-member team has unprecedented access. “We’re constantly analyzing the data set—that’s what’s really special,” he says. “Collecting data is one thing, but having a data-based approach to understanding bee health is the new play.” EOH partners with several organizations like the Western Agricultural Society, UCSB, UC Davis and Washington State University. Temby’s team also works with the Pesticide Research Institute out of Berkeley, which supports one of the most important uses for EOH: observing the effect of pesticides on colonies. “A couple years ago, there was a big pesticide incident in Montecito that killed many colonies, perhaps due to improper application,” says Temby. “As backyard beekeepers and citizen scientists, we now have a record of hive activity to share with those writing legislation. Personally, I feel empowered to use the data to make changes.” But while fighting colony collapse and the effects of pesticides remain major motivations for Temby, at the end of the day it’s the pleasure of connecting with his bees that most inspires his work. “My friends tease me, calling me an urban homesteader because I have honeybees, brew my own beer, eat organic

40 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

foods, et cetera,” he says. “But I believe my life is more typical of what a lot of people want. We want a connection with our food, with nature. When we go to work and leave our backyard behind, it feels good to maintain that connection.” He laughs. “I mean, we expect to have access to everything on our smartphones, don’t we? Well, now we can use our phones to remain connected to a part of what makes us happy.” Jaime Lewis is a food and drink writer whose work has appeared in Life & Thyme, The Clever Root, Edible San Luis Obispo and elsewhere. She is a regular columnist for 805 Living magazine as well as The Tasting Panel Magazine. She lives in San Luis Obispo.

Resources You can find out more about Eyes On Hives at KeltronixInc.com and at Indiegogo at Tinyurl.com/eyesonhives. Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association SBBA.org Beekeepers Guild of Santa Barbara BeeGuildSB.org Santa Barbara Beekeepers Google Group Groups.google.com/d/forum/santa-barbara-beekeepers


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The Santa Barbara Syndrome Putting Fresh Local Produce Onto Grocery Store Shelves by Nancy Oster PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLIN QUIRT

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A

s the grocery store produce supply chain expanded from The Santa Barbara Syndrome local to national to global in the decades following World At the 2011 Edible Communities Conference in Santa Barbara, War II, the average time from harvest to my grocery bag food writer Barry Estabrook was surprised by the statistics increased. Freshness and flavor were lost along the way. UCSB Professor David Cleveland presented from a study he Like other shoppers in the 1960s and ’70s, I’d learned to had done with his environmental studies students. Cleveland’s choose the most visually perfect fruits and vegetables—a large students found that 99% of the fruits and vegetables grown in firm red tomato, for example. I knew that in today’s food chain Santa Barbara County are exported from the county, while 95% tomatoes are picked green to travel, so I figured bland-tasting of the fruits and vegetables eaten in Santa Barbara are imported. tomatoes were the best I could expect. In an article for The Atlantic, Estabrook wrote about the Then one day in 1989 at Santa Barbara Syndrome an airport café in Australia, as evidence of our broken Barry Estabrook wrote about the Santa Barbara food system—pointing out I ordered a tomato and Syndrome as evidence of our broken food that even in a top foodcheese sandwich. On my producing county like first bite, I gasped, put down system—pointing out that even in a top foodSanta Barbara, small local the sandwich and turned to producing county like Santa Barbara, small local farms can’t get their fresh my friend. The juicy sweet produce onto local tables. farms can’t get their fresh produce onto local tables. tomato slice had a depth of Being a model flavor I’d only experienced example of the problem, as disturbing as it is, also offers us from the vine-ripened tomatoes growing in my father-in-law’s the opportunity to become the focal point for solutions to this backyard. “Why aren’t we picketing our grocery stores?” I said, nationwide problem. Why exactly is it so difficult to get local as I handed her half of my sandwich. “If an airport café in food onto our grocery store shelves, into institutional food Australia can offer vine-ripened tomatoes, why can’t a grocery service settings and onto more restaurant plates? Grocery store store in Santa Barbara?” shelves are a good place to begin our discussion. Well, it turns out I’m not the only one asking this question. First, it’s important to note that even if every fruit and The answer is complex and tightly woven into the way we vegetable currently eaten in Santa Barbara were grown here, we transport food from the farm to the grocery store. EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 43


would only consume about 11% of the abundance our local farms produce. As a result, our farmers need access to additional markets to keep their farms economically sustainable. The larger problem is that our national food distribution system, built on economies of scale, bypasses the small farm. Large flatbed trucks drive past small farms on their way to a distant warehouse to deliver huge quantities of a single item. To reach local consumers, small farmers have the option to sell their freshly picked produce at local farm stands, farmers markets and through CSA or delivery programs. But they also need outlets for large quantities of seasonal produce, like tomatoes, that ripen within a short period of time. To maintain flavor, quality and nutrients, farmers need to get their freshly harvested tomatoes to the consumer as quickly possible.

who are respectful to the earth and use sustainable practices, including giving back to the soil so their grandchildren can continue farming that same piece of land.”

Fresh From the Field

Alex Frecker worked for John Givens during high school and college, selling at farmers markets in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. After graduating with a degree in business economics and management, Alex worked at Givens’ farm for a few years before starting Frecker Farms in Carpinteria in 2013. When asked how he gets his produce to market, Alex says, “We’re lucky to have a big market like Los Angeles so close. We sell at farmers markets in LA and we’re getting into some Santa Barbara markets, but our biggest sales in town are to Harvest Santa Barbara.” He explains, “I wear a lot of hats. I’m the sales person, the tractor driver… I was picking strawberries just before you came.” Adjusting his blue baseball cap he adds, “Harvest Santa Barbara makes the job a lot easier for me.”

Like most Santa Barbara residents, I sometimes rely on produce from my nearby grocery store. However, the tomato that goes into my grocery bag has usually been bred for shelf life not for flavor and has spent too much of its life on a flatbed trailer. A top-quality tomato depends on timing. That tomato on my cheese sandwich at the Australian airport was picked at its peak and transported from field to café as quickly as possible—the way it’s done at Harvest SB. Having been a small farmer himself, Harvest SB’s Produce Buyer Shawn McMahon understands the distribution challenges farmers face. He says, “Small organic farmers are essentially truck drivers, dropping off small orders and not having much time left to take care of their land, their workers or their crop health.” Shawn’s job is to give farmers more time to work on the farm. Alex Frecker says, “I text Shawn in the morning. He sends me an order by 10am and they pick it up in the afternoon.” Harvest SB takes over at the loading dock so that the Alex can tend his crops, pay attention to farm needs and ensure the quality of the produce he harvests. On the sales side, Harvest SB Sales Manager Micah Elconin says, “We take on the burden of making the process feel as effortless as possible for our customers.” Updated price lists are sent during the week. Micah and Accounts Coordinator Maria Flynn network daily with customers. Micah says, “Our whole team works incredibly hard to find and deliver what they need.”

Harvest Santa Barbara

Pickup and Delivery

Regional food hubs like Harvest Santa Barbara are helping many communities address local demand and distribution problems. The Harvest SB story not only sheds light on the logistic problems small farmers face getting their produce to local consumers, but it also addresses the barriers some grocery stores must overcome to increase their offerings of local produce. While working at Santa Barbara farmers markets, Wesley Sleight and Sam Edelman noted that many food providers in Santa Barbara rely on national distribution companies for fresh produce. In 2005 Wes and Sam formed Farmer Direct Produce to provide a link between farmers and food service providers in the community. Jasper Eiler and his wife, Brook, purchased Farmer Direct Produce in 2012. During the past four years, they have expanded it, as Harvest Santa Barbara, into a regional food hub that currently purchases from about 70 farms, mostly local and organic, and delivers each week to about 75 customers, between San Luis Obispo and the Los Angeles area. Jasper learned about growing citrus and avocados in his great-grandparents’ Santa Barbara orchard and Brook’s greatgrandparents grew and produced raisins. As a result, their vision includes preservation of local farmland. “Farming can be environmentally abusive,” Jasper says. “We support farmers

Networking is half the job; the other half is physically getting the food from the farms to the customer. Harvest Santa Barbara has three refrigerated trucks and four drivers. I joined Jason Steward on his pickup route one hot afternoon in August. We left the warehouse at 3pm and headed out to Dos Pueblos Ranch to pick up aquaponic greens from Sustained Harvest Farms. Next stop was Ellwood Canyon Farms, where a pallet of Ambrosia melons, beets, chard and celery was wrapped and ready in the cooler. In the field at Ebby’s Organics, freshly picked tomatoes and chilies were boxed and sitting in the shade. Our final stop was John Givens Farm, where pallets of melons and vegetables were fork-lifted from the cooler into the truck. This was a light pickup day, Jason told me. Another driver was bringing in produce from northern Santa Barbara County and more produce had been delivered to the warehouse during the day. When we arrived back, the cooler was filling up and the sorting area was filled with boxes. Jason would be part of the sorting crew that evening, preparing orders for morning delivery. The next morning I met driver Tom Thornton at 6am as he was filling the truck with the orders for his route. Over the next few hours we delivered food to two branches of UCSB Dining Services, Peabody Charter School, The Good Lion cocktail bar and the Isla Vista Food Co-op.

One Farmer’s Approach

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Harvest Santa Barbara purchases from local farms and delivers to about 75 customers between San Luis Obispo and the Los Angeles area, including grocery stores such as the Isla Vista Food Co-op.

