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SUM M ER 2020

ELLE

PORTRAIT OF A LADY


robertocoin.com


ROMAN BAROCCO COLLECTION


S U M M E R 2 0 19 VISIT RHBE ACHHOUSE.COM TO VIEW THE COLLECTION AND REQUEST A SOURCE BOOK


CONTENTS / SUMMER 2020 ON THE COVER Halter swimsuit, NORMA KAMALI, similar styles available at normakamali.com; Necklace, ANISSA KERMICHE, similar

STYLE 23

styles available at anissakermiche.com

A PAINTERLY APPROACH

Photographed by MATTHEW SPROUT Styled by TRACY TAYLOR

Dior’s Victoire de Castellane blends the abstract with high jewelry for a fresh take on Art Deco.

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STYLE NEWS Preview some of our favorite new fashion finds from Fendi, Cartier, Hermès and beyond.

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A Santa Monica dining room designed by Josh Greene

DESIGNED TO A T Tiffany & Co. reimagines its iconic motif as a bold, continuous design in 18-karat rose gold.

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COUNTRY LIVING This summer’s fashion is inspired by the rolling hills of the British countryside.

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TIME OUT For every outdoor activity you indulge in, there’s a timepiece equipped to handle it.

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ICONS OF TIME Signature styles that have stood the test of time.

Hermès’ double-faced silk carré scarf

GRAND SEIKO CELEBRATES 60 YEARS Japanese brand Grand Seiko unveils limitededition watches for its milestone anniversary.

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Tiffany & Co.’s TI 18-karat rose gold bracelet

BEAUTY 39

GOOD TO THE LAST DROP The season’s top self-tanning drop formulations will give you a dewy glow.

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BEAUTY IN THE TIME OF CORONAVIRUS Reporter Bee Shapiro recounts her daily beauty regimen during shelter-in-place.

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34 Richard Mille’s RM 25-01 Adventure tourbillon watch

A DAY IN THE LIFE: JOANNA CZECH Take a walk in the celebrity skincare guru’s shoes and see her list of must-have products.

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BEAUTY NEWS The latest and greatest skincare, hair and body products to have you looking your best.

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THE ULTIMATE SKIN SUPERCHARGE With help from these post-quarantine treatments, your skin will get back to its best shape.

LIFE 47

CALIFORNIA DREAMING Childhood friends team up to design a modernist paradise in West Los Angeles.

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PLATE EXPECTATIONS A new generation of charming, nostalgic diners is popping up across the United States.

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A FAMILY AFFAIR Northern California’s Donelan Family Wines mixes business and pleasure.

56

LOUNGING IN LUXURY Invest in some al fresco home decor that’s integral to relaxation.

58

THE GREAT ESCAPE Get out of the city and into one of these summertime homes.

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THE MAGIC TOUCH Celebrity mentalist Kevin Nicholas dishes on his tricks of the trade.

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CURE FOR THE CAUSE Can these financiers and scientists solve the coronavirus crisis?

DINING ROOM: NINA CHOI

SUMMER 2020

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BIG BANG MECA-10 SHEPARD FAIREY

BOUTIQUES 4(+0:65(=,5<,ₔ-0-;/(=,5<, ),=,93@/033:ₔ)(3/(9)6<9 40(40ₔ3(:=,.(:ₔ7(34),(*/ +(33(:ₔ693(5+6ₔ/6<:;65 :(5-9(5*0:*6ₔ:*6;;:+(3, ;LS!

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CONTENTS / SUMMER 2020 CULTURE 62

THE RIGHT MOLLY

Molly Sims talks to us about her return to film with The Wrong Missy.

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TO NATALIE, WITH LOVE A new memoir and documentary explore the life of actress Natalie Wood.

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78 The Bawah Reserve private resort in Indonesia

A NEW YORK STATE OF MIND News anchor Greg Kelly reports on the debut of his Newsmax TV show.

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ALL EYES ON NEW YORK-BASED ARTIST JULIE MEHRETU The artist presents her first-ever retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

70

AFRICA’S ANTELOPE VALLEY Global Wildlife Conservation tracks the movements of Kenya’s hirola species.

TRAVEL 78

IN PURSUIT OF PARADISE Far-flung destinations to check out when you feel like traveling again.

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CASTLES IN THE EIRE Three estates in Ireland offering everything from championship golf to stunning cliffs and fine dining.

FEATURES 86

PORTRAIT OF A LADY Elle Fanning comes into her own as the star and producer of new series The Great.

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104

CITIES

ARTIFACT

Interior designer Eddie Lee crafts a modern, yet soulful East Hampton oasis.

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174

144

CHICAGO

WE HEART NEW YORK

146

DALLAS

INTO THE WOODS

A love letter to the city we adore.

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148

HAMPTONS

THE GREAT EXPECTATIONS OF NICHOLAS HOULT

150

HOUSTON

Actor Nicholas Hoult makes the leap to the small screen with Hulu’s new series The Great.

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LAS VEGAS

154

LOS ANGELES

156

MIAMI

158

MARTHA’S VINYARD

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NANTUCKET

162

NEW YORK CITY

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ORANGE COUNTY

FAMILY FEUDS The chilling murder mystery of businessman Sir Harry Oakes in the Bahamas and its connnection to the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

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A VIRTUAL VACATION The new book Living on Vacation offers dreamy images of your favorite places around the world and gives us major FOMO.

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ASPEN

THE RULES OF THE SEASON Leading trends from the Pre-Fall 2020 collections.

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SAN FRANCISCO

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BINNSHOTS/PARTIES

WAVE OF INFLUENCE Katsushika Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” has inspired famous artists worldwide.

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Gucci’s new Beverly Hills flagship

150

The Windswept salad from the cookbook Cooking in Marfa

FOOD: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

SUMMER 2020

A MOROCCAN MYSTERY TOUR Inside the Marrakech museum and foundation of visionary French perfumer and aesthete Serge Lutens.

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Undeniably Rare Exceptionally Beautiful Exquisite designs featuring Argyle Pinkâ&#x201E;˘ Diamonds @jfinediamonds

RARITY WITHIN REACH

Tiny Jewel Box Washington DC

Tappers Michigan

London Jewelers New York

Betteridge Jewelers Colorado, Connecticut

Hyde Park Jewelers California, Colorado

Barmakian Jewelers Massachusetts, New Hampshire


EDITOR

CEO/PUBLISHER

Natasha Wolff

Jason Binn

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Alexander Wolf

Elaine Heyda

STYLE EDITOR

Alexis Parente

PRINT CONSULTANT

Calev Print Media SENIOR EDITOR

Kasey Caminiti

IT MANAGER

Kevin Singh

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Lauren Watzich FINANCE DIRECTOR

Danielle Bixler

CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR

Regan Hofmann

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Veronica Jones CONTRIBUTING IMAGING SPECIALIST

FINANCE MANAGER

Travis O’Brien

Shernette Palmer

DUJOUR CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS CHICAGO

Rebecca Taras DALLAS

Holly Haber LAS VEGAS & LOS ANGELES

Andy Wang MIAMI

Rebecca Kleinman ORANGE COUNTY

Jessica Ritz SAN FRANCISCO

Jennie Nunn

EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Kim Peiffer

Tambour Curve Flying Tourbillon PDG Diamond Paved, $322,000, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC, 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-710-4494. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs, and drawings. Copyright © 2020 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 800-783-4903, or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com.


CALIBER RM 07-01

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS BOSTON BUENOS AIRES LAS VEGAS MIAMI NEW YORK ST. BARTH TORONTO VANCOUVER www.richardmille.com


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his is our first collaborative issue of DuJour, but we’ve been working together for years. However, producing, wrangling, writing and editing this summer print magazine from home was not an easy joint venture. We love a challenge, but this was a big one. Editors are used to a convivial and collaborative office environment packed with story idea meetings, sales calls, press events, schmoozing and lots of time spent in front of the issue wall. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic that circled the world this spring, none of that was possible. So we, like the rest of the world, resorted to Zoom calls to internally and externally put things together. Thanks to close friends and collaborators, ideas were generated and photography concepts discussed. Stories were concocted, book excerpts and celebrity talent were negotiated, shoots were mapped out, writers assigned, interviews scheduled, copy edited, layouts selected and cover lines written. And the result is something we’re pretty damn proud of—during a crisis or not. We hope you’re able to spend time with the issue in good health, comfortable clothes, a cozy nook of your home and, maybe, with a glass—er, bottle—of wine. We look forward to seeing you soon in happier times. The Wolf ( f ) s

Natasha Wolff

Editor Instagram: @natashawolff

Alexander Wolf

Creative Director Instagram: @alexanderwolf

NATASHA WOLFF: SCOTT RUDD; ALEXANDER WOLF: VICTORIA STEVENS

SUMMER 2020

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ED LETTER


grand-seiko.com/us-en

Grand Seiko Boutique 439 ½ North Rodeo Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Grand Seiko Boutique 510 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10022

Grand Seiko Boutique 130 NE 40th Street Miami, FL 33137


BINNSHOTS St. Patrick’s Cathedral

A NEW YORK TRIBUTE When the shops on Fifth Avenue are shuttered. The trains at Jamaica lay silent. The Cyclone of Coney Island sits idle. The elevators in One World hold no one. We love New York.

The New York Public Library

Though there’s no hustlers on Canal Street. No buskers under Grand Central. No admen atop the Chrysler building. No javaScript coders inside Chelsea Market. We love New York.

The sycamores guarding the Sheep Meadow still sing. The engines powering the Staten Island Ferry still rumble. The braided cables of the Brooklyn Bridge still hold. The tram to Roosevelt Island still sways. We love New York. The Unisphere at the Tennis Center still dazzles. The Big Bat in the Bronx still waits for its pitch. The TWA Terminal still beckons us to the skies. The floor inside the Guggenheim still spirals. The Henry Hudson Parkway still floods. We love New York. It’s love that’s unconditional. Love that’s undeniable. Love that’s mutual. Love that’s forever. Because this town is forever. No matter what. We love New York.

Bryant Park

One World Trade Center

PORTRAIT: VICTORIA STEVENS; OPPOSITE: JOE WOOLHEAD AND ARAM HEKINIAN

SUMMER 2020

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uring quarantine, I stayed in New York City to assist friends and family during these challenging times. In doing so, I wanted to pay tribute and homage to NYC together with a group of people near and dear to me— who love the city to support me in creating a message of unity and hope. On these pages, in our feature well (page 102) and online, I created an inspirational tribute titled “We Love NY,” which showcases original photography and videography that was taken during the height of the coronavirus outbreak. On a separate note, I spent a considerable amount of time writing a heartfelt narrative, “A New Yorker’s State of Mind,” with former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly who is my good friend of over 25 years, the longest serving Commissioner in the history of the NYC Police Department and the first to hold the position for two non-consecutive tenures. Whether you’re from New York City, you live in New York City or you want to be in New York City, these words will inspire you. In addition, I worked with Kelly, Larry Silverstein’s Silverstein Properties and his partner and CEO Marty Burger and their team to curate a list of some of New York’s most iconic landmarks to photograph in their most raw and courageous state during these unprecedented times. We are all indebted to Larry Silverstein and Silverstein Properties for all that they have done for New York in successfully rebuilding the World Trade Center complex and the dramatic and breathtaking Oculus, which, against all odds, has become one of the most desirable and unique communities in all of New York City following the catastrophic September 11 attacks. Silverstein Properties’ off icial photographer Joe Woolhead, who chronicled the evolution of Ground Zero, also contributed to our story. It goes without saying that my appreciation will shine bright for all those who helped to kickstart DuJour’s “We Love NY” campaign including but not limited to Alec Baldwin, Michael Caine, Kevin Costner, Michael Douglas, Fran Drescher, Dimitri Ehrlich, Daisy Fuentes, Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Paris Hilton, Richard Lefkowitz, David Lipman, Richard Marx, Melissa Pordy, Lionel Richie, Tony Robbins, Sylvester Stallone, Steven Tyler, Dave Warren, Naomi Watts and Venus Williams. This couldn’t have been possible without the talented and Jason Binn well quipped Aram Hekinian Founder and CEO of Autonomous Astronauts Creative Corporation. Twitter/Instagram: @jasonbinn

As the lilies at the Botanical Gardens still bloom. The waves against the Whitestone still lash. The lions at the Library still glower. The pigeons in front of St. Patrick’s still preen. We love New York.

The Brooklyn Bridge


The Oculus shopping center

A NEW YORKER’S STATE OF MIND You start building your own private version of New York the first time you lay eyes on it.

The Empire State Building

Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort

Built to absorb whatever comes along, New York inhales turbulence and exhales vitality. There is a sense, unique to New York, that something extraordinary could happen at any minute. A fantastic, glorious mess, the city brings together millions of vibrant lives into one entity.

Hell. Who are we kidding? New York attracts all of humanity. And we love NY. The strivers and the dreamers, the gladiators, visionaries and fast-talkers, the conmen hustlers and hell-raisers.

JASON BINN: VICTORIA STEVENS; ONE WORLD TRADE CENTER: RICH GRAESSLE/ICON SPORTSWIRE VIA GETTY IMAGES; GRAND CENTRAL STATION AND OCULUS SHOPPING CENTER: ROY ROCHLIN/ GETTY IMAGES; EMPIRE STATE BUILDING AND HOSPITAL SHIP: GARY HERSHORN/GETTY IMAGES; CHELSEA MARKET: BEN GABBE/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER PHOTOS: ARAM HEKINIAN; STEVEN TYLER: M A T T E O P R A N D O N I / B FA . C O M ; A L L O T H E R P O R T R A I T S : C O U R T E S Y O F S U B J E C T.

Grand Central Station

Shops on Fifth Avenue

Goto WeLoveNY.DuJour.com for our video series paying tribute and homage to New York

We are the world’s fastest-moving experiment in creative friction, a clash of languages, cultures and personalities. We meet confusion and congestion with grit. Maybe you have to be a New Yorker to understand—and maybe that understanding is what makes us New Yorkers. We love NY. We are home to thought-leaders and thoughtful leaders, curious question marks and walking exclamation points. It’s a dream fueled by limitless imagination and an endless sense of possibility. A city of skyscrapers where even the sky isn’t the limit.

Naomi Watts

Kevin Costner

Venus Williams

Sylvester Stallone

The buildings and the streets, the landmarks and the hidden treasure spots The shadows and sun glinting off canyons of steel, the rivers of glass running upward… the legendary addresses...

Alec Baldwin

Fran Drescher

Tommy and Dee Hilfiger

Lionel Richie

But the real beating heart of New York is here, in its people. We are the city. We are the soul of this living legend. We are the sirens and shouts. We are New Yorkers. We love New York.

Ray Kelly

Steven Tyler

Paris Hilton

Tony Robbins

—In the voice Ray Kelly

SUMMER 2020

There’s something about the dizzying hustle of New York that attracts the best of humanity.

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Chelsea Market

New York is a city that belongs to the world, as much if not more than, to America.

DUJOUR.COM

This is why we love NY.


BINNSHOTS PRE-COVID JULIA LOUISD R E Y F U S AT THE MICHAEL KORS SHOW

C A R O LY N MURPHY AND L I LY A L D R I D G E AT B V L G A R I ’ S B.ZERO1 ROCK PA R T Y MEGAN THEE S TA L L I O N AT THE COACH SHOW

ASHLEY BENSON AT T H E S T E L L A MCCARTNEY SHOW

E M I LY R A T A J K O W S K I W I T H S A R A H H O O V E R AT T H E A P F G A L A

DUJOUR.COM

JANELLE MONAE AT T H E BALMAIN SHOW

ALEXA C H U N G AT MUSÉE DES ARTS D É C O R AT I F S I N PA R I S

SUMMER 2020

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MONIQUE LHUILLIER AND R ACHEL ZOE IN LOS ANGELES

NICK, KEVIN, AND JOE JONAS I N B E V E R LY H I L L S

DIANE VON F U R S T E N B E R G AT MUSÉE DES ARTS D É C O R AT I F S I N PA R I S

R E N É E Z E L LW E G E R W I T H K AT I E C O U R I C I N B E V E R LY H I L L S

CIARA IN B R O O K LY N

CANDICE SWANE P OE L WITH ELIZABETH S T E WA R T AT BVLGARI’ S B.ZERO1 RO CK PAR T Y

K I M K A R DA S H I A N W E S T, K A N Y E W E S T, KOURTNEY K ARDASHIAN, N O R T H W E S T, A N D P E N E LO P E S CO T L A N D D I SI CK I N PA R I S

WITH OSCAR BINN AND A NEW FRIEND CARA DELEVINGNE AT T H E D I O R S H O W


SHAILENE WOODLEY AND STELLA MCCARTNEY I N PA R I S

CHARLIZE T H E R O N AT FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

LARRY S I LV E R S T E I N AT G R O U N D ZERO

FOR M E R N E W YOR K CIT Y P OLICE C O M M I S S I O N E R R A Y K E L LY A N D N E W S A N C H O R G R E G K E L LY W I T H G R E G ’ S NEWBORN DAUGHTER

K ARLIE KLOSS AT I N D O C H I N E I N N YC

KELSEA B A L L E R I N I AT THE MICHAEL KORS SHOW

J A S O N S TAT H A M , R O S I E H U N T I N G T O N W H I T E L E Y, K AT E B O S W O R T H , A N D M I C H A E L P O L I S H AT BY R E D O L O S A N G E L E S ,

WITH ROBERTO COIN OWNER PETER WEBSTER

L U P E F I A S C O AT SOHO HOUSE

NICOLE RICHIE IN LOS ANGELES

DUJOUR.COM

USHER WITH JERRY L O R E N Z O AT T H E B A C C A R AT C R Y S TA L CLE A R PA R I S E V E NT Z E N D AYA AT BVLGARI’S B.ZERO1 ROCK PAR T Y

JENNIFER FISHER AND FERN MALLIS AT L I T T L E O W L THE TOWNHOUSE I N N YC R ASHIDA J O N E S AT FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

G W Y N E T H P A LT R O W AND RUMER WILLIS WITH DEMI MOORE IN B E V E R LY H I L L S

B FA . C O M

W I T H P A R I S H I LT O N A N D N I C K Y H I LT O N R O T H S C H I L D

VIRGIL ABLOH, BELLA HADID, AND GIGI H A D I D AT O F F - W H I T E ’ S “ D I N N E R PAR T Y ”

SUMMER 2020

ROB LOWE IN LOS ANGELES

MICHAEL B. J O R D A N AT T H E COACH SHOW

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K AT H E R I N E M C N A M A R A AT A LI C E + O LI V I A’ S P R E S E N TAT I O N


The Breitling Cinema Squad Charlize Theron Brad Pitt Adam Driver

#SQUADONAMISSION


STYLE Double ring in blue-green tourmaline, price upon request

DUJOUR.COM 23 SUMMER 2020

JE WELRY

A Painterly Approach

Victoire de Castellane blends the abstract with high jewelry excellence to create a modern homage to Art Deco PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIGITTE NIEDERMAIR


BEAUT Y

LIFE

CU LT U RE

Timepiece in white opal and pink and purple sapphire

T R AV EL

Bracelet in white opal and pink sapphire

SUMMER 2020

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Double ring in kunzite and purple pearl

ior et Moi, the new high jewelry collection by Victoire de Castellane, is inspired by sentimental jewelry symbolically known as “toi et moi.” Dior’s new line illustrates its abstract and artistic nature as well as technical craftsmanship. “This collection is a continuation of my exploration of color, lacquer, geometry and the mixing of materials by creating multicolored Art Deco pieces resembling small science fiction architectures,” says de Castellane, creative director of Dior Joaillerie. The collection brings together exceptional and semiprecious stones in a nonconventional way unique to the world of high jewelry. Precious stones can be found on modern silhouettes, multifinger rings, bangles, necklaces and mismatched earrings. With unusual colors, proportions and shapes, de Castellane breaks with tradition to find the perfect balance between the current and the traditional. Lacquer plays a leading role in the collection. In 15 unexpected colors, it appears in solids and gradients contrasting delicate pearls and pristine opals. De Castellane features one of her favorite stones, the opal, in an oversized pendant necklace set with a diamond and accented with lacquer accents on a string of pearls. Each piece has been finished on both sides, giving the effect of secret jewels. These special pieces are sure to become jewel box treasures for years to come. —ALEXIS PARENTE


STYLE

Ring in red spinel and white pearl

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STYLE

Earrings in blue-green tourmaline and white opal Dior Fine Jewelry All by special order, 800.929.3467


DRAMATICALLY BE T TER.


STYLE

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T R AV EL Triangle Baguette, $730; Mini Triangle, $545, SHARKCHASER,

NE W & NOTE WORTHY

sharkchaserofficial.com

YVES SAINT LAURENT’S GREATEST HITS Assouline’s new fashion volume takes a deep dive

BY ALEXIS PARENTE

F

ashion journalist Laurence Benaïm has compiled 100 of the most iconic pieces from the Yves Saint Laurent archive into this anthology from Assouline. This volume features looks that debuted at his first runway show in January 1962 all the way to his final haute couture presentation in 2002. Yves Saint Laurent: The Impossible Collection features seminal pieces like the Mondrian shift dress, the black dress from the film Belle de Jour, tailored pantsuits and numerous “coup de crayon” draped gowns. During Saint Laurent’s time, he single-handedly transformed the idea of haute couture, redeveloping it for a new era of young and independent women. His designs drastically altered the world of fashion and introduced the concept of ready-to-wear that catered to a wider audience. assouline.com

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Yves Saint Laurent: The Impossible Collection, $895, ASSOULINE,

SUMMER 2020

assouline.com

Victoria Grantham, founder and creative director of the New York–based luxury handbag brand Sharkchaser, wanted to create bags that would move you through your day with confidence, ease and style. Each bag is a mix of classicism and functionality with a side of playfulness. The collection has been designed with a unique radiationshielding fabric to protect the body from the electrical fields and radio frequencies that our cell phones are constantly emitting. sharkchaserofficial.com

CLASH DE CARTIER forgoes classic shapes and creates a new balancing act of clean design and energetic attitude. Together, the limited-edition pieces form a singular ribbed mesh, creating a new collection for the maison. Eighteen-karat rose gold rings, bracelets and single earrings are adorned in amazonite beads. Mondrian Collection Haute Couture, Autumn 1965

Clash de Cartier 18-karat rose gold and amazonite beaded bracelet, price upon request, CARTIER,

available by appointment only at select Cartier boutiques 800.227.8437

MODEL: ©CHRISTOPH SILLEM

DUJOUR.COM

SHARK BAIT

Meet the new handbag brand on the block


TWO-FACED

New to the world of Hermès: the double-faced silk scarf

hermes.com

DUJOUR.COM

After taking seven years to create, Hermès has just debuted its first doublefaced silk carré scarf. This major technical innovation features prints on both sides of the twill, showing alternate versions of the same design. French illustrator Ugo Bienvenu designed this double-faced scarf, which showcases a comic strip of a female heroine—one side in French and one side in English.

