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LIF E IN MO N TEZ U MA C OU N TY FA L L 20 17


WE ARE EXPLORERS This is the crew of RUN + HIKE. We enjoy sharing and connecting with the community through running and hiking. Encouraging people to enjoy the benefits of being outdoors and providing them with the essential tools to scout their world. We each bring our ideas to the table and twist, bend, and blend them to make us who we are. Working to build each other up and push one another to be the best resource for our community and beyond.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS ENTERTAINMENT LIFE IN MONTEZUMA COUNTY SPRING 2017

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Yia Yia’s

Pat Kincaid, the county’s Greek grandmother, serves up authentic Greek dishes from a tiny kitchen on wheels.

Mesa Verde Voices

Following Mesa Verde Country’s podcast, Ancient Voices, KSJD and Mesa Verde National Park teamed up for a new podcast series to bridge our past ancestors with today’s humanity.

DEPARTMENTS 4

Letter from the Editor

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Contributors

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Recipe for Blue Ribbon Bread

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#ZUMAG: Instagram

Jordan Broderick gives artful instruction for baking the basic bread loaf.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES LIFE IN MONTEZUMA COUNTY SPRING 2017

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Running the Mind

Scott Robertson takes us through his running routes and thoughts on all the community has to offer.

The images and colors of southwest Colorado from our friends and neighbors.

MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY LIFE IN MONTEZUMA COUNTY SPRING 2017

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Breaking Barriers

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A Place for the Homeless

Rural citizens face a variety of barriers to living a healthier life, including access to the professional help they need.

The Bridge organization looks forward to improving facilities and outreach.

ARTS AND CULTURE LIFE IN MONTEZUMA COUNTY SPRING 2017

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Adventures of Sam Green

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Rough and Rowdy

Sam Green answers questions about his passion for photography and his home.

A creative based in the Southwest discusses his commercial design background and his take on western art.

AGRICULTURE LIFE IN MONTEZUMA COUNTY SPRING 2017

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Farm Diversity

Bob Bragg looks at how time effects diveristy in our most stable and routine ideas of farming and ranching in Montezuma County.

ABOUT THE COVER

“Killing Time on Murder Ridge” Robert BonDurant, a Dolores-based photographer tells us through his photography that killing time has its rewards. His cover photo comes from the proverbial Sunday afternoon drive in late July, somewhere West of Highway 491 in Montezuma County. The image encapsulates a wheat field of Oliver Farms just before its harvest on Murder Ridge. BonDurant takes in the moody skies and dry land wheat turned endlessly golden in a late summer sun and gives us its full detail, showcasing what beauty can come with dedicated efforts of killing time. 3


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

EVERY HOUR IN ITSELF, AS IT RESPECTS US IN PARTICULAR, IS THE ONLY ONE WE CAN CALL OUR OWN. JEAN DE LA BRUYERE, attributed, Thoughts Moral and Divine

When time begins to take shape in our lives how do we measure it? In this last issue of 2017, ZUMAG searches for deeper meaning on what it means to keep time. The pendulum swings between preserving ideas for future moments and lingering in past memories. However, finding the personal energy needed to make the most of what we have today is most important. And, we all do with time what we will. The collection of stories and photos in this issue preserve a portion of our experiences as we move through our landscape with unique perspectives in our tightly woven communities. Whether it’s the preservation of the harvest or the creative flow, our lives mean something to the places in which we exist. We hope these stories refresh some part of you, helping to bring the brightest light to whatever you come across along the way.

Our advertisers and contributors continue to inspire ZUMAG’s purpose and continually engage with the passions and visions that keep us curious. Their work and endless support are what give ZUMAG life. Thank you!

We’ll be back in the Spring of 2018. In the meandering ways of Montezuma County, enjoy yourselves and each other.

Colleen Donley, Editor & Publisher

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CONTRIBUTORS

Hunter Harrell is a writer, journalist and lifelong learner.

Whether captured in music, film or on a tangible page, she’s inspired and driven by the stories and experiences of others. She is a wallflower who appreciates new adventures, road trips and hole-in-the-wall diners. She traded rural cornfields in her Southern Illinois hometown for the neon lights of Music City to design newspapers for all of Middle Tennessee before finding a place to truly call home in Durango.

Rosie Mansfield was raised in flatland Missouri. Her idea

of the outdoors had more to do with catching frogs in creeks and riding horses around barrels than rock climbing and backpacking. It was not until moving to Boston for college and exploring the nearby White Mountains in New Hampshire that climbing, biking, fishing and backpacking became part of her outdoor experience. Now she lives in Montezuma County and spends most weekends in the desert in southeast Utah climbing, camping and cooking backcountry feasts or in the San Juan Mountains fishing and backpacking.

Bob Bragg has been a mainstay of the agriculture community

in Montezuma County for over 27 years. Bob is a familiar voice amongst the KSJD radio family in his regular morning segment highlighting agriculture markets and more. He also mentors many young agricultural leaders as well as multi-generational farmers and ranchers. Bob continues to be an influential part of the agricultural communities growth in Montezuma County. He has contributed to several publications in the Four Corners area.

Laurie Knutson is a Minnesota native, Knutson has devoted her life to helping others. Her work with adults suffering addiction and mental-health disorders in Ontario, Canada led her to take the role of Executive Director of The Bridge Emergency Shelter, our local community homeless shelter and day labor center. The love she has for living in a small community fuels her work with passion.

Robert BonDurant grew up between Chicago and Indiana

before heading West to California and making a home Santa Barbra for 20 years. An early love for the arts started with music, printmaking, the natural world and The Grateful Dead. When digital photography entered the picture, BonDurant became a dedicated student of landscape photography. His curiosity for discovering new places and storytelling has taken him from the shores of the Pacific Ocean, around the world, to his new home on the banks of the Dolores River. A long-time advocate for public lands, Rob and his dog Gracie, are enamored with the wide open spaces of Montezuma County in which endless exploring can be achieved.

