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ISSUE 31 • FALL 2016

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday ISSUE

The Papaya Man Santa Ynez AVA Cottage Industry L O YA L T O L O C A L


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SANTA BAR BAR A

E VAN JANKE

OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER

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®

page 24

page 34

Departments 8 Food for Thought

24 Drinkable Landscape

by Krista Harris

Mulling Over the Mule by George Yatchisin

10 Small Bites Talking Turkey Fall Soup Time

Eat Local Challenge

Growing Onions by Joan S. Bolton

11 Eat Local This Fall

30 In Search of Bugs

13 In Season 14 Seafood Recipes Conrad’s Ceviche Seafood Risotto Bouillabaisse

20 Seasonal Recipe Homemade Marshmallows

22 Sweet Potatoes

4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

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Then and Now by Krista Harris

page 22

26 Edible Garden

Local California Spiny Lobster by Rosminah Brown

34 Social Baking A Sweet Way to Connect with Family and Friends by Ruth Von Eberstein

70 Event Calendar 80 The Last Bite Fall’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 5


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SANTA BAR BAR A

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OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER

44 Gettin’ Down with Papaya Man Damien Raquinio Brings Aloha to Santa Barbara

page 16

by Leslie A. Westbrook

Recipes in This Issue

52 The Grand Experiment The Wonder of the Santa Ynez Valley AVA

Appetizers and Salads

by Sonja Magdevski

60 Cottage Industry Starting Your Own Food Business by Janice Cook Knight 64 Holiday Feasts

by Pascale Beale

14 Conrad’s Ceviche 69 Meyer Lemon, Persimmon and Microgreen Salad

Main Dishes and Side Dishes 18 Bouillabaisse 32 California Spiny Lobster Roll 67 Duck Confit 66 Salmon Coulibiac 16 Seafood Risotto 23 Thanksgiving Sweet Potatoes

Cookies and Sweets 38 Classic Oatmeal Raisin 36 Exquisite Macaroons 20 Homemade Marshmallows 38 Thumbprints ABOUT THE COVER

At harvest time, Dick Doré of Foxen VIneyard & Winery holds a cluster of grapes from his vineyard in the Santa Ynez AVA. Photo by Carole Topalian.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Beverage 25 The Montecito Mule

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Features


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 7


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

ERIN FEINBL AT T

Fall Harvest and Holiday Issue Our fall issue this quarter covers quite a bit of ground—from October’s Eat Local Challenge to November’s Thanksgiving celebration and all the holidays in December. Harvest may start in the summer, but it usually runs through fall and wraps up just in time for the holidays. It never fails to feel like the last three months of the year go by faster than the preceding nine months. Maybe only a 5-year-old can feel like December lasts an eternity when waiting for the holidays. The rest of us finish Thanksgiving dinner and before we know it, we’re ringing in the New Year. One of the few places time ever seems to blissfully stand still is when we are gathered around the dinner table with good friends. Where there is good food, conversation and laughter, there are good times. After the clocks are set back and fall really sets in, I’m making an autumn resolution to savor those dinnertime moments. It’s also a good time to appreciate our local seasonal produce and seafood. Lobster and shrimp season starts in October. And it may be no coincidence that we hold our annual Eat Local Challenge October 1–31. It’s our eighth annual Eat Local Challenge and I hope some of you will join me in a pledge to eat local for a month. It’s a great way to learn more about what is in season and local to our area. You might be surprised to find out that papayas are locally grown, and you can read more about that in this issue. You can also find locally grown sweet potatoes, which are great for making those traditional Thanksgiving recipes. I was always in the camp that thought putting marshmallows on top of sweet potatoes was a culinary abomination, but then I started tinkering with making my own marshmallows. I was pretty excited to learn that you could make marshmallows with real marshmallow root. So this year, you’ll find me making a variation on my grandmother’s recipe for sweet potatoes with a marshmallow topping. And you can find the recipe in this issue’s Then and Now column. The month of December may fly by, but hopefully we can all appreciate the many celebrations and meals around the dinner table as the year draws to an end. Here’s to those celebrations and to looking forward to 2017.

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

Visit our website EdibleSantaBarbara.com Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest at Edible Santa Barbara and Twitter and Instagram at EdibleSB.

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

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SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHERS

Steven Brown & Krista Harris EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson Julie Simpson DESIGNER

Steven Brown ADVERTISING & EVENTS

Katie Hershfelt SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson

Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Rosminah Brown Janice Cook Knight Liz Dodder Erin Feinblatt Evan Janke Sonja Magdevski Nancy Oster Colin Quirt Carole Topalian Ruth Von Eberstein Leslie A. Westbrook George Yatchisin

Contact Us info@ediblesantabarbara.com

Advertising Inquiries ads@ediblesantabarbara.com Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

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Small Bites

What we’re eating this harvest and holiday season. by Krista Harris

Fall Soup Time There are few things in life more comforting than a bowl of homemade soup. But there are times when you just can’t make a pot of soup for yourself. Whether you are taking the Eat Local Challenge or just craving soup, we have found two great sources for ready-to-eat, delicious local soup. C’est Cheese now offers their tomato soup and their butternut squash soup in shelfstable jars so you can stock your pantry. Just heat and serve.

C AROLE TOPALIAN

You can also get ready-to-eat soup delivered by Los Olivos–based Soup Mama. Emily Harwell makes a variety of soups using local, seasonal ingredients. Soups can be ordered each week by the quart ($11–$15) and you can add on bread (from Baker’s Table) and other local treats.

Talking Turkey Looking for a local turkey? We found two ways you can get humanely raised, naturally fed turkeys from local farms. Marcie Jimenez of Jimenez Family Farm has been raising turkeys for the last three years. This year she is raising Broad Breasted Bronze turkeys as well as Spanish Black and Bourbon heritage breeds. You can also order a turkey from Nadia Van Wingerden of Sage Hill Farm in Carpinteria. She is raising Standard Bronze heritage breed turkeys, which will be $10 per pound. The most popular are 12–15 pounds. Turkeys from Jimenez Family Farm are typically $10 per pound and can be reserved at the beginning of November or earlier. Marcie also is raising chickens, and she may even have a few geese for Christmas. Just ask at the Jimenez Family Farm stand at Santa Barbara Farmers Market or visit JimenezFamilyFarm.com. You can place orders for Nadia’s turkeys at the Sage Hill Farm stand at the Saturday Santa Barbara Farmers Market. Nadia can tell you the details of how the turkeys are raised and even a few cooking tips for making the most of your heritage turkey.

10 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

C’est Cheese is located at 825 Santa Barbara St., Santa Barbara. The Cheese Shop is open Mon–Sat 8am–6pm, Sun 8am–3pm. 805 965-0318; CestCheese.com Soup Mama is available by delivery or pickup in Santa Ynez Valley. It’s also available as an add-on through Plow to Porch in Santa Barbara. ValleySoupMama.com e Santa Barba ibl ra Ed

Eat Local Challenge

Edible Santa Barbara is partnering with the Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market to sponsor an Eat Local Challenge for the CHALLENGE month of October. Now in OCTOBER 2016 its eighth year, the Challenge encourages people to take a personal pledge to eat and drink local products October 1–31. You can choose to eat only foods produced within a 100-mile or 150-mile radius of your home, or within the tri-county region, or within California. You can also decide if you are going to make any exceptions (such as coffee, tea or spices), but the idea is to try to stay as local as possible. Find out more at EdibleSantaBarbara.com and on the Edible Santa Barbara Facebook page


eat Localthis fall Eat Local Challenge

Local Produce

Beyond Produce

The Eat Local Challenge is a great way to encourage you to think about where your food comes from and to perhaps change the way you shop and the food you buy. You might start shopping more at the farmers market or at local farm stands. You might sign up for a local produce delivery service.

If you are participating in the Eat Local Challenge—and even if you’re not—now is a great time to seek out new local food products and to experience the wide variety of local produce that our area has to offer.

Eating local isn’t just about sourcing local fruits and vegetables. Try local meats and poultry, grass-fed beef, seafood, olive oil, nuts, raw milk, cheeses and butter, jams, preserves, bread and pasta. You can even find local convenience foods—jars of tomato sauce, salsa and peanut butter.

Start by buying or growing your own produce, then branch out with other ingredients. You will find yourself cooking from scratch more often and asking questions at restaurants. You can always make some exceptions (such as coffee, spices, eating out), but try to stay as local as possible. Resources: To find out more about the Eat Local Challenge, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com or join the Eat Local Challenge group on Facebook.

Fall is a great season to focus on buying more local produce. Many summer fruits and vegetables are still available and the cool-season produce is starting to come in as well. Whether you get hooked on shopping at the farmers market or you start seeking out local produce at the grocery store, co-op or farm stand, we have some tips to help you transition to a more local way of eating.

Some grocery stores identify local products with a special label on the shelves. Keep an eye out for these. And it might be a good time to visit a small specialty shop where you can ask for local food items.

Buy What’s In Season Check our In Season list for what you will typically find at the farmers market or grocery store during the fall. Don’t waste your time looking for cherries or fava beans. Instead enjoy the bounty of pomegranates, persimmons, apples and butternut squash. You can also see at a glance what is in season throughout the year with the innovative Southern California Food Wheel. Resources: Join a community-supported agriculture (CSA) harvest subscription service where you get a weekly box of produce. See a listing of the CSAs located throughout Santa Barbara County on EdibleSantaBarbara.com. The Southern California Food Wheel can be ordered at LocalFoodWheel.com.

Local Seafood Look for and ask for local seafood at markets and restaurants. We have some of the best seafood around, and fall is a great time to enjoy the local season for ridgeback shrimp and spiny lobster. You can also find many local seafood delicacies year round, such as mussels and urchin. Resources: Community Seafood Local seafood subscription and direct sales. CommunitySeafood.com Dock to Dish Connecting small-scale fishermen to regional communities. DockToDish.com Salty Girl Seafood Working with local fishermen to create sustainable, traceable seafood products. SaltyGirlSeafood.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 11


in Seasonthis fall Fall Produce Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Basil Beans, green Blackberries Blueberries Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cantaloupe Celery Cherimoya Chiles Chives Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Dill Eggplant Fennel Figs Grapefruit Grapes Kiwi Lavender Limes Melons Mint Mustard greens Nectarines Onions, green bunching Papayas Peaches Peppers Persimmon Plums/Pluots Pomegranate Raspberries Squash, summer Strawberries Tangerines/Mandarins Tomatillo Tomatoes Turnips Watermelon

Year-Round Produce

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Fall Seafood Mussels Ridgeback shrimp Rock fish Sardines Spiny lobster Swordfish White sea bass Yellowtail

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

Year-Round Seafood

Garlic

Eggs Coffee Dairy

(harvested Sept/Oct) (harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Edible flowers Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(harvested May/June)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radish Raisins

Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sand dabs Urchin

Other Year-Round

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta, pies produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 13


seafood

Recipes

Conrad’s Ceviche Conrad Gonzales of Valle Fresh says his inspiration for this recipe came from a love of citrus-cured fish. He says, “Tuna, salmon, halibut, shrimp, scallops—I love playing with different flavors and textures of ceviche. I like a creamy and crunchy element in the form of avocado and fresh fried corn chips.” This particular recipe is a classic ceviche that uses a local halibut or snapper along with peppers and tomatoes sourced from a local farm. He suggests pairing it with a rosé, Pinot Grigio or Sauvignon Blanc. Makes 6–8 appetizer servings 1 pound very fresh, local fish fillets (use a lean white fish) 1 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice 1

⁄ 2 cup yuzu juice

1

⁄ 4 cup fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice

1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 large heirloom tomatoes, medium diced 2 charred poblano peppers, seeded and peeled, finely chopped 4 padrón peppers, finely chopped 1 cucumber peeled and small diced 1 bunch cilantro, chopped Salt and pepper, to taste

Slice the fish into small bite-sized, even pieces. Combine fish and citrus juices in a bowl and let marinate in the refrigerator for 2 hours. Juice should completely cover fish. The citrus juices will “cook” the fish, changing it from translucent to white and opaque. Strain the juice off of the fish and then add all the other ingredients to the fish. Stir gently to combine. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Serve with tortilla chips and avocado.

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— Conrad Gonzales

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seafood

Recipes

Seafood Risotto Inspired by Dario Furlati of Ca’ Dario, this is a flexible risotto dish that showcases whatever fresh, local seafood is in season. Feel free to use a mix of the seafood or use fish. Traditionally seafood risotto is not finished with Parmesan cheese, but some lemon and olive oil or a lemon-infused olive oil is a good final touch. Makes 6–8 servings 6 cups fish stock 3 tablespoons butter and/or olive oil 2 onions, finely chopped Egg Salad Sandwich 3 garlic cloves, minced

What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter 2 cups Arborio rice eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. 1 cup drymany white variations wine You have to choose from so you won’t get 1⁄ pound tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. local rock shrimp, peeled 2 1⁄ pound Makes 2 sandwiches small bay scallops 2

31⁄hard-boiled eggs,cleaned peeled and coarsely chopped 2 pound mussels, 21⁄tablespoons mayonnaise or 1cut tablespoon cleaned and into rings mayonnaise 2 pound squid, and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche Handful of Italian parsley, chopped Salt and pepper, to taste Salt and freshly ground black pepper Juice of ½ lemon, olive oil or lemon-infused olive oil Additions:

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COLIN QUIRT

COLIN QUIRT QUIRT

• A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped Bring the broth to a simmer over medium-high heat. Cover the celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped broth and keep it warm over very low heat. onion Melt the butter a large, fresh heavyherbs, saucepan medium heat. Add • A sprinkling ofin chopped suchover as parsley, basil, the onion chervil and sauté until translucent, about 8 minutes. Stir in the cilantro, or tarragon garlic and sauté for 30 seconds. Stir the rice and cook about • A dash of something tangy, such as in lemon or lime juice,for or the 2pickled minutes, until the rice is toasted. Add the wine and stir until juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dashit is absorbed, aboutvinegar 1 minute. of white wine Bread (sliced bagel, over roll, medium-low croissant or slider Add 1½ cupsbread, of hotbaguette, stock; simmer heat bun) until the liquid ismayonnaise absorbed, stirring often, about 6 minutes. Repeat, Additional and/or mustard (optional) adding 1½pickled cups ofvegetables hot broth (optional) 2 more times, stirring often, about 12 Additional minutes longer. Add the remaining broth and simmer until the rice Lettuce is just tender and the mixture is creamy, about 5 minutes longer. Combine eggs,parsley. mayonnaise, and additions and mix Stir in thethe Italian Seasonseasoning to taste, with salt and pepper. until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add Heat seasoning some oliveoroiladditions in a largeif skillet over medium heat and add the more needed. shrimp, scallops and squid. Sauté until just done and then stir them Create an open-faced or closed sandwich using additional into the risotto. Steam the mussels until they open. Top the risotto mayonnaise on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, with the mussels. Add a squeeze of lemon juice and drizzle with a or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such as little olive oil and serve. a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. — Krista Harris — Krista Harris


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seafood

Recipes

Bouillabaisse Inspired by the bouillabaisse that Clark Staub of Full of Life Flatbread makes in a huge cauldron, this version is simplified and scaled for the home cook. Use whatever fresh, local seafood you can find. It may not be authentic, but it will be true to the spirit of bouillabaisse. Makes 6–8 servings 1 onion, finely diced 2 leeks, just the white portion, thinly sliced 1

⁄ 2 fennel bulb, finely diced

Egg Salad Sandwich

Olive oil

1 clove garlic, minced

What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter

4 tomatoes, eggs? Firstchopped on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich.