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WOMAN OF STEEL

Rado’s HyperChrome Classic gets added versatility Rado’s HyperChrome Classic collection is now offering a chic travel set that turns the purchase of one watch into three different timepieces. The 35mm stainless steel model with white mother of pearl dial and quartz movement is adorned with diamonds around the bezel, and Rado’s EasyClip system allows you to switch seamlessly between black croc-embossed leather, red crocembossed leather and vintage-style stainless steel bands. HyperChrome Classic Quartz Travel Set, $2,600, RADO, rado.com

CALIFORNIA LOVE Fendi partners with artist Joshua Vides on its pre-fall collection

Fendi has collaborated with Los Angeles–based visual artist Joshua Vides to conjure a free-spirited Californian vibe for its pre-fall collection. Vides brings his unique monochromatic style to Fendi’s Peekaboo bag, ready-to-wear and accessories, giving a carefree update to the house’s most notable pieces. fendi.com Black and White Marker Style Peekaboo Handbag, $5,300, FENDI, fendi.com


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A pre-production sketch of a Tiffany T1 bracelet; Tiffany T1 high jewelry diamond choker in 18-karat rose gold, $150,000; Tiffany T1 Narrow Ring in 18-karat rose gold, $850

LEGACY

Designed to a T

Tiffany & Co.’s Tiffany T1 transforms an icon into a bold, yet effortless expression of inner strength and individual style BY AMY ELLIOTT

A

hundred years ago, Tiffany & Co. was draping its clientele in swingy sautoirs, diamond bandeau tiaras, dinner rings and dainty wristwatches. One has only to watch The Great Gatsby directed by Baz Luhrmann for a flavor of the glamorous Art Deco aesthetic that the house was embracing in the 1920s (Tiffany provided all of the jewels for the 2013 film). Today, a century later, Tiffany is less concerned with homages to its gilded heritage and focused entirely on the here and now. Made in 18-karat rose gold, its latest collection, Tiffany T1, is defined by clean lines and sharp angles combined with f luid, feminine proportions. “The goal was to evolve the T motif into a new, bold symbol that felt very modern,” says Tiffany & Co. chief artistic officer Reed Krakoff. “It’s a reimagining of our iconic motif as one continuous design, an unbroken circle featuring a beveled edge, angular surface and a multifaceted finish.” Tiffany archivists date the original T motif to the 1980s, when the letter was alternately sans serif or Greco-Roman in feel, with tips that f lared down and out like an umbrella. In 2014, the

inaugural Tiffany T collection used a slender, block-letter design vocabulary. Krakoff ’s Tiffany T1 jewels are far less literal, and encircle the wrist, finger or neck in a sensual way—there’s something sinuous about these pieces, but also substantial and robust, evoking strength and self-empowerment. “When we were creating the Tiffany T1 collection, we realized it had to live up to and be worthy of the Tiffany name—of being the best, something that people think of when they think of the ultimate way to celebrate themselves,” says Krakoff. As such, a distinctive feature of the collection is that five of the nine initial designs are set with radiant Tiffany diamonds, including an effortlessly elegant choker worn by Charlize Theron at this year’s BAFTA awards. Rising star actress Florence Pugh, of Little Women, was also photographed wearing diamond Tiffany T1 bracelets and rings at British Vogue and Tiffany & Co’s BAFTA afterparty. “It was important for me to have Tiffany diamonds incorporated as much as possible,” says Krakoff. “For me, Tiffany T1 shouldn’t be saved for special occasions—the pieces can be worn every day as a celebration of yourself.” Set by hand in a honeycomb pattern to maximize scintillation, the diamonds effectively bring


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

Tiffany & Co.’s temporary New York Flagship Next Door; chief artistic officer Reed Krakoff; Tiffany T1 Narrow Hinged Bangle in 18-karat rose gold, $3,200; the Tiffany T1 high jewelry choker features 240 hand-set diamonds—14 carats in all

TIME FOR T British actress Florence Pugh (left) wore Tiffany T1 diamond bracelets and rings at British Vogue and Tiffany & Co’s BAFTA afterparty; Charlize Theron wore the Tiffany T1 high jewelry diamond choker to this year’s BAFTA awards

SUMMER 2020

ACTRESSES: COREY TENOLD PHOTOGRAPH

—REED KRAKOFF

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the pieces to life with “incredible scale, texture and dimension” especially in the case of the high jewelry (select, one-of-a-kind designs that take hours of work to complete and feature the rarest and most remarkable of gems). “We included high jewelry designs as part of the Tiffany T1 collection to express the idea that luxury should be effortless and can be worn even very casually. Even things that are very precious can be worn every day with an offhand attitude and a sense of irreverence.” And at Tiffany, where the brand has always looked to redefine luxury in the modern age, it’s perhaps this air of elegant insouciance that feels vaguely reminiscent of the pervading trends of the 1920s. That was an era that took modern women of privilege out of the drawing room and into the nightclubs or the streets to demand freedom from the delicate-flower lifestyles imposed on them. They bobbed their hair and bared their shoulders, raised their voices, kicked up their heels and otherwise defied convention. Meanwhile, themes of female empowerment and gender equality are as topical today as they were in 1920, when women earned the right to vote in the U.S. In this way, Tiffany T1 feels particularly relevant to the current cultural mood. “Today, so many women are at the forefront of change and are powerful voices in their communities,” says Krakoff. “We wanted to design something that really felt bold, strong and inspired by their strength.” This summer, Tiffany T1 will be extended to include 18-karat white and yellow gold designs. Collectors can also anticipate the addition of bracelets, rings, earrings and pendants set with baguette diamonds in the fall. Visitors to New York City will have a chance to experience Tiffany T1 at the brand’s temporary f lagship while the iconic Fifth Avenue landmark continues to undergo a top-down renovation. “We have created something truly unique and visually dynamic with this temporary space,” says Krakoff. “Each f loor offers a unique visual concept that complements its contents and embraces the experimental nature of the space with whimsical nods to its impermanence.” Experimental, dynamic, whimsical and nested in a vision of luxury that’s effortless and irreverent…welcome to the Tiffany of the future.

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Tiffany T1 shouldn’t be saved for special occasions—the pieces can be worn every day as a celebration of yourself.


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Maillon Triomphe signature bracelet in brass with gold finish, $750, CELINE,

Gingham Platform Slingback, $1,050, FENDI,

celine.com

fendi.com

Chain link dusters, $525, JENNIFER FISHER,

TREND REP ORT

jenniferfisher jewelry.com

Country Living

“Whitney” Harris Tweed Weejuns, $110, G.H. BASS & CO,

The rolling hills of the British countryside take center stage this summer with endless plaids, sweet Liberty floral prints, textured knitwear, revamped rain gear and lots of rich leather BY ALEXIS PARENTE

Galop d’Hermès Steel Case Natural Barenia Calf Strap watch, $3,750, HERMÈS, hermes.com

Silk floral printed scarf, $395, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it

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ghbass.com

SUMMER 2020

Look 8 from Proenza Schouler Pre-Fall 2020 Collection

Cropped Cable-Knit Cardigan, $398, TORY BURCH, toryburch.com

Cancun single-breasted Blazer, $680, NANUSHKA,

Open Road Royal Deluxe Hat, $225, STETSON, stetson.com

nanushka.com

Look 2 from Gucci Pre-Fall 2020 Collection

Leather shoulder handbag, $1,490, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, ferragamo.com

Ivy Leather Short, $595, RAG AND BONE, rag-bone.com

Navy brocade mules, $775, MANOLO BLAHNIK, manoloblahnik.com


Nylon coat, $625, S MAX MARA,

Classica Parisienne medium pendant in 18k yellow and white gold with diamonds, $2,200, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin.com

maxmara.com

Medium grey and tan leather Pocket bag, $1,650, BURBERRY, us.burberry.com

a LoveShackFancydesigned tablescape

Broderie Anglaise Maxi Dress, $695, COACH, coach.com

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Grey tailored wool coat, $4,600, Gingham printed silk scarf, $890, FENDI, fendi.com

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Panthère de Cartier medium model 18k yellow gold ring with tsavorites, onyx and black lacquer, $6,100, CARTIER, cartier.com

Muslin black tartan wool cascade ruffle skirt, $1,250, MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION, select Michael Kors boutiques

Floral embroidered sweater, $1,190, BROCK COLLECTION, modaoperandi.com

Knee-high boot, price upon request, CHRISTIAN DIOR, available at Dior boutiques

Recycled Ripstop Quilt Jacket, $445, GANNI, matchesfashion.com


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For water lovers, the titanium black DLC ULYSSE NARDIN Diver X / Cape Horn watch with high-tech movement features a unidirectional rotating dive bezel and is water-resistant to 300 meters. $9,900, ulysse-nardin.com

SUMMER 2020

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ALL IN THE TIMING

Time Out

Even if you have to distance yourself from others, summer is a good time to indulge in some outside activities, and top watch brands can keep you company BY ROBERTA NAAS

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f you’re the type of person who loves getting outside and indulging in sports and activities, whether on land, in the air or in the deep blue ocean, you’ll need a watch that is built to accompany you on your journey. Luckily, top watch brands have been perfecting their outdoor timepieces to make them lighter, more durable, extremely precise and equipped with extra features to help you accomplish your feat. Because the quest for ultimate experiences seems inherent in today’s culture, watch brands have turned to new materials (including carbon and other alloys) and new technology to deliver the ideal timepieces for all sorts of experiences. In some instances, watchmakers have teamed with pilots, divers and explorers to determine the best and most-needed features and functions. Some have even brought on adventure-seeking brand ambassadors to put their watches to the true test. Officine Panerai, for instance, works with French free diving world champion Guillaume Néry, who is also a brand ambassador. In the dangerous world of free diving, Néry plunges into the ocean—as far as 400 feet—with just one breath. A multiple world record holder, he has tested several Panerai watches on his dives as

AVI Ref. 765 1953 Re-Edition, $8,600, BREITLING breitling.com

well as during his training, which includes CrossFit, swimming, paddling and running. Panerai has even launched the limited-edition Guillaume Néry Submersible watch in his honor. The automatic mechanical timepiece houses a 302-part movement with Incabloc antishock technology. Made of titanium, it is equipped with a counterclockwise rotating bezel with a graduated dive scale, and offers luminous hour markers and dots for underwater readability. Another brand known for its marine heritage, Ulysse Nardin, works with brand ambassadors that run the gamut from divers to arctic explorers and sailors. In fact, sailor and navigator Sébastien Destremau, who has won some of the most diff icult races in the world, has just come on board. Destremau was the final sailor to complete the last Vendée Globe Ocean Race in 2017, having spent 124 days at sea. Ulysse Nardin is now the Official Timekeeper of Vendée Globe, a merciless and dangerous challenge around Cape Horn and Point Nemo, where the nearest land mass is more than 1,600 miles away. Participating sailors spend months alone in treacherous waters as they traverse the oceans in this “Everest of the Seas” competition. Ulysse Nardin’s Diver X / Cape Horn and the Diver X / Nemo Point


If diving or snorkeling is your thing, take a look at the titanium PANERAI Limited Edition Guillaume Néry Submersible 47mm watch with Incabloc antishock device, water-resistant to 300 meters. $19,400, panerai.com

hublot.com

For mountain climbers, spelunkers and explorers, try the Carbon TPT and titanium RICHARD MILLE RM 25-01 Adventure tourbillon watch. $1,042,000, richardmille.com

SUMMER 2020

For those who want to hit the links, HUBLOT Big Bang Unico Golf Green Carbon watch (made of high-tech Texalium) allows golfers to calculate their score while on the course and offers aperture displays of the information. $32,500,

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For those with a pilot’s license, Breitling, long known as the creators of instruments for professionals, continues its rich roots in aviation with a host of new watches developed after carefully studying the needs of professional pilots. The recently released AVI Ref. 765 1953 Re-Edition watch, inspired by the beloved Co-Pilot watch from the 1950s, houses a mechanical movement that is a COSC-certified chronometer (attesting to its excellent precision), both antimagnetic and shock-resistant. The list goes on, but suffice it to say that many watch brands today are equipping their timepieces for the great outdoors, offering highly functional features in cases that can take a beating.

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watches are designed to go the distance with skippers who face icebergs, monumental waves and violent winds. Made of titanium with concave unidirectional carbon bezels, these watches are equipped with mechanical movements that boast high-tech parts such as Silicium and Diamonsil technology. Then there are the brands that think outside of the box for watches needed in land adventures. In the case of Richard Mille, the brand wanted to offer a watch that could withstand the harshest of climates and experiences—maybe even slay a dragon. Who better to turn to for this than Rambo, a.k.a. Sylvester Stallone (who played John Rambo in the 1982 movie First Blood), for design and functional advice. After four years of research and development in collaboration with Stallone, the $1 million-plus Richard Mille RM 25-01 Adventure tourbillon watch was unveiled. It houses some world-first tools that could be used on action hero Rambo’s wrist, including a hermetically sealed titanium compartment for five water purification capsules that render a liter of water safe to drink. The lightweight titanium and Carbon TPT watch is offered with two interchangeable bezels, including one with cardinal compass points and a spirit level for a more accurate reading of the compass needle.


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Panthère de Cartier double-loop bracelet watch in 18-karat white gold with diamondpaved bezel, $39,600, CARTIER, cartier.com

chopard.com

TEST OF TIME

Icons in Time

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These brands’ signature watches continue to appeal today thanks to their timeless elegance. And their celebrity fans clearly agree.

6 SOFIA VERGAR A

jaeger-lecoultre.com

JULIE ANDREWS

ELIZABETH TAY L O R

BY ROBERTA NAAS

Oyster Perpetual Datejust 36 watch in Oystersteel and 18-karat white gold with black dial and Jubilee bracelet. $8,550, ROLEX, rolex.com

Reverso One Duetto Moon watch in 18-karat pink gold with reversible dial featuring the phase of the moon on one side, $22,900, JAEGER-LECOULTRE,

Serpenti Tubogas double-spiral bracelet watch in steel and 18-karat rose gold with diamond accents, $17,200, BULGARI,

K AT Y PERRY

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Première Velours watch in 18-karat yellow gold and titanium with black rubber strap with velvet touch and black-lacquered dial, $4,200, CHANEL, chanel.com

bulgari.com

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SOFIA VERGARA: URI SCHANKER/WIREIMAGE; KATY PERRY: BERTRAND RINDOFF PETROFF/GETTY IMAGES

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Happy Sport watch in 18-karat rose gold with mother-of-pearl dial and floating diamonds, $13,500, CHOPARD,


For the anniversary, Grand Seiko is producing recreations of the original 1960 Grand Seiko watch. Part of the elegance collection, this version is crafted in 18-karat yellow gold and retails for $26,000.

BY ROBERTA NAAS

The original 1960 Grand Seiko is recreated in platinum and retails for $38,000

F

or centuries, most of the world has looked to Switzerland when it comes to luxury watches, but Japan is catching up. Seiko has been steadily growing the presence of its Grand Seiko line, which made its debut in 1960 and spun off into its own brand two years ago. Now, it celebrates its 60th anniversary by unveiling limited-edition watches, new movements and a new workshop in Japan dedicated to making high-tech calibers that power its watches. By combining high-precision mechanics with a clean yet highly detailed aesthetic, Grand Seiko regularly turns out some very alluring watches. “Grand Seiko’s 60th anniversary is a significant milestone for our brand,” says Brice Le Troadec, president of the Grand Seiko Corporation of America. “Not only does the number 60 have great resonance in our industry as one of the fundamental numbers in horology, it is also an expression of a moment of new energy and rebirth.” After more than a year of research and development to create the most precise, durable and beautiful timepiece, a team of master watchmakers unveiled the first Grand Seiko in December 1960. That had a 14-karat yellow gold-filled case and a slim movement whose precision met the highest international standard

The 100-piece limited-edition Hi-Beat 80 Hours watch is crafted in solid 18-karat yellow gold and offers 80 hours of power reserve. $43,000

The Hi-Beat 36000 watch from the Heritage collection with Grand Seiko logo in gold will be made in a limited edition of just 1,500 pieces, each retailing for $6,300.

SUMMER 2020

In a world where Switzerland dominates as the luxury watch leader, Japanese brand Grand Seiko is making an indelible mark

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Grand Seiko Celebrates 60 Years

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TIME WILL TELL

of timekeeping. Today, the three new watches offer that same slim profile and super-chic aesthetic. One is in platinum, one in 18-karat yellow gold and one in Brilliant Hard Titanium, a proprietary metal that is twice as hard as stainless steel but as light as titanium. Several anniversary pieces boast new mechanical movements, including the 9SA5 caliber, which the brand says is the finest caliber it has built to date. “The new movements are important for the future,” says Le Troadec. “These new calibers have managed to evolve something already mechanically impressive to a whole new level. This is the true evolution for us.” The new caliber powers the 100-piece, limited-edition Hi-Beat 80 Hours watch crafted in solid 18-karat yellow gold. The mechanical watch offers an unprecedented 80 hours of power reserve when fully wound—meaning you can put the watch down on a Friday night and it will still be running when you pick it back up on Monday morning. It is also incredibly precise, with an accuracy of +5 to -3 seconds a day. This movement also powers the new Hi-Beat 36000 Heritage Collection watch with rich blue dial (Grand Seiko’s signature color), 18-karat gold logo and a bright red second hand. Together, the gold and red elements are meant to recall the sunrise in Japan. “We are always on a journey to create the best version of Grand Seiko, in craftsmanship, beauty, accuracy and precision,” says Le Troadec. Their hard work clearly speaks for itself.


CALIBER RM 037

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS BOSTON BUENOS AIRES LAS VEGAS MIAMI NEW YORK ST. BARTH TORONTO VANCOUVER www.richardmille.com


BEAUTY DUJOUR.COM 39 SUMMER 2020

Bella Hadidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sun-kissed skin at Michael Kors

SEAN ZANNI / GETTY IMAGES

TREND REP ORT

Good to the Last Drop

Getting that dewy glow is now easier than ever thanks to a bevy of new self-tanning drop formulations

H2O Tan Drops, $36, JAMES READ, dermstore.com

Organic Sunless Tan Anti-Aging Face Serum, $54, COOLA, coola.com

D-Bronzi Anti-Pollution Sunshine Drops, $36, DRUNK ELEPHANT, drunkelephant.com

Self-Tanning Drops, $49, DR SEBAGH,

Adaptive Tan Drops, $106, OSKIA LONDON,

drsebagh.com

spacenk.com


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ST Y LE

FIRST PERSON

Beauty in the Time of Coronavirus One reporter recounts how her beauty regimen unraveled day by day during shelter-in-place

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f you know me, you’ll know that I’m a faithful creature of beauty habit. I have my favorite hairstylist and colorist, my go-to dermatologist, my eyelash extensions lady, my manicure at one specific Japanese nail salon downtown that uses a made-in-Japan gentle gel formula you can’t get anywhere else. And I like to think, after 12 years of being a beauty writer, that my favorites are the best and I waltz in there with the confidence of knowing that my services (and conversation) will be divine and the results aligned with my highly informed taste. What I hadn’t realized is how much, despite being a beauty expert, I’d completely relied on these services to keep me,

well, sane. What happens when I am left to my own devices? What happens when time of day or even day of the week becomes as muddled as a mojito? What happens to memory when it’s befuddled by kids ignoring their online schooling programs and going banshee in the house? For what really happened, I had to pour myself a tall one and walk back, socially distanced 6 feet away from anyone else, down memory lane to the beginning of New York’s shelter-in-place. Day 2: I am applauding myself for having had the good fortune of a color appointment just days ago. Not only that, but my favorite

MARCUS SCHÄFER / TRUNK ARCHIVE

BY BEE SHAPIRO


Now’s not the time to go with super-invasive peels.

41 SUMMER 2020

Fritas of Suite Reyad, and he suggests Color Wow’s Root Cover Up (sold at Ulta!). I find it weird I’m applying what looks like eyeshadow to my roots, but it’s a new normal. I shrug and drink more wine. Day 25: I finally just cut off my gel nails, but that leaves woeful leftover gel nail polish bits. Who’s going to see? Day 27: I attempt to meditate using Insight Timer. It doesn’t take. Day 30: I succumb to the new bangs temptation. I cut long, Jane Birkin–style ones. They don’t look bad, but I don’t tell David. Day 31: I realize my bangs are uneven, so I ask David for advice. He suggests finding the sharpest scissors I have at home, which end up being a scary pair of kitchen shears, and finding some “brutally clear light.” His step-by-step: “Trim your slightly damp, combed bangs without using a comb or pulling down on the hair while you are cutting—you don’t want any tension in the hair. Always cut less than you think you need to. You have time on your side, and you can go back to shorten your work if you need to.” If you can, avoid touching your hair at all, he says. “If you simply cannot wait and possess a steady hand and feel confident, trim the superficial layer of the hair—the very top layer, like layering around the face or bangs, or the very bottom layer of the hair, like a trim to deal with split ends.” Hint taken: I am not cutting my hair again. Day 32: I call up Reyad again. My grays—ack! He suggests buying Inoa by L’Oreal, as it’s a permanent color but is ammonia-free, so it won’t mess with your salon color. He calms me down by say ing I’m lucky I’m not blonde and dealing with roots. What s h o u l d m y b l o n d e f r i e n d s d o? “Honestly, it’s better to wait,” he says. ENGELMAN “It’s easier if it’s a brunette base with highlights, but if your friends are completely blonde, it’s better to deal with some roots or wait as long as you can. If you suddenly go do a home single process, it can be a disaster that will take something like nine months to a year to fix!” Blondes with short hair should buy some pomade and go for a Kristen Stewart rock ’n’ roll look. Those with long hair should do a sleek ponytail. “Better to show off the line of your roots than try to hide it,” Reyad says. Oh, and start booking your colorist stat. Reyad already has a long line of clients who say they’re going to be his first when he reopens. Day 33: I look in the mirror and I am definitely not my former polished self. I am sure the wine is not helping. I take David’s other advice and do a hair mask. Day 34: I attempt to meditate listening to Tara Brach. I fall asleep. That’s a win, right? Day 35: I realize I’ve stopped caring what my nails look like. I try a jade roller routine I found on YouTube, but I stop halfway through and bake cookies with my kids instead. Day 36: I have not given up, but I realize I’m in a totally different mindset. Don’t mistake me, I’m going to be first in line for all of my favorite services when things reopen, but taking a break has been refreshing. So I feel extra assured when the brilliant writer and comedian Jill Kargman tells me: “I basically have succumbed to the beauty dumpster fire that is my quarantined self. I do a skincare routine—weirdly, my dermis is great. The bad news is my hands look like monkeys chewed on them and stuck them in the microwave, and I have grays sprouting along my part. I say surrender to the flow; we’ll all be hiddy in June, but will look extra great for summer.” Here’s to summer!