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Not your typical grocery store, the community-owned Isla Vista Food Co-op has been buying produce directly from local farms for over 40 years. While the Co-op prioritizes direct purchases, some grocery stores find multiple small deliveries and the extra bookkeeping to be too cumbersome. This is one of the barriers that Harvest SB helps to address. When we arrived at the Co-op, a farm truck was already parked near the delivery door so we parked on the street. Tom grabbed the dolly to move boxes onto the lift gate and lowered them to the street for our largest delivery of the day —15 items from 10 different farms. The Co-op’s produce shelves offer a cornucopia of fragrances and flavors that change with the seasons. When I want a juicy sun-sweetened tomato, I go to the Co-op. Each item is sourceidentified, so I have my favorites. Ebby’s Organic Farm cherry tomatoes are exceptional, sometimes even in January. Finley Farms heirloom tomatoes, grown in the Santa Ynez summer heat, can be eaten like apples, dripping sugary sweet juice onto my plate. Frecker Farms’ strawberries provide the perfect burst of strawberry flavor. Tender crisp lettuce from The Garden of….. turns a simple salad into a masterpiece. And each summer I eagerly await Vincent Farm’s dry-farmed apricots, firm and sweet with that quintessential apricot flavor that keeps me reaching into the bag for another, then driving back to the Co-op for more.


Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan Putting fresh local produce onto grocery store shelves and onto plates throughout our community is one of the goals of the recently unveiled Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan. The plan serves as a blueprint for our regional food system. It identifies goals and strategies for protection and environmentally responsible expansion of agriculture and development of a thriving local food economy. Strategies include access to affordable healthy food for all in our community, educational guidance on better health through nutrition, and fair treatment and compensation for all members of the food workforce.

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The Food Action Plan is a culmination of 1,200 volunteer hours by over 200 community members. The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County and the Community Environmental Council spearheaded the project, in partnership with the Santa Barbara Foundation and the Orfalea Foundation. For more information, visit SBCFoodAction.org.

Supporting Our Local Food Chain Fresh, flavorful, nutrient-rich foods like these have short commercial shelf lives, but local stores like the Co-op can offer them because they are grown nearby and picked fresh for eating, not for transporting long distances. Flavor, however, isn’t the only reason to support our local food chain. Santa Barbara’s main transportation artery is the 101 Freeway. In 2005, when the La Conchita landslide blocked the freeway, delivery trucks from Southern California couldn’t get into Santa Barbara to restock supermarket shelves. Local farms had fresh food available, but the system in place wouldn’t allow produce managers at some supermarkets to put locally delivered produce onto their shelves. This needs to change. If fire, earthquakes or landslides cut off access from both the north and south, local farms become our primary food source.

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Working Towards a Santa Barbara Solution “Wouldn’t it be great if we had 10 Co-ops in the community?” asks Shawn McMahon. The answer is yes. But even more importantly, we can shop at stores that clearly identify not just the country of origin, but the local farm where their produce was grown— ensuring that “local” means “grown nearby.” And, as a community, we can celebrate the seasonality of locally grown produce, give it priority over food shipped long distances and let our grocery stores know that this is important to us and to the resilience of our community. Nancy Oster spent her early years in a community in Los Angeles, living near fields of vegetables and strawberries. Those farmlands are now covered with asphalt and concrete to support car dealerships, shopping malls, housing and grocery stores that import fresh produce from Santa Barbara. She prefers to live in Santa Barbara where that food is grown.

The Lucky Hen Larder Coming Soon to Santa Ynez Inspired Cuisine. Artistic Presentation. Impeccable Service. TheLuckyHenLarder.com Adjacent to the Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 47


Santa Barbara Channel Islands by Urmila Ramak rishnan and Chuck Graham PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHUCK GRAHAM

The beautiful coastline of Santa Cruz Island.

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Hiking on Santa Cruz Island.

Exploring the Past and Present of Santa Cruz Island

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our of the eight Channel Islands of California are in Santa Barbara County: San Miguel, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and Santa Barbara. Along with Anacapa Island in Ventura County, they form the Channel Islands National Park. San Nicholas in Ventura and San Clemente in Los Angeles County are controlled by the U.S. Navy. Santa Catalina, also in Los Angeles County, is the only island in the chain that has a permanent resident population.

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S

anta Cruz Island sits closest to Santa Barbara and provides us with our picturesque views across the channel. It’s the largest of the islands, and a look back at its natural and agricultural history can provide us with glimpses of an important part of Santa Barbara’s food culture. In some ways, Santa Cruz is the same as it has been for thousands of years. It’s a refuge to endemic species that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. But its landscape and uses have changed dramatically since humans first made the trek from the mainland to settle on the hilly and biologically diverse landscape. The Chumash According to archeological investigations, the island had a large population of Chumash natives. They came to the island at least 13,000 years ago, relying on the land and ocean for fishing, mining and hunting. Basket hopper mortars, found at archeological sites, were used to grind acorns into meal that could be made into bread. Kristina Gill, a member of the anthropology department’s Integrative Subsistence Laboratory at UC Santa Barbara, says bulbs and roots provided a much-needed balance and source of energy to the shellfish, tuna, swordfish and other marine life that made up a majority of the Chumash diet. Flowers such as rose hips, manzanita, laurel sumac, black walnut, cherries and sage were consumed, though less often. Raw seaweed from kelp forests was also highly used. The Chumash were considered sedentary hunter-gatherers who practiced a form of land management, says Gill. They encouraged certain plants to grow over others. One way they did that was an annual burning, which would promote the root crops to come back every year. The Chumash also used the island for tools. Leaves and burls from bay laurel were used to make wooden bowls and insect repellent. Walnuts and their shells were used for food and as gambling dice. Every part of elderberry was used for a different purpose—from curing coughs and colds to making bows for hunting small game. European Settlers In 1592, Spaniards came to the island, but they didn’t encounter the Chumash until the 1700s. Missionaries eventually forced the Chumash out in 1822. Settlers then used the land for agrarian purposes. Records of winemaking, ranching and some farming were recorded in countless books and personal essays. An account from Clifford McElrath in the book On Santa Cruz Island talks about the different jobs rancheros and other migrant workers had. A typical lunch consisted of barbecued lamb, bread, onions and a pint of piquette or watered-down wine. The bull cook, or handyman, of the camp used a wood-burning stove to cook for the rancheros and vineyard workers. In 1869, 10 investors formed the Santa Cruz Island Co. One of them, Justinian Caire, built and operated the Santa Cruz Island Winery in the late 1800s. He imported and planted grapes from France and produced mostly Zinfandel, although Cabernet 50 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and other varieties were grown. During Prohibition Smugglers Cove was used to illegally transport wine. McElrath also talks about sheep rearing and pig raising. Pigs and sheep were brought over to the island in the 1800s. “It is amazing in all the years that ships have been coming to the island that more pests have not been introduced,” he says in the book. Settlers brought animals, such as goats, and planted eucalyptus trees, which were used for firewood. Many of these nonnative introductions would later have substantial consequences. Modern Times In 1980, Santa Cruz attained national park designation and ranching on the island finally subsided in 1984. The Gherini family, who owned the island up until that point, hosted a hunt club, which attempted to contain and capture feral pigs and wild sheep that were a byproduct of ranching. Environmentalists made a great effort to restore the land to its original state— eradicating 150 years of nonnative species on the island, says Kate Faulkner, chief of natural resources management at Channel Islands National Park. Feral pigs and sheep damaged 60% of Chumash archeological sites when they were rooting for food. Bald eagles were heavily impacted by DDT, and as a result left the island completely, which allowed the golden eagle to enter as a new predator to the island fox. Between 1994 and 2000, the island fox population was reduced by 90% to fewer than 100 foxes. Through captive mating efforts, conservationists were able to bring the island fox population back up. In the last five years, more than 100 foxes have been bred and released back into the wild. On top of that, environmentalists have successfully eliminated the golden eagle population through live capture and have reintroduced the bald eagle to the island. Problems and challenges still remain. Plants such as eucalyptus and mustard still choke out native plants, and environmentalists still need to monitor reintroduced native species closely. Today, the park is used as a recreational oasis for the wildlife the island serves. What hikers bring with them, they must take back. In some ways, the ethic of leaving nothing behind shows a respect to the land that has stood the test of time. It left me smiling long after I stepped off the boat and onto the mainland with my empty sandwich bag and cookie-crumbed Tupperware container. I went to the island to satisfy a natural curiosity. I became a temporary ornithologist by listening to the various calls of the scrub jay, and I counted the number of cat-sized island foxes. I left the island with much more history and reverence for this “world of extremes” that nods to the original California that’s so close to Santa Barbara, yet so distant. Urmila Ramakrishnan is a freelance writer and Edible Santa Barbara writing fellow from The Culinary Trust. She lives to eat, drink, write and experiment with leftovers. Follow her writing and sports adventures on her blog “Jiu-Jitsu and Jalebi” or follow her on Twitter.


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Visiting the Islands in the Channel Islands National Park Santa Cruz Island

Anacapa Island

You could spend a lifetime exploring Santa Cruz. There are two campgrounds on the island, at Scorpion Anchorage and at Del Norte near Prisoners Harbor. However, only 24% of the island is open to the public, from the southeast end at Prisoners Harbor to San Pedro Point. Visitors can enjoy world-class kayaking through the Painted Cave, one of the largest sea caves in the world. There are also several terrific hikes in the vicinity. You can get dropped at Prisoners Harbor and backpack to the Del Norte Campground three miles east and then walk the next morning to Scorpion Anchorage another 11 miles away. With enough water and food, you can hike all day. After all that hiking, cool off by snorkeling in the kelp forests at Scorpion Anchorage and look for brilliant garibaldi and a bevy of other fish species like the bat ray, sheepshead and opal eye.