Youleaves have many variations to choose from so you won’t get 2 bay tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs.

1 sprig of thyme 1

2 sandwiches ⁄ 2 Makes teaspoon saffron

3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and chopped Salt and freshly ground pepper, to coarsely taste 2 tablespoons Zest of 1 orange mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche 3 – 4 cups fish stock Salt and pepper, to taste 1–3 pounds local fish filets, cut into chunks (halibut, black cod, rockfish)

Additions:

1 pound mussels and/or clams

• A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped

celery,shrimp chopped pickledcrab vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped 1 pound and/or onion FOR • ASERVING sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro,cut chervil tarragon Baguette, into or slices, lightly toasted

COLIN QUIRT

• Apepper dash of rouille something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the Red sauce

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash white wineleeks vinegar Sautéofthe onions, and fennel in olive oil over medium heat until softened, then add the garlic, tomatoes, bay leaves, thymebun) and Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider saffron. Add salt and pepper and the orange zest. Stir to combine Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) and cook for 10–15 minutes. Add the fish stock and the fish and Additional pickled vegetables (optional) bring to a boil. Simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes. Add the Lettuce shellfish and a little more stock if needed. Cook until all the seafood is done, aboutthe10eggs, minutes. If some seasoning gets done and before the rest,and remove Combine mayonnaise, additions mix it and warm. When is alla still done, ladle the brothTaste into and bowls, untilkeep incorporated but itwith chunky texture. add topmore with seasoning an assortment of seafood and serve with the toasted bread or additions if needed. spread with rouille sauce. Create an open-faced or closed sandwich using additional — mayonnaise Krista Harris on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such as a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. — Krista Harris


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seasonal

ERIN FEINBL AT T

Recipes Homemade Marshmallows When did marshmallows stop containing marshmallow? Here’s a recipe that uses healthier ingredients than you’ll find in most packaged marshmallows and—most importantly—puts the marshmallow back in. You can find marshmallow root online. These make a great topping for the Thanksgiving Sweet Potatoes on page 23. 1 tablespoon marshmallow root 11⁄ 4 cup water, room temperature Coconut oil for greasing pan 4 tablespoons gelatin powder (preferably from grass-fed or pastured sources) 1 cup honey (preferably local) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Organic powdered sugar for dusting

Add the marshmallow root to the room-temperature or slightly warm water. Stir or shake and then refrigerate for a couple hours or overnight. Strain out the marshmallow root, and keep 1 cup of the liquid. Lightly grease an 8- by 8-inch shallow pan and line with parchment paper, leaving the ends higher so you can lift it out of the pan. Then lightly grease the parchment paper. Place ½ cup of the marshmallow-infused water in a mixing bowl with the gelatin powder and stir until combined. Add another ½ cup of marshmallow-infused water along with the honey to a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Continue cooking it for about 8–10 minutes, or until it reaches 240° (soft ball stage) on a candy thermometer.

ERIN FEINBL AT T

Using a stand or hand mixer, gradually pour the honey mixture into the bowl of gelatin while mixing on low. Add the vanilla extract. Then mix on high until it reaches a soft peak consistency.

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Pour the marshmallow mixture into the prepared pan and spread evenly. Let sit for 4–6 hours or overnight at cool room temperature. Flip onto a large cutting board lightly dusted with powdered sugar. Remove the parchment and dust the top lightly with powdered sugar, then cut into squares or other shapes. Keep in an airtight container with parchment paper between layers to prevent sticking. — Krista Harris


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R

Sweet Potatoes

ecipes and our tastes have certainly changed over the years. I collect old cookbooks, but I don’t often cook from them. The recipes offer an interesting glimpse at what times were like but the recipes don’t always reflect what we like to eat now. For this issue’s Then and Now article, I can’t help looking at the tradition of serving sweet potatoes for Thanksgiving. When I was growing up, we had mashed sweet potatoes mixed with canned pineapple and topped with marshmallows at every Thanksgiving (and sometimes at Christmas, too). It was not my favorite. Whether you love the tradition or whether it sets your teeth on edge, it’s interesting to note that it’s not such a very old tradition. Prior to 1917, prepared marshmallows weren’t widely available. But after that time, they were produced en masse and recipes started popping up with ways to use them. In Housekeeping in Old Virginia by Marion Cabell Tyree (originally published in 1879, but mine is a reprint from 1965), there are several recipes for sweet potatoes and yams; some call for pounded crackers, others for grated crackers— neither of which sounds appetizing. But this one caught my eye, and our recipe tester said it was actually pretty good.

Then and Now

by Krista Harris

SWEET POTATOES THEN From Housekeeping in Old Virginia by Marion Cabell Tyree, published by John P. Morton and Company, 1879.

To Dress Yams

ERIN FEINBL AT T

Steam them till done, peel and slice them. Put in a buttered baking-dish a layer of yam, on which put sugar and some lumps of butter. Fill up the dish in this way, and when full, pour over it milk or cream, and bake brown. — Mrs. Dr. P. C.

22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

My current take on this dish leaves out the canned pineapple of my grandmother’s recipe but keeps her tradition of using a little bit of nutmeg. As for topping the mixture, I give in. Let’s go ahead and put marshmallows on top and make everyone happy. Me included if, instead of the packaged variety, I can make my own homemade marshmallows. It’s Thanksgiving. It’s worth making everything from scratch. And it will be a great topic of conversation around the dinner table. If you still think marshmallows are a culinary abomination, then by all means top with some crumbled candied bacon or candied apples.


ERIN FEINBL AT T

SWEET POTATOES NOW Thanksgiving Sweet Potatoes Makes 8–10 servings 4 pounds sweet potatoes 1

⁄ 4 cup milk, half and half or heavy cream

1–2 tablespoons butter 1

⁄ 4 cup maple syrup

Freshly grated nutmeg (optional) Salt and pepper Topping: your choice of homemade marshmallows (see page 20), crumbled candied bacon or candied apples

Preheat oven to 400°. Prick the sweet potatoes with a fork, place on a baking sheet and cook for 1 hour or until very tender. Cut in half and scoop out the flesh into a large mixing bowl and put the skins in the compost bin. Press the sweet potatoes through a ricer or mash them with a potato masher. Add the milk or cream along with the butter and maple syrup. Add just a bit of nutmeg, but add a generous amount of salt and pepper. Place in a large baking dish. You can make it ahead of time to this point and refrigerate until ready. Take out of the refrigerator and let it sit until it is almost room temperature. If you are using the marshmallows, cut them into pieces that aren’t too thick and then arrange on the top. (Note: The homemade marshmallows will spread further than the commercial variety.) Bake in a 350° to 375° oven (it’s flexible if you have other dishes in the oven at the same time) until heated through and the marshmallows are lightly browned, about 15–20 minutes. Watch carefully so that they don’t burn—or catch fire. Alternately, top the sweet potato mixture with crumbled candied bacon or candied apples and bake until heated through. Krista Harris is the editor and co-publisher of Edible Santa Barbara. One of her favorite things to do is to invent and reinvent recipes.

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DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

Mulling Over the Mule

by George Ya tchisin PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLIN QUIRT

24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

S

ometimes you have to go a great distance to figure out what’s best to do at home. Such is the case with this issue’s cocktail, the Montecito Mule, which most recently has its roots in the Tales of the Cocktail, a wonderful annual cross between a conference and a bacchanal thrown in New Orleans. One part of this year’s fest celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Moscow Mule, a simple classic of vodka, ginger beer and lime that has a charming creation story: A guy who has problems selling Smirnoff vodka to brown-liquor-loving Americans meets up with a guy who doesn’t know how to market his ginger beer, and the result is the cocktail world’s Reese’s Cup with a lime twist. “At least the Moscow Mule is easy (your dog could make one), smooth and refreshing,” acclaimed cocktail writer David Wondrich asserts somewhat acidly. “Taken by itself, it does no harm, and compared to so much that has followed, it’s practically elegant.” What’s better, the basic Mule is plenty of fun to adapt to the situation at hand. For instance, at one Tales tasting, producers Quady Winery and High West Distillers teamed up for a room of fantastic drinks under the title “Of Grapes and Grains.” One was a Western Sage Mule, and I’ve taken that as my inspiration to create something even more Santa Barbara, especially since you can make it with locally distilled products. (Sorry, Quady and High West!) I’ve dubbed it the Montecito Mule as it’s a bit high-toned and also hints of the foothills with its white sage simple syrup that offers you a bonus: Making it fills the house with scents as if you’ve smudged your house. It’s not every day you get to banish the bad spirits while drinking the yummy ones. (If you can’t get white sage, any garden sage will do. The white is just a bit wilder.) The blackberries are also a hearty base; you will be amazed how much flavor just two per glass add, and since this is a built drink, you end up with some delicious fruit to snack on at the mug’s bottom. And no, you don’t have to run out and buy copper mugs—the traditional vessel for the Mule. As legend has it, the drink creators met up with a copper heiress who just happened to have boxes of the mugs almost headed to the scrapyard before they figured out that the metal keeps the drink icy cool. Even better, the heiress’s heirs now reside in Santa Barbara, so you can drink local in their Moscow Copper mug. Even if you use an old-fashioned glass, it’s still a built drink, which simply means you put it together in the very vessel you serve it in, no shaker necessary. That’s another of the drink’s charms: faster to create, easier to clean up after. If you’re doing them for a party, just line up the mugs and go.


The Montecito Mule Makes 1 cocktail 2 blackberries 1 ounce white sage simple syrup 1

⁄ 2 ounce lime juice

FULL of LIFE

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1 ounce dry vermouth (Margerum recommended) 11 ⁄ 2 ounces whiskey (Cutler’s Stagecoach recommended) Approximately 2 ounces ginger beer (Fever-Tree recommended) 1 sage leaf for garnish

Use a copper mule mug, if you have one; if not, a sturdy oldfashioned glass will do. Muddle the 2 blackberries in the bottom of the mug/glass. Add the simple syrup, lime juice, vermouth and whiskey. Fill the mug 2 ⁄ 3 full with crushed ice. Top off with as much ginger beer as can fit. Stir lightly. Add the sage leaf garnish.

White Sage Simple Syrup 1

⁄ 2 cup sugar

1

⁄ 2 cup water

7 white sage leaves

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, stir to dissolve and bring to a boil. After all the sugar is incorporated, take off heat and add the sage leaves. Let cool completely. Strain out the leaves. Keep unused portion in sealed container in the refrigerator; it should keep for several weeks.

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Do note that built drinks, even when stirred, tend to deliver different facets in different sips, so be prepared for a berry blast one taste, a zip of more ginger the next, some soothing sage a third. That’s half the fun. Of course, I’ve complicated the liquor bill beyond vodka. Quady and High West suggested their Vya Extra Dry Vermouth and American Prairie Bourbon, respectively. I opted to go local and use Margerum Vermouth and Cutler’s Artisan Spirits Stagecoach Whiskey. The Margerum is so flavorful and spry it’s a bit of a shame not to just drink it neat as an aperitif, but its mix of fortified wine, herbs, spices and mystery adds a fascinating complexity to the drink. The Stagecoach Whiskey, Ian Cutler’s “summer” partner to his heartier 33 Bourbon, is made with both a wheat and corn bill, finding a lovely middle ground for a brown liquor. And a good ginger beer (for any mixer, it’s hard to go wrong with a Fever-Tree product) lifts this drink, like any Mule, with its effervescence and spicy finish. Food Artisan George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

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EDIBLE GARDEN

GROWING ONIONS by Joan S. Bolton P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C A R O L E T O PA L I A N

I

t’s easy to take onions for granted. The pungent culinary staples are readily available year-round and don’t rank nearly as high on the list of must-grow edibles as succulent summertime tomatoes or tasty wintertime leafy greens. Yet grow your own, and you may discover subtle new flavor nuances between different varieties. Onions are largely a no-fuss crop and October is an ideal time to plant. Get yours into the garden before the holidays and, depending on which types you choose, you’ll be ready to harvest in late spring and then again in early summer. Granted, that’s a long season. But since many winter vegetables take little space, such as those tender leafy greens, you’re bound to have room for at least a few rows of onions.

26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Getting Started First, it’s important to understand how onions grow. After planting, onions send down roots and push up green stalks. But they don’t begin swelling into recognizable bulbs until the leaves bulk out and the calendar ticks toward a certain number of daylight hours. Once bulbing does begin, onions typically take 100 to 110 days to reach full size. Next, onions are categorized as short-day, intermediate-day or long-day. Those labels have nothing to do with the length of the growing season. Instead, short-day onions respond to 10 to 12 hours of daylight; intermediate-day onions require 12 to 14 hours and long-day onions wait for 14 to 16 hours.


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If conventional pungent onions are more to your liking, look for short-day Red Creole or intermediate-day Cabernet or Mercury. Grow a few of each variety, and you can have a taste-off at harvest time.

Planting and Care

Santa Barbara is endowed with nearly 11 months of 10-hour days, from January 9 to December 2. Twelve-hour days run for about six months, from March 16 to September 25. But 14-hour days are a meager 69 days, from May 17 to July 25. That’s at least a month short of what long-day onions need to mature. If you do try growing them, you’ll harvest a lot of neck, but very little bulb. Note that you can also plant a second crop of short-day or intermediate-day onions in mid-spring, for a late-summer harvest. But because fall-planted onions have more time in the ground before bulbing begins, they tend to have larger root masses, resulting in larger onions.

What to Choose If you like your onions fresh and sweet, short-day Yellow Granex is a winner. The thick, flattish onions that made Vidalia, Georgia, famous are a type of Yellow Granex. Vidalias can only be labeled as such if they are grown in 20 counties in Georgia and meet certain state and federal standards. That Georgia soil is especially low in sulfur (conventional, pungent onions get their heat from sulfur-containing compounds), but you can still grow a very sweet Yellow Granex here. Other short-day, sweet onions include Red Granex, White Granex, Texas Supersweet, Sweet Georgia Brown and White Bermuda. Intermediate-day sweet onions include the all-white Super Star, a medium-sized hybrid that’s the only onion to win an All-America Selections award, and Candy, a yellow-skinned, white variety that grows to an impressive 6 inches in diameter. Stockton Red is large, too, while crunchy Italian Torpedo is a long, skinny heirloom. 28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Choose a spot that receives ample sun year-round. Impeccable drainage with loose, fertile soil that’s at least eight to 12 inches deep is imperative. The maturing bulbs will fill the uppermost four to five inches while their roots will burrow several inches below. Unless you have loamy or sandy soil, grow your onions in containers or raised beds. Mark a line where you intend to plant. Six inches from each side of the line, dig a trench twice the recommended planting depth of the seeds, sets or transplants. Sprinkle into the trench half a cup of a high phosphorous (10-20-10) granular fertilizer for each 10 feet of row. Mix well-aged compost with what you’ve dug out, fill the trenches with the mix, then plant your onions down the middle. Keep the soil moist. Once your onions sprout, taper off to watering about once a week, letting any winter rains help out. If the leaves turn yellow or soft, you’re watering too much. If the soil cracks and the stalks wilt, water more frequently and deeply. Also apply a mild dose of a high-nitrogen liquid fertilizer every few weeks until about three weeks before your expected harvest.