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colorist, Lionel at David Mallett salon in Soho, had painted on a beautiful balayage with darker roots than usual. This one will grow out nicely, and it might be the best color I’ve ever had. Too bad there are very few people to see it! Day 7: My gel nails are starting to look frightening. I start googling “How to remove gel nails” and go on the hunt for 100 percent acetone remover—sold out everywhere! Day 8: My Botox is still fresh, but filler is starting to look patchy. I text my friend and dermatologist (handy!) Dr. Dendy Engelman on what to do. She basically tells me to chill—in her lovely, friendly, Southern way. “The good news is Botox lasts about four months, and hyaluronic acid f illers last up to one year (Voluma two years!). Chances are you should be fine for a few months,” she tells me. She does suggest that I try a new retinol or retinoid product to “promote collagen production” and “help with fine lines and wrinkles.” If things start to look really droopy, she suggests investing in a jade roller or even one of the fancy at-home devices like Conture or NuFace. “They are great ways to improve skin quality and address wrinkles and sagging while we have the time to devote to them,” she texted—smile emoji. Day 9: Hair color still looking great, but I’ve stopped doing my hair altogether. Who’s going to see? Hello, trusty dry shampoo! Day 10: My skin is starting to look drab. The culprit? Likely poor sleep and too much wine. Since the chances of either better sleep or less wine are dismal, I compensate by overexfoliating. (All that time to inspect pores now!) Dendy reminds me to chill out: “Now’s not the time to go with super-invasive peels. You don’t want to make your skin barrier vulnerable to infections or other issues.” Day 15: Hair color still looking O.K. Gel nails out of control. Acetone is still out of stock everywhere. Who —DR. DENDY could have predicted the day that acetone and toilet paper would be the hottest beauty items around? But I’m starting to feel restless. I debate whether to cut bangs to change things up. My hairstylist David Mallett writes from Paris, where he is based. No, no, “Now is not the time to try bangs for the first time.” He also says, “Don’t pretend you’re a newly minted YouTube star and attempt a geometrical cut that requires skilled precision or do any type of cut that falls on the neck, which makes errors even more visible.” Day 17: Starting to lose it from seeing my kids and husband too much. What can get the endorphins f lowing? A whiter smile! My dentist Marc Lowenberg sends me a simple DIY recipe of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide. “Baking soda is minimally abrasive but removes surface stains from your teeth, and the hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen molecules, which helps whiten teeth,” he says. (Meanwhile, I’m thinking of how great my white grill will look on Zoom calls.) “You can do the paste twice a day, like toothpaste,” he adds. “Make it like you’re cooking chicken soup. Add a little hydrogen peroxide to the powder until you like the consistency. It will dry out before the next use, so add some fresh hydrogen peroxide to get it right each time.” Day 20: About half of my eyelash extensions have fallen out. I pretend I’m doing a spiky Liza Minnelli lash look by loading on tons of mascara. Soul Lee, the eyebrow and eyelash guru and owner of NYC studio Beautiful Soul, wouldn’t approve of my DIY job. She says there’s nothing I can do but wait to see her. I think about a prison break. Day 24: My grays are starting to show at my roots. I haven’t used home hair color since college. I call up color maestro Reyad


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A DAY IN THE LIFE

Joanna Czech

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BY KIM PEIFFER

was never planning to become an aesthetician,” says celebrity skincare guru Joanna Czech from her living room in Dallas, Texas. The Polish-born Czech was preparing to go to medical school when a failed physics class led her to enroll in summer beauty school, and the rest is history. Fast-forward a few decades and she is now one of the most powerful forces in the beauty world, with a client roster of fa mous fa ces t hat includes Jennifer A nist on, K im Kardashian and Christy Turlington Burns. She has a cult following and an ever-expanding waitlist to snag an appointment at one of her skin clinics (a f lagship in Dallas and a spa inside The Webster store in New York City), and she travels the globe sharing her skincare wisdom. Before awards show season, she sets up shop in Los Angeles so she can cater to the actresses clamoring for her signature glow before they walk the red carpet. Although she is often on the road somewhere in the world, she finds happiness at home in Texas, seeing clients and hanging at home with her husband. “I have an amazing passion for my work and love what I do,” Czech says. “I have been in the United States for 31 years, and when I first arrived, the industry was very much makeup-focused. You covered up bad skin with makeup. Now, it is focused on healthy skin and creating a great base for makeup, which I am very happy about.” Czech says her philosophy is based on creating healthy, glowing skin from the inside out. “There are still many products and techniques that I have been using since I was introduced to them 35 years ago because they work,” she says. “Fashion should be trendy, but skincare really isn’t.” Below, the Dior skincare ambassador walks us through a day in her shoes.

FROM TOP:

Joanna Czech; the skin guru at work on a client at her Dallas skin clinic

JOANNA’S MUST-HAVE PRODUCTS 1 The Body Wash, $25, NECESSAIRE, nécessaire.com. 2 Capture Totale Super Potent Serum, $155, DIOR, dior.com. 3 Body Essential Alpha Hydroxy Derma-Lac Lotion, $65, ENVIRON, dermaconcepts.com. 4 Recherche Lotion P50 PIGM, BIOLOGIQUE, daphne.studio

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7:00 A.M. Rise and shine time. 7:30 A.M. I’ll eat a bit of banana and have some espresso, followed by a 45-minute workout with my personal trainer. This usually consists of a combination of cross-training, weights, cardio, kickboxing and stretching or yoga. I flip between them all. 8:15 A.M. Turn on some great music and take a quick shower, rinsing my face and body. I then use toner, serum, eye cream, moisturizer and lip balm, and if I am going to be in the sun for more than 30 minutes, I apply SPF as well. 8:30 A.M. Breakfast time. I have been following Dr. Steven Gundry’s Plant Paradox diet, which is about the elimination of lectins, which can cause inflammation. I either have goat- or sheep’s-milk yogurt with berries or a homemade carrot muffin and one or two eggs, plus another shot of espresso. Then I take my supplements, which include vitamins D3, C and B12, Omega 3, 6 and 9 and a probiotic. And by this time of the morning, I have had at least a liter of water! 9:00 A.M. I get dressed, which takes me about three minutes. I very often start with my shoes when deciding what to wear. 9:05 A.M. FaceTime my mom in Poland. 9:30 A.M. I drive to my Dallas studio. 10:00 A.M. I am with my first client. Sometime between 12–3 p.m. (between clients), I have a quick lunch prepared by my chef, which consists of some form of salad and fish, most often salmon. I also always have snacks on hand during the day, like half an avocado, a hard-boiled egg or some almonds or walnuts. 4:00–5:00 P.M. I have mint tea between

PORTRAITS: THE REDMANS

SUMMER 2020

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The celebrity aesthetician takes us through a jam-packed day in her shoes (she has quite the collection!) and offers her go-to skincare routine


Fashion should be trendy, but skincare really isn’t. —JOANNA CZECH

THE MARIE KONDO OF SKINCARE

While some skincare brands tend to have a more-is-more approach with harsh ingredients that claim to speed up results, new Japanese American skincare brand Seiseo JBeauty is taking a different approach, focusing on simple, quality ingredients that stand the test of time and aim to nurture skin back to health with products that are gentle but effective. Focused on skin wellness, the fourproduct collection contains the essentials to getting skin back into its best shape: a foaming cleanser, a ceramide concentrate, a weightless moisturizer and a velvety face cream for deep hydration. seisojbeauty.com

SUMMER 2020

Leave it to Dyson to invent a hot iron that protects hair, rather than scalds it, yet works brilliantly to deliver results. Enter the Corrale straightener, the latest hair tool on the market from British mastermind James Dyson. Using flexing plates that shape and gather hair, this cord-free device (seven years in the making, BTW), has three precise heat settings plus patented flexing plates that work to deliver even heat and tension with every pass of the tool, creating perfectly smooth strands with half the damage of a traditional hot iron hair straightener. dyson.com

99 percent natural, it’s a multitasker’s dream come true. Use Gold Lust All Over Oil overnight on hair as a deep healing treatment for damaged locks, slather it on your body to soften skin or let the 17 nourishing and protective oils give your face a dewy glow. It can even be used on cuticles to soften and repair. Miracle product, indeed. The brand is also launching a lightweight thermal protectant mist this summer, which, when sprayed on strands, will shield hair from heat damage, UV rays and pollution, oribe.com

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THE STRAIGHT AND NARROW

only is this new GOLD RUSH Not beauty elixir from Oribe

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clients and I drink water throughout the day. Three liters of water per day is always my goal. 7:00 P.M. This time of the evening is usually when I see my last client of the day, then I drive home and keep working, often doing virtual consultations for clients around the world in different time zones. I also use this time to check in on my New York studio. 8:00 P.M. I take my main shower and wash off the day. My routine begins at night as this is the most important time; products are more effective when skin is at rest. Don’t forget, skincare includes the body! I begin my evening routine with a shower (my evening routine is in two parts: one part before dinner and one part after). I massage my body with Nécessaire cleanser and my Biologique Recherche massage gloves. Afterward, I use a combination of Environ’s Derma-Lac Lotion and their A,C & E Oil. 8:15 P.M. Dinner (my husband heats up our prepared dinners), which is always some sort of cooked vegetables and fish or homemade soup. 9:00 P.M. I finish my evening skincare routine. I cleanse my face (I have about 10 cleansers in rotation, depending on what my skin needs on any given night), follow with my favorite toner, Biologique Recherche Lotion P50 PIGM 400, and then massage my face with my facial massager for about 7–10 minutes. After that I do an application of serum—right now I am loving Dior Capture Totale Super Potent Serum—followed by an eye cream. My final step is moisturizer. Three times per week I use a mask or two, as well as LED therapy with my Celluma Pro. 9:30 P.M. I wind down, sometimes on calls with my brother and his family or my stepdaughter, who all live in California. Sometimes I’ll watch television (my guilty pleasure is The Voice—I love music!) or I’ll do crossword puzzles or sudoku to relax. Often I will have some berries or cassava chips as a treat. 12 A.M. Lights out. I fall asleep.


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E XPERT ADVICE

The Ultimate Skin Supercharge Dermatologists and skin experts offer the best souped-up beauty treatment regimens to get your skin back in shape this summer BY KIM PEIFFER

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fter months of being quarantined at home with most cosmetic dermatology practices temporarily closed, many are now wondering how to jump back into the skincare game after months of sitting on the bench. “With all the stresses of COVID-19 quarantine and people taking a break from home and office skincare routines, people are going to need to supercharge their skin to get it back to pre-COVID state,” says Dr. A nne Chapas, director at Union Square Laser Dermatology in New York City. But fret not: Post-COVID skincare is placing a heavy focus on quality versus quantity, which means you’ll be back to your glowing self in no time. With the launch of many new treatment procedures this summer and fall, there’s a lot to look forward to in the scope of beauty maintenance. At celebrity facialist Joanna Vargas’s namesake spa in Manhattan, she’s busy curating specific protocols for each individual depending on the state of their skin post-quarantine. One of her top recommendations? The new minimally invasive Twilight Facial, if you’re looking for an option without much downtime. “All other facials I offer are noninvasive, meaning they don’t break or damage the surface of the skin,” she says. “In the Twilight Facial, the main technology is microneedling combined with radio frequency. Once the needles go into the skin, we apply radio frequency to the needles that go into every layer of the skin. It completely remodels your collagen. It’s seriously the most amazing treatment I’ve ever done. It’s honestly like having a facelift.” After the microneedling, Vargas applies a Twilight Face Mask in addition to facial cryotherapy to calm inf lammation and inject the epidermal growth factor deep in the dermis. The mask is followed with an oxygen treatment. “I use my own professional

P H O T O : K A T B O R C H A R T/ T H E L I C E N S I N G P R O J E C T, M O D E L : C H L O E B L A N C H A R D / T H E L I O N S

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oxygen serum made from green tea and aloe,” she explains. “It’s antibacterial, collagen-stimulating and anti-inf lammatory.” The facial finishes with an LED light session to get skin into peak shape. To get skin back into shape, she recommends a combination of Twilight Facials and Clear + Brilliant laser treatments to jump start skin. “Clear + Brilliant completely retexturizes the skin, evens out pigment and diminishes the appearance of your pores,” she says. Another trend you’ll see this summer? A global approach to facial rejuvenation, says Lauren Abramowitz, founder of Park Avenue Skin Solutions. “When you come to see me or any of our highly skilled injectors, we take the whole picture into consideration before injecting just a lip, just eye troughs or just forehead lines,” she says. “The days of focusing on and injecting one area of

—LAUREN ABRAMOWITZ

DUJOUR.COM

The days of focusing on and injecting one area of the face are over!

the face are over! It’s all about taking a hybrid approach using different types of dermal fillers along with lasers, chemical peels and micro-tox to achieve full face globalization.” If you’re getting back into the beauty game and are O.K. with a little downtime, Abramowitz recommends starting with a medical-grade chemical peel (one that actually takes a layer of skin off) to brighten and freshen up the skin. “Once the skin has peeled, I would recommend an intense pulsed light treatment, followed by a microneedling and radiofrequency treatment to boost collagen, followed by a CO2 micro laser treatment infused with platelet-rich plasma,” she says. “One cycle of this and your skin will bounce right back. This regimen would be effective to do 2-4 times a year.” If you prefer a one-and-done approach to facial rejuvenation, Dr. Chapas recommends laser layering: a series of varying treatments done in one office visit to quickly restore skin health. First, reduce inf lammation with a vascular laser such as the V Beam Prima or Excel V+. Redness from underlying skin conditions like acne and rosacea f lares and allergic reactions can be greatly improved with these lasers that specifically target redness and broken blood vessels. Next, Chapas recommends Secret RF needling to firm and tighten the deeper layers of the skin. “After this quarantine, patients are going to need extra treatments to tighten the eyelid, lower face and neck skin,” she says. Finally, you can restore the glow with skin resurfacing procedures like the Fraxel Dual laser. This is performed to brighten the skin and smooth texture. “All of these procedures performed together would cause a few days of redness and swelling post-procedure but can easily be covered by tinted sunscreen or makeup,” Dr. Chapas says. Plus, patients who receive injections could have their Botox or filler done during the same visit. “Patients could continue this program every six months as maintenance,” she says. And voila, your skin is reborn.

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Blackstones salon; the book; The Well; the author; EverBody

E V E R Y B O D Y : N A DAV H AVA KO O K

JUST FOR MEN

Men’s Health and Esquire grooming editor Garrett Munce has published a men’s grooming guidebook just in time for Father’s Day. Self-Care for Men: How to Look Good and Feel Great (Adams Media) tackles topics of mental and physical wellness—something men often overlook. Here are some of Munce’s must-have wellness spots in New York City.


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LIFE LIVING DUJOUR.COM

California Dreaming

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When childhood friends reunite, the result is a modernist paradise on Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Westside

SUMMER 2020

BY NATASHA WOLFF PHOTOGRAPHY BY NINA CHOI

The entryway is one flight up from the street and overlooks the rooftops of other homes in Santa Monica Canyon. The black steel door is a side entrance to the living room used for overflow when entertaining. A Lawson Fenning table sits amidst plantings from The Tropics.


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osh Greene was working for noted interior designer Michael Smith in Los Angeles when he got reacquainted with Michal Spitzer, with whom he was raised in San Marino, California. “We grew up down the street from one another and were in the same class in elementary school,” says Greene. “When my family moved to Seattle in the early 1990s, we lost touch.” Twenty years later, they reconnected in the interior design world and afterward, when Greene and designer Katrina Hernandez had a firm called Hernandez Greene (each designer is now working on their own), Spitzer reached out to him. She and her husband, Paul Davis, along with their two kids, were building a home in Santa Monica Canyon, an intimate enclave up a winding road from the Pacific Coast Highway, and needed a designer. “Paul wanted something very modern and Michal wanted something with more decoration, so, from the get-go, it was always going to be a give and take between the architecture and interiors,” says Greene. “They balance each other out as a couple.” Greene’s interiors were inspired by the homeowner’s personal style and the architecture designed by Barbara Callas of Callas Architects. “She is one of the coolest women I know,” he explains. “Full of warmth, very stylish and extremely well-edited, but all in an easygoing and natural way.” The modern architecture, by comparison, was strong and angular, so furnishings needed to be

TOP: A Kelly Wearstler sofa flanked by two antique chinoiserie side tables from JF Chen in the living room below a painting by Isabel Bigelow. The coffee table is by Jean-Louis Deniot, Moroccan rug by Aga John and ottomans upholstered in a Zak+Fox fabric. LEFT: Walnut

stairs meet oak flooring on the second floor. A George Nakashima bench from JF Chen sits beneath a Jason Frank Rothenberg photograph.


The kitchen with its white marble counters and adjacent dining room function as one. Counter stools are by BDDW, pendant lights are by Allied Maker and cabinet hardware is by Rocky Mountain Hardware; the reductionist exterior

features black steel windows set against white plaster; the minimalist four-poster bed anchors the master bedroom, where a Karl Springer-inspired bench is dressed in a two-tone fabric from Larsen and a pair of lamps by Rose Tarlow sit bedside.

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—JOSH GREENE

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From the get-go, it was always going to be a give and take between the architecture and interiors.

softer but hold their own in the space. A lot of dark walnut was used in stairs, soffits, walls and millwork, and the window frames are black, so Greene used a mix of neutrals with bold solid colors. With all that black, the fear was that the rooms would be too heavy, but white shades and clean furniture staved off that pitfall. “Objects, art and accessories were ways to bring in more of a handmade, bohemian feel to soften the modernism,” says Greene. For both Greene and Spitzer, shopping together was the most fun part of their collaboration. They were able to choose pieces they had coveted over the years while decorating clients’ homes, like the master bedroom lamps from Rose Tarlow. Greene sourced furniture locally from famed boutiques like JF Chen, Orange, Lawson-Fenning and Nickey Kehoe, and mixed in favorites from vendors like The Future Perfect, BDDW, Apparatus and Cassina. Spitzer and Davis have two young children, so the space needed to be practical and functional— and not too precious. They also like to entertain, so the indoor-outdoor dining and entertaining spaces are generous. “This house gets used!” says Greene. And, really, that’s all any designer could ask for.


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C DINING OUT

Plate Expectations Across the United States,

old-school luncheonettes are no longer a thing of the past BY NATASHA WOLFF

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lassic diners—the kind that dot the country from Maine to California and offer mile-long menus packed with grilled cheese sandwiches and silver-dollar pancakes—have long been a destination for those seeking the comfort of familiar (if not spectacular) American fare. In his book Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity, filmmaker and artist David Lynch wrote, “There’s a safety in thinking in a diner. You can have your coffee or your milkshake, and you can go off into strange dark areas, and always come back to the safety of the diner. … They’re brightly lit, with chrome and booths and Naugahyde and great waitresses.” And while their numbers have dwindled in recent years, greasy spoons remain for many of us a comforting throwback beloved for their familiarity, though not necessarily for their culinary prowess. However, that might all be about to change. A new generation of diners is popping up across the United States, doubling down on the charm and comfort of the classic concept but

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Steak and eggs at Soho Diner in New York City; booths at Soho Diner; outside Phoenicia Diner in upstate New York

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giving their menus a decidedly epicurean overhaul. “In the last couple of years, many old-school diners have been shutting their doors, and there was a sense of loss,” says Ann Redding, the chef and restaurateur of the new Thai Diner in New York City. “I think this recent resurgence in diners shows that these sort of neighborhood community gathering places are still needed.” Kristopher Schram, the chef and owner of the West Taghkanic Diner in Ancram, New York, agrees. “There is something very comforting about diners,” he says. “When we take a seat at the counter or in the booth and the waitress starts pouring the coffee, I think a lot of us are craving that.” Phoenicia Diner in upstate New York is housed in an original 1962 DeRaffele building that has been restored with its original charm intact. “We strive for authenticity and a level of respect for the original design,” says owner Mike Cioffi. “I like the combination of nostalgia mixed in with a healthy dose of comfort food as a response to fussy and formal eating.” Whittling down their menu from the traditional multipage one was also necessary. “I remember paging through the menus as a kid but always gravitating toward 10 or 12 things that I was familiar with,” says Cioffi. “In our case, we chose to highlight menu items that we could create from scratch, source locally and that were familiar, like corned beef, eggs benedict and club sandwiches.” Finding the familiar on the menu is crucial to diners, most restaurateurs believe. The Palace Diner in Biddeford, Maine, a 90-year-old, 15-seat diner car, is a local icon. “Just keep it simple. No need to do anything other than

SOHO DINER: HEIDI’S BRIDGE

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the classics as long as you’re doing them well,” says chef and co-owner Chad Conley. While most of these institutions are a throwback when it comes to design, the food is anything but. Local produce and inventive recipes are upping the quality of the dishes served. At Thai Diner, steak and eggs get an update with a spicy dipping sauce and sticky rice; at Rose’s Fine Food in Detroit, a patty melt is elevated with a burger patty made with bone marrow; at Phoenicia Diner, corned beef hash is made with their own house-cured, pasture-raised brisket. “We are, of course, cooking a lot of eggs and making many turkey clubs, but those eggs are from a local farm and the turkey is smoked in our woodfired smoker,” explains the West Taghkanic Diner’s Schram. “It takes just as much work, craft and creativity to make that sandwich as it does food at fine dining restaurants, but the experience around it

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Chad Conley, co-owner and chef of Palace Diner in Biddeford, Maine; outside Dad’s Luncheonette in Half Moon Bay,

California; sandwiches and sides at Dad’s Luncheonette; chef Scott Clark of Dad’s Luncheonette


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isn’t fussy.” And that’s why diners are so beloved. “We feel it’s important that all dishes be recognizable, and that goes for the ingredients, as well,” says Tony Fant, the president of GrandLife Hotels, which includes NYC’s Soho Grand Hotel, home to Soho Diner. New York City alone has seen five upscale diners open in the past six months: José Andrés’ Spanish Diner at Mercado Little Spain in Hudson Yards, Champs vegan diner in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Golden Diner in Chinatown, Thai Diner in Nolita and Soho Diner in Soho. The 4,900-square-foot Soho Diner features salmon terrazzo floors, a breakfast counter with an open kitchen, custom walnut booth seats and Formica tabletops. Black-and-cream banquettes offer a nod to turn-of-the-century pharmacy booths, as do deco streamline factory lights and globes with mid-century pendants. Diner design that lacks pretense is very important. West Taghkanic Diner’s 1953 building hasn’t changed much, and that authentic flavor is baked in. “It has aged really well,” says Schram. “It has this art deco feel with terrazzo floors, curved lines and lots of chrome. We added little modern touches that play well with the original feel.” Rose’s Fine Food, a local haunt since 1964, boasts beautiful details like a stainless steel back counter, swiveling stools and glazed brick. “I knew I wanted to create an inviting space for all walks of life with really good food,” says owner Molly Mitchell.