Scott Robertson is a writer who focuses on the outdoors,

adventure, the sheer enjoyment of life’s experiences both big and small and frequently gets lost watching ants march or leaves blow in the wind. Forged in the oppressive wetness of the Pacific Northwest, he now lives outside of Mancos in a remote hermit cabin with four cats. His free time is filled with exploratory adventures including long distance trail runs, climbing and reading to become a better writer. He occasionally pretends to mountain bike.

Jordan Broderick grew up in Montezuma County, Colorado. Her departure from the area after high school landed her five years in Crested Butte which ultimately earned her a degree from the Art Institute of Colorado in Denver in Baking and Pastry. While her interest was just to dabble with sourdough she embraced and honed her skills to become the head of a full-on bakers salon and the genesis of Wheat Penny Bakery. Jordan currently lives and works in Montezuma County, managing the Dolores River Brewery. The process of launching a brick and mortar bake shop in Montezuma County is on the horizon. Look out!

Tim Calkins is the owner and creative behind Tim Calkins

Creative, a design studio based in Cortez, focused on branding, art direction, graphic design, advertising and illustration for industries such as recreation, lifestyle and entertainment. Tim is inspired by his travels. He left tracks deep in the canyons of Utah and scrambled up the tallest peaks perched above historic Colorado mining towns. These unique visual experiences continue to ignite his passion for creating one-of-a-kind works.

EDITORIAL

CONTRIBUTORS

PRODUCTION

ADVERTISING

Editor & Publisher Colleen Donley

Writers Rosie Mansfield Bob Bragg Laurie Knutson Scott Robertson Jordan Broderick Tim Calkins

Advertising Design Justin Meek Christian Ridings Samuel Lindsay Tim Calkins

Account Executives Shawna Long Teressa Nelson Cassie Constanzo

Assistant Editor Hunter Harrell Claudia Laws Manager of Creative Services Tad Smith

Photographers Sam Green Robert Bondurant Colleen Donley

Distribution Services Shelley Tanner

CORTEZ || DOLORES || MANCOS

Chief Executive Officer Douglas Bennett

© 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Published in the United States by Ballantine Communications, Inc. 1275 Main Ave., Durango, CO 81301. Ballantine Communications uses reasonable effort to include accurate and up-to-date information for its special publications. Details are subject to change, so please check ahead. The publisher accepts no responsibility for any consequences arising from the use of this guide. We welcome suggestions from readers. Please write to the editor at the address above.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Yia Yia’s

AUTHENTIC GREEK SERVED IN THE SOUTHWEST By Rosie Mansfield When she first started selling gyros in Montezuma County fifteen years ago, Pat Kincaid said most people never tried authentic Greek food, and the community wasn’t sure what to make of it. Pat and her husband Mike have lived in the area for 30 years. They’ve been married for 39 years, after being set up on a blind date. The Kincaid first started Yia Yia’s as a pop up tent, selling Greek food at the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in 2002. Initially, Mike said the truck was a way to “make some play money.” Now they’re regulars at local festivals and mainstays at the corner of West Main and South Maple streets in Cortez. “Yia” means grandmother in Greek. Pat says her yia was her teacher and inspiration to cook. Pat’s not alone in her passion; much of her family, including her mother, sister and brother, have been a part of the restaurant business.

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She said she is always coming up with new menu items, inspired and inevitably delicious.

ENTERTAINMENT

Pat’s eyes light up as she talks about her spanakopita or lamb stew – menu items she can’t prepare from the food truck because of the limited space, and the recipes requires an oven.

“I don’t care who likes it,” she said. “I’ll eat it all.” It’s hard to imagine Pat cooking up anything that wouldn’t be likeable though. Especially traditional Greek food items passed down by her mother and grandmother. Still, when Pat’s cooking in the truck she says she likes to cook less complicated things because it means everything is fresh. It’s a food truck in the parking lot, yet when you step up to the window, whether it’s for the first time ever or the first time this week, you feel like you’re stepping into her kitchen - warm, familiar and friendly. Pat’s serving up a hot lunch from her and her yia.

“I DON’T CARE WHO LIKES IT, I’LL EAT IT ALL.”

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ENTERTAINMENT

STORIES OF THE SOUTHWEST

Mesa Verde Voices By Hunter Harrell

High elevation and a dry climate preserved the region’s history. Now, a podcast series seeks to bring the present into focus by examining experiences of the past. The three-part pilot season of Mesa Verde Voices was produced by Mesa Verde National Park, Mesa Verde Museum Association, KSJD public radio and Mesa Verde Country Tourism Bureau. Host Cally Carswell introduces listeners to topics such as wildfire, water, farming and migration by drawing parallels between life then and now. Kelly Kirkpatrick at Mesa Verde Country Tourism Bureau said the podcast is about more than the park, because it highlights culture and experiences of people across the Southwest. In episode one, “Revealed by Fire,” Carswell and a guest discuss how fire has revealed sophisticated water management practices used more than 800 years ago. Episode two, “Corn equals Life,” introduces listeners to the importance of corn to survival and how agricultural practices evolved to fit the dry climate of the southwestern United

States. The final episode, “Moving On,” explains why humans everywhere, including the Ancestral Pueblo people, move around the landscape driven by cultural, spiritual and survival demands. “We want this podcast to both enrich the experience of visitors coming to visit Mesa Verde National Park and the other Pueblo sites in our region,” said Kristy Sholly, Chief of Interpretation at Mesa Verde National Park in a press release. “We hope that it sparks conversations across the country. This project represents the highest ideals of the National Park Service around education, inspiration, conservation and action. And we’re really proud to be able to bring the relevance of ancient cultures forward to our challenges today.”