Anacapa Island is made up of three small islets only visible at the lowest tides, and it’s the narrowest island in the chain. Be prepared to climb a ladder onto a dock and walk up 150 stairs until you’re on top of a windswept plateau overlooking the surrounding waters. East Anacapa is the only islet open to public visitation. The others are closed to the public to protect sensitive seabird breeding and nesting habitat. Take an easy stroll out to Inspiration Point for one of the most breathtaking island views across the entire archipelago. Another easy walk takes visitors to the lighthouse overlooking the iconic 40-foot-tall rock arch blasted by the surf. Down in the Landing Cove step off the ladder and explore the underwater world of the park. Don’t forget a snorkel and mask to take in Anacapa’s natural wonders—after all, half of this National Park is in the ocean.

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Skunk Point on Santa Rosa Island.

Left: Black oystercatchers on a rocky shoreline. Middle: The Anacapa lighthouse overlooks the iconic 40-foot-tall rock arch. Right: San Miguel Island, although currently closed, has many great hikes.

The campground at Water Canyon on Santa Rosa Island.

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San Miguel Island.

Opposite: the stunning coastline of Santa Cruz Island.


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Santa Rosa Island This island has 15 campsites that are fortified with windbreaks, drinking water and flushing toilets. The Torrey Pines forest is just east of the campground, and the only other forest like it in the world is in San Diego. Cherry Canyon Trail is accessible right out of the campground and holds many wildflower species. The old Vail & Vickers cattle ranch still stands and is preserved for those who want to learn the rich cattle ranching history on the isle. Santa Rosa Island is also home to Arlington Man, the oldest human remains discovered in North America, dating back to over 13,000 years ago. Mammoths also once roamed Santa Rosa Island, and a complete skeleton of one (discovered in 1994) can be seen at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. San Miguel Island San Miguel has been closed since May 2014 as the U.S. Navy clears the island of live ordnance left over from World War II. It’s not known when it will reopen, but when it does it has a number of phenomenal hikes. The island fox population on this islet is robust, so chances of spotting one are almost guaranteed. Santa Barbara Island Don’t forget about this tiny islet. The one-square-mile isle sits by itself to the south, far from the other islands comprising the northern chain, but in a three-day trip to this treeless island you can experience much of what it has to offer. I recommend a guided kayaking trip around the entire island if there’s good weather. You’ll have a better chance of paddling into more sea caves and beneath rocky, wave-battered archways. Birdlife is prolific here with potential sightings of elegant terns, brown boobies and Scripps’s murrelets. Thousands of California sea lions frolic around the island amongst heaving surf and spouting blowholes.

Visiting the Islands

Island Packers is the only concessionaire that works directly with the Channel Islands National Park Conservancy. Day passes are $59 for adults, $54 for seniors, and $41 for children aged 3–12. Bring your own food and drink and be prepared to hike out all your trash. 805 642-1393; IslandPackers.com You’ll need a camping permit if you’re planning a multi-day excursion. Prices depend on the island, the type of site and the duration of stay. Recreation.gov Truth Aquatics specializes in transportation for the underwater lover. Scuba divers and hikers can use the company to visit San Miguel, Sana Rosa, Santa Cruz, Anacapa and Santa Barbara Islands. They offer equipment rental and multi-day trips that include food. 805 962-1127; TruthAquatics.com Santa Barbara Adventure Company offers kayaking and educational programming—exploring the Painted Cave on Santa Cruz or stand up paddle lessons. 805 884-9283 SBAdventureCo.com Channel Islands Outfitters offers guided tours, equipment rentals and organic catered food. They offer a la carte options and overnight camping food packages that start at $40 per person. 805 899-4925; ChannelIslandsO.com

Shag Rock, Santa Barbara Island.

Hiking is easy to moderate around the island and can be done in a half day. There are great views of seals and sea lions along various trails. And on a clear day, Shag Rock, Sutil Island, Catalina and San Nicholas Islands come into view. Chuck Graham is a freelance writer and photographer living in Carpinteria. His work has appeared in Islands, Backpacker, Canoe & Kayak, BBC Wildlife and Shutterbug. You can see more of his work at ChuckGrahamPhoto.com and @chuckgrahamphoto. 54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Channel Islands Provisioners will prepare organic meals for your island trip, whether it’s for a day or for a week, and they’ll deliver your food to the dock. Packages for hikers are $32.95 per person, and include breakfast, lunch, a snack and beverages. For campers, there are four tiers of menu choices. 805 758-3375; ChannelIslandsProvisioners.com The Channel Islands National Park office is in Ventura County at 1901 Spinnaker Dr., and it offers tons of information on each island, from live exhibits to films. 805 658-5730; NPS.gov/chis/index.htm


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Bien Nacido Vineyard in Santa Maria.

History Goes to the Victor

The Story of the Santa Maria Valley AVA by Sonja Magdevski P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S H E R R I E C H AV E Z

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n a recent early spring afternoon viticulturalist and winemaker James Ontiveros was digging his hands in the soil of his Rancho Ontiveros vineyard located in the heart of the Santa Maria Valley to tell the story of the dirt he planted 20 years earlier. He explained aspects of the site, wind direction, orientation and temperature to a camera creating an educational video for his new Alta Maria wine partnership to be sold exclusively through Kroger Supermarkets, the largest grocer in the country. Upon hearing the story, I imagine what James was really telling the camera was his family’s legacy dating back generations when his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather came from Orange County to the California Central Coast in the 1830s to claim the family’s 9,000 acres of the Rancho Tepusquet land grant on Saint Mary’s Day and gave the valley its name. James Ontiveros is the ninth generation of his family (thus his other wine label Native9) to be born and raised in California 56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

and the first, until very recently, to not own any of the original land grant that had been sold off through the years. The current Rancho Ontiveros, which his family purchased in the mid 1980s, sits on a plateau overlooking the family’s previous holdings. It seems as if every day Ontiveros makes peace with his history while crafting his future in and around its legacy. This new partnership with winemaker Joe Wagner of Copper Cane Provisions in Napa Valley—think wine brand Meiomi Pinot Noir and Chardonnay that sold in 2015 for $315 million to Constellation Brands, among other holdings—provides Alta Maria the financial and marketing platform to spread the Santa Maria Valley and Santa Barbara County wine story in ways unimaginable to the great majority of Santa Barbara County wine brands. “My emotional connection to this area is steeped in so much more than, frankly, just the wine business,” said Ontiveros,


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SANTA YNEZ VALLEY A.V.A.

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In 1973, 300 acres were planted of the now-famed Bien Nacido Vineyard.

who is affectionately oftentimes called “Mr. Santa Maria” by his colleagues. “For me to now, full circle, say I have taken the things that make me proud of the area and make something of my own out of it is amazing.”

Unraveling the Story This is a story about a sense of place. Santa Barbara County has more than 20,000 acres of wine grapes planted and six American Viticultural Areas, or AVAs, that delineate a defined grape-growing region based on historic and geographic features. The Santa Maria Valley AVA is the second in California—next to the Napa Valley, both created in 1981—and located in northern Santa Barbara County and southern San Luis Obispo County. The Federal Government under the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) approves AVAs based on petitions presented by winery and vineyard owners, whose goal is to distinguish the unique characteristics of their land that consumers can identify with. Petitioners hope that their AVAs also equate to quality that the consumer will pay for, though the government “does not consider AVAs quality designations,” said Gladys Horiuchi, director of media relations for the Wine Institute in San Francisco. 58 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

A place of birth is oftentimes the most important point in any story and perhaps the most complicated when it comes to wine grapes. Those in the wine business use variable (and hotly debated) terms like terroir and typicity to further the narrative of our unique sense of place and the specialness of the wines from that place.

James Ontiveros of Alta Maria Vineyards and Native9.


Thus, James Ontiveros explaining vineyard soil for a video camera is an attempt to highlight his terroir, a term that roughly translates to the characteristic flavor, or typicity, imparted to a wine by being born into a particular area based on its soil, climate and topographic features. The AVA system is “a preliminary American boundary approximating an early ideal of typicity,” said winemaker Wes Hagen, who has successfully written proposals for three of the six Santa Barbara County AVAs. “They are a first step for Americans to understand how place impacts wine,” wrote Hagen. “In 100 years some of the boundaries will seem arbitrary and some, hopefully some of mine, will be prescient.” The primary topographic feature of Santa Maria Valley lauded by its winemakers and grape growers impacting its sense of place is the direct, unobstructed access to the maritime influence of the Pacific Ocean, contained by the unique east-west orientation of its bordering mountain ranges that moderates temperatures, conducive for growing varietals like Chardonnay and Pinot Noir that favor cooler conditions. Grape varietals, like all fruit and vegetables, have their happy places where they thrive. “We are 14 miles, as the crow flies, to the ocean,” said Doug Circle, owner of Sierra Madre Vineyard, who grows Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. “Site-specific growing makes all the difference in the world. With our wide day and night temperature differential keeping acidity in the fruit and our relatively weak soil types, coupled with our access to the ocean, we are on the edge of ripening capabilities. It is in this space where the most interesting wines are made.” Ironically, when the Santa Maria Valley was first being scouted in the late 1960s for grape growing potential, Pinot Noir was not on the minds of those first pioneers. Dale Hampton, of Hampton Farming, came to the area from Delano, California, with Louis Lucas, of Lucas and Lewellen Vineyards, looking for wine grape growing property in 1969. The Pacific Gas & Electric Company had created a buzz about grape growing in Santa Maria because of its similar growing conditions to the more established wine regions of Sonoma and Napa with the hopes of expanding its power grid. “Power was cheap back then,” said Hampton. This siren call brought farmers from throughout the state to the area. Hampton,