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“WTD” pizza at West Taghkanic Diner; its chef Kristopher Schram; outside the diner

It takes just as much work, craft and creativity to make that sandwich as it does food at fine dining restaurants. —KRISTOPHER SCHRAM

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Arroz a la Cubana at Spanish Diner; chef José Andrés of Spanish Diner; inside the diner

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The counter at Thai Diner; the chicken liver entree at Thai Diner; desserts at Thai Diner

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Thai Diner’s Redding and Matt Danzer, who also co-own together the Michelin-starred Uncle Boons, were careful to marry Americana with a distinctly Thai aesthetic. Chrome, glass blocks, old-school cake displays, mid-century chandeliers and booths intermingle with Thai materials such as teak and bamboo and retro posters. “When I was a kid, I had a pretend diner called Ann’s Diner, where my parents and sister would come and order whatever they liked,” says Redding. “When I first moved to New York City, I lived half a block from [iconic Ukrainian diner] Veselka, and it was like a second home.” “Diners have always been, and hopefully always will be, the epitome of a democratic, all-inclusive restaurant,” says Fant. “Too many restaurants these days cater to a homogenized crowd of sameness, and it’s rare to see all demographics sharing the same space.” There is a comfort in knowing what you’re going to get—especially in uncertain times. “I love all iterations of diners,” says Mitchell. “I always feel at ease when I spot the stools and the stainless steel.”


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FROM TOP:

Joe Judge, Joe Nielsen, Joe and Cushing Donelan at the Judge Vineyard in Sonoma; a bottle of the new BROSÉ rosé wine

PROFILE

A Family Affair BY NATASHA WOLFF

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orthern California winemaker Joe Donelan started in the wine business 20 years ago and, in 2008, founded Donelan Family Wines. Sons Tripp and Cushing were brought into the company to head up market, branding, sales and business development for the familyowned Santa Rosa, California-based winery. The family produces syrah, pinot noir and chardonnay, and sources grapes from their own 10-acre Obsidian Estate as well as from exclusive vineyard partnerships in the Sonoma Valley. After the 2017 devastating Tubbs Fire hit the Knights

Valley, the family decided to replant syrah and add grenache, mourvèdre, viognier and cabernet sauvignon grapes to the mix. “The vineyard and climate make perfect conditions for all these grapes, and the new plantings will allow us to have more estate-driven wines,” explains Cushing Donelan. “That’s the driving force of our decision to lay down roots in Sonoma: The microclimates, topography and grape selection are all ideal for showcasing a broad portfolio of wines.” The label’s terroir-driven wines are fresh, exciting and food-friendly. The syrahs in particular have garnered four 100-point scores from wine critics Robert Parker and Jeb Dunnuck. “We work with syrah for the most part, but also make killer chardonnay and pinot noir,” says Cushing. “Our wines are born in California and educated in Europe, meaning they are full of flavor and concentration but they possess nuance and elegance.” When they’re not in Northern California, the Donelans spend summers together on Nantucket at a beachfront home in Miacomet. The family looks forward to annual industry events like the Nantucket Wine & Food festival (sadly postponed this year), where they’ve been able to spread awareness about their wine offerings among local restaurateurs and sommeliers. “My parents first started coming in the late 1970s and bought property in the 1980s,” says Cushing, who worked for 10 seasons at local notable restaurants like Straight Wharf,

Our wines are born in California and educated in Europe, meaning they are full of flavor and concentration but they possess nuance and elegance. —CUSHING DONELAN

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At Donelan Family Wines, it’s as much about togetherness as it is about the grapes.


The Pearl, Boarding House and Lola 41. A lot of memories have been made on the island. “I met my wife while at the Pearl, got engaged at Galley Beach and got married at the Nantucket Yacht Club,” he explains. Recently, Cushing has branched out on his own with a venture in partnership with Scott Manson, COO of SB Projects, and Doug Banker of BroBible. BROSÉ is a start-up rosé label made from carignane and pinot noir grapes. The affordable rosé is available online now, with distribution to follow (bro-se.com). “We wanted to have something fun and delicious that doesn’t take itself so seriously,” says Cushing. We can certainly raise a glass to that. donelanwines.com

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M I D D LE .W E S T . SPIRITS. V I M & P E TA L . DRY GIN.

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HILLROCK SOLERA BOURBON

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TWO JAMES. SPIRITS. ABSINTHE.

twojames.com

FROM TOP:

FA M I LY ; J O N A T H A N N I M E R F R O H

Perli Vineyard in Mendocino, California; Cushing, Christine, Tripp and Joe Donelan on Nantucket

TEN TO ONE WHITE RUM

tentoone rum.com GOSLINGS. F A M I LY . RESERVE. OLD RUM.

goslingsrum.com

SUMMER 2020

casa dragones.com

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CASA DR AGONES BLANCO TEQUILA


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DESIGN

Lounging in Luxury This summer, dive right in …to a sunbed

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wimming pools may be a favorite spot to cool off, but their surrounding terraces and decks have become increasingly inviting outdoor spaces to relax, socialize and work. Cushioned chaise lounges, all-weather woven furniture, plush round sunbeds and sectional sofas provide ample seating options for socializing, entertaining, relaxing or simply taking a nap alfresco. “With people spending more time at home this year, backyard design becomes more integral to the enjoyment of your space,” says New York City-based interior designer Elizabeth Muraro Hague. “In the last decade, home design has trended toward bringing the outside indoors by creating generous walls of windows and doors.” Designers have noted seeing slatted wood poolside cabanas and comfy day beds with retractable canopies from luxury hotels to private residences. Some of the newest contoured loungers even rest in a few inches of water on resort-style Baja shelves for those who just don’t want to be far from the water. “I almost always make sure to add umbrella anchors to the bottom of my clients’ pools,” suggests Muraro Hague. “In the south, where the pools get used year-round, my clients are able to pop open umbrellas in the shallower sun shelf areas of their pools and never have to leave.” Other daybeds f loat across pools—it’s a brave new world. A cabana island with comfy seating occupies the center of the circular pool at the iconic Fontainebleau Miami Beach, and round daybeds dot a circular deck. “Things have definitely changed,” says Lindsay Foster, senior director of merchandising for outdoor furniture at Frontgate. “Even 10 years ago, outdoor living was not for everyone. Now, the pool is a design space all its own.” Top luxury outdoor furniture brands like Brown Jordan, Manutti and Janus et

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The pool at the Arte residences in Surfside, Florida; the pool at The Beverly Hills Hotel; Bungalow 11 at The Breakers Resort in Palm Beach

Cie offer spacious outdoor couches and curvaceous plush seating that provide practical comfort. “There are so many companies out there who make beautiful backyard seating,” says Muraro Hague. “I love pieces from the Virginia-based Kingsley Bate. Their furniture is incredibly well-made.” Their social responsibility is appealing to their customers, as they work hand-in-hand with the governments in Java and Burma to responsibly forest the teak used in their products. “People are investing in cantilevered umbrellas that go over the pool, so you can be both in the pool and in the shade,” says Foster. For those seeking shade, Jardinico’s sleek, rotating outdoor parasols provide solace for the sun-shy. “Tuuci makes my favorite umbrellas for the backyard,” says Muraro Hague. “With sun protection on the forefront of everyone’s minds these days, I have more clients requesting cabanas like the ones from Tuuci or larger cantilevered umbrellas to make sure they can have enough shady areas.” Sun- and water-safe fabrics are also now ubiquitous, and some f loats, like Frontgate’s Soleil water lounger, can remain safely in the pool even on hot summer days. More functionality is being incorporated into poolside furnishings, too, with side tables containing built-in coolers for ice and beverages and seating clusters for cocktails. “It is about creating different moments by the pool and different uses throughout the day,” says Foster. In the pool, floating cabanas, foam chaises with cupholders, drifting bean bag chairs and buoyant mesh easy chairs will make it very unlikely you’ll venture far from the water. At Arte by Antonio Citterio, a new ultra-luxury beachfront condominium development in Miami, a private spa area with an indoor pool leads to an outside pool area with teak sun loungers and an adjacent meditation pond lined with cabanas. Mixing textures like wood with woven and natural materials like wicker and rattan is a nice way to mix up outdoor furniture so it’s not too heavy or monotonous. “Kingsley Bate also makes weatherresistant woven resin, wicker and rattan,” says Muraro Hague. “I love mixing their teak and woven furniture together to create a warmer, more curated backyard space.” In Los Angeles, architects like Tom Kundig are finding that clients want outdoor spaces a nd pool a rea s t hat a re “ less f ussy.” California is all about healthful living. “People want balance, meditative spaces and gardens and pools that give people a place to retreat to and allow them to connect with the natural landscape,” says Kundig. Now that we’re spending a lot more time at home, these calm, natural spaces provide a place to feel comforted and safe.


We’ll help you understand the financing process to ensure you make an informed decision about your second home mortgage options.

Unique financing options for second and vacation homes If you’re dreaming about vacation homeownership near your favorite location, you’ve come to the right place for financing information and tips. We’re ready to help you through every stage of homeownership — as you plan to buy, when you purchase, and even after you own your vacation home. From your mortgage application to enjoying your new getaway, we’ll be there by your side. Together, we will explore our versatile options to see what your unique situation may allow for. • Purchase and refinance amounts up to $6 million • The ability to close in LLC’s and Trusts • Our re-cast feature allows eligible customers to “re-cast” or “re-amortize” their loan after making a large principal payment2; buyers will have a lower monthly mortgage payment, but they may pay more interest over the full mortgage term than they would by making a principal reduction without using the recast option • Buyers can purchase with cash up-front and get a mortgage within 90 days of purchase2 • The ability to lend in all 50 states Contact your local Wells Fargo team today. Hamptons Branch 42 Hill Street Southampton, NY 11968 631-283-2120 www.wfhm.com/hamptonsbranch 1. Certain requirements must be met which will be explained to the buyer at the time he/she requests a recast. Consult with a home mortgage consultant for more details. 2. For nonconforming loans, application must be submitted within 90-days of purchase. For conforming loans application must be submitted within 6 months of purchase. Other restrictions apply. Consult with a home mortgage consultant for details. Information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N. A. © 2016 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS3295579 Expires 6/2017


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1306 ROUTE 9D, GARRISON, NY

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21 HURLINGHAM DRIVE, GREENWICH CT

RE AL ESTATE

SUMMER 2020

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5046 CARBON BEACH TERR ACE , MALIBU, CA

The Great Escape When you’re sick of the city and itching for a backyard and a pool, here are five homes to decamp to this summer—courtesy of Douglas Elliman

277 DANIELSON DRIVE , ASPEN, CO

219 FURTHER LANE, EAST HAMPTON, NY


ENTERTAINMENT

The Magic Touch

New York’s mentalist to the stars shares some tricks of the trade BY LAUREN WATZICH

M

agic has the power to make people smile. It allows them to forget about the world’s problems, even for just a few minutes. This is reason enough for magician Kevin Nicholas to continue amusing his fans from a distance. Better known as the Modern Mentalist, he’s making a name for himself in the entertainment world with mind-blowing tricks and a fresh, cool-kid vibe to match. Nicholas, who has been perfecting his craft since his teenage years, performs for high-profile clientele at intimate hangouts and large soirées in Manhattan, the Hamptons, Los Angeles and beyond. In fact, he’s had the pleasure of entertaining celebrities like Kate Hudson, Michael Strahan (his reaction was priceless) and Paris Hilton. He’s also partnered with fashion brands including Saint Laurent and Alexander Wang and the New York Knicks and Yankees at their spring training camp. From the crazy things he does with a stack of cards to his insane fork-bending illusions that prompt a “Whoa, what just happened?” reaction from onlookers, Nicholas has more than a few tricks up his sleeve. “I've created a hybrid style of mentalism and

magic,” he says. “My style aims to bring a modern feel to magic using technology and culture, like guessing an audience member’s PIN code or predicting what their favorite wine is.” While there’s no magic trick to predict what the future will hold, Nicholas is optimistic. He’s been performing remotely for clients and parties. “The value of live performances has not diminished—it just may take a different form, such as stage magic versus a typical close-up performance,” he says. @ModernMentalist


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DOLL ARS & SENSE

Cure for the Cause

The venture capitalists at the center of the coronavirus fight

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he battle to halt the COVID-19 pandemic will, of course, involve quite a bit of brain power and likely even more cash. One team looking for the answers is Scientists to Stop COVID-19, which the Wall Street Journal repor ted in an Apr il stor y is described as “a lockdown-era Manhattan Project, a nod to the World War II group of scientists who helped develop the atomic bomb.” Scientists to Stop COVID-19 comprises a group of billionaires, industry leaders and scientists working together as a kind of “ad hoc review board for the flood of research on the coronavirus,” reported the Wall Street Journal. Together, they have been sifting through various nontraditional treatments from around the world to bring the best plans and recommendations to the current political administration. As of late April, they had assembled a confidential report. Scientists to Stop COVID-19 is overseen by Tom Cahill, a young Duke-educated physician-turned-venture capitalist based in the Boston area. In March, Cahill organized a conference call to discuss how to assist with the f ight to stop the coronavirus. What he imagined as a small group of friends and investors mushroomed into hundreds of people interested in participating. Among them: National Basketball Association Commissioner Adam Silver; Steve Pagliuca of Bain Capital; PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel; financier-turned-philanthropist Michael Milken; and Brian Sheth, the Austin-based co-founder and president of Vista Equity Partners. It was Sheth—a Democratic philanthropist with an expertise in technology who was also an investor in Cahill’s fund, Newpath Partners—who closed the gap between the group and the Trump White House. Sheth introduced Cahill to Thomas Hicks Jr., who lives in Dallas, is a co-chairman of the Republican National Committee, and “hunts birds with Donald Trump,” according to the Wall Street Journal. Forbes has reported that Sheth’s net worth is $2.2 billion, making him one of the richest people in the Austin area. In recent years, Sheth and his wife, Adria, donated $3 million through their Sheth Sangreal Foundation to help build a new campus for the local Boys and Girls Club,

featuring various sports fields, a recording studio, art and dance studios and a learning center for coding. Last year, they pledged to donate $1 million per year for the next decade to fund campus operations. Over the years, the 73-year-old Milken, who founded the Milken Institute to promote social good in 1991, has spoken out about how important philanthropy and fundraising are to accelerating scientific change. This is particularly true when it comes to COV ID -19 research and the efforts of the Scientists to Stop COVID-19. Risk-takers must be supported, Milken told the Wall Street Journal in another interview in early May, to “invest in where the world is going, not where it is.”

L A B W O R K : G E E R T V A N D E N W I J N G A E R T/ B L O O M B E R G V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; B R I A N S H E T H : M I C H A E L KOVAC / G E T T Y I M AG E S

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BY TABATHA TAFT

BRIAN. SHETH.


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H E A LT H C A R E P R O F E S S I O N A L : C H I P S O M O D E V I L L A / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; J I M PA L L O T T A : J I M D A V I S / T H E B O S T O N G L O B E ; P E T E R T H I E L : D A V I D PA U L M O R R I S / B L O O M B E R G ; S T E P H E N PA G L I U C A : S C O T T E E L L S / B L O O M B E R G ; M I C H A E L M I L K E N : J O H N N Y N U N E Z / W I R E I M A G E

M I C H A E L. M I L K E N.


FILM

The Right Molly

Actress, producer and lifestyle entrepreneur Molly Sims returns to film with The Wrong Missy BY NATASHA WOLFF

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SMITH HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY

Molly Sims in a Raquel Diniz dress and BaubleBar earrings in Cancun


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ou won’t find Molly Sims running lines at home with her film executive husband. “He lets me do my thing,” says the 47-year-old actress and model who is married to Scott Stuber, Netflix’s head of original films. The space seems to have ser ved her well: Sims—who previously appeared in movies like Fired Up! and Yes Man— is returning to the screen this month after a 12-year hiatus from acting in the romantic comedy The Wrong Missy. But it isn’t as though she hasn’t been busy. In the years since her last role, Sims moved from New York City to Los Angeles, got married and had three children. She’s also written two books; started an eponymous lifestyle website offering fashion, beauty and health and wellness content; and done work with philanthropic organizations including Baby2Baby. We talked with the actress and producer from her home on the Westside of Los Angeles amidst the shelter-in-place guidelines to talk about her new Netf lix film, her time away from the spotlight and what’s coming next.

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Katia Pryce’s DanceBody workout, Lauren Roxburgh for foam rolling and 20-minute

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I’m more of a homebody than people think I am. FOMO is not something I suffer from.

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It’s been over a decade since you’ve acted in a film. What was special about The Wrong Missy? I had just had a baby and was thinking about getting back together with the old cast of [the 2006 film] The Benchwarmers. I love David Spade and Rob Schneider and we had a lot of fun shooting in Hawaii. It’s a very funny, light romantic comedy about a mistaken identity. Exactly what we need right now. I was a little nervous getting back into it, but I realized I missed acting. What does your day look like during shelter-in-place? We’re with our three children at home. We’re doing school online and trying to maintain some structure, doing things like arts and crafts, making bath bombs and forts, having cake for breakfast and staying in pajamas all day. It depends on the day; some days I cry, hide from my kids, bake, cook or try to get a workout in. What are your go-to meals? We’ve been sitting down for dinner as a family, which is nice. I have been roasting chicken—I’m on the hunt for the perfect roast chicken—making salmon, healthy quesadillas and tacos and guacamole. What organizational project have you tackled? Sims wears a This is a nesting period for me for sure, like when I was pregRaquel Diniz dress nant. I’ve reorganized my workout clothes, the kids’ toys, you and Rebecca de name it. I find cleaning very therapeutic. It really helps people live Ravenel earrings better. I’m actually producing a reality show on the Nashvillein Cancun based organizational company The Home Edit and its founders, Joanna Teplin and Clea Shearer. We go into the homes of real people and celebrities and make sense of everything. It’s called House Goals With the Home Edit and it comes out this September. How have you been helping those in need right now? I just participated in City Harvest’s Great New York Foodathon to help underserved families in New York City. I’m working with Baby2Baby, No Kid Hungry and Save the Children, as well. Hopefully, inf luencers can make a difference during this time. What workouts are you doing? —MOLLY SIMS Lots of online apps and videos from

sprints on the treadmill. What’s been the easiest or hardest adjustment? The easiest is that I was always structured in my day and home. The hardest is having everyone at home here with me. I don’t get a lot of alone time anyway in normal conditions, but I’m not used to having my husband here all day. What have you learned about yourself in this period? I’m more of a homebody than people think I am. FOMO is not something I suffer from. What are you watching? Scott and I are watching Tiger King and Schitt’s Creek on Netf lix and BBC’s The Split. With the kids, we’ve been crushing Trolls and the Harry Potter films. I watch MSNBC and CNN and I read The New Yorker, New York and Politico. What’s atop your to-do list once this is all over? A pedicure! I really have taken those for granted. What will be your first meal out? Date night with Scott at Giorgio Baldi, where we had one of our first dates. We’ll have the Dover sole with spinach, the lobster appetizer, carciofi salad with fennel and pecorino and some nice red wine.


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To Natalie, With Love

A new memoir and documentary explore the life of actress Natalie Wood

In the memoir More Than Love (out now from Scribner), Natalie Wood’s daughter Natasha Gregson Wagner offers an intimate portrait of the iconic actress, who died tragically at a young age. Gregson Wagner recounts family life with Wood, her stepfather Robert Wagner and half-sisters Courtney and Katie growing up in Hollywood in the 1970s. A companion documentary Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind (out now on HBO after premiering at Sundance earlier this year) explores the mother-daughter relationship in and out of the public eye. Below is an excerpt from More Than Love.

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y mother had grown up on movie sets, always surrounded by a cast of characters and crew, with a mother who followed her everywhere. Even now that she was a grown woman, she wasn’t comfortable being alone. She was someone who needed to be surrounded by people and a bustling household most of the time. When we first lived all together on Canon Drive in the mid-1970s, my dad was working on a TV series called Switch, an action-adventure detective show. As the lead, he had to work twelve- to fourteen-hour days, but he called regularly from whatever set he was on, and the two of them were always making plans. “R.J.,” my mom would say, cradling the receiver, “we’re having dinner with the Pecks tonight. What time do you think you’ll be wrapped?” Then she would nod and say, “Okay … amazing … incredible … I love it!” She’d laugh her musical laugh and hang up. A constant stream of lunch and dinner dates, parties, phone calls, visitors, and house guests vied with me for my mom’s attention. Oftentimes it felt like I had to share her not just with my dad and my extended family, but also with the world. Although I wasn’t happy when my parents went out to parties or for dinners, I loved it when they stayed home to entertain. I always knew when my parents’ friends were coming over because my mom did her eyes. I’d watch as she got ready, sitting with her at the vanity in the

dressing room area that led to her white-and-green bathroom….I can still picture my mother in front of that mirror with five or six hot rollers framing her face, doing her eyes. To start, she dipped a long, thin brush in water, then into the palette of black pressed powder to form a liquid eyeliner, which she used to paint a fine outline around each eye. With a smaller brush, she coated her eyelid in brown eye shadow and blended it with an upward motion. Next she curled her lashes with a mysterious metal contraption before stroking a wand of mascara over them. Once the eyes were done, pale pink lipstick and a swab of gloss were the finishing touches. She could talk to me or Daddy Wagner or a friend on the phone throughout her makeup routine and never make a mistake. As my mom got ready, she’d often walk around in a nude bra and undies, curlers in her hair, one eye painted, buzzing the kitchen to ask Kilky what time the guests were arriving, how long the wine had been chilling, what Courtney and I were having for dinner. Or she would waltz into my dad’s office next door to their bedroom and carry on a conversation in various stages of undress. Then she’d pick up something to wear from her enormous walk-in closet shimmering with dresses, blouses, pantsuits, hats, shoes, and fur coats. A spritz of her gardenia perfume, the same kind given to her by Barbara Stanwyck when she was a little girl, and she was ready to be the hostess…. Though bedtimes were strictly enforced, Courtney and I were allowed to join the parties early in the evening. Mommie and Daddy wanted us there to meet and greet their guests, to talk, and

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he director Elia Kazan was another frequent guest. My mom had given one of the greatest performances of her career for him in Splendor in the Grass, earning her second Academy Award nomination for it. She was in awe of his talent as a director. This was the man who had made A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront with Marlon Brando, and East of Eden with James Dean. She always considered Splendor her best film and Kazan one of her greatest champions. Everybody called Kazan “Gadge,” a nickname he earned from his love of fiddling with gadgets. Around our house, Gadge wore shorts and could often be found poolside, soaking up the sun on a chaise lounge. To me he looked a little like Elmer Fudd. With rumpled gray hair, he sort of shuff led from side to side when he walked. I figured he must be very funny because my parents were constantly laughing when they were with him. My mother had a handful of older women who were important to her. She had spent so much time around adults when she was a child that many of her friends were her senior by many years. There was Rosalind Russell, who had played her mother in Gypsy; the author, activist, and philanthropist Mickey Ziffren; the grand dame of Hollywood Edie Goetz (daughter of Louis B. Mayer); and the actress and writer Ruth Gordon. My mother loved and admired these fancy ladies, and so naturally I loved them too. Once, I remember being sick with a cold, lying drowsily in my mom’s bed on Canon Drive, overhearing Mommie on the phone with Edie Goetz. “Oh, she would love that, Edie. No, I don’t think she has ever seen a nosegay. Oh, how perfect, how divine! You are the best, Edie. Thank you.” This was how I learned Edie was sending me a nosegay.