DOWNLOAD THE PODCAST Due to limited wireless service, visitors are encouraged to download the podcasts before visiting to enrich the travel experience. Locals too will enjoy hearing stories that relate to their home and history. The series may also be downloaded at the new Visitor and Research Center, which has free Wi-Fi service, at the entrance to the park. Season two will include five podcasts, thanks to funding from Ballantine Family Fund, Mesa Verde Museum Association and the members of KSJD. To download season one of Mesa Verde Voices go to iTunes or mesaverdevoices.org

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OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

RUNNING THE

Mind By Scott Robertson

Throughout our lives, as each moment passes, so does our perception of time. Our feelings about days past, our hopes for days yet to come, and the never ending struggle to stay “present” with each passing moment. I’ve had the pleasure of existing on this planet for about 34 years, and for more than half, I’ve been grateful for the opportunity to put one foot in front of the other, and glean lessons from the most simple of activities – running. Two years, six months and 29 days ago I moved to Montezuma County. I remember my first few forays and exploratory excursions on the local trails. New to the area, I had no idea that Phil’s World was firmly under the exclusive jurisdiction of mountain bikers. So I ran the lower portions of Hippy House and Trust loops, the loamy sand soaked from slowly melting snow which hid itself among the twists and turns of north facing pockets. Lessons in patience came to mind; my lungs struggled to extract oxygen from the rarified air after living at sea level for several years, my pace now a minute or two slower per mile. I ventured to the sandstone expanses of Canyon of the Ancients, finding a completely different landscape just a stone’s throw from Phil’s, marveling at the buildings left by the Ancestral Puebloans long ago. Later that fall I tiptoed past migrating tarantulas as they stumbled clumsily with eyes skyward, wary of ravenous raptors patrolling overhead. As the season progressed, I familiarized myself with the paths blanketed with pine needles at Boggy Draw, and daydreamed about the prospect of the new Dolores Overlook trail, which I explored in its infancy. I ran ribbon to ribbon; bushwhacking, getting lost and probably trespassing trying to find the way home. But it beat an unplanned night in the woods. Depending on who you ask, running is either the greatest or worst activity on the planet. Running sucks; it is hard work, and there is no way around that. So why do we run? As a species, running is part of our history. Our African ancestors used their ability to run, slowly, for long periods of time to chase game into a state of exhaustion. I think the Greek’s ran too; something about a marathon maybe? Running is one of the simplest pursuits, ever. The only prerequisite is a little bit

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OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

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OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

“LEARN TO SLOW DOWN - AT FIRST” of motivation. The equipment required? Nothing more than your body, and technically you don’t need shoes or clothing. I was introduced to running by a close friend in college. I never ran competitively in school, except for a lackluster stint in middle school. Instead, I always looked at it as a nefarious component of more fun activities like soccer. My friend, however, spent hours alone on the dusty, granite speckled singletrack trails around Lake Tahoe, and the mystery of that experience drew me in like a magnet. Eschewing all known training science, I soon found myself driving to various trailheads, getting lost for hours and trying to run long expanses with poorly crafted topo maps, limited knowledge and a bit of anxiety knowing that hitchhiking was the only way back to my car. Aside from the sweat, blood and tears (I’m prone to getting a bit emotional when the views stun, and blood sugar is low), running afforded an intimate connection to the area I lived. When my eyes lifted to the peaks above the lake, they would race from one to the next. My mind recalled the names of each, the twists and turns of their secret paths, memories of missions that lasted through the night and those rare moments where endorphins trump pain and the miles pass almost effortlessly.

“WHAT IS MONTEZUMA COUNTY? WHY ARE WE HERE? WHERE ARE WE GOING?” Running taught me about pace, and no matter how you want to run, your performance is and will be predicated on the time you have, or have not spent preparing. I learned to be patient. I stopped thinking about the end of the run; that whole “it’s not the destination but the journey,” is true. Most importantly, it connected me to my community in a way I’d never imagined. As I trudged along the trail, I noticed sections in

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disrepair, noted the difference between hiker and runner only trails and those open to mountain bikes, connected with like-minded individuals and learned from stronger runners. Years later in Montezuma County, I once again feel more deeply connected to my community and specifically the surrounding landscape. I learned to slow down – at first out of necessity, and then because I no longer felt a need to hit pace targets that no one cared about but me. Later, I realized how important pacing goals are for life. At our youngest, life is solely about experience, exploration and discovery, while our pace furious and frantic. As we grow older, education supplants the time we were once allotted to play, increasingly so as some dive into post-high school endeavors. In college, I remember thinking once we all graduated, the seemingly mad pace of life would slow. Then I got a job. Today, I realize the pace of life only seems to slow or quicken, but stays consistent. It is only our perspective on and the emotions we ascribe to our current place in life that add variability to our perception of faster, or slower. As my shoes gathered miles on county roads, forest trails, paved streets and finally stopped collecting miles altogether after a short climbing fall, I pondered my place in this new space, and the space itself. What is Montezuma County? Why are we here? Where are we going? A friend once told me in life we should hope to find ourselves running toward, and not away from things. I’ve hypothetically proposed this same question to Montezuma County, our home. There are many communities throughout the country and history that found themselves at a crossroads where things once taken as a given became less certain. Where a potential way forward tends to encourage the new and obfuscates those who came before, equal parts excitement and fear.