Lucas and brothers Bob and Stephen Miller all arrived at the same time looking for land. “It was a little better than the wild west, but not by much,” Hampton laughed. Following in the footsteps of the first commercial vineyard planted in the area by Uriel Nielson, also from Delano, in 1964, Hampton and Lucas planted 800 acres of their Tepusquet vineyard in 1970 to similar varietals, such as Riesling, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon. “We planted stuff that didn’t need to be there because we didn’t have the advance knowledge back then as we do now,” Hampton said. “We planted Cabernet, which was an error, and we also planted Pinot Noir out there, which at that time was also an error because you couldn’t give that stuff away. Riesling was big and Chardonnay was always fairly decent and then we had some other oddball stuff. Now Riesling you can’t give away. Everything is always changing.” During this time Rancho Sisquoc began planting 50 acres of Cabernet with some Riesling, followed by Riverbench, with the Miller family the next big early adopter of the area. In 1973 Hampton and his crew planted the initial 300 acres of the nowfamed Bien Nacido Vineyard with the Millers to Cabernet, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot Noir. The Millers made their way north from Ventura County, where they had farmed avocados and lemons for generations, to buy 2,000 acres of the former Rancho Tepusquet land grant, reuniting significant portions of the property. “Bob Miller had a great vision,” Hampton said. “He knew what he wanted to do.” Vision was one thing, though establishing a customer base was another matter. The early clients were from Napa and Sonoma, using Santa Maria grapes as filler in their wines to stretch supply. Today Santa Barbara County has more than 200 wineries, but back then there were only a handful, and they were all struggling. “North Coast wineries were not making Central Coast labels,” said Nicholas Miller, VP of sales and marketing for his family’s business. “Today we take it for granted but back then there wasn’t much acreage in the ground. Early on our boom-and-bust cycles didn’t mean anything to the people in the North Coast. When they had bumps they simply wouldn’t return phone calls from here. We were the first on the chopping block.” EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 59


wine if you do it right and most people did, so it got important to put the area on the label,” Hampton said. While Northern California wineries slowly started to take notice of Santa Maria, they also began to buy up land to plant their own vineyards. Big players like Robert Mondavi and Kendall Jackson began to establish roots in the early 1980s, while local players were starting to make some headway as well. Coupled with new vineyard plantings and grafting corrections on old plantings, Santa Maria began to quickly find its voice in the world.

The Way Forward

Jim Clendenen of Au Bon Climat.

It seems incredible to imagine someone not returning phone calls from Bien Nacido Vineyards, which today is the most vineyard-designated vineyard in the world with close to 70 clients not only vineyard-designating the name but many also block-designating specific areas within the vineyard to express the unique characteristics of the grapes that go into their wines. It wasn’t just Bien Nacido that had trouble back then; all of the vineyards had difficulty selling their fruit. “We didn’t know what ego meant,” said Dale. “We always struggled to get wineries to buy our grapes because of Napa and Monterey, though once you got them going they liked it, and soon the rest of them came up behind.” The establishment of the Santa Maria Valley AVA became important in creating a special district for people to champion the similarities they were beginning to recognize and for customers to feel more confident in buying the fruit. “Santa Maria has a lot of issues when you are farming with the coolness and the wetness of things, but it also creates a great 60 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

It may seem difficult for people to understand why Cabernet doesn’t grow well in the same conditions where Pinot Noir thrives, and even growing well is a loaded question in many circles. Getting a grapevine to grow is one thing; getting it to beautifully express its unique characteristics by being grown in a favorable place is another. Cabernet expresses itself better in warmer climates, while Pinot Noir falls apart in hot areas. You can’t get a succulent to adequately grow in Alaska. Deeper still, the variables that affects a wine’s terroir and typicity are enormous: Soil, rootstock, clone, vine spacing, irrigation, pruning, yield, harvest date, winemaker temperament, cellar decision making and more all affect a wine’s final expression of its sense of place, or lack thereof. Some winemakers believe the AVA system doesn’t go far enough, while many winemakers are excited to work with fruit from a specific area based on the general characteristics found in the resulting wines, while still others roll their eyes at the notion of vineyard expression. For Bien Nacido Vineyard Manager Chris Hammell, who also makes wine for his Hammell Wine Alliance label, the idea of terroir goes much further than simply the site. It has to include the human element. “With terroir you have the soil, the weather and the person; how the person interacts with the vine is of equal importance,” he said. “Terroir is a tool in our hands to make a wine. Are areas different? Of course they are different, though just because you are on the other side of the road doesn’t mean one is good or bad.” What most winemakers can all agree upon is that the AVA system provides a starting point to further the conversation.


Perhaps no two people have advanced the conversation about Santa Barbara County and the vineyards they have worked with over the past 30 years more than Jim Clendenen of Au Bon Climat winery and Bob Lindquist of Qupé. Both started their wineries in 1982 after working together at the newly established Zaca Mesa winery in the late 1970s, with winemakers including Ken Brown of Ken Brown Wines and Adam Tolmach of The Ojai Vineyard. “Nobody knew anything about what they should be doing in wine,” Clendenen said. “There were no role models to follow. We had no idea you could go out and start your own small winery. The most important thing during that period of time for people to understand was that the grapes were not very good. They were planted with poor spacing, poor clones, poor irrigation, they were young… Bob fought so hard to get good Syrah.” It was when Lindquist met the late Bob Miller of Bien Nacido in 1985 that both their paths would change dramatically. “Bob approached me at a wine tasting event and fell in love with what I was doing,” Lindquist said. “He liked what we stood for and said, ‘We’d love to have you come out to the vineyard. We’d love to graft some Syrah over for you.’” They grafted a seven-acre block of Riesling to Syrah and Lindquist made his first wine from Bien Nacido in 1987. A year later Bob Miller approached him again about building a winery on the property, saying, “We’d love to hitch our wagon to a young winemaker like yourself,” according to Lindquist. “We’ll put you on the map and vice versa.” That was when Lindquist reached out to friends Clendenen, Tolmach and Rick Longoria of Longoria wines to create their own winery space at Bien Nacido. Clendenen and Tolmach agreed and they built one room in 1989. Today, Clendenen and Lindquist produce 100,000 cases of wine out of a building that has expanded three-fold over the years while mentoring young winemakers and graciously hosting hundreds of industry professionals to their famous communal lunches for the past 20 years. Most importantly, they have traveled the world selling their wines representing Santa Barbara County. “Being here at Bien Nacido allowed us access to the best grapes and to do custom plantings, where they planted blocks specifically for us that became some of our most important wines,” Lindquist said. To spend time with Lindquist and Clendenen is to open up the encyclopedia of wine during their time. Every harvest date, decision and persons involved are remarkably recalled instantly without ever having to write anything down. “This was the end of the world,” Clendenen said. “The only thing that ever got any interest in Santa Maria at that time was hillbillies, bumpkins and vegetal Cabernet. The Santa Maria Valley has slowly forged a regional quality measure. We have been making wine for almost 40 years here. This is where we built things and where we invested everything. We would never want to be anywhere else.” Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhone Varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine.

One of the Top 15 Amazing Small Town Bakeries in the U.S.!

Extra virgin olive oils, flavored olive oils, olive tapenades, table olives, gourmet vinegars, local food products.

Open Daily 11–5

2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 olivehillfarm.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 61


Bread

A Love Story by Pascale Beale

62 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

yeasty scent populates some of my favorite memories: a bakery near my grandparents’ house where the local specialty was a craquelin, a brioche-type of sugar-bread which—when toasted and slathered with butter and my grandmother’s apricot jam— came as close to heavenly breakfast food as one could imagine; or a small bakery in Provence that made delicate fougasse, the perfect vehicle for the fresh goat cheese we found at the local market; or the olive-laden and lardon-packed baguettes that I covet and that can transform crostini into the hors d’oeuvres to end all hors d’oeuvres. I realize now that I have always been on a quest for good bread. When I moved to California in the mid-1980s that bread was hard to come by. By then, even some of my favorite haunts in France had closed and new “modern” bakeries had taken their place. The bread never tasted the same, and I yearned for the bread from my childhood.

d

Years later, I found myself walking down another narrow street, in another Provencal village, this time with my own children in tow. We strolled past an old bakery early in the morning. The door to the little shop opened, a smartly dressed man stepped out with a baguette under his arm and in that moment that magical yeasty aroma drifted out through the door. I stopped in my tracks, doubled back, walked into the boulangerie holding one child in each hand, inhaled deeply, closed my eyes and inhaled again as childhood memories came flooding back. I am sure that I smiled even as PASC ALE BE ALE