Harvest Three to four months after the beginning of January for short-day types, or three to four months after mid-March for intermediate-day types, the stalks should begin to dry out and flop over. That’s your cue that harvest time has arrived. A mature onion typically bears 13 leaves, with each one corresponding to a ring inside. But even more important is that the tops have entirely toppled. Use a trowel or cultivator fork to carefully lift out your onions. Spread the bulbs, side by side, stalks and all, on a screen or black plastic garden flat tray. Leave them in the shade for a week or so to cure. Then trim the tops to an inch above the bulbs. Store the bulbs—still in single layers—between sheets of newspaper or screens. Or hang them in mesh bags or nylon stockings. Or leave the stalks attached and braid them, then hang them. Dry, cool air is key. Avoid refrigeration, as the moist air can hasten deterioration. Sweet onions are best fresh, as they have a high moisture content and typically keep only a month or two. However, the hotter, more pungent varieties can be stored in a dry location for four to six months. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


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In Search of Bugs

Local California Spiny Lobster Words and Photos by Rosminah Brown

Scott Engelman with his catch.

O

n a sunny afternoon, we drive out to Goleta Beach, set up the gear, unload a two-person kayak and drag it to the water. Within minutes we’ve pushed beyond the waves and are paddling our way past the pier. Once we’ve found a favorite spot, it’s time. Scott pulls on his SCUBA tanks and slides into the ocean, while I either put on snorkeling gear to free dive or, more likely, I grab a book and wait it out on the undulating currents, looking for the telltale sign of air bubbles popping up. If it’s a good day, the visibility in the water will be good, and if we’re lucky, Scott will return with bugs. That’s spiny lobster to the rest of us. So this is Scott Engelman. He is originally from landlocked Colorado and grew up in the great outdoors. Once he moved 30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

to Santa Barbara over 10 years ago, he fell in love with the Pacific Ocean. He’s a regular guy, in the sense that he had little experience with ocean life and what he’s learned is self-motivated and self-taught, plus getting SCUBA certified through UCSB in 2009. While he enjoys diving year-round, it’s October through March that particularly interests him—this is the spiny lobster season. Even amateur lobster hunting requires a standard ocean fishing license, plus an additional lobster report card to record every dive attempt and the number of lobsters taken. There is also a daily limit of seven and a minimum size requirement. The report card must be submitted to California Department of Fish and Wildlife by the end the month following the season


ending, or the card holder is fined. And non-commercial lobster hunting isn’t easy either. For one thing, they must be actively captured by the individual—by hand or by hoop net. Second, there’s commercial competition from passive trapping cages. Once the commercial season starts, each commercial permitholder can have hundreds of traps in the water, each of which can catch multiple lobsters. As we paddle in our kayak, the water is dotted with the buoys of traps as far as the eye can see. It’s hard to imagine that any lobsters along our coastline have a chance to survive this intensity of trapping. Yet, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, a 2011 stock assessment found that the population is at a sustainable level. Interestingly, there’s one perk an individual hunter has: Non-commercial lobster season starts four days before commercial boats can start trapping. That’s four days you’ll find Scott out in the water, foraging for lobster and other tasty ocean treats, such as urchin. Once he returns to the kayak with his catch of spiny lobsters (and maybe a few urchins for me), we paddle furiously back to shore and clean up. At some point, Scott will put the lobsters on his head—that’s just his thing. Then we feast! California spiny lobsters must be consumed or processed as quickly as possible, or kept alive. Once they die they excrete an enzyme that blackens their flesh. Consider this a good thing, because now you know that your pale, tender-fleshed lobster is fresh. It might be hard to compare the California spiny lobster with the ubiquitously popular Maine lobster, but locally we know that our lobster is utterly divine. Ours lack the large claws (a plus if you’re the one trying to catch them), but the bodies are full of muscular flesh that steams, grills and sautés well, and pulls cleanly from the shell. The meat is also considered sweeter than Maine lobsters’. Whichever lobster coast you fall on, we can agree on two things: One, any lobster you have is best eaten fresh; and two, the lobster roll perfected on the East Coast is really delicious. We can make our own using California spiny lobster while they are in season until mid-May (see accompanying recipe). Scott is one of the best lobster divers I know, and I’ve run into a good number of hunters in the time I’ve jumped on the bug-loving bandwagon. Lobsters aren’t easy to catch, either. They can move, fast! They can hide in rocky burrows and caves, and they can defend themselves. But even when I see many divers returning empty-handed, Scott often pops up with a game bag full of them, along with a fish, some urchin and stories of his watery excursion. Maybe he was born with the knack of tracking down those bugs, but when people come over and ask how he got so good, he modestly says “from three years of failure,” while the lobsters sit on his head or perch on his shoulder. It may be true that you learn more from failure than from success, but success also brings in a fabulous dinner foraged from our beautiful coast.

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RECIPE California spiny lobster must be eaten fresh. If you have a fresh lobster and do not have time to eat it all that day, you can remove the tail and freeze it for later. Store the detached tail in a container of water, letting it freeze in the ice. Thaw it in your refrigerator until the ice melts, then prepare it how you like. The East Coast has popularized the lobster roll using Maine lobster. The lobster roll falls into two preparation categories: Maine style with mayonnaise, or Connecticut style with butter. Here is our variation using California spiny lobster. If you aren’t lucky enough to know Scott or have a Scott-like person in your life, you can find spiny lobster seasonally at local fish markets.

California Spiny Lobster Roll Makes 2 servings 1 spiny lobster 2 tablespoons mayonnaise A squeeze of lemon plus some zest 1 stalk celery, finely diced, leafy top retained Salt and pepper to taste 2 soft rolls, like brioche or hot dog buns Butter Uni (optional)

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add the live lobster. Lightly boil for 10 minutes. Drain and rinse with cool water until you can handle the lobster. Using a large knife, cut the lobster lengthwise. Remove all the guts and rinse again. You now have a cooked lobster that’s ready to eat as it is. Pull out the tail flesh, and if you’re happy with the amount of meat here, you can work with the tail only. But if you have the will and patience, the meat inside the legs and antennae is also delicious. Roughly chop the lobster meat into bite-size pieces and place in a bowl. This can now be chilled, or used immediately. Stir in the mayonnaise, lemon juice, lemon zest, and diced celery. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Heat up a skillet or grill pan, split open the buns (from the top if you can), butter them generously inside and out, and toast the buns on all sides until golden. A toaster oven works, too. Scoop the lobster onto the toasted buns, sprinkle with the celery leaves, and optionally top with a few pieces of fresh Santa Barbara uni, then serve. To make the butter-based version, briefly sauté your cooked lobster and celery over medium heat with half a stick of butter, the juice of half a lemon and a pinch of paprika, just enough to melt the butter and heat the lobster through. Season it with salt and pepper, then pile it onto the butter-toasted bun. Top it with the celery leaves and optional uni, then serve immediately. Rosminah Brown is a Santa Barbara native who types fast and eats slow. She once jumped in the Neptune Pool at Hearst’s Castle. She is still upset that JR’s BBQ closed. She is always seeking a perfect, singular, exquisite bite of food. 32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016


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Social Baking A Sweet Way to Connect with Family and Friends by Ruth Von Eberstein P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E VA N J A N K E

O

ver the past 25 years, I have baked cookies and packaged them to give as holiday gifts to my clients, family and friends. Often, I’ve had one or two co-workers with me in the kitchen. It was always a fun night of mixing (and, yes, drinking wine), baking and ultimately packaging a variety of cookies to deliver to our clients to show our appreciation. Over the years, my kids and their friends shared some memorable rainy days (remember rain?) in our kitchen rolling out and cutting Christmas cookies and then decorating them. Now, as young adults, they say they fondly remember those afternoons, especially bringing cookies home to their families. So often was I asked for the cookie recipes that I decided to design and produce a small sampling in the form of a

34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

booklet, titled Social Baking. The 12 cookie recipes I selected were based on recipes that I collected over the years. Some are family favorites—all were given to me by close friends and colleagues. As I prepared and tasted the original recipes, I noted handwritten changes in the margins. Tested time and time again, each recipe evolved by increasing or decreasing various ingredients, adding additional ingredients and/or altering the baking time and substituting organic ingredients whenever possible. The ultimate result is a set of simple yet superior cookie recipes that produce delicious and (dare I say) healthy treats. I think cookies are perfect for dessert at the end of a special dinner with friends or family, as gifts and, of course, as part


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of your holiday traditions. Baking with others and sharing the end product is the essence of Social Baking. Making cookies from scratch can also begin the process of what I call “going basic”— transitioning to many more homecooked dishes that use fresh and, whenever possible, organic ingredients. A long-time farmers market attendee, I am a big advocate of fresh, seasonal and local. I honestly think baking “sweet treats” can lead to overall better food habits and community in the kitchen. To go basic, start by replacing the store-bought mixes or packaged cookies you have in your cupboard with fresh, basic ingredients and the tools needed to prepare and bake real cookies. This will allow you to make many of your baked goods from scratch. It’s easy and better for you, because you’re able to control the quality of ingredients and omit the preservatives, additives and other things that just don’t belong in baked goods—or any food, for that matter. Think farmers market for fresh ingredients like eggs, nuts and fruit preserves. When possible, shop markets that offer organic ingredients and know that you’re making the very best treats. Next thing you know, going basic could cross over into all aspects of your cooking habits. There’s also a key benefit of making homemade food of any kind. When you cook with others, it becomes a social activity—a learning experience for children and adults alike— that creates useful skills for a lifetime. It’s also a fun way to spend time with family and friends, working and talking in the kitchen. My idea with Social Baking began as a fun project to share with family and friends and has become a mini launch pad to encourage people to bake more from scratch, connect with family and friends and to create happy memories by the dozen. I encourage everyone to get social in the kitchen and go basic. You’ll taste the love. 36 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Recipes

S

Exquisite Macaroons Golden brown, chewy, melt-in-your-mouth coconut cookie goodness—this is the cookie to make for the coconut lover in your house. Super quick and easy recipe to follow and a great place to start “going basic.” Makes 16 cookies 2 egg whites 1

⁄ 4 cup butter

2

⁄ 3 cup sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut

Preheat oven to 375°. Lightly grease cookie sheet with butter. Separate 2 eggs. Using a fork, beat the egg whites and set aside. Use a mixer to cream butter and sugar. Add vanilla and egg whites and continue to mix at medium speed for 2 minutes; mixture should be fluffy. Fold in the coconut. Scoop dollops of mixture onto the cookie sheet — I use a heaping tablespoon measure to do this step. Space dollops 1 inch apart. Bake for 15 minutes. Allow cookies to cool on the cookie sheet for a few minutes before transferring to a cooling rack, but not too long or they may stick to the cookie sheet!


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Classic Oatmeal Raisin There’s something about this recipe that produces a wonderfully textured cookie. It’s just the right amount of brown sugar and butter that makes it chewy like a caramel candy, but with a subtle taste of tart lemon at the finish. Love these cookies for breakfast with coffee. Makes 4 dozen cookies 1 cup butter 2 cups brown sugar 2 eggs 31 ⁄ 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice 1

⁄ 2 cup whole-wheat flour

11 ⁄ 4 cups flour

Thumbprints These cookies are delicious and can provide a variety of flavors in one batch by using more than one type of fruit preserve to fill the “thumbprint reservoir.” Another option is to include the chopped nut coating on half or the entire batch. Kids seem to prefer the nut-free version. Makes about 2½ dozen cookies 1 cup butter 1

⁄ 2 cup brown sugar

2 eggs, separated 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups flour Fruit jelly or jam 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans*

Preheat oven to 375°. Lightly grease cookie sheet with butter. Using a food processor, chop walnuts—be careful not to over process. Use a mixer to cream butter, sugar and egg yolks. Add vanilla, flour and mix well. Use a fork to beat egg whites in a separate bowl. Using your hands, roll bits of dough into 1-inch balls, dip them into egg white mix and roll in chopped nuts* and arrange on a cookie sheet 1 inch apart. Bake for 5 minutes and remove from oven. Use the backside of a spoon to make a dent in the center of each cookie. Fill with fruit preserve and bake for an additional 8 minutes. Let cookies remain on the sheet to cool for a few minutes before moving to a cooling rack. *Optional: You may skip the last step, and instead roll the cookie dough in chopped nuts. Do, however, dip the dough balls in egg white before baking, nuts or no nuts.

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

1

⁄ 4 cup ground flax seed

1 teaspoon baking soda 1

⁄ 4 teaspoon salt

3 cups rolled oats 11 ⁄ 2 cups raisins

Heads up! Finished batter must be chilled at least 1 hour before baking. Using a mixer, beat butter and sugar until creamy. Add eggs and lemon juice and mix well at medium speed. Gradually add the flour, soda, salt and flax seed meal while continuing to mix. Use a large spoon or spatula to stir in the oats and raisins. Transfer batter to a bowl with a lid and chill. Preheat oven to 350°. Lightly grease cookie sheet with butter. Drop 1½-inch dollops onto a cookie sheet 1 inch apart. Bake 17–18 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow cookies to remain on the cookie sheet for a few minutes before transferring to a cooling rack. Ruth Von Eberstein is the author of Social Baking (available at local bookstores and online). She is also an independent graphic artist, art director and founder of RAVE & Associates, a creative agency.