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

I then think of other areas in the west that have undergone a similar transition. Most of us are familiar with the histories of towns like Leavenworth, Washington, Moab, Utah, and in some respects, Montezuma County. We’ve seen what can happen to an area when the main economic drivers are tied to industry or non-renewable resources. Leavenworth realized their backyard looked like the Swiss Alps after the railroad lines shifted and the mill shut down, pushed Bavarian-style architectural styles on the town’s businesses, and today tourists flock to the rivers, mountains and beer halls but most importantly, the town itself survives. Moab harnessed the power of the incredible recreation opportunities and natural beauty of their city and the surrounding areas demand for nuclear fuel plummeted as the Cold War lost steam, and their title as the “Uranium Capital of the World” became less than genuine. I wonder, are we as a community approaching a similar crossroads? Which direction should we take? Which do we want to take?

of the visitors who come each season and spend at our restaurants, stores and gas stations, or an improved quality of life for those of us who already choose to call it home. We are all running in one form or another. We run to school and work; we run toward the freedom provided by the end of each day’s responsibilities, we run into the future with clouded visions, waiting to see the clarity of each moment to come. Our only obstacle, our biggest opportunity, is determining how to move forward in a way that honors what was, celebrates what is, and leverages what can be to ensure our little slice of heaven continues to satisfy our worldly desires, and brings in people who augment our values and our lives. In the end, we are all running in one way or another. The only question is where we are headed, and how we will get there.

“WE ARE ALL RUNNING IN ONE WAY OR ANOTHER”

As we run, both through thoughts and ideas and on foot, we watch patiently as our community works to determine the best path forward. I see small groups of incredibly motivated citizens who work tirelessly, and selflessly for the benefit of all. The nonprofit organizations and devotees who give themselves wholly to the cause, asking for little in return. Our local arts and entertainment industry, as well as the business proprietors, are slowly turning downtown areas into thriving centers of commerce and culture. The breweries have added libations of the highest quality, which will hopefully create a competitive atmosphere that raises glasses, if you will. Not to mention the recreation advocates see the potential in our backyard, be it economic benefit

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MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY

Breaking Barriers

A SUMMARY OF COUNTY HEALTH CARE STRUGGLES AND SOLUTIONS

By Hunter Harrell Rural Colorado is a sight to see, and there is a lot to see. In fact, seventy-three percent of Colorado is considered rural or frontier, including Montezuma County. There’s a common trend in individuals and rural communities across the nation; they’re either growing or dying. According to Colorado Rural Health Center (CRHC), the average age of a person living in a rural area is 41, and by 2018 the senior population is expected to grow almost 10 percent, making up one-quarter of the residents in these communities. While Montezuma County has a vivacious mix of young, old, new and established, the county is riding the wave of changing times with much to offer. But the 26,785 residents that call this desert valley home have obstacles to overcome when it comes to improving their health. 18

County Complications In recent years, leaders from organizations such as CRHC and Colorado Health Foundation (CHF) met with leaders in Montezuma County to discuss concerns about the barriers to healthcare. In December 2015, Karen McNeil-Miller, CHF President and CEO participated in a “listening tour” across the state, where professionals outside the healthcare business could share their thoughts on the reasons individuals might not seek proper care. McNeil-Miller and her crew comprised of 13 other CHF employees and two staff members of Community Resource Center covered 150 miles of Southwest Colorado between Durango, Cortez and Dove Creek to assess the available services and needs.


MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY

The first stop on that tour was Pinon Project Family Resource Center in Cortez. The Pinon Project, which was established in 1994, offers a wide range of services to families in need to promote a healthier futures. Health Program Director at The Pinon Project Dave Hart said one of their many services helps families locate physicians and understand insurance or Medicaid enrollment and policies. There are also financial and parenting classes available through the center as well as emergency assistance for self-sufficient families. Through these programs and services, The Pinon Project helps more than 3,000 families. “As far as the healthcare side, I oversee the advocates that help people sign up for Medicaid,” Hart said. “We make sure people have access to insurance so that when they need it, they can use it. When helping people enroll, we try to help them find providers. There are not a lot of providers here, but the hospital has done so much in the last two years.” While visiting Cortez, 25 Montezuma County citizens joined McNeil-Miller to talk about access to parks and outdoor recreation, as well as the importance of agriculture to the area. Diving further into discussion, attendees agreed Axis Health Care is a major asset thanks to their integrated approach to medical and mental health. However, the public expressed need for more dental care providers since not all take Medicaid. Other topics that came to light during this session included housing costs, access to healthy foods and a growing elderly population. In Dove Creek, similar sentiments echoed from the residents. The 2,000 individuals that live in Dolores County have very basic health services, and must travel to another county to see a licensed mental health professional or social worker. Access to affordable, healthy foods is also difficult for folks in the frontier. Following the visit to Dove Creek, Colorado Health Foundation members drove to Mancos, and toured Cortez Middle School Garden Production Area with Montezuma School to Farm. The listening tour concluded in Durango where residents echoed the problems of surrounding communities – income disparity and behavioral health issues.

Individual Dilemmas Health is often influenced by one’s choices, education and economic opportunities. High unemployment, seasonal jobs, lower wages and high housing costs contribute to 20 percent of Montezuma County residents living in poverty. Forty percent of people spend more than 30 percent of their monthly income on their mortgage, and 43.7 percent spend more than 30 percent of their monthly income on rent. Add in utilities and groceries, and income is already stretched thin, especially for families.

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MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY

For the 20 percent of citizens without insurance, care is just too costly. Those fortunate enough to have insurance must find a physician that accepts their form of coverage, which can often mean traveling out of the county for specialized care. Travel to and from appointments in this wide open space creates another obstacle. Some residents have to travel more than 150 miles for care, making them less likely to seek prevention services. Individuals without personal transportation must rely on inconsistent or inaccessible public transportation as well. However, the greatest health challenges in Montezuma County are related to behavior and substance abuse. Thanks to high turnover, behavioral health providers are hard to recruit, and residents desperately need options for various issues. In Montezuma County, just over one-quarter of residents are considered obese, and 7.5 percent have been diagnosed with diabetes. The county also has the highest concentration of cigarette smokers in the region, and the second highest cancer death rate.