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to enjoy the festivities. We’d wander in, fresh from bath time, wearing our nighties, our hair still wet. I would scoop a handful of cashews from one of the silver bowls and eat them while my parents and their friends drank wine and told each other funny stories, clouds of cigarette smoke wafting to the ceiling…. Like my mother, I had an instinct for performance from a young age. I was keen to shine in social settings as long as I felt surrounded by people I trusted. I loved making my parents and their friends laugh. I could do an impersonation of a monkey that my mom had taught me, just like the one she’d done in Miracle on 34th Street. Or I would tell a knock-knock joke. If I didn’t have a joke to tell, I’d scoop up one of our dogs or cats and wander around with them. I passed through wafts of perfume mixed with cigarette smoke, the sounds of laughter and storytelling in my ears, the beautiful ladies saying hello, asking for a hug, the silks and satins of their clothing smooth against my freshly washed arms…. Both my parents had grown up in the studio system, and their careers spanned many generations of actors and filmmakers. As a result, guest lists for my parents’ parties included a mix of the not famous at all, the so-so famous, and the very famous. Celebrities I remember seeing at our house were Bette Davis, George Segal, Gene Kelly—who lived down the street—and Gregory Peck and his wife Veronique. I was too young to appreciate that these people were legends. I just knew I enjoyed it if they were nice and paid attention to me. I remember dancing legend Fred Astaire was always immaculately dressed in vests, ties, and cashmere blazers. He had a wide, clean face and, usually, a yellow silk scarf around his neck, and he always smelled clean, like a fresh bar of soap.

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ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF HBO

Natalie Wood with daughter, Natasha Gregson Wagner, in Hawaii in 1978; Wood and Robert Wagner’s first wedding in 1957; Wood and daughter Courtney Wagner at Natasha’s fifth birthday party in 1975


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hen there were those guests who visited infrequently but who were considered very important. One day when I was about six, my mother said to me, “Now, Natasha, tonight a dear friend of ours is coming over for dinner. His name is Sir Laurence Olivier, and he’s the world’s most talented living actor, so you must be very polite to him.” The most talented actor I knew was my Daddy Wagner, so I told my mom: “He can’t be the world’s greatest actor. Daddy is.” My mom laughed her wonderful laugh and later, when “Larry” arrived, I was introduced to him. Larry reminded me of a cozy grandfather and sounded just like my Daddy Gregson with his English accent. I immediately felt at ease around him. Since I’d recently discovered knock-knock jokes, I decided to entertain Sir Laurence with a few of my favorites. He was kind enough to humor me by listening attentively, dutifully replying, “Who’s there?” to my every “Knock-knock!” When I started laughing before all the punch lines, he even joined me in my hysterics. After dinner, I left the room and my mother told him the story about what I’d said about my father before he arrived. Before she got to the punch line, Larry interrupted. “Don’t tell me,” he said. “I’ll bet I know what Natasha said: that her daddy is the greatest actor in the world.” I walked back in at the precise moment he spoke the words “. . . her daddy is the greatest actor in the world.” I smiled triumphantly and said, “See? He agrees with me!” Most days around five o’clock, my mother picked up the phone to buzz the pool house and the guest house for my godfathers Mart or Howard. “Martino, Aitchey, when are you coming down here? Let’s sit at the bar and have a drink.” Like the nuts and cigarettes in the little silver cups on the bar, alcohol was always present at home. It was part of what made our household so lively and festive. Various bottles were stacked deep in the liquor cabinet, and the liquids inside f lowed freely. My parents always drank. All their f r iends drank too. Dr ink ing wa s an ever yday pa stime in Hollywood in those days, often continuing late into the night. Sometimes the fun took on an edge that bothered me. My mom did not drink hard liquor, only wine, her favorite being white-wine spritzers. Around the time I turned eight years old, I’d start to notice if she’d had too many drinks. She seemed less attentive to me, and when this happened, I worried about her. I was used to having a somewhat vigilant, slightly bossy mother. When she had been drinking, if I tugged on her skirt because I needed her, she would no longer react right away. Instead, she’d brush me off with a far-away-sounding voice, as if she was too distracted by whatever conversation she was having with a guest to give me her full attention. Mommie was here, but at the same time, she wasn’t really here. Where’s my regular mother? I used to think. Both my parents seemed to drink more when we traveled. In 1978, we rented a house on the beach in Hawaii for three months while my dad shot the miniseries Pearl with Angie Dickinson. Late one night, I was awakened by voices and walked out of the house to find my parents’ good friend Tom Mankiewicz wearing nothing but his bikini briefs. He held a drink in his hand, and my fully clothed parents were drinking too. Mank was there to discuss writing and directing the pilot of a new series my dad was starring in called Hart to Hart. But this didn’t look like a business meeting to me. “Why are you in your underwear?” I blurted out. “Well, Beano,” he said, “I’m thinking of taking a dip in the ocean.” It was two in the morning. Why wasn’t anyone talking him out of it? At eight years old, I knew that a grown man going swimming in his underwear in the middle of the night wasn’t the best plan. “But it’s dark outside.” I looked to my mom and my dad, but they gave me no indication that anything abnormal was happening. My dad simply said, “You should be in bed.”

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I went back to my room, thinking, What kinds of craziness do my parents get into when I’m not around? I had the strong feeling that I needed to keep an eye on them. The following summer, we went to the Las Brisas resort in Acapulco. My dad had made some commercials for a Mexican clothing company in exchange for a free trip there.

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Wood, Wagner, Courtney and Natasha in 1978; the poster for HBO’s documentary Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind

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ne evening, my dad was driving, my mom was in the passenger seat, and Courtney and I were in the back. When we returned to the hotel, my mother was slumped over in her seat. My dad said, “Natalie, get up.” She tried to move and ended up falling down onto the f loorboard. “Natalie, you’re scaring the kids,” my dad said. “Get up.” She mumbled, “I can’t get up,” from the f loor. She looked like my mom, but she wasn’t acting like my mom. It was scary to me. That was the only time I remember seeing my mom really drunk. Was my mother dependent on alcohol? Or just someone who enjoyed a few drinks? Mostly I felt too shy and confused to talk to my parents about their drinking. On the few occasions that I did protest, they would assure me that there was nothing to be concerned about and that I was worrying too much. They were in control; everyone was safe. All was well in my world. Maybe at some point, had she lived, my mom would have realized the drinking was getting out of hand, and she would have turned to my dad and said, “R.J., it’s time to take a break.” She was a professional actress: when she needed to diet for a role, she was extremely disciplined, counting calories and working out to get into shape. Maybe she would have done the same with alcohol. I’ll simply never know.

FROM MORE THAN LOVE: AN INTIMATE PORTRAIT OF MY MOTHER, NATALIE WOOD BY NATASHA GREGSON WAGNER. COPYRIGHT © 2020 BY NATASHA GREGSON WAGNER. REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF SCRIBNER, A DIVISION OF SIMON & SCHUSTER, INC.

COURTESY OF HBO

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A New York State of Mind Journalist and news personality Greg Kelly debuts a new series with an eye on New York City BY K ASEY CAMINITI

DA N I A L D ’ O T TAV I O

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ON NEWSMAX TV.

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GREG KELLY REPORTS AIRS WEEKNIGHTS AT 7 P.M. EDT

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s a trusted news anchor and host of Greg Kelly Reports, Greg Kelly has earned the trust of viewers across the country through years of on-air reporting. The son of former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly (with whom he speaks daily) has had his roots planted in Manhattan since covering events like the 2001 New York City mayoral campaign and live reporting from Ground Zero. For nearly 10 years, Kelly was the co-host of Fox’s local morning show Good Day New York alongside Rosanna Scotto, where he became a household name. Before all that, Kelly was a Marine Corps fighter pilot flying AV-8B Harrier jump jets for almost a decade. Since leaving Good Day New York in 2017, his loyal audience has wondered where his commanding charisma would land him next. In January, Kelly launched a national primetime nightly news and opinion show, Greg Kelly Reports, for cable news network Newsmax TV. The nightly news show showcases Kelly’s skillful broadcasting coupled with his signature New York City confidence.

“Now, I’m able to give my honest point of view of current events as they unfold,” says Kelly. “The first thing that struck me when I began at Newsmax is how much more energy being an anchor on my own took, as opposed to being a co-host. When I was working with Rosanna, so much of what we did worked because of our chemistry—we were so comfortable ad-libbing together.” But, of course, coverage changed a lot this spring with the onset of the coronavirus crisis, which has dominated news cycles. “The coronavirus crisis is so broad, keeping up with everything is a full-time challenge,” says Kelly. “At Newsmax, we’ve spent a lot of time focused on nursing homes, where so many infections and deaths have resulted from wrongheaded state policies. It’s a scandal that too many in the media haven’t covered enough.” Since leaving the morning show grind, he’s been focusing on his health and getting enough sleep. “Dr. Oz told me how important it is to go to bed and wake up at the same time, even on weekends,” says Kelly. “I look and feel decades younger.” So, is he stressed during the pandemic? “The uncertainty of this time is not quite as unsettling for me as it might have been had I not served in the military,” explains Kelly. Also, on the advice of a friend, he’s discovered running to blow off steam. “Anywhere between three and seven miles almost every day,” he says. “I was terrible at first, but now I love it.”


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All Eyes on Julie Mehretu

The artist presents her first-ever retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art BY LAUREN WATZICH

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n the contemporary art world, Julie Mehretu is undoubtedly one of the strongest female forces. Beloved by artists and activists alike, she’s a master of composition and brushwork most recognized for her high-profile, large-scale abstract landscapes, as well as her use of multilayered mediums. Since bursting onto the scene more than two decades ago, she’s created momentous paintings and prints that are housed in museum collections across the country and have sold at auction for millions. Chances are, if you’ve walked by the Goldman Sachs tower in Manhattan, you’re already familiar with one of Mehretu’s most famous commissioned works—a colossal, 80-foot-wide “Mural” visible from the street. Now at the midpoint of her career, with countless exhibitions under her belt, the Ethiopian-born, Michigan-bred New Yorker is presenting the most comprehensive overview of her work to date at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The exhibition, Julie Mehretu, co-organized by the Whitney and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), is set to open on June 26. Her work addresses such diverse topics as ancient civilizations, allegory, modernism, geopolitics, revolution and social spaces. Thirty paintings and 32 works on paper, spanning the artist’s entire career to date, cover the realms of abstraction, architecture, landscape, scale and, most recently, figuration. “While Mehretu’s early work offers invitations to consider

entangled pasts and potential futures, her new work in the studio is volatile, destabilizing, erratic and provocative, reminding us of the infinite breadth and depth of human consciousness and history,” says LACMA exhibition curator Christine Y. Kim. Throughout her career, Mehretu has not only turned to the history of painting to understand styles of depiction, she has invested in understanding herself as a painter and a queer, mixed-race immigrant living in the U.S. “I’m working with the history and tradition of painting, and that’s been a consideration of mine since I started really making conscious art,” says Mehretu. “I’m a painter, and that’s what I’m obsessed with. But it’s about trying to understand myself. I keep going back to that, digging deeper into who I am. That’s how I am with the work and trying to push to understand what I make and why I make it the way I do.” For Adam D. Weinberg, director of the Whitney Museum, the experience of being in front of Mehretu’s large canvases is transporting. “Standing close to one of her large canvases, enveloped in its fullness, color, forms and symbolic content, one is easily swept up, into and away by the work’s informational overload and force field of visually magnetic strokes, lines, routes and trajectories.”

“EPIGRAPH DAMASCUS”: NIELS BORCH JENSEN; PORTRAIT: ANASTASIA MUNA; “ R E T O P I S T I C S : A R E N E G A D E E VAC UAT I O N ” : E D WA R D C . R O B I N S O N I I

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Julie Mehretu “Epigraph Damascus” (2016) at Los Angeles County Museum of Art [Photo credit: Niels Borch Jensen]; Julie Mehretu; “Retopistics: A Renegade Evacuation” (2001) [Photo credit: Edward C. Robinson II]


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Connect with the most affluent individuals where they LIVE, WORK and PLAY

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Bevy at Park Hyatt New York


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PHIL ANTHROPY

Africa’s Antelope Valley Global Wildlife Conservation tracks the movements of the dwindling hirola species in Kenya

A ranger from Tsavo Trust helps look for hirola during the few hours of soft light

Conservation (GWC) comes in: to help their partners raise the funds needed for these essential projects. Photos are powerful tools for fundraising, as they help people make an emotional connection with animals, but there were few quality close-ups of the notoriously evasive hirola. “Today, the main threats to the hirola are predation and poaching,” says Moore. “Those who’ve survived have survived for a reason—they are very wary and good at P H O T O G R A P H S B Y R O B I N M O O R E / G L O B A L W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N LANDSCAPE, LEFT: GETTY IMAGES/VINCENZO LOMBARDO

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ildlife photographer Dr. Robin Moore knows when to get the perfect shot of skittish, evasive animals that are hard to photograph. For him, time is measured in sunrises and sunsets. Those are the golden hours when soft, filtered light can bring out the gleam in an animal’s eye and the subtle striations in its fur. That, of course, is assuming the subject goes where you want. On an October 2019 trip to Kenya, Moore had just five short tropical sunrises and sunsets— about two hours total—to find and photograph the hirola, a critically endangered antelope. There are less than 500 hirola left, all of them in the country’s southeastern corner. Once 16,000 strong before a devastating rinderpest outbreak in the 1980s, the hirola is the only surviving member of its genus. Its loss would be the first extinction of a genus on the African continent since the evolution of modern man. Following the Kenya Wildlife Service’s National Hirola Recovery and Action Plan, The Tsavo Trust and Northern Rangelands Trust plan to build a new hirola sanctuary in the Tsavo East National Park and to double the size of an existing space within the Ishaqbini Community Conservancy. And that’s where Global Wildlife


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making themselves scarce. They are probably the most skittish animal I’ve ever photographed.” To make matters more complicated, just 70 hirola live in the 5,300-square-mile Tsavo East National Park, where Moore was on assignment. They tend to travel in small groups of about five animals, blending into the landscape of red dirt and dry brush. So, how did Moore manage to capture not just any shot, but an intimate portrait of a mom and baby? Moore got some advance scouting help from Dr. Barney Long, GWC’s senior director of species conservation. As he toured the park, Moore took note of the lighting, the landscape’s coloring and any eyesores to avoid in the background— all useful intel that would help him plan his shoot. “They would see a hirola about a mile away in the distance,” Moore says. “I’d say, ‘How do you know that’s a hirola?’ They just knew.” The plan was to get close enough to capture details like the hirola’s distinct undereye scent glands, but not too close that they’d scare them away. After getting a lot of shots of the magic animal running away, Moore noticed a pattern. Often, the hirola would start to run, then stop and look around before sprinting away, almost like an indecisive squirrel crossing the road. So when the group encountered a mother and her calf, Moore was ready. The pair started walking away, and when they paused to look back for a couple of seconds, Moore made eye contact and got his stunning portrait.

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“When I first saw the hirola in the wild, I was shocked by how stunningly beautiful they were,” says Long. “They’re this gorgeous shade of chestnut brown, striking in this understated way. Once people understand the hirola’s beauty, hopefully they’ll feel compelled to support them.” Of course, the hirola is more than a pretty face and a shiny coat. It’s a uniquely resilient species. Unlike more well-known animals that can be found across Africa, the hirola has stayed put and adapted to southeastern Kenya’s harsh, arid climate. “The hirola is kind of a specialist, where other animals are generalists,” Long chuckles. “I use a sports analogy to describe it. Billions of people watch football [soccer], and it’s on all the time. But every four years during the Olympics, we find ourselves discovering and cheering for these cool, niche sports like luge or curling. We need to champion our specialists!” The hirola’s deep local roots have endeared it to the community. The Ishaqbini fenced sanctuary is located within a completely community-managed conservancy, complete with a warden and an antipoaching group, and the push to double the sanctuary’s size came from the community. And Tsavo East is in a government-run national park. “We have the stakeholder and government support to save the hirola,” Long says. “Now we just need the funds. We can’t lose a whole genus because of money.”

There are fewer than 500 hirola left, all of them in Kenya’s southeastern corner

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Rangers from Tsavo Trust have a keen eye for Hirola and other species that can be tricky to spot.

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A garden courtyard in the Serge Lutens House OPPOSITE:

a sumptuous interior with stained glass and light fixtures designed by Lutens


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A CLOSER LOOK

A Moroccan Mystery Tour There’s only one way to visit the Serge

Lutens House in Marrakesh. One writer gets through the velvet rope. BY JONATHAN SOROFF

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t its heart, Marrakesh is a city of design. Beyond the Barbary apes and snake charmers on the main square of the medina and the frantic bartering in the narrow, labyrinthine alleys of the souk, the Ochre City has perhaps the world’s greatest collection of classical Islamic architecture, encompassing exquisite courtyard gardens full of fragrant f lowers, shade trees and murmuring fountains. The absolute highest expression of this ideal is the Serge Lutens Foundation, built over the last 50 years by the visionary French perfumer and aesthete. The edifice, cobbled together from 60 separate riads, covers two and a half acres and houses Lutens’s unparalleled collection of art, artifacts and hand-wrought craftsmanship. The only problem? This 33,000-square-foot monument isn’t open to the general public, and the only people allowed to visit are guests of the Royal Mansour—the five-star hotel built and owned by King Mohammed VI. It may seem counterintuitive (and a bit elitist) to build what amounts to a museum and then bar people from seeing it, but all you need to do is visit the Majorelle Garden, one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions, to understand Lutens’s reasoning. Saved from demolition in the 1970s and lovingly restored by Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint


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dizzyingly ornate geometric designs on the hand-carved ceilings, recall an M.C. Escher print, while the custom light fixtures and furniture designed by Lutens himself have to be seen to be believed. African art and artifacts, collected from all over the continent, are deployed inventively, like the Jewish Berber wedding belts that serve as wall coverings or the artful tabletop compositions of priceless antiquities. The f loors are smothered in the finest carpets, and the walls covered with masks and masterworks by the likes of Majorelle, Edy Legrand and Paul Jouve. It’s an aesthete’s dream, culminating in tea and pastries in a quiet corner and a visit to Lutens’ perfume museum. So extraordinary is the experience that leaving feels like being evicted from paradise, but returning to the Royal Mansour isn’t exactly a hardship. Set amid lush gardens dotted with orange trees, the hotel is another dazzling example of Moroccan design and offers sufficient reasons to stay there on its own. The exclusive access to the Serge Lutens Foundation, however, makes it mandatory. TOP: A

fountain splashes in a courtyard

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Laurent (whose museum is next door), the collection of Majorelle Garden is a pilgrimage for deFrench-Moroccan paintings adorns sign lovers—and their legions are a probthe walls of lem. Originally the home and studio of a room with light French painter Jacques Majorelle, the rare fixtures and furniture of botanical garden is punctuated by buildhis design ings painted in his namesake shade of blue, and it attracts hordes of selfie stick– wielding inf luencer wannabes who crowd and jostle each other in what was intended to be a serene space. By the same token, the line for a momentary glimpse at the intricately carved and ornamented Saadian Tombs (an ancient royal necropolis) often exceeds an hour’s wait, and the tour groups traipsing through the Bahia or El Badi palaces take some of the magic away from the magnificent interiors. Which is precisely why Lutens has so severely restricted access to his masterpiece. The guiding principle of Moroccan architecture and garden design is to create quiet, contemplative spaces where the only sounds are murmuring water or music, and the only scent the heady aroma of a tropical blossom. The low-lit rooms are meant to offer respite from the harsh light and heat of the city, a calm space in which to retreat from the frenetic streets. Unique among the sites of Marrakesh, the Serge Lutens House offers this experience. Guests of the Royal Mansour are transported via vintage sidecar to an unassuming front door. Inside, they’re greeted with the traditional Moroccan welcome of milk and dates and then conducted, at a monastic pace, through a maze of elaborate rooms and courtyards. The spaces are hushed, and so deeply sensory that the experience takes on a spiritual quality. No cameras are allowed, not for the cheesy reason of selling postcards in the gift shop (there is none), but to ensure that visitors fully immerse themselves in the present and their immediate surroundings. The symmetry of the rooms, with Moorish arches radiating and


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

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Dinner with an ocean view at the Terraza of Islas Secas; a casita’s private pool

In Pursuit of Paradise When the travel bans have lifted, we know you’ ll be eager to travel far afield. Until then, start planning your getaway. BY LAUREN JADE HILL

With all travel plans halted by the global health crisis, this summer is a fine time to start looking ahead to the escapes you’ll appreciate so much more when the world opens back up. Make your next journey a sublime retreat to one of these island hideaways everyone is lusting after.

I S L A S S EC A S , PA N A M A One of the newest private islands to join the luxury travel scene, Islas Secas has made waves since officially opening late last year. The privately owned archipelago lies in the marine life–rich waters off Panama’s Pacific Coast, just a short distance from Coiba National Marine Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its plentiful sea creatures and diversity of coral. The luxury enclave spans one island at the heart of the archipelago, with garden-enshrouded casitas with pools accommodating up to just 18 guests.