I

spent part of my childhood living in a small hilltop village in Southern France. The village streets were narrow, cobbled and devoid of cars. Every morning my brother and I set off to collect baguettes and croissants for breakfast. The tantalizing aroma of freshly baked bread floated through the narrow alleyways tickling our olfactory senses and would bring us running. We would scamper through the twists and turns, up and down centuries-old worn steps, until we arrived, panting, at the back door of the boulangerie. I don’t know that we ever went into the shop itself. We always got our bread directly from the baker in the cavernous room that housed his ovens and wood. The baker, a jovial man, dressed in his whites and dusted with a fine coating of flour, would always shout “Bonjour, les enfants!” (Good morning, children) as we tumbled into his kitchen. We would watch, mesmerized, as he took a huge wooden paddle off the brick-lined wall and opened the ovens to pull out the freshly baked loaves. We would stand transfixed as loaf after loaf would emerge from the massive ovens and listen as the crusts crackled as they started to cool. The challenge was to try and make it back to the house without breaking off the end of the baguette or chewing an ear off of a croissant. We failed every time. So what is it about that aroma that is just so tantalizing? This one aroma that can make me think of home, will always make me smile and start a kaleidoscope of images in my mind—documenting past decades of travel highlighted by delicious morsels of bread. This


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my children squirmed on the ends of my arms. The baker’s wife cleared her throat to bring me out of my reverie. “Madame?’ she inquired, as if to ask if I had not momentarily lost my mind as I stood there gulping the air in the middle of her neatly appointed establishment. Regaining my senses, I promptly bought a fougasse, pain au chocolat for the kids, and a delicate ficelle. The children happily chomped on their treats as we continued our stroll through the village. “Wasn’t the smell of that bread incredible!?” I mused. They looked at me in a way only children can —Mum’s gone mad. I waxed lyrical about the bread, the crust, the crunch, the delicate flavor of the crumb, the give in the bread as I squeezed it. They were spectacularly nonplussed. Fast forward 10 years. I was—through the-mostappropriate-auction-item-ever purchased by my mum—given the opportunity to learn how to make bread in the style of Tartine, Chad Robertson’s renowned bakery in San Francisco. On day two of this bread intensive, my good friend John turned up at a somewhat unearthly 4am to show me how to shape and bake the bread. I should add at this point that making bread this way is a labor of love and not something to be rushed. Starters are nourished, fed and nurtured with the same care and attention as is a newborn. Some bakers I know have traveled with their starters lest something should happen to them unattended. Using a bloomed starter, mixing it into the warm water, adding the bread flour and watching the ensuing transformation is absolutely magical—every time. The dough, once it has risen, is soft and pillow-like. The surface is smooth and delicate, and I find that I treat the dough with reverence as I caress it into shape. I was apprehensive that morning as John, my mother and I placed the dough into the hot cast-iron Dutch ovens. Would the bread rise? Would it have that crust? Was it possible to re-create that type of bread at home? Forty minutes later came the moment of truth. The bread emerged from the oven golden brown; it made the tell-tale hollow sound as we knocked on the bottom of the loaf; and best of all, THAT aroma flooded the kitchen as we open the oven door. Oh my, oh my, oh my! It practically made me jump up and down—shades of that little girl running through the cobblestone streets all those years ago. As a result of that baking class, I launched into a four-month bread-making extravaganza, sometimes baking twice a day, testing all manner of fillings. One morning, my now-teenage daughter emerged from her bedroom, rubbing the sleep from her eyes. “MUM, Mum!” she cried, “It’s THAT smell!” “What are you talking about?’” I teased. “THAT smell of fresh bread—just like when we were in France. Remember when you dragged us into that bakery and just stood there! Don’t you remember?’ And I thought it hadn’t registered. Yet 10 years later she recalled with crystal clarity the day on the bakery steps. That is bread’s magical power. It makes you smile. It makes you remember. It is simple, yet complex. It is good and nourishing. All of this in a loaf of freshly baked bread. 64 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

d Note: Thankfully, bread making has enjoyed a renaissance in the past decade and there are plenty of good places to get some really excellent bread. Bob’s Well Bread in Los Alamos uses some of the same techniques as Tartine and his bread is excellent. If you find yourself in Los Angeles it’s worth making a trip to Republique and Gjusta. If you are interested in baking your own bread, stop by the Piedrassasi stand at the Saturday Santa Barbara Farmers Market. They often have freshly milled flour from locally grown wheat and wild yeast starter.

RECIPE Pluot Bruschetta There is a lovely French word, l’apéro (short for apéritif ), which means an informal, relaxed get-together for nibbles and a drink. An apéro can last 30 minutes or two hours. It precedes dinner and always involves light, tasty morsels to munch on, some wine or perhaps a kir, a pastis or other drink. The nibbles often consist of olives, tiny tomatoes, saucisson, a good pâté, crackers and perhaps some small crostini or bruschetta. We are all apéro aficionados in my family. In the summer, we used to gather under the plane trees outside our old farmhouse, play boules and while away an hour or so as the sun dipped below the horizon. Friends would drop by, sit on the old stone well, watch the game at hand and catch up on the day’s events before going on to supper. It is one of my favorite times of day. I made this whilst dreaming of my next apéro in Provence. Makes 8 appetizer servings 8 pluots, halved, pitted and diced 4 green onions, ends trimmed and finely sliced 2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped 4 tablespoons olive oil 4 tablespoons basil, finely chopped 6 large or 16 small slices of olive bread, toasted 3 ounces goat cheese Black pepper

In a medium-sized bowl, combine the pluots, green onions, chives, olive oil and basil. Toss to coat well. Place the toasts on a serving platter. Spread the toasts with the goat cheese. Spoon the pluot mixture on top and grind some fresh black pepper on each bruschetta. Serve immediately.


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RECIPE Fig Tapenade Crostini with a Watercress Salad This is what you make when you have either too many figs or too many ripe figs. Olives and figs are oddly wonderful together—it’s that whole salty-sweet thing that can work so well. You can also serve the crostini as an appetizer. Makes 8 servings FOR THE CROSTINI

F R I E N D S • F L O W E R S • F A M I LY • F O O D • F U N

Enjoy Summer at the

1 cup black olives, pitted 1 teaspoon capers 1 clove garlic, chopped Juice and zest of 1 lemon 8 –10 fresh figs (depending on size) Salt and pepper Olive oil 1

7 Markets • 6 Days a Week Rain or Shine

⁄ 2 bunch chives, finely chopped

Baguette or ciabatta, cut into thin slices and toasted

Place the olives, capers, garlic, lemon juice and zest and figs in a food processor and pulse until you have a coarse tapenade.

What’s in your basket this week?

Drizzle a little olive oil onto each slice of toast and spoon some of the tapenade onto the toasts. Sprinkle the tops of each crostini with some of the chopped chives. FOR THE SALAD 3 tablespoons olive oil Juice of 1 lemon

S AT U R D AY S

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Salt and pepper

Downtown Santa Barbara

Camino Real Marketplace

Corner of Santa Barbara & Cota Street 8:30am – 1:00pm

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 10:00am – 2:00pm

4 – 6 ounces watercress (use some watercress microgreens too if you can find them) 24 small green figs, halved

Whisk the olive oil and lemon juice together in a small bowl. Season with a little salt and pepper. Divide the watercress greens between 8 plates and arrange the figs on top of the greens. Drizzle with the vinaigrette. Place 2 or 3 crostini onto each plate and serve.

W E D N E S D AY S

T U E S D AY S

Solvang Village

Old Town Santa Barbara

Copenhagen Drive & 1st Street 2:30pm – 6:30pm

500 & 600 Blocks of State Street 4:00pm – 7:30pm

F R I D AY S

T H U R S D AY S

Montecito

Camino Real Marketplace

100 & 1200 Block of Coast Village Road 8:00am – 11:15am

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 3:00pm – 6:00pm

Carpinteria Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons and Salade. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

800 Block of Linden Avenue 3:00pm – 6:30pm

facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket

www.sbfarmersmarket.org (805) 962-5354

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SWUIM NM T EERR EEDDI IBBLLEE EEVVEENNTTSS S AT U R D AY

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JUNE

JUNE

JUNE

Un WINEd Saturday Concert Series

Santa Barbara Wine Festival

Edible Santa Barbara New Issue Release Party

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1–4pm at Foley Estate Vineyard & Winery in Lompoc Enjoy stunning views and pair food and wine by Foley, while relaxing to live music. Ongoing. For more information call 805 737-6222 or email tastingrooom@foleywines.com.

2–5pm at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History The 2016 Santa Barbara Wine Festival will take place along the banks of Mission Creek. Mingle with winemakers, bakers and chefs while enjoying the sunshine. Experience the best of Central Coast Wines at this festival. For tickets and more info visit SBnature.org.

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5–7pm at Barbareño in Santa Barbara Join us as we celebrate the release of the Summer issue of Edible Santa Barbara on the patio at Barbareño. Featuring barbequed Cuban pork sandwiches, sides, wine, beer and other refreshments. Free to attend; food and beverages for purchase. More info at EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

M O N D AY

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Valley Piggery Whole-Hog Roast

Winemaker Dinner at Pico with Foxen Winery

Sample Foods from the Curry House at Nectar

11am–6pm at Refugio Ranch in Los Olivos

Pico at the Los Alamos General Store 458 Bell St., Los Alamos

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Come celebrate Independence Day with a pig roast and fixin’s brought to you by Valley Piggery, with wine specials by the glass and bottle. Find more info at RefugioRanch.com.

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A great opportunity to meet Foxen Winery’s Dick and Jenny Doré, who will be on hand to pour and talk you through the wines table side as you enjoy a 3-course dinner created by Chef Drew Terp. Call 805 344-1122 for dinner reservations. LosAlamosGeneralStore.com

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5–8pm at Nectar Eatery & Lounge Come in for a delicious preview of foods from the Curry House at Nectar. Aparna Sherman will give a talk and demo on the proper use of spices in cooking and for health. Free to attend; more info at NectarSB.com/events.