Searching for Solutions Though the odds are stacked against rural citizens, there is hope still. After analyzing results of the listening tour, Colorado Health Foundation praised the community’s strengths. Creative collaborations between health professionals and human services provide the community with everything from nutrition education to insurance assistance. From incredible nonprofit support to the tribal health center for Native Americans, leaders in the community continue to find ways to fill the gaps in regional health services. These programs are often a starting point for residents to take control of their health. Aside from knowledge and resources, these groups attribute their small successes to staying in touch with town. “We are in tune to what is going on in the community,” Hart said. “In most rural communities, it is often a difficult thing to have resources. We are lucky to have the hospital and [Cortez Integrated Healthcare.] As a team, there are a lot of organizations like ourselves to ensure everyone gets access to resources, but sometimes you aren’t going to have enough.” The School-Based Health Center at Montezuma-Cortez High School is another one of those solutions. Any student enrolled in school is eligible for comprehensive primary and behavioral care, regardless of ability to pay. Dolores Rotary Club is currently pursuing a grant to establish a similar model to serve their students. The health of the community depends on innovative ideas from the resilient residents to inspire others to break barriers and adopt healthy habits each day. By working together, Montezuma County can transform what healthcare looks like in rural areas. There is just one question every individual must answer for themselves: am I growing or dying?

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MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY

A PLACE FOR THE HOMELESS

THE BRIDGE ORGANIZATION LOOKS FORWARD TO IMPROVING FACILITIES AND OUTREACH

By Laurie Knutson There is nothing quite like coming home, un-

locking the door and existing safely in your own space. That feeling is one that the homeless

population does not experience. However, that is about to change in the Cortez area.

For 11 years, The Bridge Emergency Shelter in

Cortez has welcomed adult men and women in

need of emergency or short-term shelter during the seven most inclement months of the year.

And the organization looks forward to maintain-

ing that legacy for years to come by continuing to improve facilities and outreach.

In addition to the shelter, The Bridge took over the Cortez Day Labor Center in 2010. This 22

program provides opportunities for hourly labor that result in increased income for so many,

and pumps $120,000 into the local economy annually. The Day Labor Program runs year

round, but is only open to shelter guests during the shelter season.

The Bridge is now looking forward to an exciting opportunity in the growth of the organization

and its services. There will be a new shelter in Cortez that will also have shared supportive

housing on the second floor for up to 24 formerly homeless persons. In the past, housing the

homeless was only a dream. But when the owner of our current location decided to sell the prop-

erty, a whole new direction emerged. This made

relocation an option, and kick-started the process


MATTERS OF THE COMMUNITY

of looking for a new location that would allow us to expand services. However, there was no suitable space with sufficient square footage and facilities available; So in February 2017, the decision to pursue a build was put in place. Years ago, Montezuma County deeded land to the Recovery Center in Cortez for a shelter or detox facility. That land was quitclaimed to The Bridge, and it made an application to the State of Colorado Division of Housing. In August this year, the state committed more than $1.9 million in grants and low interest loans to support building the new facility. The Bridge has been actively fundraising for this project and continues to pursue additional dollars from multiple sources. It is hoped that the new facility will be open in the fall of 2018. The Shelter, Day Labor Program and Bridge Emergency services will be located at the same facility. People who choose to apply for The Bridge apartments will need to have some income source, either from a parttime or full-time job, disability or social security. They will pay $200 a month for rent and utilities, which will include a modesty furnished apartment, with a full bathroom, kitchenette and a shared bedroom. They will be offered budgeting lessons, nutritional cooking lessons and will receive referrals for services provided by other agencies. The apartments are not meant for permanent living. Instead, they are intended to provide a successful transition into more permanent housing, either out in the open housing market or by rising to the top of the long subsidized public housing lists. Residents will be able to come and go from their portion of the building and be afforded the privacy of people who rent and have a lease. For more information you can reach the Bridge at (970) 565-9808 or go online to www.thebridgeshelter.org Anna Bousquet, Day Labor Manager

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ARTS AND CULTURE

Adventures

of Sam Green

Q & A with Hunter Harrell, photos by Sam Green

Where did you grow up, and how did you like to spend your time?

Sioux Falls, South Dakota … kid stuff like ice skating, hanging out at the swimming pool, Boy Scouts. Overland Park, Kansas … high school years … Started taking pictures for the high school yearbook and newspaper. I reached the rank of Star Boy Scout.

How did you make photography your career, and how long did it take you?

I became interested in photography in eighth grade when I took a photography class and made a pinhole camera out of an oatmeal box. I earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Kansas State University, specializing in photojournalism. After college, I began my career, working at various newspapers in four different states.

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I enjoy recording the local history with photographs. Especially taking action pictures of people with good facial expressions. It’s all about showing local people the wonders of the place we live.

ARTS AND CULTURE

What do you like about photography?

How does the way people treat you differ when you have a camera around your neck? People tend to start smiling and posing for the camera. I always have to try to get them to return to what they were doing to get a candid shot. I often take pictures of them posing, knowing I’ll never use them and wait for them to start ignoring me so I can get a more natural shot.

What do you like most about being a photographer?

It’s something different every day. I’m usually covering the most important thing going on that day, and I’m in the thick of the action.

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ARTS AND CULTURE

If you could be anything other than a photographer, what would you be?

“I don’t really have a desire to be anything else.”

What kind of images do you like to capture most?