Explore the wilderness from here before indulging in ocean-to-fork dining infused with Panamanian flavor at the cathedral-like opensided Terraza and unwinding with a cocktail at the Hemingway-style bar. More than just an upscale place to stay, the resort also established the Islas Secas Foundation to protect the surrounding environment by collaborating on initiatives with local research and education programs. Use the resort as a base to experience this unique part of the world while looking out for the giant mantas, dolphins and humpback whales that pass through. islassecas.com

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Wa Ale’s open-sided pavilion

S O N E VA F U S H I , M A L D I V E S Sustainability and style come together at Soneva Fushi. Known in equal parts for its eco-friendly philosophy and over-the-top luxury, the resort pairs the creation of local community and environmental projects with one-of-a-kind facilities like a state-of-the-art observatory and glass-blowing studio in addition to its lavish villas, which are tucked among the island’s flora, destination dining spots and Six Senses Spa. Not only does 2020 mark Soneva Fushi’s 25th year, it also marks the arrival of the legendary island resort’s first-ever overwater villas. The eight one- and two-bedroom standalone suites, which are planned to debut later this year, reflect Soneva’s drive for sustainability with low-impact design using materials that are sustainable sourced to complement the Maldives’ natural beauty. Just like the overwater villas on sister island Soneva Jani, these lavish hideaways come with private pools and slides plunging into the turquoise sea. soneva.com

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one of the resort’s tented suites

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ABOVE: Wa Ale is located on Myanmar’s remote Mergui Archipelago

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A villa pool at Soneva Fushi; the resort’s beach; a private residence

Wa Ale is a resort built on the endeavor to protect and preserve the environment. Even before the mesmerizing island hideaway made its debut, its founders had established a platform for conservation and community projects. Set deep in the Mergui Archipelago off Myanmar’s southernmost coast, Wa Ale and its surrounding islands are exceptionally remote. It’s perhaps this isolation that gives the protected region its abundant wildlife, lush flora, wealth of marine life and authentic local culture of fishing villages and sea gypsies. Wa Ale Resort introduces you to this local community and pristine environment while also providing a barefoot luxury retreat distinguished by beachfront, safari-style tented suites, treetop villas, an open-sided pavilion for dining with an ocean view and jungle-backed beach bar for sunset cocktails. Following its 2018 launch, the resort is now set to debut a new collection of ultra-luxury beach residences on the opposite side of the secluded island. waaleresort.com


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ABOVE: Retreat to Necker Island’s ocean-view Bali Buah suite

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The sustainably built structures at Kisawa Sanctuary; inside one of its serene villas

the resort’s pools

Kisawa Sanctuary, Mozambique Sustainable architecture integrating 3-D printing and traditional crafts make this luxury retreat on the shores of the protected Bazaruto Archipelago’s remote Benguerra Island one of 2020’s most intriguing openings. kisawasanctuary.com

An island renowned for its celebratory spirit, beach dinners, water sports and floating sushi bar, Necker is the epitome of island decadence and an idyllic pocket of paradise to escape to within the British Virgin Islands. Originally bought by business magnate Sir Richard Branson in 1978, Necker is among the world’s most talked-about island getaways in part thanks to its reputation for hedonism. The resort reopened partially at the end of 2018 after the destruction of Hurricane Irma, and guests in 2020 are the first to see it fully completed. The newly renovated Bali Hi Balinese-style private house, which now has its own private plunge pools, was completed before the summer. Reserve the entire island, which accommodates up to 30 guests, or plan ahead for a Celebration Week, when you can book on a suite-by-suite basis. virginlimitededition.com

The Chedi Kudavillingili, Maldives This private island retreat planned for a 2020 debut promises chic overwater villas inspired by local design, a beach club, an overwater spa and an almost-500-foot-long pool amidst the turquoise waters of the Maldives’ Kaafu Atoll. ghmhotels.com

Four Seasons Resort and Residences Caye Chapel, Belize Oceanfront estates, private residences and overwater bungalows infused with the Four Seasons DNA will provide an escape on the edge of the UNESCO World Heritagedesignated Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System when this resort opens in 2021. cayechapel.com


FONTAINEBLEAU

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| OCEANFRONT RESORT | MIAMI BEACH

G U E ST R O O M S & S U I T E S W I T H B R E AT H TA K I N G V I E W S • 1 2 C A S U A L A N D F I N E D I N I N G R E S TA U R A N T S H A K K A S A N ® • S C A R P E T TA ® BY S C O T T C O N A N T • S T R I P S T E A K ® BY M I C H A E L M I N A • P I Z Z A & B U R G E R BY M I C H A E L M I N A F B K I D S ® C L U B • L A P I S ® S PA A N D S A L O N • T H E GY M • 1 1 P O O L S A N D T H E AT L A N T I C O C E A N T H E S H O P S AT F O N TA I N E B L E A U ® • T H E A RT O F F O N TA I N E B L E A U ® • L I V ® N I G H TC L U B

F O N TA I N E B L E A U .C O M


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Castles in the Eire Three standout estates in Ireland to add to your bucket list BY JONATHAN SOROFF

It’s estimated that there are 30,000 castles, fortifications and ruins scattered throughout Ireland—a huge number for such a small country. Fortunately, many of them have been converted into luxury hotels. Here are a few of our favorites for the next time you find yourself in the mood to do a bit of Irish castle-hopping.

K I L K E A C A S T L E E S TAT E A N D G O L F C L U B Located a mere hour’s drive from the Dublin airport in County Kildare, Kilkea Castle underwent a major renovation in the last eight years and continues to receive tweaks, like the newly opened spa, which employs Elemis products and boasts a hydrotherapy pool. The castle keep, where the pub is located, dates back to 1180, when it was built for a knight who arrived during the AngloNorman invasion of 1169, and it’s been home to some of the most colorful characters in Irish history. The par-70 championship golf course is enhanced by the river that runs through the estate (which itself boasts superb trout and salmon fishing), and on-site activities include falconry, archery, tennis and whiskey tastings. Kildare is famed throughout the world as “the thoroughbred county,” and equestrian pursuits ranging from hunting to trail-riding, jumping and racing are w ildly popular throughout the surrounding country side. Nearby is a range for clay pigeon shooting, and the local pub, the Moone High Cross Inn, dates to the 9th century, is still heated by peat f ire and has attracted the likes of Clint Eastwood and Sandra Bullock. The newly redecorated castle guest rooms are classic Irish country, with thick damask drapes, shimmering silks and traditional furniture. A wonderful place to stay while exploring local attractions like the town of Kilkenny, the ancient monastic ruins of Glendalough or the Irish National Stud and Gardens. kilkeacastle.ie

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The exterior of Castle Kilkea; its blue bedroom; the drawing room


DROMOLAND CASTLE Located in County Clare, Dromoland is the ancestral seat of the O’Brien clan, whose lineage dates back a millennium to the last High King of Ireland, Brian Boru. The 11th-century fortification was expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries to its present baronial, neo-Gothic form with its picturesque castellated turrets. It was sold by Lord Inchiquin and transformed into a hotel in 1962, offering some of the poshest accommodations in Ireland. The surrounding golf course and 450 acres of parkland make for superb sport, and all the normal country pursuits—horseback riding, shooting, archery, falconry and more—are available to guests. A short drive away is one of Ireland’s greatest natural wonders, the jaw-dropping Cliffs of Moher, as well as the geologically unique area known as The Burren, which boasts the deservedly famous Burren Perfumery. Dromoland’s formal dining option, the Earl of Thomond, features one of Ireland’s finest wine lists and serves sophisticated takes on traditional Irish dishes with an emphasis on fish and game, using seasonal, local ingredients. The hotel’s bar, meanwhile, has been charmingly fashioned out of the Lord’s octagonal library and offers one of the largest selections of Irish whiskeys in the world. A member of Preferred Hotels and Resorts, Dromoland regularly receives awards and accolades and has hosted everyone from Bono and Johnny Cash to Bill Clinton and King Juan Carlos of Spain. dromoland.ie

the Brian Boru Suite at Dromoland Castle; its afternoon tea service; the Connaught Room at Ashford Castle

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Located in County Mayo, Ashford Castle dates to 1228 and once belonged to the wildly rich Guinness family. A member of Leading Hotels of the World, the supremely comfortable hotel is a combination of medieval and Victorian architectural styles that blend into an idealized fairy-tale form set amid 350 acres on the shore of Lake Corrib. The French chateau-style hunting lodge offers all the standard countr y pursuits, as well as cycling, kayaking and ziplining. The spa, which is regularly voted one of Ireland’s best, features exquisite décor, a relaxation pool, hammam and terrace offering tranquil water views. Dining options include intimate dinners in the wine cellar, while a rooftop cigar bar is accessed through the castle’s billiard room. The hotel has curated a series of extraordinary Irish experiences focusing on food, music and story, craft and design and expeditions to the mountains and valleys or the seacoast. The 83 rooms, many with romantic views of the lake, are appointed with unique art, priceless antiques and sumptuous textiles, and the gardens are among the most beautiful in Ireland. It’s not surprising that John Ford filmed the John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara classic The Quiet Man in and around Ashford. Few other hotels in the world can lay claim to such intoxicating charm. ashfordcastle.com

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Elle Fanning discusses her small-screen debut in a sharp satire; a coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Asianinspired country home; an ode to New York City; Nicholas Hoult plays a cruel Russian emperor; and a gripping murder mystery in 1940s Bahamas with a royal tie

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A Hamptons retreat built for a couple by architect Edward Wendt


Swimsuit, ERES, similar styles available at eres.com;

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NATASHA WOLFF! PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW SPROUT! STYLING BY TRACY TAYLOR

M A T T H E W S P R O U T/A U G U S T I M A G E , L L C ]

Actress Elle Fanning discusses her new Hulu series, TikTok dances, how to perfect the poached egg and her reality TV obsession


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IN LATE MARCH, ELLE FANNING WAS SUPPOSED TO GO OFF TO Budapest to film The Nightingale, based on Kristin Hannah’s bestselling novel about two sisters struggling to survive in Nazioccupied France. Her co-star—for the first time since they made plays together at home as toddlers—was meant to be her older sister, Dakota, who is four years her senior. But, as happened with most Hollywood movies and television series in production during the COVID-19 crisis, just a few days before the siblings were set to depart from Los A ngeles for Hungary, shooting on The Nightingale was canceled, its release date postponed indefinitely. “We’ve dreamed of this for a long time, and we talked for a while about what project could get us together,” says the 22-year-old Fanning, who underlines that they will star in The Nightingale at some point in the future. “We thought maybe we didn’t want to play sisters, but we’ve grown up in this industry and have a unique understanding of what it means to be sisters. So, at least the sister part we’ve got down.”

Though they were already quite close, at the moment, they are closer than ever, hunkered down at the family home in California’s San Fernando Valley, where Fanning usually lives with her mother and grandmother when she’s not filming somewhere on location. Now, Dakota, who was recently living in New York City, is bunking there, too. “It’s a rare occasion that we get to be together,” Fanning says. “So we’re enjoying each other’s company.” It will be easy, then, for the entire Fanning family to have a premiere party for her new series, The Great, which they can all binge together on Hulu. On the show, Fanning stars as a young Catherine the Great, sowing her seeds in a new marriage to Russia’s Peter III, played by Nicholas Hoult. The series marks Fanning’s first real foray into comedy. But it’s a specific kind of comedy—a satirical, genre-bending romp through 18th-century Russia in the vein of 2018’s The Favourite, which The Great creator Tony McNamara also co-wrote, earning him an Oscar nomination. “Being asked to play Catherine in this show was a gift,” says Fanning. “Tony wrote a play in Australia that was very much in this witty, irreverent voice.” McNamara had originally planned to adapt his play into a feature film, but in this time of peak streaming television, decided to develop it into a series. He asked Fanning to play Catherine and help produce the show. “As Catherine is gaining her voice on The Great, I was gaining mine,” she says. “I went to pitch meetings and saw the mechanics of the series from the beginning.” Fanning lived in London for six months while filming the series. She loved the opportunity to f lex her comedic muscles with the wordplay, banter and rhythm in McNamara’s scripts. “That was hugely appealing for me. I love challenging myself,” Fanning says. She believes the experience was a boost for her abilities, even in a career that includes two Sofia Coppola movies (Somewhere and The Beguiled) and roles opposite co-stars like Annette Bening, Bryan Cranston, Angelina Jolie and Jeff Bridges. “It’s all very Shakespearean and I had to get used to it and not be embarrassed.”


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“AS CATHERINE IS GAINING HER VOICE ON THE GREAT, I WAS GAINING MINE.”


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“I do sort of have a strawberry obsession,” Fanning explains. “I’ve been doing Strawberry Shortcake coloring books while in quarantine.” Friends sent her a recorded birthday message via Cameo from some of her favorite cast members on a recent season of Love Island, while Coppola sent a birthday video over text from Napa. “She’s way too chic for Zoom,” laughs Fanning. Fanning was embraced early on by the fashion industr y. She loves Miu Miu, Dior, Gucci and Valentino, while the Rodarte designers, sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy, are friends. But she isn’t dressing up at the moment. “It’s mostly sweatpants and T-shirts, like everyone else,” Fanning says. As the weather gets warmer, she’ll start pulling out her sundresses, and she’s having fun with her hair, blowing it out and curling it at home to pass the time. “I also dyed it pink myself,” she says. Social media has become a welcome distraction. “It’s a nice place where we’re all together,” she says of her high school friends and the pals she’s made in the business over the 20 years she’s been working. She’s been learning TikTok dances, “but I won’t post them,” she says, and has gotten into Chelsea Peretti’s comedic makeup tutorials and Karen Elson’s singing clips on Instagram. She’s been using her own account to show off her photography skills and picking up some cooking tips. “My grandmother loves hearty Southern food,” Fanning says. “I’ve always loved cooking and helping her in the kitchen.” They’ve been meal planning, ordering groceries, mixing spinach dip, making lamb chops and perfecting the poached egg. Fanning is also finding inventive ways to use leftovers, including quesadillas made from, well, anything. “Just add whatever you have in the fridge and fry it up,” Fanning says. If she’s not quite Julia Child, we can let it slide. She happens to be one of the best actors of her generation, so forgive her if she’s already looking forward to her first meal out of quarantine: guacamole, sweet corn, hard-shell beef tacos and churros from Casa Vega in nearby Studio City. “Also, just hugging someone that you haven’t been able to in a long time,” Fanning says.

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nd Fanning knows a thing or two about bingeing. She has a taste for reality television and has been watching the Michael Jordan documentary series The Last Dance (“We’re huge sports people,” she says of her family) and old standbys like MasterChef Junior and 90 Day Fiancé with her mom. “We have a whole ritual around it,” Fanning says of 90 Day Fiancé. (Dakota, meanwhile, is watching The West Wing from the beginning.) Being in quarantine has given Fanning more time to keep up with her Campbell Hall friends via Zoom happy hours. Their group meetings are called “See You Next Tuesday” because they meet on Tuesdays. (It’s the kind of joke you’d find in The Great.) Fanning sips Aperol spritzes while they reminisce about high school, just like the sophisticated 22-year-old that she is. Indeed, Fanning turned 22 in April amidst the shelter-in-place restrictions in Los Angeles. How did she celebrate? Not necessarily with an Aperol spritz; she says she listened to the Taylor Swift song “22” and ordered in Chinese food from Chin Chin. To top it off: a strawberry shortcake from Big Sugar Bakeshop featuring the cartoon character Strawberry Shortcake wearing a quarantinefriendly facemask.

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Fanning believes the hilariously dark show is exactly the entertainment we need right now. “Fun, laughter and escapism are really important,” she explains. “But it also grapples with themes that are super relevant, even though it’s historical,” she adds, especially in its depiction of Catherine attempting to gain her footing in the patriarchal and misogynist Russian court. Despite the seemingly elevated historical setting, “I think it’s totally bingeable,” Fanning continues. There’s plenty of bawdy humor and surprising twists: “With shows like The Handmaid’s Tale, you need time to process between episodes; it’s heavy. But with The Great, it’s light enough that you can watch it all in one go.”


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The entry doubles as a gallery showcasing the clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; collection of East Hampton painters. Works by John Little and Charlotte Park are hung in a brutalist shell of concrete floors and stucco walls flanked by a Hans Wegner chair upholstered in green leather.


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NATASHA WOLFF! PHOTOGRAPHY BY

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

To create a sense of drama in the entry, architect Edward Wendt and designer Eddie Lee introduced an ellipse in the ceiling to show the living room above. The ceilings are high-gloss Farrow and Ball paint and the oak stairs are open to let light in.

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ETER EMMERSON AND FEI SHAO DON’T LIKE TO MESS WITH A GOOD THING. THE FORMER COACH International executive and his husband had already commissioned New York City–based interior designer Eddie Lee to design two of their homes when they approached him about a third. “Given that this was our third project together, they trusted me to design a mix of contemporary upholstery with classic antique elements to create a curated yet comfortable space,” explains Lee. The homeowners found this spectacular East Hampton property on the wetlands along Gardiners Bay offering stunning views of Shelter Island, and commissioned Lee and architect Edward Wendt to create a new home. “The client wanted a modern house that spoke to the property with a warm, organic vibe,” says Lee. “The client loves Asian cultures and gardens, so we looked to classic modern steel-and-glass architecture for inspiration and added an Asian spirit.” The resulting modern Zen residence was inspired by the clients’ favorite garden in Japan. Lee used sleek stone, wood, steel, concrete and glass throughout the architecture, allowing the interiors to be more colorful and daring (think concrete floors with raw silk walls in the master bedroom). A central ellipse with open stair exposes the central steel spine, giving double height to the entryway and creating a home for the client’s extensive collection of works by local artists. The color palate is warm and neutral with charcoals, grays, warm tans and greens. Rich materials like lush velvets, layered hides, textured cork and wood ceilings and leather-wrapped stair handrails give a maximalist aesthetic to the stark architecture. All in all, the homeowners are thrilled with the result. “They recently hosted the East Hampton Historical Society benefit, and guests told the owners that they were shocked the house was newly built, as it had so much soul,” says Lee. Certainly the best compliment any designer could hope to receive.

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DESIGNER EDDIE LEE CREATES AN EAST HAMPTON GETAWAY FOR A MANHATTAN COUPLE

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The open dining, kitchen and living area evokes a masculine, modern aesthetic with concrete floors and a bleached oak ceiling, exposed steel beams and cold-rolled steel cabinetry. An 18th-century Coromandel screen is repurposed as the doors to a recessed china cabinet. The central column evokes a tree trunk rooted in the Zen garden below. A Berman Rosetti dining table from Ferrell Mittman and B&B Italia chairs sit below an Apparatus light fixture.


BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN Ă&#x2030;. The masculine charcoaland-gray scheme continues in the covered porch and serves as a strong counterpoint to the lush green foliage. A specimen Japanese maple anchors the garden and a Brown Jordan sectional and chairs, coffee table from Stone Yard Inc. and Perennials rug populate the room.


THE CLIENT LOVES ASIAN CULTURES AND GARDENS, SO WE LOOKED TO CLASSIC MODERN STEEL-ANDGLASS ARCHITECTURE FOR INSPIRATION AND ADDED AN ASIAN SPIRIT. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;EDDIE LEE

B AT H I N G B E A U T Y

.

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Mosa tile, Vola sink fixtures and a custom-designed vanity in a guest bathroom

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ROOM WITH . A VIEW Ă&#x2030;. This is the view that sold the clients on the property: a modern scheme juxtaposed with light and dark. The clients wanted it to feel masculine but still inviting and soulful. A B&B Italia sectional, James Devlin Studio coffee table and ottoman, 18th-century wingback chair, Apparatus light fixture and Kyle Bunting rug from Edelman Leather fill the space.


A N AT U R A L M O O D . Custom-designed laser-cut oak closet doors are based on 19th-century Japanese woodblock prints. The doors, along with the dresser and television cabinet, were fabricated by Trunzo Building.


ARTFUL AUTOS

Ă&#x2030;.

The garage doubles as a party shed and houses the clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; extensive collection of 19th-century portraiture.

POOL RULES The infinity pool overlooks protected wetlands and Gardiners Bay. Chaise longues are by Brown Jordan, and a custom-designed daybed was fabricated by Trunzo Building with Sebastian upholstery.


WE LOVE NY MEDIA

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BY JASON BINN

The New York City skyline

During the height of the coronavirus pandemic this spring, DuJour captured images of some of NYCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most iconic landmarks in their natural state


Fire Department of New York firefighters at Lenox Hill Hospital

Go to

WeLoveNY.DuJour.com

SKYLINE: ARAM HEKINIAN; FDNY INSET: CINDY ORD/GETTY IMAGES

for our video series featuring Alec Baldwin, Michael Caine, Kevin Costner, Michael Douglas, Fran Drescher, Dimitri Ehrlich, Daisy Fuentes, Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Paris Hilton, Richard Lefkowitz, David Lipman, Richard Marx, Melissa Pordy, Lionel Richie, Tony Robbins, Sylvester Stallone, Steven Tyler, Dave Warren, Naomi Watts, Venus Williams and many as they recount what drives their love for our great city. Including photography by Autonomous Astronauts Creative Aram Hekinian and Joe Woolhead Special Thanks: Dave Warren, Fly Communications, Aram Hekinian, Lipman Studiosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; David Lipman, Richard Lefkowitz, Melissa Pordy


OCULUS SHOPPING CENTER: ROY ROCHLIN/GETTY IMAGES; H O S P I T A L S H I P : B R Y A N R . S M I T H /A F P V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S

The Oculus shopping center and PATH train station in the World Trade Center

Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort


ARAM HEKINIAN

The Brooklyn Bridge


ARAM HEKINIAN

The streets of New York

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RADIO CITY: JOE WOOLHEAD; VESSEL: NOAM GALAI/GETTY IMAGES; GRAND CENTRAL STATION: ROY ROCHLIN/GETTY IMAGES; EMPIRE STATE BUILDING: GARY H E R S H O R N / G E T T Y I M AG E S ; A P P L E S T O R E : R O B K I M / G E T T Y I M AG E S ; C H E L S E A M A R K E T : B E N G A B B E / G E T T Y I M AG E S ; S T O R E S O N F I F T H AV E N U E : A R A M H E K I N I A N

Hudson Yardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vessel

Radio City Music Hall

Grand Central Station

Chelsea Market The Empire State Building honoring first responders and the Chrysler Building

The Apple Store at 58th Street and Fifth Avenue

Closed stores on Fifth Avenue


Times Square

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One World Trade Center


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THE GREAT EXPECTATIONS OF

NICHOLAS HOULT


With the debut of the new Hulu series The Great, about the rise of Catherine the Great, actor Nicholas Hoult makes the small-screen leap BY

MARSHALL HEYMAN! PHOTOGRAPHY BY

KALE FRIESEN! STYLING BY

ALEXEY KAZAKOV


Suit and shirt, BERLUTI, similar styles available at berluti.com; Tie, CELINE, similar styles available at celine.com; White sneakers, LOUIS VUITTON, similar styles available at louisvuitton.com PREVIOUS PAGE:

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There are characters you love to hate, and then there’s Nicholas Hoult’s Peter III in The Great, a new Hulu comedy based very loosely on the life of the young Catherine the Great.

opposition, complete with an overf lowing wig. “Each line of dialogue was a real treat.” Near the end of filming, McNamara told Hoult about The Great, which the writer had originally envisioned as a feature but decided to pitch, with Fanning, as a streaming series. And the rest is, well, a kind of reconstrwucted history. “I’m not going to lie: I didn’t do any research on Peter III,” says Hoult with a laugh. “That wasn’t something that was encouraged with The Favourite, either. It’s very much taken as a fictional story. There was a moment when I asked Tony if I could do a Russian accent, but I tried it one night and it broke up the rhythm of the dialogue and I decided, this isn’t what needs to be done.” Hoult calls both experiences “singular.” “It’s outlandish and wild and then there’s this underlying heartbreak to it as well,” he explains. “Tony has the ability to completely hit you with unexpected things that you didn’t see coming. It’s very freeing how irreverent and fun it is. I don’t want to be empathetic to Peter. He does terrible things. But if you’re enjoying playing the character, people enjoy it as well.” Besides The Great and two movies recently made available for streaming—The Banker on Apple TV+ and True History of the Kelly Gang from IFC Films on VOD—like the rest of Hollywood, Hoult is essentially on hold. He made Those Who Wish Me Dead, based on the electrifying thriller by Michael Koryta, with Angelina Jolie and Tyler Perry last year in New Mexico, but it’s unclear when it might be released. While shooting The Great in early March, Hoult was prepping for a role in Mission: Impossible 7 with Tom Cruise, but shooting in Italy for that film has been put on hold indefinitely. Hoult is trying to keep up the training he started for the action sequel at home with a jump rope, some resistance bands and the help of his trainer friend. But mostly, his time involves taking care of his 2-year-old son with his model girlfriend Bryana Holly Bezlaj. “Everyone else is picking up new habits and doing DIY, but the reality with parenthood is most of the time you’re busy feeding him, making sure he’s entertained, and then at the end of the day you just want to sleep,” Hoult says. To pass whatever time he has on his own, Hoult has rediscovered video games, in particular God of War on Playstation 4. “I got hooked on that pretty quick,” he says. He’s been reading a bit, with the novel Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson and 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari on his current list. There’s been a lot of cooking, “but not anything I haven’t cooked before,” he notes. “Last night we made macaroni and cheese, and I like to do a roast on Sunday if we can, but mostly it’s whatever we can find.” He stays in touch with family and friends back home in London with a regular weekend pub quiz. He and Bezlaj hosted a recent event on Zoom and came up with multiple rounds of questions themselves. “Whatever knowledge or interesting facts you can,” Hoult says. “You make them up.” Despite the strange state of the world, Hoult recognizes the break may have been a needed one. “I’m kind of enjoying it,” he says.