F R I D AY

S U N D AY

F R I D AY

JULY

JULY

JULY

Mexican Fiesta Cooking Class

Cake Decorating Cooking Class

Sunset Reserve & Rare Wine Tasting

6:30 –9:30pm at HEAT Culinary

1–4pm at HEAT Culinary

A Friday night cooking up California Mexican favorites: homemade tortillas and tortilla chips; Fresno chili hot sauce; fish tacos with cabbage and jicama slaw; grilled Mexican caesar salad with avocado dressing; arbol chili rice. $65. For more info visit HeatCulinary.com

HEAT provides the cake, filling, frosting and tools and you learn and practice the technique. Covers: torting, filling, covering and stacking (two-tier cake production), sugarpaste (fondant), flower paste design, piping (basket-weave, round tips, dots, star, petal and leaf). $65. For more info visit HeatCulinary.com

Taste some of California’s best reserve and rare wines as part of the California Wine Festival. These limited tickets offer samples from Santa Barbara County, Napa, Sonoma and more. $15.39; for tickets and more information visit CaliforniaWineFestival.com.

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6:30–9pm, at Chase Palm Park Plaza in Santa Barbara

S AT U R D AY

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JULY

JULY

JULY

JULY

Los Alamos Third Saturday Evening Stroll

The Santa Barbara French Festival

Vegan Tapas y Tapas Cooking Class

Organic Alquimia Tequila Tasting

5– 8pm at downtown Los Alamos

11am–7pm at Oak Park in Santa Barbara

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The Los Alamos merchants on Bell Street invite everyone to experience Los Alamos community charm first-hand with its new Third Saturdays program. Ongoing. For more information call 805 344-1900.

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Celebrate Bastille Day weekend with crepes, pastries, wine, mimosas, entertainment and more. Sign up for a raffle for the chance to win a French getaway. The event is free and familyfriendly. Visit FrenchFestival.com for more info.

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6 –9pm at The Food Liaison Learn to make warm creamy grits with blistered tomatoes and sunflower tahini; roasted romanesco with treviso and miso aioli; and portobello carpaccio. Taste teasers include fried baby artichokes, marinated olive platter and crispy chickpeas. $85; purchase tickets at TheFoodLiaison.com.

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6 –7:30pm at Nectar Eatery & Lounge Enjoy a great presentation by organic Alquimia owner and taste three great tequilas paired with delicious Mexican food. $45; more info at NectarSB.com/ events.


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com W E D N E S D AY – S U N D AY

F R I D AY

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AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

Carpinteria First Friday

In the Vineyard & On the Farm Dinner

3–7

Old Spanish Days Fiesta

A U GUST

A celebration of Santa Barbara’s heritage, through music, parades, fiestas, dancing and family events. Serious foodies frequent the mercado at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church with its wide array of authentic Mexican cuisine and entertainment. Full listing of events can be found at OldSpanishDays-Fiesta.org.

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5–8pm Friday, held around Carpinteria Spend the first Friday of every month discovering Carpinteria’s quaint shops, locally brewed beer, live entertainment, sweet deals, delicious food and art walks.

4:30pm at the Bernat Vineyard, Los Olivos

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AUGUST

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Summer Canning Cooking Class

Summer Farmers Market Dinner Cooking Class

Buttonwood All Farm Dinner

6–9pm at The Food Liaison

Starting with appetizers, Buttonwood’s farm-to-table feast takes place pond-side in the middle of their 39-acre vineyard. Taste farm-raised meat, fruits and vegetables with award-winning Buttonwood wines; everything on the table raised, grown and produced on Buttonwood Farm. For reservations call 805 688-3032.

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1–4pm at HEAT Culinary Learn how to capture the summer season through canning. The class will cover apricot honey, cherry with fresh basil, peach sauternes jam and pickled summer squash and peppers. $65. For more info visit HeatCulinary.com

Dine with Bernat winemaker Sam Marmorstein where wine starts—the vines. The farm-based menu created by Los Olivos Café’s Chris Joslyn will accompany Bernat Wines. $125; reservations required.To reserve your seat visit LosOlivosCafe.com and click on the event “Special Event” tab.

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Prepare meals with a farm box filled with the surprise of a variety of seasonal produce from Shepherd Farm, and take an unopened Farm Box home to practice with. Savor pork raised by Casitas Valley Farm and sip craft beer from Smoke Mountain Brewery. $125; visit TheFoodLiaison.com for more info.

5:30pm at Buttonwood Winery, Solvang

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AUGUST

AUGUST

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AUGUST

Solvang Third Wednesday

Interactive Vineyard Tour and Tasting

Under the Harvest Sun

Julia Child Favorites Cooking Class

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3–7pm in downtown Solvang Stroll through the lively streets of Solvang while tasting at five participating wine or beer tasting rooms. $20 includes the tastings, a specialty logo glass and a map to help you navigate your way through all the fun. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit SolvangThirdWednesday.com.

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9:30am–noon at Zaca Mesa Winery in Los Olivos Join wine educator Dane Cook on an interactive exploration of the Zaca Mesa Vineyard. Sample grapes from the vines as you learn the characteristics that influence picking decisions. A catered lunch and tasting is included. $75; visit ZacaMesa. com for more information.

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3:30pm at Nesbitt Polo Estate in Summerland Summerland Winery’s annual fundraising event to support the Summerland School and Just Imagine It. Enjoy a polo match followed by an evening of wine, dining and dancing. There will also be a silent auction. Tickets available at SummerlandWine.com.

6:30–9pm at Heat Culinary Cook through Julia Child’s cookbook The French Chef cookbook while sipping a good glass of wine. Learn to make traditional endive and beet salad; cassoulet; roast duck in orange sauce with scalloped potatoes au gratin and souffle a l’orange. $65. For more info visit HeatCulinary.com

S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

Santa Barbara Fermentation Festival

Supper for Third Saturday

OCAF Chalk Festival

5:30 & 7:30pm at Bell Street Farm in Los Alamos

10am–5pm at Orcutt Union Plaza in Old Town Orcutt

Bell Street Farm’s monthly four-course, family-style supper includes a charcuterie plate, antipasto, rotisserie chicken with accompanying vegetables, and dessert. $44 per person, not including beverages, tax or gratuity. Two seatings, 5:30 and 7:30. 805 344-4609; BellStreetFarm.com

Enjoy a day of chalk artists, live performances, food from artisan vendors, art activities for the children and more. This is the fifth year the Orcutt Children’s Art Foundation is hosting the free admission event. For more information visit OrcuttArts.com/ chalk-festival

11

S E PT E MBER

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11am–5pm at Rancho La Patera & Stow House in Goleta The 6th annual festival focuses on microbiome and glyphosate research and features four education stages; hands-on demos; health and science experts; exhibitors, food tastings; DIY Pickle Station; kids program; and a 21+ Farm-toBar Area. SBFermentationFestival.com.

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 69


edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

E AT DRINK LOC AL GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food tradition and lifestyle. We’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Restaurant 2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and award winning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Restaurant one of the most sought after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976.

The Hitching Post II 406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving wood-grilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

Carpinteria The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd. 805 200-3030 TheFoodLiaison.com Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing many locally grown organic ingredients, enjoy daily rotating entrées and soups, seasonal menu, and gourmet salad bar. Corporate and event catering since 2013. Sign up for cooking classes online. Lunch Counter Mon–Fri 11am–3pm. 70 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Giannfranco’s Trattoria

Backyard Bowls

666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com

5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com

Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm; closed Tue.

Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

HEAT Culinary

115 E. College Ave., Ste. 10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com

4642 Carpinteria Ave. 805 242-1151 HeatCulinary.com Santa Barbara County’s culinary school, food truck and full service caterer. HEAT events are known for personalized service, organic ingredients, large portions and attention to detail. Offering originality and undivided attention to create a memorable event.

Sly’s 686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat–Sun 9am–3pm.

Goleta Bacara Resort & Spa 8301 Hollister Ave. 844 276-0955 BacaraResort.com Nestled on the bluff and beaches of the Gaviota coast, Bacara offers relaxed luxury and incomparable natural beauty. Additional features include a four-story spa, wellness center, zero-edge saline swimming pools, restaurants, lounges and tasting room.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods

High quality local & imported specialty foods, including charcuterie, gourmet cheeses, a fullservice deli, exotic meats (alligator, wild boar, bison and more), specialty foods from around the world, and local beers and wines. Catering available; small intimate affairs to large special events. Open MonWed 10am–6pm, Thu–Fri 10am–7pm, Sat 10am–6pm and Sun 10am–4pm.

Foley Estates 6121 E. Hwy. 246 805 737-6222 FoleyWines.com Foley Estates Vineyard & Winery is the realization of vintner Bill Foley’s dream to produce world class Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Syrah in Santa Barbara County. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Longoria Wines 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866-759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria Wines is a small family-owned winery producing acclaimed artisanal wines from some of the finest vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Visit their tasting room in Los Olivos at 2935 Grand Avenue, daily 11am–4:30pm or at their new winery and tasting room in Lompoc at 415 E. Chestnut Avenue, open Friday through Sunday 11am–4:30pm.