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Gettin’ Down with Papaya Man Damien Raquinio Brings Aloha to Santa Barbara by Leslie A. Westbrook P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E R I N F E I N B L AT T

I

Damien grew up in Kona, Hawaii—his mother a pastry t’s a busy June-gloom day at the Saturday Santa Barbara chef and dad a sunglasses sales rep on the sunny isle. He was Farmers Market. Musicians are strumming and singing. raised on “hippie home lunches”— typically rice cracker with The sweet smell of summer fruit fragrances the air. And peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Later, he discovered his Hawaiian native Damien “Papaya Man” Raquinio is tending love of plants while attending West Hawaii Explorations his cornucopia of homegrown papayas with the help of Soleil Academy—a science-based high school that offered classes in (a sweet waif of a spirit who greets me with a warm hug) and permaculture, hydroponics, fish farming/aquaponics and other Logan Van Der Kar, who hails from Carpinteria avocado earth sciences—in the mid-1990s. farming roots. “I chose to study hydroponics and learned that I loved A pretty young lady strolls up to the Golden State Papaya plants. I always grew plants and had a garden as a kid and found booth and asks, “Are these grown here?” The team tells her the science of growing in water new and exciting!” he recalled. yes, in Goleta. “And do they look like papaya trees?” she innocently adds. There were lots of discussions and debates The helpers politely answer Growing papayas commercially outside of about hydroponic vs. organic again in the affirmative, before Hawaii and Florida has its challenges. gardening, a switch that weighing and selling the sweet Damien would make many golden nectar of the gods to Yet, they’ve found a “sweet spot” in years later. Damien moved the satisfied customer, as well The Goodland of Goleta. to Santa Barbara in 1999— as to other fans, including because his surf buddies chefs from Mesa Verde, Scarlett attending SBCC told him there were a lot of girls here—and Begonia, Sama Sama Kitchen and other dining venues that he labored in the toxic world of surfboard shaping and repair in support the farm stand. Then there are the rest of us who have what is now the more gentrified Funk Zone. discovered and crave the only papayas commercially grown on the mainland west of the Mississippi. Fast-forward to 2013 and the transplanted Hawaiian surfer’s Whole Foods epiphany. Today there are two varieties of the Hawaiian fruit for sale: the smaller, sweet Sunset and a larger variety, Exotica, that the “I walked into Whole Foods and was amazed by the produce tall, reed-thin grower says sometimes has “hints of coconut” and fresh fruit section. Then I saw Hawaiian papayas for $7 a flavor. The 38-year-old farmer is feeling a bit peaked after pound. We were used to getting them for FREE! I paid $12 for attending the late-night Summer Round Up concert the night one papaya, and I was, like, ‘holy shit!’” he laughed. before at the Santa Barbara Bowl. But Damien promises to An idea was born—and he partnered with equally passionate show me his exotic fruit farm—which he calls his “food forest” Adam Rhodes to start their tropical fruit growing business, in Goleta’s More Mesa neighborhood—later, after the market which began in a greenhouse out at The Orchid in the far end closes and he packs up. of Goleta. Adam is a real estate developer and surfer who turned Opposite: Damien Raquinio

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on to permaculture. They connected in the surf world, and both wanted to “reinvent themselves.” “We were the first people crazy enough to try this!” Adam said. “Papayas are 80 cents a pound in Hawaii,” he noted. “While waiting for our first crop to grow and become productive, we grew row crops of veggies, and we were happy with the results. Then we explored farmers markets three years ago.” They grew their first papayas from non-GMO seeds from Hawaii—and were blessed with good trees. “Then Old Man Winter Rainstorm flooded our greenhouse! If we didn’t get into a functional greenhouse, our crazy experiment would never fly,” said Adam. So they moved their growing operation to Island View Nursery in Carpinteria and to more affordable Goleta. The two both admit it’s been a long road of trial and error— with many failures along the way. “Every time we move, there are new issues. Both the climate and soil are different. It’s a nightmare!” says Damien, who takes failure in his stride. “I’ve failed my whole life in normal systems,” he admitted, “I am dyslexic, and I am not scared of failure. It can be a learning experience.” Once they made it to the farmers markets, the feedback was so positive (even though they were nowhere close to being ready with small yields and needed more volume to make the experiment economically feasible) that they forged ahead. “Most Hawaiian papayas are GMO and picked hard and green. Mexican papayas are picked hard and green and have little flavor and are sprayed with pesticides or irradiated for 20 minutes. We grow organically and pick ours the day before we sell them. That’s why they taste so good,” said Adam. “Taste good” is an understatement. There are also four key elements, according to the farmers: good genetics, good soil, the right environment and the right amount of light. Later, after he packed up for the day, I met Damien in Goleta so he could lead me to the spot I’d “never find in a million years.” I followed him in his blue Ford truck along a windy and hole-pocked dirt road. We passed rows of old, abandoned glasspaneled greenhouses with missing panes and graffiti decorating the exterior. We arrived at his two-acre greenhouse — with a table covered by a bright umbrella (the color of papayas) out front. Inside was a steamy, jungly, Jurassic Park -like “food forest.” It brimmed with healthy papaya trees pregnant with fruit, towering banana trees with humongous deep green leaves as wide as elephant ears, twisty tomato plants, dark green vines of wonderful purple Hawaiian sweet potatoes, along with turmeric, passion fruit and dragon fruit (pitaya) in the works. Raquinio realized he wanted to take the permaculture system to a commercial level and create a food forest where plants and companion plants work together. Opposite: Adam Rhodes at left with bananas and Damien Raquinio at right with pineapple. Preceding pages: mango growing in their greenhouse in Carpinteria.

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“These are epic greenhouses that I am dialing in!” Damien said enthusiastically in his surf lingo, as he described his process of soil-grown greenhouse tomatoes, papayas and other fruits being produced, using natural and organic methods. (Some of his growing methods he prefers to keep secret, including a special fertilization technique.) In addition to the twoacre greenhouse, the partners are growing on two acres of adjacent leased outdoor land. “Aren’t they cute?” he says about a stunning row of papaya trees. What guy uses the word “cute,” I wonder? A cute one, it seems, who also uses a skateboard or scooter to get around while tending his produce. Even songbirds find comfort in this tropical growing paradise— singing light-hearted songs that seemingly add sweetness to the fruit. I even had a chance to smell the heavenly sweet papaya flower on Damien Raquinio the trees. Growing papayas commercially outside of Hawaii and Florida has its challenges. Yet, they’ve found a “sweet spot” in The Goodland of Goleta, when the sun shone upon the seemingly magic growing pocket even on this foggy June-gloom day. The proof is in the produce: deliciously sweet papayas, tasty Japanese Pink winter tomatoes and other varieties; five types of bananas and three of pineapples. Who knows what else will emerge from the experimentation with seeds from Brazil and Hawaii that this dynamic duo are pursuing? Perhaps the most stealth product is the Okinawan purple sweet potato (Hawaiian name is Uala). I prepared these delectable and pretty root vegetables with coconut milk for Thanksgiving dinner last year, and they were the hit of the dinner table. “It’s an ongoing giant experiment! Plants are funny. They respond positively and negatively to everything you do to them,” Damien said. Kind of like people, I thought to myself, noting that 50 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

many of Damien’s aphorisms about plants also apply to humans. “Do your plants speak to you?” I asked. Not surprisingly, he answered, “They do!” The future? “We hope to have mangos in one to two years,” said Damien as he showed me the small, pretty green 1-month-old plants he started from seed— rootstock that he will graft. “Sometimes I have to re-learn everything I thought I knew. One door opens to a whole lot of other questions! Sometimes it takes me way left field—that’s a good thing!” There’s only so much you can do watching a papaya grow— which, like a baby, takes nine months from seed to maturity. “Most of my day consists of fixing problems and taking care of odds and ends—which is insane! All day, every day, and it’s not fun,” he lamented. “There’s irrigation, infrastructure and management,” in addition to growing and doing things he’s never done before. Then, on a brighter note, he tells me “We’re still growing and learning. Next year I expect sales to be amazing. It’s a great product, and everybody loves it. Farming is cool.” And with that, he takes off down the pathway on his skateboard to fix a leak. Leslie A. Westbrook is an award-winning journalist and author. The thirdgeneration Californian (on her Sicilian side) has written for national and regional publications for over 30 years. This is her first, but hopefully not last, article for Edible Santa Barbara. She loves papayas and lives in Carpinteria.


The Grand Experiment The Wonder of the Santa Ynez Valley AVA by Sonja Magdevski

Williamson Doré Vineyard

52 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016


T

o sit with Bill Wathen is to smile, a lot. His energy is contagious when he talks wine and vineyards in Santa Barbara

County. He and longtime friend Dick DorĂŠ founded Foxen Winery in 1985 by making one barrel of Cabernet Sauvignon with grapes from Rancho Sisquoc in Santa Maria. Their original plan

CAROLE TOPALIAN

was to drink it themselves.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 53


CAROLE TOPALIAN

Wathen began his winemaking career as a viticulturist in 1975 working with Santa Barbara County grape growing pioneers Dale Hampton and Louis Lucas. After a few years away farming at Chalone Vineyards under another California wine pioneer, Richard Graff, Wathen says he returned to Santa Barbara, a winemaker. “I learned you can go beyond growing grapes and capture the year every year.” The story of Santa Barbara County winemaking and its diversity of varietals wouldn’t be complete without Foxen Winery and its equal-opportunity approach to sourcing fruit. In addition to their own estate vineyards, they work with fruit from every corner in Santa Barbara County and make 30 different product codes of wine. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Chenin Blanc, Sangiovese, Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and more. As Wathen is listing vineyards scrolling through the

54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

map in his head, I jokingly asked if he has ever forgotten he has grapes somewhere. “I came from a family of nine siblings, and my mom never forgot about us,” he smiled. As a viticulturist and an avid runner, he spends a fair amount of time running through the acres Foxen leases at 15 different vineyards to understand the temperament of each site. “That is one of the most beautiful points of my job—to spend the whole year in these vineyards. I would not trade that for anything,” Wathen said. Foxen Winery has been witness to the establishment of all of Santa Barbara County’s American Viticultural Areas (AVAs). Their longtime relationships have allowed them to secure coveted contracts with producers before vines are even planted to feed their constant varietal curiosity.


With their experience and enthusiasm they have also mentored several new producers, encouraging them to continue the endless possibilities of what can happen in Santa Barbara wine country. “We have stayed here because we believe in the diversity,” Wathen said. “We could not do what we do anywhere else in the world. We can make cool-climate Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc, all the Pinot Noir, warm-climate Cabernet Sauvignon, luscious Merlot from Happy Canyon (that is one of the best blending wines in the world) this is what AVAs are all about. We are defining that diversity.”

To some, the plethora of possibilities available to Santa Barbara County winegrowers is daunting, while others deem it borderline confusing for the consumer. With the historic French appellation model as a reference, the main question many ask is: How can one grow Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon in the same area? In France, different regions grow different grapes governed by strict laws that regulate much more than varietal specifics. Our AVA system does not dictate grape varietals; it recognizes grape-growing regions large and small based on distinct geographic features. It may be important to note that over the years California has become home to dozens of French winemakers seeking freedom of wine expression. There is no doubt that the establishment of an AVA helps define a region and for the most part an AVA naturally lends itself to specific grape varietals that thrive best in its microclimate, like any fruit or vegetable. Gardeners who plant from seed understand this immediately by reading the back of the seed packets, and, of course, from experience. Yet the Santa Ynez Valley AVA is an anomaly. It stretches some 500 square miles from Santa Ynez to Lompoc in a wide band from the San Rafael Mountains in the east to the ocean in the west following the Santa Ynez Valley River Watershed. On any given summer day, it can be 100° in Santa Ynez and 78° in Lompoc. Some grapes can handle a few hours at 100°, while others significantly struggle. The unique aspect in understanding the social climate of the time during the establishment of the Santa Ynez Valley AVA in 1983 is that vineyard sites were not delineated by varietal as they are today and viticulture practices were not as sophisticated. This was new territory to be discovered. The primary varietals of the day were planted in most vineyards irrespective of a site’s true nuance. Planting Chardonnay at Gainey in the warm east was just as normal as planting Cabernet Sauvignon at Sanford & Benedict in the cool west, along with Riesling, Gewürztraminer and Sauvignon Blanc. As Brooks Firestone, who started making wine at Firestone Vineyard in 1975, stated in a Washington Post interview from 1983, “It’s hard to describe our new region because different wineries are going in their own directions. We did the studies and it looks good. But to some extent it’s a roll of the dice.” Dan Gainey of Gainey Vineyards echoed this sentiment. “When we started it was all one big experiment.” Gainey’s grandfather originally planted vineyards in the mid-1960s on

C AROLE TOPALIAN

Understanding the Santa Ynez Valley

Dick Doré, above, and with his wife Jenny and their dog Tembo opposite in the Williamson Doré Vineyard.

their ranch and pulled them out after only a few years. He couldn’t sell the grapes and producing their own wine was not common practice. In the early 1980s Gainey’s father, who never lost sight of the dream, replanted the vineyards with the renewed interest of the time. “Everyone pretty much did the same thing and planted everything,” Gainey said. “It was that way throughout the county. When I think back on those times I remember it being very loose and very informal. There was no tradition of any kind. Some of those wines turned out pretty well, and some of them didn’t.” The success of the Santa Maria Valley AVA in 1981, created by larger commercial vineyards focused on selling grapes, encouraged the smaller producers in the Santa Ynez Valley to create their own identity. The mavericks spearheading the effort at that time were a mere handful spanning the long east-west corridor including Firestone Vineyards, Santa Ynez Valley Winery, Zaca Mesa Winery, Sanford & Benedict Winery, Ballard Canyon Winery, Santa Barbara Winery and a few others. With so few vineyards, the effort was inclusive. Everyone was invited to attend. On May 16, 1983, the Santa Ynez Valley AVA gained official status. EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 55


Santa Maria 101

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY Los Alamos

Lompoc

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Rick Longoria of Longoria Winery, who spent his teen years in Lompoc, returned to the area in 1976 after working in Sonoma, where his mentor André Tchelistcheff, one of the most influential winemakers of the 20th century, recommended the cellar master position for him at Firestone Winery. Tchelistcheff was consulting for Firestone and saw great potential in the area. “After decades of working in the industry as he did, he developed a sixth sense about things,” Longoria said. 56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

HAPPY CANYON OF SANTA BARBARA A.V.A.

From a stack of boxes he was preparing for recycling, Longoria had pulled an old file with meeting notes and the 12-member roster of the then-new Santa Ynez Valley Viticulture Association dated March 19, 1985. “It was an exciting time,” Longoria said, as he rattled off names—Fred Brander, Richard Sanford, Bill Davidge, Tony Austin, Ken Brown, Jim Clendenen. He laughed at the memories that flooded his eyes, particularly about an old Italian woman named Mary Vigoroso

STE VEN BROWN

Lompoc

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY A.V.A.


STE VEN BROWN

Rick Longoria

STE VEN BROWN

who grew grapes and made wine under the Los Alamos Winery label in a dairy barn. “Everyone wanted to be involved,” Longoria said. “Everyone was relatively new to the business. You know how it is when you start a new business. You want to join everything you can join, and everyone is very positive.” Media attention in those early days was bolstered by the start of the association’s wine festival weekends that were twoday affairs of wine tasting and camaraderie. The proximity to Los Angeles 150 miles south encouraged a flow of tourists who could now explore a new weekend destination. Many of the wines were also receiving accolades and were supported by Los Angeles restaurants and retailers, who regularly hosted private tastings and wine dinners. “You knew everyone at every event,” recalled Mike Brown of Kalyra Winery, who came to the area in 1981 from UC Davis to replace Fred Brander as winemaker at Santa Ynez Valley Winery when he left to open Brander Vineyards. Kalyra’s current tasting room is in the old Santa Ynez Valley Winery that was once a dairy. “Everyone knew what you made, and you knew everyone coming up from LA because it was the same people. There were only a dozen or so wineries at the time,” Brown said. Today that number hovers around 200, ranging from tiny to large producers, all looking for a piece of the magic these initial wineries created. “It was a completely different world back then.” To Brown, the Santa Ynez Valley AVA designation makes perfect sense because of its simple unifying factors of climate and watershed. When he first arrived, UC Davis was growing hybrid vines plus the standards Cabernet Sauvignon to Riesling and performing root stock trials in their front vineyards to see what would work. Today, Brown still grows a dizzying array of aromatic white varietals in those same plots. He began to list the area’s attributes: ocean breezes, warm days, cool nights, dry summers, large temperature swings from day to night, long growing season, great acidity, balanced acid-to-sugar ratios, lower pHs... he stoped and looked at me questioningly. Did I want him to go on? “This area makes winemaking easier from the start,” he said. Vineyard Manager John Belfy of Buona Terra Farming agrees. He’s planted everything from Arneis and Chardonnay to Verdelho and Zinfandel in the Valley. He’s also seen the various trends in grape selection and farming practices shift wildly, not to mention the changes in social culture from a time when a handshake meant everything. “Everyone shared equipment and picking crews, and everyone knew how to turn on their neighbor’s frost protection,” Belfy said. It wasn’t unusual for a fellow farmer to barge into someone’s house in the middle of the night warning of freezing temperatures during a vineyard’s tender spring months. This was the time when Cabernet Franc was popular, in the late 1990s—before Syrah was briefly all the rage, and Pinot Noir rapidly became the grape darling. “It has been a steep learning curve with a lot of experimentation,” Belfy said. “Today winemakers make better wine because growers have learned to grow better grapes. We have done this together.”