DUJOUR.COM

This Peter III is a buffoon who enjoys more than the occasional sexual escapade. He is a terror to his lovely and intelligent wife Catherine, whom he impor ted from Germany (played here by the 22-year-old actress Elle Fanning). He has no problem walking through the palace, observed by many, in the Full Monty (save for his mother’s jewelry); unceremoniously killing his wife’s new pet bear in court; or threatening to execute an advisor for refusing to shave. But, despite Peter’s sometimes absolutely rancid behavior, you still kinda like him. “He’s incredibly dumb, insensitive at times, and a bizarre human, but one that’s endearing in odd ways,” says Hoult from his home in the Hollywood Hills, where birds are chirping in the background. “He’s outrageous and obnoxious, but he’s also a broken, sweet little boy who’s trying to fill his father’s footsteps. He never censors himself. That’s likeable in a person. You know exactly where you stand. But he does say things that are bewildering.” That his Peter comes off alluringly is due to the fact that Hoult himself is charming, dashing and charismatic. The 30-year-old British actor appeared at age 11 in 2002’s About a Boy and has worked ever since, in films as varied as 2015’s Mad Max: Fury Road, the 2019 biopic Tolkien and 2018’s The Favourite, which won Olivia Colman an Academy Award for Best Actress. It was Hoult’s role in The Favourite that led him to The Great. The Favourite was co-written by the Australian screenwriter Tony McNamara; The Great is based on McNamara’s play of the same name. Hoult was filming The Current War, in which he plays the inventor Nikola Tesla, in London, when he got a call asking him to audition for The Favourite. “I loved the writing,” Hoult recalls of the script. “Typically, period drama stories are a little bit dull, but this made me laugh out loud. “I had the best time playing the character of Hurley,” Hoult adds of his role as the leader of the


Jacket, sweater, pants and boots, CELINE, similar styles available at

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“TYPICALLY, PERIOD DRAMA STORIES ARE A LITTLE BIT DULL, BUT THIS MADE ME LAUGH OUT LOUD.”


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Grooming: Joanna Ford


feuds Take one very rich man, add family hatreds, financial secrets, Nazi sympathizers and the notorious Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and what do you get? The mysterious death of Sir Harry Oakes in the Bahamas.

BY

NANCY BILYEAU

GA H U RT RT Y E ROCARKEEDS I: TK H EY ER SE T OT N K E / H U LT O N A R C H I V E ; M U R D E R S I T E : P I C T O R I A L PA R A D E / H U LT O N A R C H I V E

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family


FROM LEFT:

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Sir Harry Oakes circa 1940; the grisly bedroom murder scene on July 8, 1943


it was July 8, 1943,

AN HOUR AFTER DAWN; A TIME AND A SEASON FOR EVERYTHING TO BE QUIET AND slow-moving on the island of New Providence in the Bahamas. But not this morning. Frantic phone calls destroyed the drowsy, sultry calm. The largest landowner in the Bahamas, a man worth $200 million, had been found dead, and the cause was anything but natural. Sir Harry Oakes, 68, born and raised in Maine, possessor of a Canadian gold-mine fortune and a British title, had been bludgeoned to death in the bedroom of Westbourne, his bougainvillea-adorned Nassau estate. From the looks of the crime scene, he’d also been set on fire. The walls bore bloodstains. Feathers were everywhere, their source a torn pillow, although some of the wilder rumors claimed they came from a chicken, evidence of a voodoo ritual. To deal with the shocking murder and control the soon-to-balloon scandal, an aide woke up the governor of the Bahamas. The governor just happened to be a British royal, and an infamous one at that: the Duke of Windsor, formerly King Edward VIII, who in 1936 gave up his throne “for the woman I love,” American divorcee Wallis Simpson. The couple put on a good face for the public during their five-year-long stint in the Bahamas, but privately vented about their exile to “this hot little hell.” The Duke of Windsor’s handling of the case—or, as most would describe it, mishandling of the case—went a long way toward firmly placing the killing of Oakes in a hall of fame of tantalizing mysterious murders. Oakes’s son-in-law, Alfred de Marigny, was swiftly arrested and tried for murder, but after a headline-saturated trial was found not guilty.

FREDERIC LEWIS/GETTY IMAGES

The British Colonial Hotel in Nassau, Bahamas


No one else was ever charged, but theories on means and motives rage up to the present day. A cottage industry of books, novels and movies have tackled the case, dubbed “the unsolved murder of the century” in one review. One of the reasons the 1943 crime still exerts such a powerful fascination is that this pot brims with everything. “Toss away every notion, every preconception, you may have about the Bahamas in the 1940s,” declares Bahamianolog y, a website devoted to Bahamian history. “Put every idea as far away in your mind as humanly possible. The Bahamas was, in stark reality, a seething cauldron of Nazi sympathizers, British spies, money launderers, narcotics traffickers, gambling mobsters, land swindlers, murderers and paid-for-hire assassins.”

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Once he’d made his fortune, Oakes chose not to expand his f inancial reach beyond his mines or establish himself as a cultural heavyweight like John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie or the Guggenheims. He bought property and became a local benefactor in Niagara Falls and Palm Beach, Florida. But his obsession became finding a way to seal off his money from taxation. This was what propelled Oakes to the Bahamas, a country with no income tax, in 1935. He was one of the first major tax exiles—not just in the Bahamas, but anywhere, Gray says. Real estate developer Harold Christie, a man of legendary sales talent, courted Oakes until he persuaded the richest man in the British empire to establish residency in the Bahamas, then a crown colony. A 700-island tropical archipelago 50 miles off the Florida coast, the Bahamas at the time had 70,000 residents, three-quarters of them of African descent. The economic boom fueled by running rum and other booze into the U.S. during Prohibition was over. A small white elite in Nassau—nicknamed the “Bay Street Boys”— ran everything, shrugging off the poverty of most islanders. Oakes bought a lot of property and built a golf course and an airport. He took his family with him to New Providence, a wife and five children. His favorite child seems to have been Nancy, a lively redhead. To her parents’ dismay, at the age of 18, Nancy married Alfred de Marigny, 32 years old and twice-divorced. According to Murdered Midas, he bore a Don Juan reputation in the Bahamas; he named his yacht Concubine and, according to persistent rumors, would drug young women before assaulting them. De Marigny wasn’t the only unsavory person living tax-free in the Bahamas in the 1930s. Swedish industrialist Axel Wenner-Gren, owner of a 700-acre island that today is known as Paradise Island, was a well-known Nazi sympathizer. Wenner-Green made deals with the Krupps and counted Hitler’s No. 2, morphine addict and Luftwaffe overseer Hermann Göring, as a close friend. Interestingly, in her book, Gray reveals little-known ties between Oakes and Nazi sympathizers forged before he moved to the Bahamas. The Oakes family had lived in Britain just long enough for the millionaire to receive his title. “The sinister friendships with pro-Nazi appeasers that he made in London during the 1930s, which probably secured his baronetcy…may have been a factor in his death,” Gray writes. The afternoon that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor arrived in Nassau in 1940, when Britain was fighting Germany for its very existence, the question of Nazi sympathies became pressing indeed.

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ALFRED DE MARIGNY AND NANCY OAKES: POPPERFOTO/GETTY IMAGES; A L F R E D D E M A R I G N Y L E AV I N G P O L I C E S TAT O N : R A L P H M O R S E / T H E L I F E P I C T U R E C O L L E C T I O N

FROM LEFT:

Murder suspect Alfred de Marigny (Oakes’s son-in-law) entering the Nassau Courthouse 1943; de Marigny and his wife Nancy in Nassau in November 1943, following his acquittal

DUJOUR.COM

he book Murdered Midas, published in late 2019 by the Oxford-educated Canadian historian Charlotte Gray, has brought a new round of attention to the unsolved murder. In her excellent book, Gray not only crafts a carefully constructed “whodunit,” she takes a deep dive into Sir Harry Oakes himself, the first book to put Oakes in context as a major force in early 20th-century North American finance. One of her motives was to establish Oakes as a person with many dimensions. In the decades since his murder, the millionaire’s image has become more and more loathsome. In books on the case he comes across as greedy, harsh, brutish and driven by grudges, almost suggesting he deserved his end. “He wasn’t likable,” Gray says in an interview with DuJour. “I wanted to find out why he had such a reputation.” As a young man from a middle-class family, Oakes attended medical school for two years, but left in 1898 to follow his obsession: finding gold. He spent nearly 15 years working grueling hours in territories all over the world—abstaining from alcohol, near-friendless—in pursuit of his gold rush dream before he got his break at Kirkland Lake in northern Ontario. Gray compares his singlemindedness to today’s Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs.


THE BAHAMAS WAS “A SEETHING CAULDRON OF NAZI SYMPATHIZERS, BRITISH SPIES, MONEY LAUNDERERS, MOBSTERS, LAND SWINDLERS AND PAID-FOR-HIRE ASSASSINS.”

It was not irrelevant that, on this small island, the French de Marigny and the Duke of Windsor despised each other. When the Miami police officers arrested de Marigny, letting it be known to Oakes’s family members that they had f ingerprint evidence condemning him, he was thrown in Nassau’s jail. The motive was described as his hatred of his father-in-law and desire to speed up his wife’s inheritance. However, at the trial, the fingerprint evidence fell apart. It’s accepted by everyone familiar with the case that the Floridians falsified the damning fingerprint and bungled the evidence-gathering process overall. The jury found de Marigny not guilty. In a twist, the court decided to nonetheless order the Frenchman’s deportation. With his loyal young wife at his side, de

PA I M A G E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

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he days are long gone when the relationship of Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson was considered the love stor y of the centur y. In the popular Netf lix series The Crown, the cover-up of the Duke of Windsor’s possibly treasonous sympathies with Germany takes up an entire episode. Bestselling biog rapher A ndrew Mor ton, in his book 17 Carnations, writes that before she married her royal lover, some people went so far as to regard Simpson as a promiscuous Nazi spy. The title of Morton’s 2015 book refers to a belief that Joachim von Ribbentrop, Hitler’s most valued diplomat, regularly sent Simpson bouquets of 17 carnations to celebrate how many times they’d had sex. Such stories were among the reasons that when Edward VIII insisted on marrying Simpson, the British government threatened to revolt and he was forced to abdicate, taking the new title of the Duke of Windsor. After the Windsors made a string of disastrous decisions in France, Spain and Portugal, Prime Minister Winston Churchill ordered them to f ill the vacant governorship in the far-off Bahamas, considered a backwater, for the duration of the war. Few could blame him. The Duke liked to tell people that if he’d remained king, England and Germany wouldn’t have gone to war. While they were in the Bahamas, the couple were watched carefully by the FBI and others. Among their suspicions was that in the special dry-cleaning Simpson sent to New York City were secret messages for German operatives. Shortly after the Windsors arrived, they insisted on redecorating Government House in Nassau, pressuring the strapped Bahamian government to foot some of the bill. “The Duke and his wife were more interested in their home comforts and getting off the island in the f irst years,” says Morton, who also authored Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words and Meghan: A Hollywood Princess. “They were concerned to have the official residence renovated at whatever cost.” This changed after the United States entered World War II in The Duke and December 1941. Morton says the Bahamas became an important Duchess of training post, “and the Duke worked hard to ensure new arrivals Windsor at their controversial were suitably accommodated… I think the Duchess comes away meeting with with high marks for the way she threw herself into war work.” Adolf Hitler Unfortunately for the Windsors, in the view of most historiin Munich 1937 ans, any positive effort they put into their work was overshadowed by the Duke of Windsor’s actions after learning that his friend and favorite golf companion, Sir Harry Oakes, had been murdered. The Duke ordered that investigation duties be taken away from Bahamian law enforcement and given instead to two Miami police officers: Capt. Edward Melchen, who had served as the Duke’s bodyguard during a Miami visit, and Capt. James Otto Barker, a former ambulance driver. The murder inquiry revealed that on the night of his murder, Oakes had a few people to dinner, including Harold Christie. (Oakes’s wife was escaping the heat in Maine.) The other guests left, but with a rainstorm lashing the island, Christie accepted Oakes’s invitation to spend the night in a bedroom down the hall from his own. The next morning, it was Christie who found the dead body of his host. Oakes was known to dislike his wastrel son-in-law, and the two hadn’t spoken for several months. De Marigny lived nearby and, with his wife also off the island, had no one to vouch for his presence after his own evening guests went home.


Marigny left the Bahamas, to stay for a while with his friend Ernest Hemingway in Cuba. No other suspect was questioned; the official investigation was over, even though the man arrested had been found not guilty. It was as if people in charge didn’t want to press for answers.

BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES

S

o, who killed Sir Harry Oakes? The theories that have emerged since 1943 have ranged from a killer reappearing from Oakes’s Canadian past to a rage-filled secret lover to a hit man sent by mobster Meyer Lansky. Charlotte Gray is among those who find it significant that in the months before his murder, Oakes had become discontent on the island and had been thinking of moving to Mexico. For years, Oakes had lived under Harold Christie’s spell. But Oakes was grow ing worried that his riches weren’t truly safe from the taxman in the British Bahamas. Should the richest man on the island have left, it would have been ruinous for Christie and the Bay Street Boys. Another ominous development: the multimillionaire pro-Nazi Swede A xel Wenner-Gren, who had been forced to leave the Bahamas and f lee to Mexico, was in 1943 f loating a scheme for Oakes and Christie to transfer money to Mexico City, sheltering investments in that neutral country. It’s been alleged that the Duke of Windsor had been approached to send his money to Mexico, as well. If questions about Oakes’s murder had followed a money trail to Mexico, it would have been a disaster for the Duke of Windsor. How could Christie have slept in a bedroom less than 20 feet away and not heard a thing while Oakes was bludgeoned to death and a fire was set? He told police he had stayed at Westbourne until morning, yet at de Marigny’s trial, a Bahamian police official testified he saw Christie riding in a car in Nassau the night of the murder. “Hired assassin” is the phrase people return to. Christie’s dazzling ascent continued. He was knighted in 1964 and died in 1973, by which time the Bahamas was a highly desirable vacation destination and spot for luxury homes. The New York Times wrote in his obituary, “His company, H. G. Christie Real Estate, was one of the first to realize the potential of the Bahamas as a vacation land and played a major role in the development of Nassau and the outer islands.” His great triumph was Lyford Cay on the western tip of New Providence Island. Christie built up the area and sold it to another businessman in 1954, and it became one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the world, home to Greek shipping magnates, statesmen, moguls, royalty and actors like Sean Connery. But while the Bahamas’s fame grew, Oakes’s unsolved murder remained in the background like a persistent sea breeze. British writer William Boyd, keen to write a novel about the case, wrangled an invite in 1985 to a private party on Lyford Cay to poke around. (His book Any Human Heart would eventually be made into a television miniseries featuring Gillian Anderson as the Duchess of Windsor.) In a story he wrote for The Guardian, Boyd says that he was suddenly approached by a “burly” man: “Are you the person asking questions about Harry Oakes?” Boyd was told that if he kept probing, Friends he’d be thrown out of the party. Harold Christie and Oakes In the end, it seems there are questions visit El Salvador about the murder of Oakes that, even if alin 1941 lowed to be voiced, cannot be answered.


a

WHEN TRAVEL ISN’T IN THE CARDS, WE CAN STILL VISIT DREAMY PLACES FAR AWAY—THROUGH BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHY


K A P S I M A L I S A R C H I T E C T S /J U L I A K L I M I

Phaidon’s new book Living on Vacation is a picturesque journey featuring architect-designed homes tucked away in the most desirable locations around the globe. From sun-drenched private islands and secluded desert villas to tranquil lakefront cottages, we’ve handpicked a few of our favorite visuals to satisfy your wanderlust. Bon voyage. —LAUREN WATZICH

Santorini GREECE Endless Aegean Sea views from a Kapsimalis Architects-designed house in Santorini


Vega NORWAY

Ã&#x2026;KE E:SON LINDMAN

Peacefully rocky surroundings at the Writers House by Kolman Boye Architects in Norway


M U N R O - S C H A L K W I J K- R E Y E S - T R O C H E

Seyé MEXICO Bacoc Hacienda, a tropical paradise designed by Reyes Ríos + Larraín Arquitectos, in Mexico


Tucson ARIZONA

BILL TIMMERMAN

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A sunny desert abode designed by DUST in Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tucson Mountains


E S T U D I O A R Q U I T E C T U R A C A M P O B A E Z A /J AV I E R C A L L E J A S

Cรกdiz SPAIN

The beachside House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza in Spain


JOE FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY

Healdsburg CALIFORNIA LIVING ON VACATION (Phaidon) is out now

Outdoor patio sunsets at a Feldman Architecturedesigned home in Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sonoma County


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The Rules of the Season THE 10 BUILDING BLOCKS FOR MASTERING THE PRE-FALL FASHION TRENDS, AND HOW TO GET THE LOOK RIGHT

1

Chic Toppers

DOLCE & GABBANA

Structured jackets and coats, whether paired with slim trousers or a sequined dress, were all over the pre-fall presentations. Find a style that emphasizes the shoulder and achieve the borrowed-from-theboys look with a button-up shirt and skinny pants. Burberryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s updated trench feels right for day or night.

STYLE TIP

Play with proportions by pairing your oversized cocoon-style coat with an ultra-skinny trouser.

BURBERRY NINA RICCI


2 The Dress

If you buy one article of clothing this summer, make it a dress. Botanical prints, draped silhouettes, pastels and ethnic prints are warm-weather must-haves. Gucciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s metallic mini dress is a great babydoll throwback to Courtney Love.

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PROENZA SCHOULER

STYLE TIP

CHRISTIAN DIOR

The retro babydoll silhouette gets a refresh when styled with a thigh-high statement boot.

GUCCI


3 Prep Up

Corduroy is getting a chic update this season thanks to Victoria Beckham and Fendi.

VICTORIA BECKHAM

4

STAUD

Sweet Treats

Pretty plumes, tender tulle and petal-like ruffles are textures that make a soft statement and never go out of style. Khaite and Brock Collection always serve up feminine favorites.

BROCK COLLECTION FENDI KHAITE


T ES ALL E B -F TH PRE OF

5 Make It Menswear

Have fun with tailored masculine pieces like double-breasted jackets, boxy coats and long skirts. Houndstooth, herringbone and tartan patterns are another way to get in on the look.

DUJOUR.COM

MAX MARA

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STELLA MCCARTNEY STYLE TIP

Try a feminine approach to menswear with a vibrant suit in an elegant fabric like grosgrain or velvet.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA


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PRADA

6

THE ATTICO

Pattern Play

Patterns are everywhere this season. From plaids at Christian Dior to graphic Art Deco-inspired prints at Gucci, to mixed-up animal prints at The Attico, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for everyone.

TORY BURCH STAUD


T ES ALL E B -F TH PRE OF

Summer Shearling

GIVENCHY STYLE TIP

Ribbed textures and chevron patterns on a sandy-hued shearling are all the interest you need. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going this big on outerwear, keep the rest muted and conservative.

ISABEL MARANT

SUMMER 2020

For extra dimension in your ensemble, work in a textured shearling coat. Think the lustworthy ribbed shearling topper seen at Givenchy and shearling wrap coat at Isabel Marant.

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SALVATORE FERRAGAMO


8 This season, shorts are popping up everywhere at every length. From thigh-grazing minis at Etro and Coach to the longer, looser silhouette seen at Michael Kors and Bottega Veneta, now is the time to experiment with this style.

COACH

BOTTEGA VENETA

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The Long and the Short of It

ETRO

9 Back to School

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

Collegiate separates like rugby-striped tops, plaid kilt skirts and knee socks get a varsity chic spin.

TORY BURCH


T ES ALL E B -F TH PRE OF

10

STYLE TIP

Squared Away

Metallics and quilting are two of summer’s biggest trends, and Fendi put them together for a head-to-toe ensemble. For this look, stick with complementary, tonal shades—don’t start mixing.