Scratch Kitchen

Casa Dumetz

610 N. H. St. 805 819-0829 Scratch-Kitchen.com

388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com

With a wealth of local and seasonal produce and local wines, Scratch Kitchen aims to highlight all the best culinary elements of the Lompoc and Santa Ynez Valleys. Open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Saturday 11am–9pm, brunch Sunday 10am–2pm, and Sunday dinner 5pm–9pm.

A boutique winery specializing in Rhone varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Los Alamos Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. 805 344-1911 BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hard-to-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Craft Kitchen's weekly small plate specials. Thu 4–8pm, Fri–Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon-6pm.

Bell Street Farm Eatery & Market 406 Bell St. 805 344-4609 BellStreetFarm.com This cozy and delicious eatery is surrounded by gorgeous vineyards and farmland. Award-winning cuisine and sophisticated yet comfortable design, a distinctive environment to enjoy a meal, snack or wine tasting for residents and visitors alike. Assemble your own picnic baskets and accessories for creating a portable meal, as well as gifts and merchandise from local artisans and some of the best of California. Thu and Mon 11am–4pm, Fri–Sun 11am–5pm.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com Bob’s Well Bread is about great bread, made the oldfashioned way—handcrafted in small batches and baked to perfection in a custom-built, stone-deck oven. Stop by their bakery for baguettes, croissants, bagels and more. Closed Tue and Wed.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com On weekends Full of Life Flatbread converts their production flatbread bakery space into a restaurant and offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm; Sun brunch 11am–2pm.

Martian Ranch & Vineyard 9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Taste their estate grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-this-world experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends. Enjoy wines by the glass, bocce court, horse shoe pit and dog friendly picnic areas.

Pico at The General Store 458 Bell St. 805 344-1122 LosAlamosGeneralStore.com Pico at The Los Alamos General Store brings a new culinary, wine and shopping experience to "Little LA", in the heart of Santa Barbara's Wine Country.

Plenty on Bell 508 Bell St. 805 344-2111 PlentyOnBell.com Long-time Los Alamos chef and local favorite Jesper Johansson is back in the kitchen at Plenty on Bell, serving local, seasonal food for lunch, seven days a week.

Los Olivos Alta Maria Vineyards 2933 Grand Ave., Ste. A 805 686-1144 AltaMaria.com Striving to make the best wine possible in a conscious manner, Alta Maria Vineyards utilizes organic and sustainable techniques along with conventional methods that leave no indelible mark on the people, places and products around them. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm. Native9 is offered for sale daily and can be tasted during Heritage Tastings.

The Brander Vineyard 2401 N. Refugio Rd. 805 688-2455 Brander.com Established in 1975, The Brander Vineyard is one of the oldest and most distinguished wineries in the Santa Barbara County. Founder Fred Brander has dedicated himself to making exceptional block designates of estate Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon that push the quality envelope for Bordeaux style wines. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Global Gardens 2450 Alamo Pintado Rd. 800 307-0447 GlobalGardensOnline.com Global Gardens is Santa Barbara County’s premier certified organic extra-virgin olive oil producer. Visit their demonstration farm and tasting bar for their signature tasting palette of over 12 tastings, education, worldly recipes and more. Fri–Sun 10am–4pm or by appointment.

Los Olivos Wine Merchant & Café

2879 Grand Ave. 805 688-7265 LosOlivosCafe.com Bringing together the best flavors of the Central Coast. Their award-winning wine list offers over 500 wines to enjoy with their fresh, seasonal and local cuisine, or to enjoy at home. Open for lunch and dinner daily 11:30am–8:30pm (8pm Sun) and breakfast Sat–Sun 8–10:30am.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 71


Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, the family-owned winery has been dedicated to crafting some of Santa Barbara County’s most distinctive wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm.

Montecito American Riviera Bank

Santa Barbara Backyard Bowls 3849 State St. 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Il Fustino 3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

525 San Ysidro Rd. 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com

3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com

Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Bree’Osh 1150 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-2500 Breeosh.com Bree’Osh is a French artisan bakery café specializing in sweet and savory brioche bread made with traditional sourdough. Featuring local, organic, high quality ingredients. Open 7am–3pm. Closed Mondays.

Here’s The Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s The Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan. Mon– Thu 1-9pm, Fri-Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm.

Montecito Country Mart 1016 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-9664 MontecitoCountryMart.com The Montecito Country Mart, built in 1964, has recently been renovated and preserved, with its original barber shop, post office, market, old fashioned toy store, as well as Rori’s Ice Cream and Merci to Go artisan food shop. Independent boutique shops include Mate Gallery, Kendal Conrad, Calypso, Intermix, Malia Mills, Hudson Grace, James Perse and Space NK Apothecary. Shops open Mon–Fri 10am-6pm; Sat–Sun 10am-5pm.

Tecolote Bookstore 1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977 Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon– Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun. 72 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

Whole Foods Market 3761 State St. 805 837-6959 WholeFoodsMarket.com Founded in 1980 in Austin, Texas, Whole Foods Market, a leader in the natural and organic foods industry and America’s first national certified organic grocer, was named “America’s Healthiest Grocery Store” in 2008 by Health magazine.

Santa Barbara (Downtown) 805 Boba 651 Paseo Nuevo #213 805 845-5655 805Boba.com 805 Boba offers authentic Taiwanese “bubble” tea with a local twist. Featuring fresh local fruit, hand crafted syrups, tea, tapioca pearls and many other options, 805 Boba strives to provide the best quality slushes, smoothies, and tea in Santa Barbara. Ask about their Farmers Market Edition boba featuring seasonal produce from the Santa Barbara Farmers Market.

Alchemy Arts Café 35 W. Haley St. 805 899-8811 AlchemyWellnessSpa.com Offering a dynamic menu that evolves with the seasons, Alchemy Arts Café strives to provide more nourishment, value, grace, and excitement to your

dining experience. The chefs and wellness team work in tandem to design recipes, elixirs, food and juice cleansing programs to support your health goals. Available evenings for private parties and special events. Open 9am–5pm except first Thursday of each month 9am–8pm.

American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library is known for world class Chardonnays and Pinots, Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available. Open noon–6pm daily.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Barbareño 205 W. Canon Perdido 805 963-9591 Barbareno.com Offering a casual approach to the classic California tavern, highlighting the traditions and specialties of the Central Coast and its many outstanding purveyors. Sit inside and enjoy the enticing atmosphere of an open kitchen, or outside on the patio alongside the Santa Maria grill. Bar menu available Mon–Fri 5–6:30pm, dinner nightly 5:30–9:30pm.

Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “asfresh-and-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.

C’est Cheese 825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Mon–Sat 7am–6pm; Sun 8am–3pm.


Destination Maps 3.22 Miles From Hwy 101

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Santa Barbara 1. The Lark Santa Barbara, The Lucky Penny, Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant, Santa Barbara Wine Collective 2. Riverbench Winery 3. Municipal Winemakers 4. Lucky Lama 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB 6. Chocolate Maya 7. Alchemy Arts Café 8. Grapeseed Co. 9. 805 Boba 10. Barbareño 11. Scarlett Begonia 12. Bouchon Santa Barbara 13. SB Public Market, Il Fustino 14. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 15. Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 16. Sama Sama 17. Isabella Gourmet Foods, Cebada Vineyards Tasting Room

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Ca’ Dario Pizzeria

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams

29 E. Victoria St. 805 957-2020 CaDarioPizza.net

728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com

Located just steps away from Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery, Ca’ Dario Pizzeria offers a casual, urban atmosphere to enjoy authentic pizzas, salads and appetizers. The 30-seat restaurant boasts a welcoming bar, perfect for enjoying local or Italian beers on tap. Open for lunch Mon–Sat 11:30am–2:30pm; dinner Mon–Sun 5–9:30pm.

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: from scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year, sweet legacy of keeping it real.

Cebada Vineyard & Winery 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 735-4648 CebadaWine.com Cebada vinifies estate-grown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. This boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundian style wines. Enjoy their hand-crafted vertical wine tasting in La Arcada Plaza.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya scours the world for pure, luscious chocolates and offers incredible savory bars, truffles, bonbons and gift baskets as well as a wide choice of organic and fair-trade chocolate products. Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat 10am–5pm; Sun 10am–4pm.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm; Sat 10–5pm; closed Sun.

Il Fustino 38 W. Victoria St. 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Isabella Gourmet Foods 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 585-5257 IsabellaGourmetFoods.com A boutique artisan grocery combining the downhome charm of an East Coast general store with an upscale West Coast setting and featuring locally made small-batch foods. Open Mon–Fri 9am–6pm; Sat 10am–6pm; Sun 11am–5pm.

Margerum Wine Company 813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com Committed to creating handcrafted wines using only the highest-quality grapes to make wines that are indicative of the place where they are grown. Two tasting rooms located in the historic El Paseo complex: Margerum Tasting Room and MWC32, which features reserve and limited production wines. Open daily noon–6pm with the last tasting at 5:30pm.

Nectar Eatery & Lounge 20 E. Cota St. 805 899-4694 NectarSB.com Offering great small plates with ethnic notes that pair beautifully with local wines and fine cocktails. Enjoy special items on Meatless Mondays, Tequila Tuesdays and Wine Wednesdays along with their regular menu. Host your private party in the romantic lounge upstairs. Open 5–10pm for dinner; drinks until 2am.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 137 Anacapa St., Suite C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 11am–6pm daily.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia will always strive to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Open for dinner and cocktail hour Tue– Sat 4–9pm, breakfast and lunch Tue–Sun 9am–2pm.