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 57


COLLIN QUIRT

Grapes at Gainey Vineyard.

Today the Santa Ynez Valley boasts more wineries than any other AVA in Santa Barbara County and has also become home to four sub-AVAs within its borders: Sta. Rita Hills, Happy Canyon, Ballard Canyon and the new Los Olivos District, each of which I plan to explore in later stories. Advances in viticulture have allowed most varietals to find a proper home in their story, and winemakers have wanted to further define their borders amidst growing competition. Gainey pulled out its Chardonnay and planted it in the cooler Sta. Rita Hills. Sanford & Benedict pulled out its Cabernet Sauvignon and the warmer Happy Canyon area gladly embraced it. All of the established vineyards have gone through their growing pains, and Wathen is happy about the journey. After spending the first 15 years of his career chasing the “Holy Grail” of Cabernet Sauvignon through the county from Santa Maria through Santa Ynez, it finally found a sense of place.

Seeking the True Santa Ynez Valley As important as Wathen is to spreading the gospel of Santa Barbara County, Andrew Murray is equally beholden to the Santa Ynez Valley, which is deeply embedded in his identity. His common tale told hundreds of times over his 25-year career is that he decided to become a winemaker over a sip of Viognier in France while traveling with his parents. “I have this 58 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

wonderful mythology story about my life where I woke up here full size one day—very Zeus-like,” Murray laughs. His true story is much richer thanks to Wathen playing an instrumental role convincing the Murrays that their newly purchased property was ideal for Rhône varietals. It was the summer after Andrew’s senior year, and he had just returned from an epic European backpacking trip with his friends when his dad picked him up from the airport and immediately put him to work digging holes for the vineyard under Wathen’s guidance. “I was planting the vineyard with Billy that summer and thought, ‘Wait a minute. Dad, are we really going to sell these grapes to someone else?’ This is hard work. I am out there working in the hot sun every day and then at night making sure each vine is getting water and protecting them from gopher damage. How do you value something you have put so much love and care into?” Planting the vineyard is what made Murray decide to become a winemaker. He transferred from Berkeley to UC Davis for college and spent the first years while the vines were maturing soaking up everything he could at Foxen Winery up the road. Once the vineyard began producing, that property became his life. There were days, Murray said, he never left. His home and work were right there. The Santa Ynez Valley was exactly where he was on his small portion in the center of Foxen Canyon Road. “I always felt that this was the heartwood of the Santa Ynez Valley,” Murray said.


Extra virgin olive oils, flavored olive oils, olive tapenades, table olives, gourmet vinegars, local food products.

Open Daily 11–5

2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 olivehillfarm.com Andrew Murray

For 15 years he built his winery’s reputation on an estate model with Santa Ynez Valley AVA proudly on the label. Then, his family sold the property, and his core was suddenly gone. Murray bounced around looking for fruit from other areas in Santa Barbara and the Central Coast. While finding some gems, for years he craved the unique, specific area he had known and fallen in love with. Two years ago the opportunity to return to an estate model on Foxen Canyon Road became available through his acquisition of Curtis Winery and Vineyards, a stone’s throw from his original site. “It is such a joy that it is hard to explain the opportunity I feel once again... it is so rewarding,” Murray said. He is currently replanting portions of the Curtis vineyard, reminding him of those early days starting out in the great unknown. “I try not to make wine from other appellations because I feel so strongly that we can do it here. This is the Goldilocks climate,” he says. “I stole this from a Firestone brochure and I have made it my own. We are neither too hot nor too cold. We are a moderate, modest climate. One of the best wine climates on the planet for being a human among vines.”

THE U LTIM ATE FALL WINE & F OOD WEEK E N D

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS

OCTOBER 7-10, COLUMBUS DAY WEEKEND

Photos by Tenley Fohl Photography

FESTIVAL GRAND TASTING S ATUR DAY, O CTO BER 8 , 2 0 1 6 MISSION SANTA INÉS, SOLVANG, 1 TO 4PM $80.00 (+Ticketing Fee), at the door $90 (+Ticketing Fee) Featuring the eight wine trails of Santa Barbara Wine Country paired with dozens of wine country restaurants & food purveyors showcasing freshly harvested regional produce.

Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhone Varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine.

For an elevated & more intimate wine tasting experience become a Connoisseur Club ticketholder… Enjoy food & wine demos, seminars and live music. For information & tickets visit celebrationofharvest.com or call 805-688-0881

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 59


Cottage Industry Starting Your Own Food Business by Janice Cook Knight

H

ave you ever dreamed of starting your own food business, or do you know someone who did? Do you have a scrumptious family recipe you know others would love?

60 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

A selection of cottage industry food products, from top, clockwise: Cabin 11 Bakery, Hippy Pop popcorn, Red Hen Cannery marmalade, Cinnies vegan cinnamon roll, Good Stuff doughnut holes, Lemon & Coriander preserved lemons, Chapala Farms jam, Sugar Cat Studio cupcake mix.


My Aunt Doris, now 82, loved to bake. She made The Cottage Food Law provides two kinds of licenses: Type A, which requires no fees on the part of the producer, cookies, cakes and pies, and she hoped one day to open allows approved foods to be made at home and sold directly a bakery and share her baking skills with the world. Alas, to the consumer. If, however, a producer wishes to sell his or the cost of starting her own bakery enterprise was too her homemade product to a restaurant or retail store, a Type daunting. Instead, her audience was limited to a smaller B license is required. The cost is currently $300, and the circle of family and friends. licensee must have an inspection from the health department, Many would-be food entrepreneurs have been deterred initially, and is subject to a health inspection once a year. by cost. Previously, making a food product for sale to With the Type A license, an inspector need never darken the public required the vendor to prepare the food in an your door unless there is a problem with a product and a expensive commercial kitchen. That changed in 2012, consumer complains about it. when the Cottage Food Bill became California law (effective The Cottage Food Law does have a financial cap: January 2013), making it easier for some food visionaries Annual gross sales cannot exceed $50,000. to fulfill their dreams. This was indeed exciting news. The need for a certified kitchen for low-risk products seemed What does this law mean to some of our Central Coast unnecessary to many people, and thankfully, lawmakers and food producers? some health officials agreed. Maureen Caffey started her Red Hen Cannery in 2013. It started when an article in the Los Angeles Times feaThe Cottage Food Law enabled her to begin production tured an LA baker, Mark Stambler. In 2011, Stambler was without a lot of costly overhead. Caffey grew up on a farm baking bread at home and selling it to a restaurant; he was in Carpinteria, that is still actively being farmed by her dad, quickly shut down by the health department. This caught granddad and uncles. Her family has been there since the the attention of Assemblyman Mike Gatto, who wanted 1860s, producing various crops over the years: lima beans, to help find a way for hay, oranges, berries (they had a U-pick Stambler and others There are about 64 vendors using the Cottage blackberry farm) and, to work out of their Food Law in the city of Santa Barbara, and over 250 recently, avocados. She homes. California’s lives next door to her economy was just starttotal countywide. All of those licenses are current, parents, and has access ing to emerge from the though those who hold them may not be actively to some of their farm’s economic downturn, old fruit trees. and so it was a fruitful selling a product yet. time for the California Caffey uses fruit legislature to pass a bill from a 60-year-old that would encourage small businesses and increase employValencia orange tree to make marmalade. Other fruits she ment. Assemblyman Gatto drafted the Cottage Food Bill, uses in her preserves include kumquats, tangelos, Bearss with amendments that were acceptable to the Department limes, Meyer lemons, kalamansi (Philippine limes), blood oranges, passion fruit, peaches, plums, cherries, blackberries, of Public Health. Governor Jerry Brown stated that the raspberries, apricots, figs and apples. Cottage Food Law would “make it easier for people to do business in California,” and signed the law into effect. At Kenyon College and the Naropa institute, Caffey studied writing and art. She worked as the farm educator at The law allows Cottage Food Operators to prepare Fairview Gardens in Goleta. She also worked in kitchens— only certain kinds of foods in home kitchens. The foods The Timbers in Summerland and a sandwich shop in allowed are low-risk products, and the list of acceptable Carpinteria—and she realized that she loved working in the foods is very specific. The foods pose no risk of botulism kitchen. The Cottage Food Law gave her the possibility to or other dangerous pathogens. Baked goods, like the kind start a food business at home. my aunt would have liked to sell, are on the safe list as long as they don’t contain any cream, custard or meat fillings. Both her mother and grandmother were renowned Certain dried fruits, nut mixes and nut butters and pasta for their jams, and so Caffey is putting her family training are allowed, as well as preserves and jams made with fruit, to good use—using family-grown fruit with simple, to name a few of the allowed items. (See a full list on the timeless, family-tested recipes. She sells at our local farmers next page.) markets—a system she also knows well, as her dad has had a presence in the markets here for 20 years. Again, only foods on the safe list will be approved for the cottage food industry. Fermented foods, and low-acid Her recipes are streamlined. Even so, she tries to offer foods such as canned vegetables and meat, require permits flavors you can’t buy at the supermarket: Instead of a simple and manufacturing processes that are not approved for strawberry jam, she makes strawberry-vanilla and strawberry with lime and hibiscus. home preparation.

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After a year and a half, Caffey was able to make the leap into a commercial kitchen. This allows her wider distribution, and the chance to make products that wouldn’t be allowed by the cottage law—such as her tomato jam (which is low-acid so must be made in a commercial kitchen setting). She says, “The cottage law allows businesses to scale up. It allowed me to test the market with my products.” As a food producer selling directly to clients, she received immediate feedback from consumers. She spent that year and a half hearing what her customers wanted. “At the farmers market, customers are not shy.”

Thinking about making a cottage food product? Here is a list of the foods approved for preparation. Visit CDPH.ca.gov for more details. Baked goods, without cream, custard or meat fillings, such as breads, biscuits, churros, cookies, pastries and tortillas. Candy, such as brittle and toffee. Chocolate-covered nonperishable foods, such as nuts and dried fruits. Dried fruit. Dried pasta. Dry baking mixes. Fruit pies, fruit empanadas and fruit tamales. Granola, cereals and trail mixes. Herb blends and dried mole paste. Honey and sweet sorghum syrup. Jams, jellies, preserves and fruit butters that comply with the standard described in Part 150 of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Nut mixes and nut butters. Popcorn. Vinegar and mustard. Roasted coffee and dried tea. Waffle cones and pizelles. Cotton candy. Candied apples. Confections such as salted caramel, fudge, marshmallow bars, chocolate-covered marshmallow, nuts and hard candy, or any combination thereof. Buttercream frosting, buttercream icing, buttercream fondant and gum paste that do not contain eggs, cream, or cream cheese. Dried or dehydrated vegetables. Dried vegetarian-based soup mixes. Vegetable and potato chips. Ground chocolate. Seasoning salt. Flat icing.

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Caffey’s success is just what the cottage food law was designed for, according to Larry Fay, environmental health director for Santa Barbara County. Cottage Food Operators can test the market and see if their products are viable before acquiring a commercial kitchen. Fay says that the Cottage Food Law “balances what people want to do with the necessary safety precautions in place.” He does not know of any food-borne outbreaks associated with the Cottage Food Law in California. Operators must take a basic course in food safety within three months of obtaining their license and follow the regulations. And operators have good reason to follow these rules, as they will benefit from satisfied customers. No one wants a customer’s health to be at risk. Cottage Food Operators must also check local zoning laws to make sure they are in compliance. Increased customer traffic, for example, in a dense neighborhood could potentially become a problem. Also, they may need a business license or other permits, so should check with their local jurisdictions. Caffey said working under the cottage law was easier than operating at the commercial kitchen level, because if you need information you can talk to the local office. There is more bureaucracy at the state level. Requirements for food labeling at the commercial level have been her biggest challenge: “Every jurisdiction has a different labeling requirement.” There are about 64 vendors using the Cottage Food Law in the city of Santa Barbara, and over 250 total countywide. All of those licenses are current, though those who hold them may not be actively selling a product yet. The tiny storefront known as Isabella Gourmet Foods in downtown Santa Barbara is a great place to find local foods. Many of the products carried by proprietor Amy Chalker were produced under the Cottage Food Law. These include Red Hen Cannery’s preserves; Cabin 11 Bakery; Cinnies vegan cinnamon rolls; Good Stuff baked treats and vegan doughnuts; and Integrity Cacao chocolates. Anneli Clavering started her Cabin 11 crackers company because she missed the cracker breads available in her native Sweden. A Santa Barbara resident for nine years, she developed a tasty gluten-free cracker in two flavors: fennel and caraway. These are multi-seed crackers mixed 50/50 with cornmeal, and all ingredients are organic. She is in the process of developing a gluten-free biscotti. Katie Bellanger is the creator of Cinnies, vegan iced cinnamon rolls in enticing flavors such as Cookies & Cream, Coconut Salted Caramel and Funfetti with colorful sprinkles. Bellanger also offers a gluten-free Cinnie. As a kid she always dreamed of opening her own restaurant. Bellanger attended culinary school at the University of Missouri Food and Beverage program, with a minor in business. Besides making her popular Cinnies, in late September Bellanger plans to open a restaurant called The Honey B, located above Antioch University at the corner of Chapala and Cota Streets. She plans to sell gourmet savory waffle sandwiches with cheeses and herbs, vegan organic salads and rice bowls, her Cinnies in 14 flavors and her naturally colored rainbow bagels. A tower garden located in the café, provided by LA Urban Farms, will provide produce for the restaurant.


Yuko Walters of Good Stuff Baked Treats makes luscious cookies with some traditional ingredients such as butter, eggs and chocolate chips, and also colorful vegan doughnuts made with coconut oil and vegan butter. Her products are a popular item at Isabella Gourmet Foods, and her creative doughnut flavors change daily: You might find ginger glaze and piecrust, or a green matcha drizzled with glaze, or perhaps a magenta raspberry glazed doughnut. Walters only started baking after she became a parent. The cottage food law inspired her to go into business. Though her doughnut toppings look complex, she likes keeping the flavors simple and fresh. Her products are also found at Breakfast Culture Club at the corner of Chapala and Ortega. A little farther south, Merissa Marcuccella of Thousand Oaks has used the Cottage Food Law to create Integrity Cacao. Her chocolates are vegan, organic and sweetened with maple syrup. Marcuccella uses high-quality ingredients such as Fair Trade raw chocolate flavored with essential oils. One frustration she has with the Cottage Food Law is that she is not allowed to ship her chocolates across state lines, so must confine her business to California. Her most popular chocolate flavor is the Celtic Sea Salt. I tried her rose truffles, meltingly smooth and intensely chocolaty with the sophisticated accent of powdered pink rose petals. All of the above mentioned operators have Type B permits, allowing them to sell to restaurants or stores. But some are content to only sell directly to their customers. Victoria Williamson recently obtained her Type A permit. Calling herself “The Sourdough Bread Lady,” she makes breads of three types: a rye-kamut blend, an oat-kamut blend and an all kamut (kamut is an ancient form of non-hybridized wheat). Her breads have a long ferment, and the organic grains are first sprouted, then dehydrated, then freshly ground before making into bread. These are hearty loaves, with added seeds and some spices, such as turmeric. Williamson, who was born in Azerbaijan (formerly part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics), bases her bread-making techniques on old family recipes. Joan Kershaw is another bread baker who recently started selling organic breads using the cottage permit. Kershaw offers a gluten-free strawberry molasses bread, and also a whole-grain sourdough made with rice, oat, quinoa and rye flours. She has a Type A permit, and potential customers should get on her email list to receive notice of the week’s offerings and to arrange pickup or delivery. I told my Aunt Doris about the new law. She said she is happy for the present and future entrepreneurs to have this chance at business. Given the creativity of the producers whose foods I have tried, and the quality of their products, I can only pronounce the Cottage Food Law a very good thing. As more people become aware of the law, what other wonderful products will be developed?