Sports are my favorite, but I also like wildlife and nature pictures. Sometimes, I see a potential picture and spend up to a week getting the right lighting and background. For instance, there was a water tower being constructed in Boise, Idaho, when I was working for the Statesman newspaper there, and it reminded me of a giant cup, so I kept going back until I could get the sun in the perfect position to appear inside the “cup.”

Where do you picture yourself if you’re the one being photographed? On the lake wakeskating.

Who or what inspires you?

I like working in unique lighting situations and seeing what I can do in unusual circumstances.

What other parts of the world would you want to photograph if given the chance, and why?

Iceland looks like it would be an interesting place to photograph with the natural hot springs and northern lights. Or someplace with a lot of waterfalls would be fun too.

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MONTEZUMA www.leadershipmontezuma.org

We Welcome The Class of 2017 For more than 20 years, Leadership Montezuma has created community leaders through 9 focused sessions that dive-in to all of the entities that make Montezuma County great! Leadership Montezuma stimulates and fosters diverse viewpoints, resulting in innovative answers to critical questions facing our community. The program strives to create awareness and to connect leaders with community issues.

LEARN

PLAY

GIVE

CONNECT WITH US!

Facebook.com/leadership.montezuma

Topics covered: ›› Water, Agriculture, and Natural Resources ›› Ute Mountain Ute Tribe ›› Culture and Arts ›› Non-Profit Leadership, Board Training, and Leader Development ›› Education ›› Health and Human Services ›› Public Safety ›› Local Government and Special Districts


ARTS AND CULTURE

ROUGH AND ROWDY By Tim Calkins

A CREATIVE BASED IN THE SOUTHWEST DISCUSSES HIS COMMERCIAL DESIGN BACKGROUND AND HIS TAKE ON WESTERN ART. Tim headed West in 2011 from Michigan with nothing more than a Jeep full of clothes, his favorite Pearl Jam

records and his art supplies. The only familiarity he had

with the region were through old westerns he frequent-

ed on Sunday TV with his dad and a trip to Moab, UT in 2010. Both of which were enough for him to decide the Southwest was the place he needed to be.

As a kid he loved watching John Wayne, playing cow-

boys, drawing and being outside. His mother Linda was an art teacher and his mentor, Steve Perry, played a

critical role in guiding his skills and ambitions towards

a career in the arts. After earning an art scholarship to Savannah College of Art and Design, he began a path towards a commercial graphic design career.

Fast forward 13 years and Tim is running his own cre-

ative studio in Cortez serving clients locally and nationally. “I’ve found much success helping clients discover themselves, advertise their messages and reach their

goals. I’m the guy behind the scenes that has cultivated tremendous growth through my work and I feel fortunate to help those clients.”

Whether that was his five years at Osprey Packs as

the lead creative, as art director on projects for Amway

Global or year-long branding campaigns for commercial furniture giants Herman Miller and Steelcase.

Tim wears another hat just as well. As a fine artist, Tim creates visual stories based on his travels in the rough

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and rowdy places of the fabled Southwest. He’s left tracks deep into Utah, Arizona and Colorado and has been inspired by the colorful characters he’s met along the way. His unique approach to creating is reflected through his subject matter, color use, composition and various techniques. Contrast always plays and important role in every piece. “I love graphic design and I’ve been a fine artist my entire life. One I’ve been groomed to do, the other is in my blood. So I’ve tried to use all the skills and modernize a topic I love, the classic Western. Realism amazes me and at the same time I love abstraction and I see both in all the places and people I’ve encountered out here. I try to incorporate this in my art as much as I can.” Tim juxteposes masculine topics like Cowboys, with modern, sometimes femanine color harmonies in his compositions. It’s clean and composed, yet gritty and non-conforming like the West. He often references design principals he learned and will bend the rules when he feels necessary. It may be his friend’s book of haikus he carries around, an old timer at the American Legion, or a week in Bisbee, AZ that inspires his next work. “My artwork is a story about people and places. Each piece is unique, just like that moment in time. The West is so remote and special to me and I feel like you find one-of-a-kind people here with an interesting story to tell that you don’t find anywhere else. Had I not moved to Cortez, I wouldn’t be doing the work I am today.“


ARTS AND CULTURE

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escape to where creativity flourishes I N T E G R AT I N G N AT U R E & T H E A R T S

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TRADING COMPANY & MUSEUM Experience our trading post and museum in Cortez. Open 6 days a week, Mon - Sat 9am - 5:30pm. Featuring the finest in Native American arts and crafts since 1961. 345 W. Main Cortez. CO 81321 1.800.444.2024 ‹› 1.970.565.9607

WWW.NOTAHDINEH.COM


AGRICULTURE

Farm agriculture lessons Diversity from our ancestors By Bob Bragg

The Four Corners Region is a fascinating place to live and work, especially if your beat is agriculture. I came to Montezuma County to teach vocational agriculture for the San Juan Basin Vocational Technical School in the mid 1970s. One of my duties as a vo-ag instructor was to make home visits with students to supervise farming projects that were part of their course curriculum. A side benefit of these visits was that I became acquainted with many farm and ranch families in the community. Some of of those families traced their roots back to the early pioneers who had settled the region before the turn of the 20th Century. Often, as I observed the progress my students had made on their crop and livestock projects, I observed the evidence that the ancestral puebloans had inhabited the land long ago. The puebloan farmers left signs of their activities all over the Montezuma Valley and beyond. It is easy to find pottery shards and broken flint pieces in plowed fields, and remnants of dwellings are easy to spot when riding the canyons looking for cattle. Sometimes, we may run across check 32

dams they used to irrigate crops of corn, beans, squash and some indigenous plants.