The Wine Cask 813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com

Santa Barbara (Funk Zone) Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. 805 880-3364 LamaDog.com Craft beer tap room and bottle shop located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu–Sat 11:30am–midnight.

The Lark 131 Anacapa St., Ste. A (805) 284-0370 TheLarkSB.com The Lark, Santa Barbara’s premier dining destination, features locally sourced seasonal ingredients celebrating the abundant bounty of the Central Coast. Meals are served family-style with handcrafted cocktails and an extensive wine list to complement Chef Jason Paluska’s creations. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant

131 Anacapa St., Ste. B 805 284-0380 LesMarchandsWine.com Les Marchands is a European-style wine bar and retail shop with a world-class team of sommeliers providing unique experiences in wine, food and education. With an extensive wine list, Les Marchands offers something for anyone. Open Sun-Thu 11am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm.

Santa Barbara Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 456-2700 SantaBarbaraWineCollective.com Santa Barbara Wine Collective is a downtown tasting room for five local like-minded producers focusing on Santa Barbara County’s unique terroir. Wines are available for tastings, by the glass or bottle or to take home. Open Sun–Wed Noon–7pm; Fri–Sat Noon-8pm.

Santa Barbara (Mesa) Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm; Sun 7am–10pm.

MESAVERDE 1919 Cliff Dr. 805 963-4474 MesaverdeRestaurant.com MESAVERDE, a plant-based restaurant in Santa Barbara, fuses Mediterranean flavors and fresh ingredients to establish a taste reaching beyond simple expectations. They offer locally sourced produce and raw vegan desserts. House-made kombucha, cold-pressed juices and almond milk are made daily.

The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 75


Santa Maria Cambria Estate Winery 5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com

eat. drink. read. think.

Family-owned, sustainably-farmed, estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com

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5391 Presquile Dr. 805 937-8110 PresquileWine.com Presqu’ile is a small, family-run winery dedicated to making exceptional cool-climate Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Situated on a hilltop, with ocean and vineyard views, Presqu'ile offers one of the most sunning and memorable Central Coast wine tasting experiences. Open Sat–Tue 11am–5pm, Fri 11am–6pm.

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Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com

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The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open 11am–4pm daily.

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Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 10am–4pm daily.

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Subscribe Online Today EdibleSantaBarbara.com For more information email us at info@EdibleSantaBarbara.com

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The Lucky Hen Larder/Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company 1095 Meadowvale Rd. Santa Ynez 805 691-9448 TheLuckyHenLarder.com The Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company is the only “cut-to-order” cheese shop in the SY Valley. The shop features over 100 artisan and farmstead cheeses as well as Lucky Hen Larder proprietary goods and picnic items and hand-crafted sandwiches daily. Open Mon– Sat 10am –5pm; Sun 10am–4pm.

Rancho Olivos 2390 Refugio Rd. 805 686-9653 RanchoOlivos.com Located in beautiful Santa Ynez, Rancho Olivos creates distinctively fresh artisan extra-virgin olive oils from their sustainably grown Italian and Spanish varietals of olives. Open for olive oil tasting daily noon–4pm.


SY Kitchen 1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com Modern Northern Italian dishes showcasing local ingredients in an inviting farmhouse in the heart of Santa Ynez. Chef Luca Crestanelli's specialties include home-made pastas; wood-fired pizzas, and oak-grilled chicken, lamb chops and steak. Dazzling cocktails are crafted by Alberto Battaglini. Dinner nightly from 5pm; lunch Wed–Sat 11:30am–2:30pm; Italian Breakfast Sun 10am–2pm.

Solvang Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

First & Oak 409 1st St., Solvang, 93463 805 688-1703 FirstAndOak.com Local, sustainable, organic. Offering an array of complex plates emphasizing flavor and finesse. California eclectic, utilizing French technique and inspiration from world travels. The seasonal plates are designed for creating your own tasting menu, paired with a hand-selected sommelier’s wine list.

Lincourt Vineyards 1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-8554 LincourtWines.com Lincourt Vineyard is the perfect stop for a picnic in wine country. Stop by our tasting room to sample our estate grown Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Gruner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, and Chardonnay open daily 10am–5pm.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Comfort food with a twist, prepared with seasonal and local, farm fresh ingredients. The best charcuterie plates around feature farm fresh cheeses, housemade jams, pickled veggies, nuts and fruit. Great local wine, craft beer and signature cocktails. Breakfast/ Lunch: weekdays (except Tues) 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8:30am–3pm. Dinner: Wed–Mon 5–9pm.

Summerland Summerland Winery 2330 Lillie Ave. 805 565-9463 SummerlandWine.com Founded in 2002, a boutique winery dedicated to the production of fine wines from the Central Coast of California. Focused on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay varietals, the winemaker also dabbles in expressive Rhône and Bordeaux iterations. An inviting, relaxed atmosphere in the seaside village of Summerland, California. Open 11am–6pm, Fri until 9pm.

Source Guide Bragg Live Food Products Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Dave’s Garage 650 Easy St. Simi Valley 805 306-1174 DavesGarage-HotRodShop.com Mentored by one of the finest car builders and designers in the business, Dave specializes in classic restorations, complete custom builds, fabrication, modifications and collision repairs of pre-1975 vehicles. Dave’s Garage recently moved into a new 8,000 square foot shop and showroom with products for do-ityourselfers.

Drake Family Farms DrakeFamilyFarms.com Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

The Food Archivist 805 234-3069 Facebook.com/TheFoodArchivist The Food Archivist is a multimedia recipe document that celebrates the family foodie experience by preserving family recipes through interviews, photography and video. Preserve the recipes you have come to love and celebrate and honor the loved ones who have touched your life and cooked your favorite recipes all these years. Pass the recipe, please!

Giffin & Crane General Contractors 805 966-6401 GiffinAndCrane.com At Giffin & Crane General Contractors, Inc., each project is unique, whether it’s a simple remodel or an extraordinary architectural estate. Working closely with their clients to fulfill their clients’ dreams, they are committed to providing the best workmanship, on time and in budget.

Harvest Santa Barbara 805 696-6930 HarvestSantaBarbara.com Delivering freshly harvested wholesale produce— sourced directly from local family farms to schools, restaurants, hospitals and retail businesses. Their mission is to be the catalyst for a healthier, more sustainable food system by strengthening the ties between farmers and the community.

Hollandia Produce 805 684-4146 LiveGourmet.com GrowerPetes.com Hollandia Produce is a family owned and operated agricultural business specializing in hydroponically greenhouse grown vegetables. Located in Carpinteria, California, the company grows, ships and distributes its certified organic label Grower Pete’s, and its Live Gourmet line of products, which are harvested with their roots intact to preserve freshness.

Jimenez Family Farm 805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Morris Grassfed 831 623-2933 MorrisGrassfed.com Providing 100% grassfed and finished beef to customers throughout California. Processed in USDA inspected facilities , cut and wrapped by small-scale artisan butchers and delivered directly at pre-arranged delivery locations throughout the year. Family owned, they practice holistic management on the rangelands they manage.

Niman Ranch

11990 Grant St. Northglenn, CO 80233 NimanRanch.com Niman Ranch is committed to providing the finest tasting humanely and sustainably raised pork, beef and lamb raised by independent family farmers and ranchers. No antibiotics—ever, no added hormones— ever, all vegetarian feeds and raised outdoors or in deeply bedded pens.

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market 805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Seven markets, six days a week. See schedule on page 67.

Valle Fresh 805 865-2282 ValleFresh.com Specializing in hand-crafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans, Valle Fresh is a family owned catering company that has a zeal for the food and services we provide. Chef Conrad Gonzales offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa pork. Try our new Mangalitsa Nduja (mangalitsa salami paste) infused with Palmina Nebbiolo wine. Order online at our Mangalitsa Market, or buy at Palmina tasting room. Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.US) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2016 | 77


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The Last Bite Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

Caramelized Grilled Watermelon Salad at The Black Sheep Is there anything more delicious than cold, ripe watermelon in the heat of summer? Well, yes, actually. When Chef Robert Perez sears watermelon, caramelizing it for this summer dish at The Black Sheep, the iconic red and green fruit is transformed. And it becomes even more delicious. Chef Perez’s style of cooking is to take fresh ingredients and transform them into a whole new taste sensation—all while sticking to a base of traditional cooking. This recipe was born out of his grandmother’s famous pickled watermelon rinds. He fondly remembers eating the rinds during his childhood in the South, and regrets that he never recorded the recipe. He tested many recipes to finally get the magic combination for his Picked Watermelon Rind, served with spare ribs or as part of a pickled plate at his new restaurant next door to The Black Sheep, the aptly named Oveja Blanca (White Sheep). The fruit left over is not wasted and becomes a grilled, savory-fruity summer salad at The Black Sheep. To make the salad, Chef Perez starts with a local, ripe watermelon and cuts it into 3-inch-long rectangles, 1 inch thick—with rind and seeds removed. Sprinkle the watermelon with olive oil, salt and pepper. Make sure the grill is very hot and then place the watermelon on the grill for 2 to 3 minutes to get some nice grill marks. Then, turn it over to about a minute, just to warm the other side.

LIZ DODDER

On a plate, spread some basil oil (or basil-infused olive oil) and then drizzle it with red wine syrup (made by heating 2 parts red wine, 1 part vinegar, 1 part sugar and some rosemary). Top with tomato concassé (blanched, peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes), toasted pistachios and micro basil.

80 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2016

Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com


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Edible Santa Barbara Summer 2016  

Celebrating the local food and wine of Santa Barbara County.

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