There are currently over 250 Cottage Food Operators in Santa Barbara County. The majority of them have a Type A license and can sell only directly. Here are the ones listed on the County’s website currently operating with a Type B license, meaning you are more apt to find their products at retail stores. Baklava Royale Broken Clock Vinegar Works Cabin 11 Bakery Cathyz Cookies Chapala Farms Dart Artisan Coffee Four Daughters Jellin Good Stuff Grandma Bainer’s Bakery Hippy Pop Jelly Empire Jimmy’s Redneck Rub Katie’s Cottage Company Koval Confections L.J.’s Southern Belle Cookies Lemon & Coriander Lompoc Honey Mela Foods Newtrition Works Popcorn King Pretzel Guild Refugio Roasting Company Sage Family Seasoning Santa Barbara Fudge Standard Loaf Starlight Kitchen Sugar Cat Studio Sweet Lisi’s Baked Goods Tom’s Mom’s Sweet Treats Two Nuts for Granola Vincent Farm Kitchen Wanda’s Witchin’

To contact producers named in this story: Katie Bellanger: http://kebwg3.wixsite.com/cinnies Maureen Caffey: www.redhencannery.com Anneli Clavering: www.cabin11.com

Janice Cook Knight is the author of The Follow Your Heart Cookbook: Recipes from the Vegetarian Restaurant and Follow Your Heart’s Vegetarian Soup Cookbook. She has taught cooking for 35 years. Her article in the Fall 2014 issue of Edible Santa Barbara, “Hurray for the Orange, Red and Gold: The Season for Persimmons,” won the 2015 M.F.K. Fisher Award in the Print Category. JaniceCookKnight.com

Joan Kershaw: joankersh@gmail.com Merissa Marcuccella: www.integritycacao.com Yuko Walters: eatgoodstuffeveryday.com Victoria Williamson: sourdoughbreadlady@gmail.com

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Holiday Feasts by Pascale Beale

E

very winter during my early childhood in England, as soon as the school holidays began we piled into the family car, packed to the gills with winter coats wrapped around an assortment of delectable treats from our favorite English purveyors of fine food—namely whole Stilton, Christmas puddings and Brandy Butter from Fortnum & Mason. We made the very long, often-frigid trek from London, across the choppy English Channel, the bleak landscape of northern France, through Paris, down the Route Nationale 6, turning east in Lyon to wind our way up the snow-covered mountain passes to my grandparents’ home in the French Alps. My memories of that time consist of a series of gustatory tableaux, each more elaborate than the next. The dinner table set with bone china, delicate crystal that glittered in the candlelight on embroidered linens and a procession of delicate dishes carried from the kitchen. It became apparent to me at an early age that holiday meals meant days of careful preparations, multiple shopping expeditions and hours in the kitchen. My grandmother orchestrated all of this with an apparent ease that belied the considerable task of feeding the hordes that descended on their house for the end-of-year festivities. Le réveillon (Christmas Eve dinner) was serious business, and I longed to be part of the preparations. As soon as I was old enough, I was entrusted with setting the table, under my grandmother’s careful supervision. I made decorations and wrote place cards. She was exacting, and I strove to live up to her standards —not an easy task! Every one of my grandparents’ children upheld these traditions and when my aunt and uncle took over the relay of hosting le réveillon we all made a beeline for their home in St. Etienne. My uncle Yves, a jovial bon-vivant, would make everyone welcome, a glass of wine in hand, homemade saucisson and pâté on the kitchen table. Serious business needed attention, he would say, as he opened the back door of the kitchen to reveal 4 or 5 crates of oysters from Arcachon that had to be shucked. Everyone would gather around the table, tea towel in one hand, oyster shucker in the other, and get to work, regaling each other with stories of Christmases past. My aunt prepared the crushed ice for the platters and one by one the oysters would be laid out on their glistening beds. All their réveillons began in this manner, followed by roasts with small potatoes cooked 64 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

in duck fat, delicate green salads, platters of cheese and a grand Buche de Noel to cap it all off, each course paired with wines from their cellar. It was magical, and I delighted in the rituals as much as the degustation. Le réveillon finished in the early hours of the morning, leaving precious little time for Christmas Day preparations. We did not have Christmas stockings; instead, each person placed a pair of shoes under or by the tree. You would have to wait until morning to see if your shoes had been filled with treats from Le Pere Noel (Father Christmas). One year I tiptoed down to the semi-dark living room after everyone had gone to sleep, to place my gifts in each person’s shoes. I was almost there when I realized that I was not alone. There was someone peering at the shoes, large bag in hand! Who could that be? I think I scared my grandmother more than she scared me. We both jumped, and then realizing whom it was, laughed out loud, only to shoosh each other lest we wake anyone else up. We played Le Pere Noel together and reminisced about all the celebrations we had at her house and how we would decorate the tree with my grandfather. We talked about favorite dishes and sweet treats. We filled shoes side by side, then whispered bonne nuit to each other as we tiptoed back to our rooms. From that night on I felt as though I had become part of the fabric of our réveillons and entrusted with preserving the traditions for future generations. Little did I know that this would happen sooner than I thought! Work brought me to California and the prospect of a balmy (read 80°) holiday season presented itself. What should we do? Do we serve the same meal? Can we find the same ingredients? “We” were a bunch of French and expat Brits (family and friends) living in Los Angeles. Shopping expeditions ensued, preparations made, tree trimmed, stockings replaced shoes by the tree, tables set, glasses polished and wine chilled. We found smoked salmon and served it with toast and crème fraîche. We poached a whole salmon paired with steamed potatoes. We found a Christmas pudding for dessert. The wine was from California and France. The meal reflected the eclectic nature of the guests. We started new traditions, an Anglo-French culinary mixology. English pudding for le réveillon, and French Buche de Noel


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Salmon Coulibiac

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for a more traditional Christmas Day meal. Gone was the stuffed turkey, the heavy sauces and purées from my grandmother’s table, replaced with duck confit served with an herb salad. There is, however, one constant: Although the setting may be less formal, the continuing thread that ties all these celebrations together is the coming together of family and friends, to enjoy each other’s company, to laugh about meals past, to share in the preparation and to relish the bounty before us. Each year in the wee hours of Christmas Day as I tiptoe down to prepare the breakfast table and fill stockings, I think about my grandmother and how she created a delicious sanctuary that enveloped the end-of-year celebrations. This past Christmas, my daughter said, “I know it’s you, Mum.” I smiled and said, “Would you like to be part of the transformation?” “No, not yet,” she said. “I’d like it to be magical a little longer.” Soon enough the baton will pass, and new traditions will begin.

Lightly flour a clean work surface and roll out 1 piece of the dough into a rectangle that is 16 by 10 inches. Center this piece of dough on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush with some of the beaten eggs. Spread out half the rice mixture in the center of the dough leaving a 2-inch-wide border. Lay all the salmon strips side by side over the rice mixture so that you re-create the shape of the whole side of salmon. Cover the salmon with the remaining rice/spinach mixture. Fold up the dough to cover the sides of the salmon. The dough will not reach over the top of the top layer of rice. Brush the outside edges of the dough with more of the beaten egg mixture. Roll out the second piece of dough into a rectangle that is 16 by 8 inches. Place this strip of dough on top of the rice mixture so that it drapes and covers the sides of the dough. Your salmon and rice mixture should now be completely encased in dough. Brush all of the dough with the remaining egg mixture. Bake for 20–25 minutes. The dough will be golden brown.

RECIPES

Remove from the oven. Cut inch-wide slices and serve on warmed plates. Served with the herb and chive coulis.

Salmon Coulibiac

FOR THE PASTRY DOUGH

Coulibiacs were all the rage in the 1950s and ’60s. Unfortunately, as with all fads, they passed. What a huge shame in this case as it is a wonderful dish, particularly for a special occasion. I often make it on Christmas Eve as the presentation is beautiful and festive, and because the pastry is filled with wild rice and spinach encasing the salmon, you do not need anything other than the herb sauce to serve alongside.

9 ounces (2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour

Makes 8–10 servings

Place all the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Use repeated pulses until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Use longer pulses until the dough has formed a ball. The texture is very smooth and slightly moist.

1 whole side salmon, approximately 4 pounds, cut crosswise into 1 ⁄ -inch-wide strips 2 1 tablespoon Herbes de Poisson (a mix of mustard, coriander and fennel seeds and coarse salt) 1 tablespoon lemon olive oil Olive oil 1 pound spinach 4–5 green onions, finely chopped 3 cups cooked wild rice or wild rice mix Freshly ground pepper 2 batches of the dough recipe (see below) 2 extra eggs, beaten in a small bowl

Preheat oven to 400°. Place all the salmon strips in a bowl with the Herbes de Poisson and lemon oil. Coat the salmon well. Set aside. Pour a little olive oil in a large skillet placed over medium-high heat. Add in the chopped green onions and cook for 5 minutes, then add in the spinach and cook for 2–3 minutes or until it has just wilted. Remove from the heat. Put all the spinach in a large mixing bowl and add in the pre-cooked rice, a teaspoon of salt and 4–5 turns of the peppermill. Mix all of these ingredients together well. 66 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

51 ⁄ 2 ounces (11 ⁄ 3 sticks) slightly softened butter, cut into small pieces. Zest of 1 lemon 1 large egg Pinch of salt

Wrap up the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 20 minutes before using. HERB AND CHIVE COULIS Makes 8 servings as an accompaniment 1 bunch dill, finely chopped 1 bunch chives, finely chopped 2 tablespoons flat Italian parsley, finely chopped 1 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice Zest of 1 lemon 1

⁄ 4 cup vegetable stock

Salt Pepper

Place all the ingredients in a food processor and blend until you have a fine sauce. If it is still a little thick, add some additional vegetable stock, 1 tablespoon at a time. Check the seasoning and add some coarse sea salt and pepper if needed. The coulis should be bright green. You can make this up to 2 hours ahead of time.


Duck Confit I love duck confit. It is one of my favorite things to eat and the wonderful thing about making it yourself is that any leftovers can be warmed up and put into a salad the next day, which is equally delicious.

After 12 hours rinse the salt from the duck legs and dry on paper towels. Lay the duck legs, skin side down, in a frying pan placed over low heat. Cook for 15–20 minutes, until golden brown, turning them over once.

Makes 8 servings

Heat the oven to 300°. Transfer the legs to a small flame-proof casserole or oven-proof dish and add enough of the melted duck fat to cover the legs completely. Cover tightly with a lid and cook in the oven until the duck has rendered all of its fat and is so tender that it is almost falling off the bone—this will take approximately 2½ hours.

8 duck legs, trimmed of any excess fat 6–8 tablespoons coarse salt 2 teaspoons peppercorns, slightly crushed 5–6 sprigs fresh thyme 4–5 bay leaves, broken into pieces

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3 pounds duck fat, melted

In a small bowl combine the salt, peppercorns, thyme and bay leaves and mix together well. Rub each duck leg with some of the salt mixture, place in a shallow dish, cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 12 hours.

To preserve the duck, place some of the duck fat in the bottom of a preserving jar. Carefully place the legs on top and then cover the legs completely with more duck fat. Be sure there are no air bubbles. Cover and refrigerate for 1 week. The fat encasing the legs will preserve the meat. To serve, remove the legs from the duck fat, scraping off as much fat as you can. Place the pieces in a roasting pan and roast in a 325° oven for 30 minutes. EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 67


68 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

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Meyer Lemon, Persimmon and Microgreen Salad


Meyer Lemon, Persimmon and Microgreen Salad The fabulous thing about Meyer lemons is that you can eat the whole fruit, preferably in thin slices, including the rind. They’re sweet and add a slightly piquant bite to any dish. In this vinaigrette, the zing in the lemons is balanced by the pomegranate molasses. It’s not molasses, exactly, rather a reduction of pomegranate juice and sugar. It’s a sweet and tangy alternative to honey, which you could substitute in this recipe. Do try the molasses, though, as it’s a treat.

F R I E N D S • F L O W E R S • F A M I LY • F O O D • F U N

Enjoy Autumn at the

7 Markets • 6 Days a Week Rain or Shine

Makes 8 servings 8 Meyer lemons, very thinly sliced

What’s in your basket this week?

4–5 Fuyu persimmons, very thinly sliced, horizontally, using a mandoline if possible 4 ounces microgreens 1 large handful cilantro leaves Juice of 1 large lemon 1

⁄ 4 cup olive oil

1 teaspoon pomegranate molasses Large pinch of coarse sea salt 4–5 grinds of black pepper

Arrange the Meyer lemon and persimmon slices on a large platter or individual plates in an attractive pattern. Work in concentric circles, alternating the fruit so that it looks like a giant flower. Place the microgreens in the center of the platter or plates. Sprinkle with the cilantro leaves. Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, pomegranate molasses, salt and pepper in a small bowl. When ready to serve, drizzle the salad with the vinaigrette.

S AT U R D AY S

S U N D AY S

Downtown Santa Barbara

Camino Real Marketplace

Corner of Santa Barbara & Cota Street 8:30am – 1:00pm

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 10:00am – 2:00pm

T U E S D AY S

Solvang Village

W E D N E S D AY S

Old Town Santa Barbara 500 & 600 Blocks of State Street 4:00pm – 7:30pm 3:00pm – 6:30pm (Beginning Nov 1)

Copenhagen Drive & 1st Street 2:30pm – 6:30pm 2:30pm – 6:00pm (Beginning Nov 1) F R I D AY S

T H U R S D AY S

Camino Real Marketplace In Goleta at Storke & Hollister 3:00pm – 6:00pm

Montecito 100 & 1200 Block of Coast Village Road 8:00am – 11:15am

Carpinteria Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons and Salade. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

800 Block of Linden Avenue 3:00pm – 6:30pm 3:00pm – 6:00pm (Beginning Nov 1)

facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket

www.sbfarmersmarket.org (805) 962-5354

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FA L L H A WRI V NETSETR &E H DO I BLLI D E AY E VEEdNi bTl Se E v e n t s OCTOBER 1–31 Eat Local Challenge

OC T O B ER

Edible Santa Barbara presents the eighth annual Eat Local Challenge for the month of October. We encourage you to take a pledge to eat and drink local foods for 31 days. For more info visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com and join the Facebook Group and RSVP for the event at Eat Local Challenge.