From the early 1900s when the county became populated, farmers and ranchers developed a diverse agricultural economy both on dryland and irrigated farms. But USDA Census of Agriculture reports from 1920 to the 1970s show a declining diversity in farm production during that 50 year period. These reports also indicate that much of the food consumed by residents of the Four Corners Region from the 1920s through the 1950s was produced locally, because some of the products like milk, eggs, strawberries and fresh poultry would not fare well with the transportation available then. When I arrived in the county, farmers were in the middle of an agricultural boom that Secretary of Agriculture, Earl Butz, engineered when he was appointed by President Richard Nixon in 1971. Butz’s mantra to farmers was to plant “fence row to fence row,” and “get big or get out” to supply cheap grains for food processors and export markets. Farm diversity took a big hit both in our county and throughout the U.S. when farmers bought into this philosophy.


To add fuel to this specialization fire, university professors, agricultural publications and farmer’s bankers encouraged them to borrow money to invest in land and equipment, because the high grain prices were sure to last. But the prices were a bubble. When it burst, farmers discovered that they couldn’t produce their way out of the debt crisis that hit them in the early 1980s. When land and equipment values cratered, tens of thousands of farmers were left without the equity necessary to finance their farm’s operations, and they went bankrupt.

AGRICULTURE

“The Four Corners Region is a fascinating place to live and work, especially if your beat is agriculture.” sus, the number of farms in the one to nine acre category increased by 162 percent, while farms in the 10 to 40 acre category increased by 88 percent. These farms were counted because the owners had reported a least $1,000 income on their IRS Schedule F, the form farmers use to report income. From what we know about puebloan farming practices, those early farmers were highly specialized, with three main crops, corn, beans and squash. They also raised turkeys, but maybe not for food but for feathers. Would they have fared better if they had a wider variety of crops to grow?

Many farmers who survived the crash became risk averse, and hesitated to make changes to their fragile operations by diversifying into other crops or livestock. Young people were also discouraged from getting into farming by friends and families. So by the end of the 20th Century, the farm and ranch scene in Montezuma County was similar to other parts of the country, where the average age of operators was rising and crop diversity was almost nonexistent. By the turn of the 21st Century though, I began to see a change in attitudes about the future of farming and ranching. For example, some of my farm and ranch clients were making plans for their children to join their operations after they finished college. I also started to meet young people who were intent on starting small scale farms to grow produce for local consumption. Consumers also played a role in changing attitudes about agriculture. They began to demand wholesome, good tasting food that was produced locally. Farmers markets became popular both nationally and locally. As an example, the Cortez Farmers Market has expanded dramatically over the past several years, and markets have opened in both Dolores and Mancos. The Census of Agriculture also provides evidence that small scale production in Montezuma County is growing. From the 1997 census to the 2012 cen-

I also wonder, would a more diverse production model in the U.S. benefit large scale farmers and ranchers who are currently struggling with low commodity prices for both crops and cattle? Former USDA Under Secretary for Rural Development and former CEO of the U.S. Grains Council, Tom Dorr, recently suggested that rather than try to tinker with a business as usual farm bill, Congress should try to craft a bill that helps farmers and ranchers to produce value added products. In other words, products that don’t require a lot of processing before consumers buy them.

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AGRICULTURE

REC I PE

Basic Country Loaf By Jordan Broderick A great loaf of bread has the power to sabotage a gluten-free diet. There is magic in fresh bread. Even loaves that do not turn out perfect still taste incredible. This is a recipe for basic country loaves, adapted from the Tartine method and formula. You will need a basic kitchen scale, a sourdough starter, proofing bowls or colanders lined with tea towels and a large dutch oven to begin.

FOR THE LEVAN

1 TABLESPOON SOURDOUGH STARTER

100 GRAMS WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR 100 GRAMS BREAD FLOUR 200 GRAMS WATER Mix together in a bowl and let sit for 8 hours. The levan should be double in size and a spoonful will float on water when ready. FOR THE BREAD 200 GRAMS LEVAN 700 GRAMS BREAD FLOUR 300 GRAMS WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR 20 GRAMS SALT 750 GRAMS WATER First mix together the levan, flour and 700 grams of water. Using your hands, mix until all water is incorporated into the flour. Cover and let sit in a warm spot for 30 minutes. While resting flour two proofing bowls or colanders lined with a tea towels. Add the last 50 grams of water and the salt. Squish the dough together with your hands, don’t worry if it doesn’t absorb all of the water. Fold the dough over itself, cover and let sit for 30 minutes. Stretch and fold the dough over itself four times, like folding an envelope. Be gentle, there is no kneading in this recipe. Let rest 30 minutes. Repeat this process three more times. After the last folding and rest, the dough should be full of air bubbles and lofty. Dump it onto a lightly floured counter and use a bench knife to di-

34

vide the dough into two equal portions. Fold itself and use the bench knife to tuck the folds under itself and gently shape it into a round. Try not to push the air out of the dough. Let rest for 20 minutes and reshape the loaf. Gently lift the shaped loaves and place top down into the prepped proofing bowls or colanders. Cover and let sit for two to four hours, depending on how warm the room is. It will rise but it won’t double in size. Preheat your oven with a large dutch oven, lid on, to 450 degrees. Lift lid and gently flip the dough into the dutch oven. Using a sharp knife or razor blade slash the top of the dough. Replace lid and bake for 20 minutes. Remove lid and continue baking for 30 more minutes or until dark golden brown. Carefully lift the loaf out of the dutch oven using a dish towel and place on a cookie rack to cool.


NEW

USED

We love where we live, play, hunt and explore. So stop in to see our selection of new & used cars, SUVs & trucks. Our service center is trusted so we’re here to serve the Cortez, Mancos and Dolores areas.