F RIDAY

S AT U RD AY

WED N E S D AY

OCTOBER 1

OCTOBER 5

FrancFest!

Edible Santa Barbara New Issue Release Party

4:30–8pm at Buttonwood Farm & Winery Calling all ‘Franc-o-philes’ to celebrate Cabernet Franc and those who craft a wine from this most unique grape. Expect more than a dozen wineries pouring their Cab Franc or Franc-based blends, grilled snacks, a bit of music and ending with a bonfire on our beautiful pondside beach. Food prepared by a local chef available for purchase. Tickets at ButtonwoodWinery.com.

5–7pm at The Santa Barbara Wine Collective & Helena Avenue Bakery 131 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara Join us to celebrate the release of the fall issue of Edible Santa Barbara. Pick up a copy of the new issue and mingle with the Edible team. Free admission. Local wine and food available for purchase. Visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com for more information.

SATUR D AY

S AT U R D AY

OCTOBER 7

OCTOBER 8

OCTOBER 8

Harvest Dinner

Celebration of Harvest

7pm at Root 246 in Solvang

1–4pm; Old Mission Santa Inés Solvang

Paint in the Vineyard at Saarloos + Sons

Join the Santa Barbara County wine community for a small respite from the harvest, along with attending wine lovers, who will all reach deep into their personal cellars, to attend the Harvest Dinner at Root 246 in the Fountain Courtyard, in downtown Solvang. More info and tickets at http://www.celebrationofharvest.com/ friday-night-dinner.

10am–1pm; 2971 Grand Ave. Los Olivos

Celebrate the 2016 Harvest as all 100+ winery members gather to present their wines, often poured by the winemakers themselves. The Festival also presents some of the best local food from restaurants, caterers and gourmet food creators. Listen to live music from various bands and musicians. CelebrationOfHarvest.com

This painting in the vineyard class provides a beautiful, stress-free environment that will both inspire your creative spirit and indulge the winelover in you. $65 per person includes a tasting of Saarloos + Sons wine and all the supplies necessary to create your landscape masterpiece. 805 688-1200 for tickets.

M ONDAY

SATUR D AY

S AT U R D AY

OCTOBER 10

OCTOBER 15

OCTOBER 15

Salumi + Beer Class

Santa Barbara Harbor & Seafood Festival

Santa Barbara Wine & Seafood Pairing

10am–5pm at 132-A Harbor Way Santa Barbara

Noon–4pm at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

6:30pm at C’est Cheese Santa Barbara It’s time for the C’est Cheese annual Salumi + Beer Class hosted by Mr. Michael himself. Join him as you taste through 8 different delicious cured meats paired with Bell’s beer from Michigan and Michael will share all his great knowledge on the art of curing pork! $20 advance tickets required. CestCheese.com

Seafood lovers of all ages can go to the Harbor for delectable regional seafood specialties, cooking demonstrations, interactive maritime education, boat rides, live music and more. Free admission. HarborFestival.org

S ATU RDAY

M O N D AY & TUE S D AY

Chef Dario Furlati of Ca’ Dario & Ca’ Dario Pizzeria, Chef Clark Staub of Full of Life Flatbread, and Chef Conrad Gonzales of Valle Fresh will prepare locally inspired seafood dishes to be paired with Santa Barbara County wine. $25 pre-sale; $35 at the door; SBMM.org or 805 456-8747 for tickets.

S AT U RD AY

MON D AY

OCTOBER 15

OCTOBER 24 & 25

OCTOBER 29

OCTOBER 31

Farm to Table Dinner

Cheeses of Northern Italy

Costume Contest

Ghost Village Road

5–7pm at Zaca Mesa Winery in Los Olivos

6:30pm at C’est Cheese Santa Barbara

10am–4pm at Riverbench Winery Santa Maria

3–6 pm at Here’s the Scoop Montecito

Taste cheeses from the three main northern regions: Piedmont, Lombardy and the Veneto. Due to all the fresh water that comes down from the Italian Alps, this area is home to some incredible cheese. Taste through five that really showcase each of their areas alongside a nice smooth Barbera d’Asti red wine. $20 advance tickets required. CestCheese.com

Join the fun in the Riverbench Winery customer and staff costume contest. Come out in your scariest or most creative costume and get a chance to win some fun prizes. Prizes will be given out to the following: most creative costume couple or group, scariest costume and most creative costume. Contest is free and for age 21 and up.

Costume contest and seasonal treat “Worms & Dirt” gelato for kids in costume. Part of the “Ghost Village Road” Halloween events on Coast Village Road. 1187 Coast Village Road, Montecito.

Celebrate fall harvest with an intimate evening of farm-to-table dining. Enjoy course after course paired expertly with Zaca Mesa wines. In the midst of the harvest, experience the newly renovated Zaca Mesa courtyard as chefs prepare seasonal dishes using locally sourced ingredients. It will be an evening full of incredible food and phenomenal wine. Space is limited; reserve with Ashley@ ZacaMesa.com or 805 688-9339 x 311

70 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com THUR SDAY

T H U R S DAY

NOVEMBER 10

NOVEMBER 12

NOVEMBER 17

Artisanal Bread II

Paint in the Vineyard at Gainey Winery

Vegetarian Appetizers of India & Nepal

10am–1pm; 3950 E. Highway 246 Santa Ynez

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

This painting in the vineyard class provides a beautiful, stress-free environment that will both inspire your creative spirit and indulge the wine-lover in you. $65 per person includes a tasting of Gainey Winery wine and all the supplies necessary to create your landscape masterpiece. 805 688-0558 for tickets.

Appetizers of India & Nepal with a Vegetarian/Vegan twist. This class will cover Vegetable Momos (Tibetan potstickers), Mint & Tamarind Chutney, Aloo Tikka (Spiced Potato Cakes), Paneer Tikka (Grilled Paneer Cheese Kebab), and Gobi Manchurian (Fried & Sauced Cauliflower). Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

NO VE MBER

S AT U RD AY

New Recipes & Techniques to Mix, Ferment, Shape & Bake Hand Crafted Breads & Artisanal Loaves. This class will cover brioche, rosemary focaccia, garlic & brown butter ciabatta and bagels. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com

S ATU RDAY

SATUR D AY

S AT U R D AY

T H U R S DAY

NOVEMBER 19

NOVEMBER 19

NOVEMBER 26

NOVEMBER 24

Fall Orchard

Los Alamos Third Saturday Evening Stroll

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co.’s 6th Anniversary Party

Thanksgiving at Angel Oak

5–8pm at downtown Los Alamos

1–9:30pm at Fig Mt. Buellton Taproom & Brewery, 45 Industrial Way, Buellton

A spectacular four-course menu will highlight the freshest flavors of the season in a stunning setting overlooking the ocean. $115 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Reservations: AngelOakSB.com

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria Crisp fall days call for a seasonal menu celebrating the harvest. In this class, you will create a fall inspired menu of Apple & Cranberry Stuffing, Cider Roasted Carrots & Parsnips, Roasted Pork Loin with Sweet Onion Filling, and Mini Apple Pies with Salted Caramel Sauce. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com

The Los Alamos merchants on Bell Street invite everyone to experience Los Alamos community charm first-hand with its new Third Saturdays program. Ongoing. For more information call 805 344-1900.

Enjoy live music, contests, food from their new restaurant, cask releases and more as they celebrate six years of great craft beer!

Bacara Resort and Spa

SATUR D AY

S U N D AY

S AT U R DAY

DECEMBER 3

DECEMBER 4

DECEMBER 10

Holiday Open House

Fall Pies & Tarts

1–4pm at the Brander Vineyard Santa Ynez

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

Edible SB Holiday Pop-Up Shop

D E C E MBER

Join the festivities at Brander Vineyard for a late fall holiday open house. Enjoy wine tasting on current releases, futures tasting & sales, and holiday shopping. 2401 N. Refugio Road; brander.com

One slice just isn’t ever enough! This class will cover Mini Pumpkin Pies with Fallen Leaf “Cut-Out” Crust, Brandy Pear & Almond Cream Tart, Apple Streusel Pie and Brown Sugar Cranberry Tartlets. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com.

S ATU RDAY

SATUR D AY– S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U RD AY – SU NDAY

DECEMBER 10

DECEMBER 10–11

DECEMBER 17

DECEMBER 24&25

Paint in the Vineyard at Brander Winery

Christmas on the Trail

Nordic Holiday

Christmas at Angel Oak

Join the Foxen Canyon wineries for a special holiday weekend event. Your Passport allows you to enjoy 20 one-ounce pours from 13 participating wineries on the famous Foxen Canyon Wine Trail. On Saturday each winery will provide delicious small bites for you to enjoy. Your ticket also gets you a commemorative GoVino glass and special gift. Each winery will also offer special deals for Passport holders. Tickets are available at fcwt2016xmas. eventbrite.com.

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

10am–1pm; 2401 N. Refugio Rd. Santa Ynez This painting in the vineyard class provides a beautiful, stress-free environment that will both inspire your creative spirit and indulge the winelover in you. $65 per person includes a tasting of Brander Winery wine and all the supplies necessary to create your landscape masterpiece. 805 688-0558 for tickets.

Festive holiday foods from the Nordic tradition. This class will cover Smoked Salmon Blinis, Caramel Potatoes, Sweet & Sour Cabbage, Roast Pork with Red Currant Gravy, and Cinnamon & Sugar Ebelskivers. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com

1–6pm at Telegraph Brewing Co. Santa Barbara Featuring businesses from the Edible Gift Guide on pages 40–43, seasonal grub from HEAT Culinary and brews from Telegraph Brewing Company. Sip and savor as you shop for holiday gifts and meet some of Santa Barbara’s best local artisans. Free and open to the public. Food and beverage for purchase.

Bacara Resort and Spa Enjoy an unforgettable holiday with your loved ones at Angel Oak. Chef Vincent Lesage is pleased to present four exquisite specials, offered in addition to Angel Oak’s regular a la carte menu. Reservations: AngelOakSB.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 71


edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

E AT DRINK LOC AL GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food tradition and lifestyle. We’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Restaurant 2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and awardwinning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Restaurant one of the most sought-after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food-friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976.

The Hitching Post II 406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving wood-grilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

Carpinteria The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd. 805 200-3030 TheFoodLiaison.com Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing many locally grown organic ingredients, enjoy daily rotating entrées and soups, seasonal menu, and gourmet salad bar. Corporate and event catering since 2013. Sign up for cooking classes online. Lunch Counter Mon–Fri 11am–3pm. 72 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Giannfranco’s Trattoria

The Bistro at Bacara

666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com

8301 Hollister Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93117 877 804-8632 BacaraResort.com

Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm; closed Tue.

Named “Top 100 Best Al Fresco Dining Restaurants in America” by OpenTable, The Bistro offers a casual and relaxed atmosphere to dine and enjoy sweeping views of the coastline. Local produce and sustainable seafood highlight an acclaimed menu of traditional bistro favorites, including brick oven flatbreads, seasonal salads, and the signature Bistro burger. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave. 805 242-1151 HeatCulinary.com Santa Barbara County’s culinary school, food truck and full service caterer. HEAT events are known for personalized service, organic ingredients, large portions and attention to detail. Offering originality and undivided attention to create a memorable event.

Sly’s 686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat–Sun 9am–3pm.

Goleta Angel Oak at Bacara 8301 Hollister Ave. 877 804-8632 AngelOakSB.com Angel Oak is a modern steak and seafood restaurant showcasing the culinary knowledge of Chef Vincent Lesage. The diverse menu includes classic steakhouse dishes under a certified Kobe and dry-aged beef program, as well as locally-sourced fare such as Santa Barbara’s famous uni. All set against a stunning ocean backdrop. Hours: Sun–Thur 6–10pm; Fri & Sat 6–11pm.

Backyard Bowls 5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods 115 E. College Ave., Ste. 10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com High-quality local & imported specialty foods, including charcuterie, gourmet cheeses, a fullservice deli, exotic meats (alligator, wild boar, bison and more), specialty foods from around the world, and local beers and wines. Catering available; small intimate affairs to large special events. Open MonWed 10am–6pm, Thu–Fri 10am–7pm, Sat 10am–6pm and Sun 10am–4pm.

Foley Estates 6121 E. Hwy. 246 805 737-6222 FoleyWines.com Foley Estates Vineyard & Winery is the realization of vintner Bill Foley’s dream to produce world-class Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Syrah in Santa Barbara County. Open daily 10am–5pm.


Longoria Wines

Bob’s Well Bread

Pico at The General Store

415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866-759-4637 LongoriaWine.com

550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com

458 Bell St. 805 344-1122 LosAlamosGeneralStore.com

Longoria Wines is a small family-owned winery with over three decades of producing acclaimed artisanal wines from some of the finest vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Enjoy a tasting or a glass of wine in the tasting room or lounge of the restored historic JM Club at their new winery facility in Lompoc at 415 E. Chestnut Avenue, open daily 11am–4:30pm.

Bob’s Well Bread is about great bread, made the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches and baked to perfection in a custom-built, stone-deck oven. Stop by their bakery for baguettes, croissants, bagels and more. Closed Tue and Wed.

Pico at The Los Alamos General Store brings a new culinary, wine and shopping experience to "Little LA", in the heart of Santa Barbara's Wine Country.

Scratch Kitchen 610 N. H. St. 805 819-0829 Scratch-Kitchen.com With a wealth of local and seasonal produce and local wines, Scratch Kitchen aims to highlight all the best culinary elements of the Lompoc and Santa Ynez Valleys. Open for lunch and dinner Tues through Sat 11am–9pm, brunch Sun 10am–2pm, and Sun dinner 5pm–9pm.

Los Alamos Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. 805 344-1911 BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hard-to-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Craft Kitchen's weekly small plate specials. Thu 4–8pm, Fri–Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon-6pm.

Bell Street Farm Eatery & Market 406 Bell St. 805 344-4609 BellStreetFarm.com This cozy and delicious eatery is surrounded by gorgeous vineyards and farmland. Award-winning cuisine and sophisticated yet comfortable design, a distinctive environment to enjoy a meal, snack or wine tasting for residents and visitors alike. Assemble your own picnic baskets and accessories for creating a portable meal, as well as gifts and merchandise from local artisans and some of the best of California. Thu and Mon 11am–4pm, Fri–Sun 11am–5pm.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhone varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com On weekends Full of Life Flatbread converts their production flatbread bakery space into a restaurant and offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm; Sun brunch 11am–2pm.

Martian Ranch & Vineyard 9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Taste their estate-grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-this-world experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends. Enjoy wines by the glass, bocce court, horse shoe pit and dog friendly picnic areas. Open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Mon and Tues by appointment only.

Plenty on Bell 508 Bell St. 805 344-2111 PlentyOnBell.com Longtime Los Alamos chef and local favorite Jesper Johansson is back in the kitchen at Plenty on Bell, serving local, seasonal food for lunch. Open Tue–Thur 11am–4pm; Fri–Sat 11am–8pm; Sun 9am–2pm.

Valle Fresh 388 Bell Street 805-865-2282 ValleFresh.com Specializing in hand-crafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans, Valle Fresh is a family owned catering company that has a zeal for the food and services we provide. Chef Conrad Gonzales offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more. Taco Shop open Thur 4–8pm; Fri 2–8pm; Sat noon–8pm; Sun noon–5pm.