(970) 565-8431

www.KeeseeMotorCompany.com

111 South Broadway Cortez, CO 81321 Showroom Hours Mon - Fri 8 am - 5:30 pm Sat 8 am - 3 pm

Sun Closed


This winter, prepare for the cold with good company and your favorite drink. Stop by Mancos Liquor and find what you need to keep you warm. Please Drink Responsibly and Respect Our Wilderness.

Open Daily: 8 am - Close ¡ (970) 533-7651 ¡ 160 Hwy 160 E Frontage Rd Mancos, CO 81328


Ideas. Stories. Community.

Visit Sunflowertheatre.org for upcoming shows Box Office Hours: Wednesday – Friday, 3pm – 5pm Tickets are always available at sunflowertheatre.org The Sunflower Theatre is available for your event. Contact Desiree Henderson for rental information.

sunflowertheatre.org | 970-516-1818 8 East Main Street Cortez CO 81321


@SHANNONS_PERSONAL_ARCHIVE The entirety of this trip consisted of driving from Albuquerque to the ranch near Dolores, Colorado, playing card games, taking pictures, stargazing during the meteor shower, fishing and going to Escalante Days! #ESCALANTEDAYS

@MTB_SHAUN Every race day does not go as planned, tired legs did not want to go today. Get some rest and try again next time #RACEDAY #NATIVECYCLING #DOLORES #ESCALANTEDAYS #FUN #OUTDOORS

@ROCCOSGIRL83 Successful shopping #ESCALANTEDAYS

@DOLORESRIVERBREWERY Representing the DRB @skabrewing anniversary! #DOLORESRIVERBREWERY #DOLORESCOLORADO #MEOWMEOWDANCEDANCE #PUTTHISINYOURMOUH #YESTHATSTHEGUYFROMGAMEOFTHRONES

@DRIVINANDVIBIN Hello again, Colorado. Set up camp at @theviewsrvpark #GETOUTSIDE RVLIFE #RVLIVING #CAMPERVIBES #CAMPVIBE #VANLIFE #COLORADOLIFE #DOLORESCOLORADO

@ISLANDROBIN Beauty down at McPhee Reservoir! #MCPHEERESERVOIR #DRYCREEKCANYON #DOLORESCOLORADO #HIDDENGEM

@MARTINN505 #BEANCANYONTRAIL #DOLORESCOLORADO #GETOUTSIDE #SANTACRUZBICYCLES

@ITSTOOSOONTOTELL Amidst the destruction, helplessness, and my tendency to sink into a #BURNITALLDOWN mood, I keep reminding myself create something. Anything. There’s a lot of love in this garden and I’m proud to be a part of it.

@TALESFROMTHEMUTINY Buster Brown and Ewan showing off nature’s Snapchat filter. #SUNFLOWERS #BABYGOAT #PYGMYGOATS #FARMLIFE #MUTINYRANCH #MCELMOCANYON #MESAVERDECOUNTRY #MONTEZUMACOUNTY #BACKYARDGOATS

#ZUMAG 38


@COREYROBINSON Another acceptable office view. Thanks for the motivation @COLSHEA. #COLORADO #COLORFULCOLORADO #RAINBOW #RAIN #SAFETYTHIRD #USFS #VISITCOLORADO #LETSEXPLORE #FINDYOURPARK #OPTOUTSIDE #NATIONALPARKS #NPS #CAMP #GETOUTSTAYOUT #REDROCK #MONTEZUMACOUNTY

@LOVEKRAUTS Sunset dinner and really inspiring women... some of my favorite things!! Thanks to @NICHOLEKBAKER for the spectacular shot. #LOVEKRAUTS #KRAUT #EATCLEAN #CULTUREDFOODS #FERMENTEDFOODS #ALLNATURAL #SAUERKRAUT #CABBAGEQUEEN #FEEDYOURBODY #NOURISHYOURBODY #HEALTHYEATING #PROBIOTICS #GUTHEALTH #MANCOSVALLEY #MONTEZUMACOUNTY #SUNSET #HOMEMADE #EATLOCAL

@BUDS2TALL Times up! Leaving Colorado Wednesday for some time in the desert and then we wind our way up to the Olympic Peninsula for the winter. The Four Corners / Mesa Verde area is our Real Colorado, and we miss it already. Mancos feels like home, and we’ll definitely be back.

@ILLUMINATED.MOMENTS Being in love. Don’t forget to check the blog today for #PREVIEWTUESDAY images.

@BARNJETTER Quick getaway in the sky.

@ERINFROMTEXAS Sunset view, Sleeping Ute.

@WGRIFFIN2424 Best riding partners! Enjoying the beautiful Colorado sunshine. #GOATLOVE #LOVEMYHORSES #COLORADOWILDERNESS #SUNSHINE

@ALLIE_PURK Gotta love chillin with the cousins. #COUSINS #NOFILTERNEEDED #COLORADO #SUNSET #DESERT #TRAMPOLINE #RECKLESS #ADVENTURE #FUN

@BILLFREEMANPHOTO A great way to start the day; some early morning #SINGLETRACK IN THE ASPENS. #COLORADO #BRAAP #MOTOLIFE

@ZUMAG #MONTEZUMACOUNTY

Tag your photos on social media with #ZUMAG to show us what you love about the Montezuma County.

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S U TC L I F F E V I N E Y A R D S

Wine is made from single vineyards, picked by hand by real people working together, you will love these wines. We do business with friends, on a hand-shake basis, producing grapes with passion and care, in the traditions of the Old World.

S U TC L I F F E VINEYARDS

www.sutcliffewines.com ¡ (970) 565¡0825


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WWW.SWHEALTH.ORG 970-565-6666 1311 N. MILDRED ROAD CORTEZ, CO 81321

ZuMAg - Fall 2017  

Life in Montezuma County Colorado

ZuMAg - Fall 2017  

Life in Montezuma County Colorado