Los Olivos

Los Olivos Wine Merchant & Café

2879 Grand Ave. 805 688-7265 LosOlivosCafe.com Bringing together the best flavors of the Central Coast. Their award-winning wine list offers over 500 wines to enjoy with their fresh, seasonal and local cuisine, or to enjoy at home. Open for lunch and dinner daily 11:30am–8:30pm (8pm Sun) and breakfast Sat–Sun 8–10:30am.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 73


Olive Hill Farm

Tecolote Bookstore

2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com

1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977

Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, the family-owned winery has been dedicated to crafting some of Santa Barbara County’s most distinctive wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm.

Montecito American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd. 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Bree’Osh 1150 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-2500 Breeosh.com Bree’Osh is a French artisan bakery café specializing in sweet and savory brioche bread made with traditional sourdough. Featuring local, organic, high quality ingredients. Open 7am–3pm. Closed Mon–Tue.

Here’s The Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s The Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan. Mon–Thu 1-9pm, Fri-Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm.

Montecito Country Mart 1016 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-9664 MontecitoCountryMart.com The Montecito Country Mart, built in 1964, has recently been renovated and preserved, with its original barber shop, post office, market, old-fashioned toy store, as well as Rori’s Ice Cream and Merci to Go artisan food shop. Independent boutique shops include Mate Gallery, Kendal Conrad, Calypso, Intermix, Malia Mills, Hudson Grace, James Perse and Space NK Apothecary. Shops open Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat–Sun 10am–5pm.

San Ysidro Ranch 900 San Ysidro Ln. Santa Barbara 805 565-1724 SanYsidroRanch.com Visit the Stonehouse, named one of the 50 Best restaurants in America by Open Table, or visit Plow & Angel for a comfortable and convivial atmosphere.

74 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon– Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun.

Santa Barbara Backyard Bowls 3849 State St. 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Il Fustino 3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

Whole Foods Market 3761 State St. 805 837-6959 WholeFoodsMarket.com Founded in 1980 in Austin, Texas, Whole Foods Market, a leader in the natural and organic foods industry and America’s first national certified organic grocer, was named “America’s Healthiest Grocery Store” in 2008 by Health magazine.

Santa Barbara (Downtown) 805 Boba 651 Paseo Nuevo #213 805 845-5655 805Boba.com 805 Boba offers authentic Taiwanese “bubble” tea with a local twist. Featuring fresh local fruit, hand crafted syrups, tea, tapioca pearls and many other options, 805 Boba strives to provide the best quality slushes, smoothies, and tea in Santa Barbara. Ask about their Farmers Market Edition boba featuring seasonal produce from the Santa Barbara Farmers Market.

Alchemy Arts Café 35 W. Haley St. 805 899-8811 AlchemyWellnessSpa.com Offering a dynamic menu that evolves with the seasons, Alchemy Arts Café strives to provide more nourishment, value, grace, and excitement to your dining experience. The chefs and wellness team work in tandem to design recipes, elixirs, food and juice cleansing programs to support your health goals. Available evenings for private parties and special events. Open 9am–5pm except first Thursday of each month 9am–8pm.

American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots. Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available. Open noon–6pm daily.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Barbareño 205 W. Canon Perdido 805 963-9591 Barbareno.com Offering a casual approach to the classic California tavern, highlighting the traditions and specialties of the Central Coast and its many outstanding purveyors. Sit inside and enjoy the enticing atmosphere of an open kitchen, or outside on the patio alongside the Santa Maria grill. Bar menu available Mon–Fri 5–6:30pm, dinner nightly 5:30–9:30pm.

Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “asfresh-and-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.


Destination Maps

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18. American Riviera Bank 19. C’est Cheese 20. The Wine Cask, Au Bon Climat, Margerum Wines 21. Nectar Eatery & Lounge 22. McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 23. Maudet’s 24. Telegraph Brewing Co. 25. Renaud’s, Loreto Plaza  26. Il Fustino 27. Whole Foods 28. Backyard Bowls, La Cumbre 29. MesaVerde Restaurant 30. Lazy Acres

76 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

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1. Santa Barbara Maritime Museum 2. Riverbench Santa Barbara, The Lark Santa Barbara, The Lucky Penny, Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant, Loquita, Santa Barbara Wine Collective 3. Municipal Winemakers 4. Lama Dog 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB 6. Chocolate Maya 7. Alchemy Arts Café 8. Grapeseed Co. 9. 805 Boba 10. Barbareño 11. Scarlett Begonia 12. Bouchon Santa Barbara 13. SB Public Market, Il Fustino 14. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 15. Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 16. OnQ Financial 17. Isabella Gourmet Foods

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C’est Cheese

Margerum Wine Company

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery

825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com

813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com

137 Anacapa St., Suite C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com

In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Mon–Sat 7am–6pm; Sun 8am–3pm.

Committed to creating handcrafted wines using only the highest-quality grapes to make wines that are indicative of the place where they are grown. Two tasting rooms located in the historic El Paseo complex: Margerum Tasting Room and MWC32, which features reserve and limited production wines. Open daily noon–6pm with the last tasting at 5:30pm.

Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 11am–6pm daily.

Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 29 E. Victoria St. 805 957-2020 CaDarioPizza.net Located just steps away from Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery, Ca’ Dario Pizzeria offers a casual, urban atmosphere to enjoy authentic pizzas, salads and appetizers. The 30-seat restaurant boasts a welcoming bar, perfect for enjoying local or Italian beers on tap. Open for lunch Mon–Sat 11:30am–2:30pm; dinner Mon–Sun 5–9:30pm.

Cebada Vineyard & Winery 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 735-4648 CebadaWine.com Cebada vinifies estate-grown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. This boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundian style wines. Enjoy their hand-crafted vertical wine tasting in La Arcada Plaza.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Mesocacao including some small bean to bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and some exotic findings from their travels overseas.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm; Sat 10–5pm; closed Sun.

Il Fustino 38 W. Victoria St. 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Maudet’s Artisan Crepes 114 E. Haley St. Ste E. 805 886-4368 Maudets.com Located in downtown Santa Barbara, Maudet’s specializes in artisan French crepes, handmade daily. Organic sweet, savory, gluten-free buckwheat and chocolate crepes are available for the home chef, wholesale or retail. Available from your local grocer or order online for pick-up or delivery.

Santa Barbara Maritime Museum 113 Harbor Way, Ste 190 805 962 8404 SBMM.org The Santa Barbara Maritime Museum brings history to life through its educational programs and interactive exhibits, as well as events. Open 10am –5pm. Closed Wed.

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: from scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year, sweet legacy of keeping it real.

Nectar Eatery & Lounge 20 E. Cota St. 805 899-4694 NectarSB.com Offering great small plates with ethnic notes that pair beautifully with local wines and fine cocktails. Enjoy special items on Meatless Mondays, Tequila Tuesdays and Wine Wednesdays along with their regular menu. Host your private party in the romantic lounge upstairs. Open 5–10pm for dinner; drinks until 2am.

On Q Financial 1332 Anacapa St., Ste. 110. 805 335-8200 OnQFinancial.com Since the Santa Barbara branch of On Q Financial opened in 2013, their goal has been to ensure the mortgage process is streamlined and smooth for every client. They also work with community partners to provide homebuyers’ workshops, and they can help you purchase a home or refinance your existing home loans.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia will always strive to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Open for dinner and cocktail hour Tue– Sat 4:30–9pm, breakfast and lunch Tue–Sun 9am–2pm.

The Wine Cask 813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

Santa Barbara (Funk Zone) Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. 805 880-3364 LamaDog.com Craft beer tap room and bottle shop located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu–Sat 11:30am–midnight.

The Lark 131 Anacapa St., Ste. A (805) 284-0370 TheLarkSB.com The Lark, Santa Barbara’s premier dining destination, features locally sourced seasonal ingredients celebrating the abundant bounty of the Central Coast. Meals are served family-style with handcrafted cocktails and an extensive wine list to complement Chef Jason Paluska’s creations. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant

131 Anacapa St., Ste. B 805 284-0380 LesMarchandsWine.com Les Marchands is a European-style wine bar and retail shop with a world-class team of sommeliers providing unique experiences in wine, food and education. With an extensive wine list, Les Marchands offers something for anyone. Open Sun-Thu 11am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 77


Loquita 202 State St. 805 880-3380 LoquitaSB.com

eat. drink. read. think.

Loquita, a tribute to Santa Barbara’s Spanish origins, presents authentic Spanish food including tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Menu created by Executive Chef Peter Lee and Spanish Chef Perfecte Rocher. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Santa Barbara Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 456-2700 SantaBarbaraWineCollective.com

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Santa Barbara Wine Collective is a downtown tasting room for five local like-minded producers focusing on Santa Barbara County’s unique terroir. Wines are available for tastings, by the glass or bottle or to take home. Open Sun–Thu 11am–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–8pm.

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Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com

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Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm; Sun 7am–10pm.

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5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com Family-owned, sustainably-farmed, estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

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Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com

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Subscribe Online Today EdibleSantaBarbara.com For more information email us at info@EdibleSantaBarbara.com

78 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016

The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open 11am–4pm daily.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 10am–4pm daily.


Santa Ynez The Brander Vineyard 2401 N. Refugio Rd. 805 688-2455 Brander.com Established in 1975, The Brander Vineyard is one of the oldest and most distinguished wineries in the Santa Barbara County. Founder Fred Brander has dedicated himself to making exceptional block designates of estate Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon that push the quality envelope for Bordeaux style wines. Open daily 11am–4pm.

The Lucky Hen Larder 1095 Meadowvale Rd. Santa Ynez 805 691-9448 TheLuckyHenLarder.com The Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company is the only “cut-to-order” cheese shop in the SY Valley. The shop features over 100 artisan and farmstead cheeses as well as Lucky Hen Larder proprietary goods and picnic items and hand-crafted sandwiches daily. Open Mon– Sat 10am –5pm; Sun 10am–4pm.

Rancho Olivos 2390 Refugio Rd. 805 686-9653 RanchoOlivos.com Located in beautiful Santa Ynez, Rancho Olivos creates distinctively fresh artisan extra-virgin olive oils from their sustainably grown Italian and Spanish varietals of olives. Open for olive oil tasting daily noon–4pm.

SY Kitchen 1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com Modern Northern Italian dishes showcasing local ingredients in an inviting farmhouse in the heart of Santa Ynez. Chef Luca Crestanelli's specialties include home-made pastas; wood-fired pizzas, and oak-grilled chicken, lamb chops and steak. Dazzling cocktails are crafted by Alberto Battaglini. Dinner nightly from 5pm; lunch Wed–Sat 11:30am–2:30pm; Italian Breakfast Sun 10am–2pm.

Solvang Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

Lincourt Vineyards 1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-8554 LincourtWines.com Lincourt Vineyard is the perfect stop for a picnic in wine country. Stop by our tasting room to sample our estate grown Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Gruner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, and Chardonnay. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Comfort food with a twist, prepared with seasonal and local, farm fresh ingredients. The best charcuterie plates around feature farm fresh cheeses, house-made jams, pickled veggies, nuts and fruit. Great local wine, craft beer and signature cocktails. Breakfast/Lunch: weekdays (except Tues) 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8:30am–3pm. Dinner: Wed–Mon 5–9pm.

Summerland Summerland Winery 2330 Lillie Ave. 805 565-9463 SummerlandWine.com Founded in 2002, a boutique winery dedicated to the production of fine wines from the Central Coast of California. Focused on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay varietals, the winemaker also dabbles in expressive Rhône and Bordeaux iterations. An inviting, relaxed atmosphere in the seaside village of Summerland, California. Open 11am–7pm, Fridays until 6pm

Source Guide Bragg Live Food Products Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Dave’s Garage 650 Easy St. Simi Valley 805 306-1174 DavesGarage-HotRodShop.com Mentored by one of the finest car builders and designers in the business, Dave specializes in classic restorations, complete custom builds, fabrication, modifications and collision repairs of pre-1975 vehicles. Dave’s Garage recently moved into a new 8,000 square foot shop and showroom with products for do-ityourselfers.

Drake Family Farms DrakeFamilyFarms.com Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

The Food Archivist 805 234-3069 Facebook.com/TheFoodArchivist The Food Archivist is a multimedia recipe document that celebrates the family foodie experience by preserving family recipes through interviews, photography and video. Preserve the recipes you have come to love and celebrate and honor the loved ones who have touched your life and cooked your favorite recipes all these years. Pass the recipe, please!

Giffin & Crane General Contractors 805 966-6401 GiffinAndCrane.com At Giffin & Crane General Contractors, Inc., each project is unique, whether it’s a simple remodel or an extraordinary architectural estate. Working closely with their clients to fulfill their clients’ dreams, they are committed to providing the best workmanship, on time and in budget.

Harvest Santa Barbara 805 696-6930 HarvestSantaBarbara.com Delivering freshly harvested wholesale produce— sourced directly from local family farms to schools, restaurants, hospitals and retail businesses. Their mission is to be the catalyst for a healthier, more sustainable food system by strengthening the ties between farmers and the community.

Jimenez Family Farm 805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Niman Ranch

11990 Grant St. Northglenn, CO 80233 NimanRanch.com Niman Ranch is committed to providing the finest tasting humanely and sustainably raised pork, beef and lamb raised by independent family farmers and ranchers. No antibiotics—ever, no added hormones— ever, all vegetarian feeds and raised outdoors or in deeply bedded pens.

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market 805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Seven markets, six days a week. See schedule on page 69.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa pork at Industrial Eats, Buellton; Aly’s Restaurant, Solvang; Pico & Full of Life Flatbread, Los Alamos; Barbareño & Bacara Bistro Restaurant, Santa Barbara. Also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first. Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.US) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2016 | 79


The Last Bite Fall’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

Herb-Crusted Fish of the Day at Mad & Vin You might not guess it, but one of the best places to eat local fish is the cozy, modern Danish restaurant inside the renovated Landsby hotel in Solvang: Mad & Vin. Both the ceviche and the Herb-Crusted Fish of the Day come from our local waters. The supplier is Buellton native Travis Meyer, who’s been fishing here his whole life. When he recently began selling his local wild halibut and other white fish to Industrial Eats (or select spots in the Santa Ynez Valley), newly promoted Head Chef Beto Huizar quickly jumped on board.

To make this dish, Huizar dries fresh thyme, oregano and sage in the oven, then mixes in salt, sesame seeds and sumac. He salts the fish, presses the herb mix on the nonskin side, then sautés it in oil over medium heat for just 2 minutes on each side. He deep-fries the quinoa in small batches for about a minute. The vegetables are roasted, the chard is blanched and then sautéed with sliced garlic. He finishes the fish in the oven and then tops the vegetables and quinoa with the fish and adds his reduced orange shrub sauce and some edible flowers. Beautiful! Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com

LIZ DODDER

Meyer’s local catch is the inspiration for the Herb-Crusted Fish, paired with local fall vegetables, crispy red quinoa (a house original) and a sauce from their house-made orange shrub (a traditional technique for preserving fruit). Huizar was raised on a farm in Mexico, where everything was fresh and his grandmother cooked from scratch. After arriving

here in the Valley at 18, he worked in various kitchens, always keeping his eye on local ingredients.

80 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2016


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