Bottega Veneta has knocked this trend into overdrive recently and women are still clamouring for this puffy texture. We love this luxe material on coats, bags, shoes and more

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BURBERRY

FENDI

BOTTEGA VENETA

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO


GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK


CITIES ASPEN

CHICAGO DALLAS

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TORTELLINI TIME

Celebrated chef Massimo Bottura has opened his first United States restaurant, and it’s on the roof of the newly renovated Gucci flagship in Beverly Hills. “At Gucci Osteria, guests are invited into an Italian landscape that emphasizes a reverence for the ingredients, the seasons and the layers of culinary traditions while leaving room for improvisation and the unexpected,” Bottura says. The chef, who earned three Michelin stars at Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy, is exuberantly playing the hits and also trying new things on Rodeo Drive. His legendary tortellini with Parmigiano-Reggiano is on the menu, of course. But so are California-inspired creations like a fruit-forward dessert inspired by a Malibu sunset. “This is an incredible city with myriad cultural influences and an abundance of local organic produce, which makes it a dynamic intersection between freedom of expression and respect for ingredients,” Bottura says. “It has become an inspirational place for cooks and diners alike.” —ANDY WANG gucci.com


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Wine on ice; the entrance of the Little Nell as photographed by Gray Malin; riders en route to Mad Dog Ranch

Good Vibrations

Remède Spa at The St. Regis Aspen is upping the ante with new offerings meant to ease pain and inflammation, making your body feel as relaxed as Jell-O after a day of hiking or biking. Utilizing a combo of stretching, acupressure and vibrating massage, the new Rocky Mountain Vibes treatment is a 90-minute sports massage incorporating CBD oil with the vibrational therapy of the Hyperice Hypervolt massager device. st-regis.marriott.com

LITTLE NELL EXTERIOR: GRAY MALIN

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RIDE AND IMBIBE

What’s more rewarding than indulging with a decadent meal and world-class wines after working up an appetite in the Rockies? The Little Nell hotel, which has cemented its five-diamond, five-star status once again as the crown jewel of Aspen 30 years after its opening, has concocted its annual Ride & Dine dinner series for the summer. Travel along the river from the hotel to Mad Dog Ranch in Snowmass with a group of other cyclists to arrive at the most picturesque al fresco dinner spot. Toast your trip with a bottle of wine selected from the hotel’s 20,000-bottle cellar while you dine under the stars listening to live music. thelittlenell.com


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Betula is garnering lots of buzz for its French Pan-American cuisine, and it’s constantly packed. With two distinct areas, a 130-seat main dining room and a lounge area where DJs spin, there’s something for every type of visitor. French chef Laurent Cantineaux and Venezuelan restaurateur Juan Carlos Pérez Febres (owners of beloved St. Barths restaurant Bonito), came to Aspen on holiday and decided to open a sister restaurant here while Bonito was closed following Hurricane Irma’s devastation of the island. Escargots, bluefin tuna tataki and Peking duck magret are some of the fan favorites. betulaaspen.com

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BY KIM PEIFFER

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spen locals, close friends and avid travelers Laura Kaplan and Nicole Tarumianz came up with the idea for Capricho during a family surfing trip. “While talking between waves, Laura and I discovered a shared quest for the ultimate travel companion: a bag that embraces quiet luxury and enduring elegance,” says Tarumianz. “In all our years of searching, we’ve never found the perfect travel bag.” So they set out to create a line of supple, buttery totes and duffles (made of Colombian leather) without any ostentatious logos that would be able to withstand serious travel. The Marcella tote ($1,295) and Clarita weekender zippered duffel ($1,595) come in black, loden green, cocoa, navy, sky and clay. “[They’re] handcrafted leather bags made for a lifetime of journeys and adventures,” explains Kaplan. We spoke with the co-founders to learn about their unique approach to luxury. caprichobags.com

What makes Capricho bags unique? Simplicity and Colombian craftsmanship define the beauty of a Capricho bag. A Capricho isn’t structured. Instead, the totes and duffels are soft yet durable. However, even when they are filled to capacity, they easily squish under an airplane seat or in a crowded overhead space. A simple yet thoughtfully sized interior zipper pocket holds your airline tickets, passport and phone, and there’s a strap to easily secure your bag on the top of your suitcase.

our personal view of travel and a life well lived. How does a specific place, person or product make you feel? We may be in the business of making bags, but our vision is to enhance our collective nature to live authentically. With every design decision, we strive to transform personal experiences via intuitive luxury—to create a conduit that broadens perspectives, Your brand is about “intuitive luxury.” What deepens relationships and helps celebrate each individual’s unique does that mean to you? global perspective. Every day, we make decisions that reflect Where are they produced in Colombia? Capricho’s boutique workshop in Bogota handcrafts exclusive Alma leather, produced solely for Capricho bags. Alma perfectly matures with age and is deceptively light. The Bogota workshop is anchored in family heritage and has been producing leather for nearly 20 years.

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set out to create the best travel bag

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Laura Kaplan and Nicole Tarumianz; Capricho Clarita weekender duffels


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WELL AND GOOD

With almost three decades of experience under his belt, restaurateur Kevin Boehm expands his horizons with a health and wellness concept BY REBECCA TARAS

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fter opening 30 restaurants in the last 27 years, James Beard award-winning restaurateur Kevin Boehm (along with partners Robb Leone and Joseph Fisher) has launched his most challenging concept to date: Bian, a posh integrative wellness club. Expect state-of-the-art equipment; extensive fitness, yoga and pilates classes; cutting-edge therapeutic modalities; lavish spa and beauty services; and a cold plunge pool and steam room. Every member will receive a fully personalized health and wellness program (the club also has a complete medical facility) that blends Eastern and Western medical practices. Physicians include those who work with the Chicago Blackhawks, U.S. Men’s Soccer team, U.S. Women’s Volleyball team, and the Chicago Marathon, as well as one of the leading naturopathic doctors in the U.S. But instead of serving hearty fare, as at his star restaurant Boka, Bian will offer a curated selection of organic food and beverage including energizing smoothies, juices and elixirs and organic wine and spirits. Boehm explains why he decided to jump on the healthy bandwagon and what he does to keep his life in balance. livebian.com

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Bian’s bar; Kevin Boehm; the club’s entrance

How is Bian a departure for you and your restaurants? Wellness is such a big part of my life, and Bian is a reflection of how my partners and I want to live. There is a blank space in this intersection of medical, beauty, fitness and healthy food. We think we can fill it by building a wellness ecosystem. What do you see as the future of dining in Chicago? People want to be challenged more with cuisine than they used

to. Those also want layers. Layers of food, of design, and they want a story behind everything. People get bored very quickly these days. They want concepts with depth to them. What are your favorite venues and restaurants right now? I love Juno, HaiSous, Café Cancale and Bar Biscay. How do you unwind when you’re not working? I try to find myself on a yoga mat at least three times a week. I love movies, and I play a lot of vinyl … everything from Miles Davis to Van Morrison.

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ROOM REQUEST the comfort of their own cocoon. Of course, there’s a trademark Nobu Restaurant on-site where guests can feast on dishes like black cod miso and rock shrimp tempura, and on warmer days, the rooftop lounge is the perfect gathering place to partake in a frosty libation with friends while enjoying those not-so-endless days. But it’s not all about feasting; a state-of-the-art fitness center is equipped with Technogym equipment, and guests can chase a sweat session with a dip in the lantern-lit tranquility pool. chicago.nobuhotels.com

lurefishbar.com Lure Fish Bar’s tuna tacos

RETAIL THERAPY

Founded in 2011 by tech veteran Julie Wainwright, The RealReal has morphed into the largest online marketplace for authenticated consigned luxury goods, including fine jewelry and watches, women’s and men’s fashion, home items, fine art and products for kids. Its fifth brick-and-mortar location, on the Magnificent Mile, is a 12,000-square-foot store with an emphasis on women’s clothing and accessories. therealreal.com

SUMMER 2020

Known for its world-class sushi program, raw bar and rotating oyster selection, Lure Fishbar—which already has locations in New York City and Miami—is coming to River North. “Since opening Lure in the heart of Soho 15 years ago, we’ve always strived to create a restaurant that brings people together over delicious food, drinks and high-energy ambiance,” says owner John McDonald. “Through the years, visiting Chicago, I experienced a city that is about community and hospitality, making it a natural fit for our next location.” Expect entrees like lobster bisque, crab cakes, a shrimp po’ boy sandwich, classic fish and chips, grilled mahi-mahi tacos and miso salmon.

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From Ibiza to Manila, Nobu Hotels are considered some of the best in the world. Now, Chicagoans and visitors to the Windy City can partake of the famous top-notch service and lavish amenities at the new Nobu Hotel Chicago in the West Loop. Perfectly positioned on Restaurant Row, the property boasts 115 well-appointed guest rooms including 23 suites. Standout features include signature Nobu beds, deep soaking tubs, Natura Bissé bath amenities, traditional Japanese tea service and yoga mats for those looking to stretch and destress in

Veteran restaurateur and chef Carole Jones of Chicago Raw is making it easier to eat light in a city packed with pizzerias and steak houses. Her latest venture, Fulton Market District’s Uncooked, is a plant-based, zero-waste eatery where raw, whole ingredients are at the forefront. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, every item on the menu (including smoothies, juices, entrees and desserts) is 100 percent plant-based, glutenfree, dairy-free and void of refined sugars. To further demonstrate its commitment to the health of the planet and the local community, Uncooked will serve as Chicago’s first zero-waste dining experience, using only plantUncooked’s based, compostable packaging. sesame Jones runs the eatery with her noodles son Jeremy and his wife Kaitlyn, and Jeremy says, “My mother’s appreciation for the beauty and variety that can be found in whole, plant-based foods, and her genuine passion to restore our planet through health-conscious choices has been deeply ingrained in my beliefs.”


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Lela Orr; looks from her Ferrah label

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RUNAWAY STAR Project Runway alum

Lela Orr is designing her way into Dallas’s closets

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aving clinched the 2020 Rising Star Award from Fashion Group International of Dallas, Lela Orr is readying a boutique to showcase her Ferrah fashion label as well as other sustainable fashion and accessories. Located across the street from the hip Trinity Groves complex, the boutique is called Sept, which is steeped in meaning. “The goal is to have seven sustainable designers hanging or displaying at a time,” Orr explains. “Sept means ‘clan’ or ‘guild’; my birthday is Sept. 7; and sept also means ‘seven’ in French.” Orr’s business has quadrupled since her appearance on Project Runway in spring 2019, evolving from an atelier of mostly custom work to small-batch production runs. Ferrah means “joy” in Arabic, and Orr’s goal is “to create clothing that can bring joy to women and make you feel like your best self.” That translates to urban chic styles like a khaki belted cargo jumpsuit and a pink silk crepe skirt with side drawstrings for adjustable length. She stitches her

designs using only natural-fiber textiles colored with natural dyes. “We are being more mindful of things because fashion is the biggest polluting industry, next to oil and gas,” Orr notes. She eschews synthetics like spandex and aims for zero waste, donating leftover textiles to quilting guilds or crafting them into accessories. Conscious of animal welfare, Orr uses pineapple “leather” instead of animal skins and plans on experimenting with a new textile made of cactus. She crafts felt hats with locally sourced wool that has been hand sheared to avoid wounding the sheep. “Every collection, we try to be more and more sustainable,” says the designer. ferrah.co


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E AT H E R E N O W . Gourmet comfort food is the star attraction at Yardbird Southern Table & Bar, which roosted this spring in a prime downtown spot across from Klyde Warren Park and the Dallas Museum of Art. Many of the recipes at this Miami import are generations old, like the fried bird that’s brined for 27 hours, dredged in cayenne flour and dished up alongside crispy waffles and pressed cubes of spiced mint-infused watermelon. Don’t miss decadent five-cheese macaroni artfully topped with a whole lobster or bouffant deviled eggs crowned with trout roe. It’s the fifth Yardbird from award-winning Miami restaurateur 50 Eggs Hospitality Group, and it sports a unique modern look that blends streamlined furnishings, mesh curtains and geometric tiling with rustic trims—including, of course, chicken wire. runchickenrun.com

smoothing the complexion via light-adaptive pigments. The multifunctional products also work as makeup primers. Based in Barcelona, the luxury firm’s American headquarters is in Irving, a Dallas ’burb.

BEAUTY BEAT Chill out with Cryo, a new steel attachment for BeautyBio’s best-selling GloPro microneedling facial roller device. “Skin icing has been an age-old remedy for inflammation and depuffing,” explains the Dallasbased brand’s cofounder and CEO, Jamie O’Banion. “We have harnessed the pore tightening and contouring benefits of skin icing in a way that everyone

naturabisse.com

can easily execute.” The Cryo comes with two heads: one for around the eyes and another for the face and body, where the freeze can ease sore muscles. beautybio.com

Natura Bissé’s new Diamond Cocoon Sheer cream and matching eye treatment guard facial skin against pollution and blue light while moisturizing and

Clean beauty retailer Follain has created its own in-house skincare line, developed by founder Tara Foley, that will launch at the brand’s Knox Street store this summer. Featuring a toning mist, hydrating cleanser, two masks, an eye cream and a moisturizer, the all-natural, fragrance-free line boasts ingredients such as rosehip oil, green tea and willow bark extract. follain.com

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Venerable Swiss watchmaker Audemars Piguet is putting down roots in Texas this summer with a boutique at Highland Park Village. The brand is unique among collectible timepiece makers, and not just because in 1899 it built the first wristwatch that could chime the hour and in 1972 created the inaugural highend steel sports watch. Remarkably, the exacting watchmaker is still owned by the founding Audemars and Piguet families, who continue to prize innovation. Its latest invention: the world’s thinnest (6.3 millimeters) watch with an automatic perpetual calendar, the Royal Oak Self-winding Perpetual Calendar Ultra-Thin.

Mark Bradford: End Papers highlights 35 major abstract works created with the artist’s fundamental material—the translucent hairdressing papers that he learned to use as a child in his mother’s Los Angeles salon. The retrospective at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth runs through summer. themodern.org

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Keeping Time

ESSENTIAL EXHIBITIONS


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Reinvigorate your mind and body on the mat at One Yoga House’s Montauk outpost. Choose from a room-temperature, warm or hot Vinyasa Flow class, or opt for a moment of mindfulness with a meditation session. oneyogahouse.com At new wellness center Organic Edge in Water Mill, all the high-tech therapies offered in the city are now available under one Hamptons roof. Founder Shannon Conklin wanted to offer services like colon hydrotherapy, targeted cryotherapy and an infrared sauna pod that combines lymphatic drainage massage and pink Himalayan salt air that you can’t find elsewhere out east. “I spent years managing centers in Manhattan hearing my clients beg for these therapies on the east end,” says Conklin. “People were going the entire summer without the kinds of services that Organic Edge offers.” yourorganicedge.com

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A class at One Yoga House

Opening June 27 at Dia Bridgehampton is a year-long exhibition of artist Jill Magid. The artist’s 11 screenprints, which deal with themes of reproductions, color and originality, will be on display. diaart.org FOR MORE ON THE HAMPTONS, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

E AT H E R E N O W . A new Duryea’s Lobster Deck is slated to take over the former Orient by the Sea space on the North Fork—a sister restaurant to the Montauk mainstay. The indoor/outdoor restaurant’s summercentric menu will include dishes such as lobster rolls, fresh crudité and a raw bar highlighting seafood from nearby waters. “Duryea’s is all about transporting people to a different part of the world, for a few hours, offering a much-needed escape from the busy lives most of us have,” says managing partner Steven Jauffrineau. duryealobsters.com

After undergoing a face-lift and name change, Green Hill Kitchen & Que in

Alfresco dining at Green Hill Kitchen & Que

Greenport is now barbeque-focused, with meat-centric offerings like 24-hour NY Prime Beef Brisket and other comfort foods. “The idea was to join approachable foods that people can easily identify with a wallet-friendly price point,” says chef Matt Boudreau. greenhillny.com

LOUNGING AROUND

Polkadot England is a new line of soft, feminine loungewear and sleepwear co-founded by mother-daughter duo Debra Schoenau and Rachel Schoenau Doneger. The Sag Harbor-based Schoenau owns a store called Relax that houses a special section dedicated to Polkadot England, which has garnered a cult-like following on the East Coast. The joggers, boy shorts, nightgowns, robes and camisoles come in pretty prints like hearts, stripes, roses and very of-themoment tie-dye and are all made in the English countryside. “Kids love to match their moms, so we wanted to provide customers with matching motherdaughter or mother-son sets, which are rare in the market,” says Doneger. polkadotengland.com


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THE WOLF OF WINE STREET Winery scion Joey Wölffer celebrates 10 years in business BY NATASHA WOLFF

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What new products have you launched in your tenure? Our dry ciders and gin have extended us into new categories, and we recently launched a grüner cider. Crisp apple notes complement light acidity and bubbles bringing about a fun, fresh and youthful surprise for the palette. What aspect of the estate is particularly close to your heart?

Be Well

The stables are particularly important to me. We have an extraordinary equestrian center used for training, schooling, year-round boarding and instruction, and an 80-stall facility with the largest indoor riding ring on the East Coast. What are your favorite local haunts? Gibson Beach in Sagaponack and the Mashomack Preserve on Shelter Island. For meals, The Crow’s Nest and Estia’s Little Kitchen and of course, Wölffer. And Judith Desirée Skin Thérapie for facials in Sag Harbor.

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Joey Wölffer; Wölffer Estate’s Summer in a Bottle rosé

This June, July and September Shou Sugi Ban House in Water Mill, which opened to much fanfare last year, will offer its three-day Signature Reset Retreats. Featuring unlimited fitness classes, meals, meditation, movement and more, these wellness experiences offer the opportunity to reset and reconnect with yourself and nature. The 3-acre sanctuary boasts 13 guest studios, hydrotherapy pools, two barns, a spa, movement spaces, organic vegetable and herb gardens and a library. The specially curated programming includes fitness, nutrition, skin and body care, hydrotherapy, yoga, healing arts and meditation. shousugibanhouse.com

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When was the vineyard started? My father Christian started the vineyard in 1988. He was a man with great creative vision and a huge passion for life. Wölffer Estate Vineyard & Stables was the

Have your varietals changed over the years? With the help of our winemaker and partner Roman Roth, we produce mainly merlot, chardonnay, cabernet franc and cabernet sauvignon. Our unique combination of Bridgehampton loam soil and breezes from the Atlantic Ocean provides maritime conditions perfect for achieving the balance of ripeness and acidity that has come to define our style.

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realization of his lifelong dream and a true labor of love. Now, my father’s one-time weekend getaway spans more than 470 acres. My brother Marc and I took over the business in 2013.

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etween the family-owned Wölffer Estate Vineyard and two Wölffer Kitchen restaurants, Sag Harbor resident Joey Wölffer has a lot in her glass. But she’s focused on a lot more than just wine. Ten years ago, she founded The Styleliner, a riff on a food truck for fashion, to highlight designers who didn’t have a platform in the U.S. “I was eager to create a vehicle for me to bring fashion to the customer,” Wölffer says of the venture. “It’s something that really seems to work.” Five years later, she opened her first brick-and-mortar shop in Sag Harbor, and last year, she launched Joey Wölffer Reworked, a collection of one-of-a-kind, upcycled and reimagined womenswear, all made in New York City. We caught up with the entrepreneur to talk about business—and pleasure.


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styling products. “My consumer was asking for it, and I was personally wanting to apply my philosophy head to toe,” says Masterson. The four-piece collection, in development for two years, features products like the Wild Marula Tangle Spray detangling mist, which uses plant oils and amino acid blends to strengthen and protect the hair cuticle without harmful silicones. The Cocomino Glossing Shampoo is a universal, color-safe cleanser made of coconutbased surfactants that gently clean. And because you need to wash more than just your hair when you’re in the shower, the brand is also launching Kamili Cream Body Cleanser, a complementary Sili Body Lotion and the aluminum- and baking soda-free Sweet Pitti Deodorant Cream to keep you smelling your best all day without irritating your sensitive underarm area. We talked to Masterson about these launches and more.

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BRANCHING OUT Drunk Elephant founder Tiffany Masterson makes the jump to hair and body care BY NATASHA WOLFF

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Masterson; Drunk Elephant’s new hair and body products

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fter years of trying different products to tackle a myriad of skin ailments from rosacea to oiliness, Houston-based entrepreneur Tiffany Masterson launched beauty brand Drunk Elephant in 2012. Her nontoxic, essential oil-free skincare line uses safe, smart ingredients that are pH-friendly and deliver exactly what each skin type needs. So it was only a matter of time before she tackled the scalp with a new line of fragrance- and sulfate-free shampoo, conditioner and

What’s the secret to Drunk Elephant’s success? What makes us different is that our ingredients respect and support the healthy function of skin when they are applied externally. They won’t cause irritation or harm, and they keep the acid mantle intact. The external health of the skin itself matters a lot if you are going to make and sell skincare. Think the Whole30 for the skin! Do these four haircare products serve all hair types? I launched with the core collection, much like I did with my skincare line. That way, people can use the products all together. Other products will roll out later over the years. Everyone can absolutely use this line; it’s for all hair types. Like our skincare formulas, our hair care is designed to be flexible and customizable to your specific concerns. Did these launches feel like a natural progression for the brand? Yes, very much so. It’s a natural step for us to make toward taking care of the scalp, which is skin, and the skin on the body. I’m not sure where these products have been all my life!


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Woodshed Smokehouse’s paella; Musaafer’s dining room

Tim Love, Texas’ dynamic chef with restaurants in Fort Worth, Denton, Austin and Knoxville, Tennessee, will be debuting three dining venues in Houston this spring. Located at the sprawling Levy Park, Love is opening an outpost of his acclaimed Woodshed Smokehouse, celebrating smoked meats, game and fish infused with diverse wood flavors; Love Shack, a classic burger joint offering custom-made riffs on comfort food favorites; and Side Dough, a double-decker bus from 1973 situated at the front of the park serving pastries, breakfast tacos and coffee. Houston has perhaps never seen a restaurant as opulent as the yet-to-open Musaafer. Inspired by the ancient palaces of India, the elaborate 10,000-square-foot space transports

C O O K I N G I N M A R FA : D O U G L A S F R I E D M A N

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Jenny Laird’s Texas Caviar recipe; entertaining West Texas style

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Cooking in Marfa: Welcome, We’ve Been Expecting You (Phaidon) introduces readers to the artist colony and ranching community in the remote country of Far West Texas. Written by Virginia Lebermann, co-founder of Ballroom Marfa and co-owner of famous dining venue The Capri, and Rocky Barnette, the chef at the restaurant, this new book offers an intimate look at the many facets that make the small town special. Boasting a foreword by chef Daniel Humm and photography by Douglas Friedman, the tome is a shrine to so many who make the pilgrimage here. Creative director and Texas native Trey Laird, the man behind ad campaigns and branding for mega brands like Tom Ford, Tiffany and Tory Burch, has been coming to Marfa for years and spends a lot of his time there alongside friends like Friedman. “Marfa is this unique convergence of complete isolation yet complete connectivity and sophistication,” says Laird. Marfa is definitely a study in contradictions; it’s in the middle of the desert but connected to any number of important cultural happenings. “Donald Judd was just so visionary to take art out of a museum setting and make it an experience that’s connected to nature.” Devotees love the purity and authenticity that exists there. “It hasn’t been totally redesigned,” says Laird, who’s a Chinati Foundation board member. “It’s really a special group of like-minded people who have a connection to art and to the region.”

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guests to another place and time thanks to its multisensory cuisine and design. Staying true to a name that means “traveler,” the restaurant features five unique areas aiming to take patrons on a distinct culinary journey and experience. The design was conceptualized by New Delhi–based design firm Chromed Design Studio, which took this on as its first U.S. project. Chromed worked with acclaimed Indian fashion designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee to custom-design wallpaper throughout the space. musaaferhouston.com This summer, longtime friends Lukkaew Srasrisuwan and Miranda Leotkhamfu's dream of introducing Houstonians to the colorful and exotic tastes of Thailand is coming to fruition. The female duo’s new concept, Kin Dee (loosely translated as “to Eat Well”) is opening in the Market at the Heights and will feature a vibrant 2,500-square-foot interior that skews contemporary with custom furnishings and extensive tropical greenery throughout. Among the offerings are green curry with rice noodles, thai boat noodle soup, money bags and casseroled shrimp with glass noodles. kindeethaicuisine.com


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High Stakes

Circa Resort & Casino, which is scheduled to open on the Fremont Street Experience this December, is going big in a way that downtown Las Vegas has never seen before. It will be the city’s tallest structure north of the Strip, and developer and CEO Derek Stevens is creating the world’s largest sportsbook as well as an enormous rooftop pool amphitheater.

million pixels on a high-definition screen that will be the biggest sportsbook screen in history

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million pixels on a screen that will broadcast sporting events at the pool amphitheater

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rooftop pools that will be open 365 days a year

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million square feet

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pool cabanas, 38 day beds and 337 chaise lounges

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feet tall

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slot machines and 49 table games

sit-down restaurants, headlined by a steakhouse from former Palms chef Barry S. Dakake and a 24-hour deli from Michigan sandwich sensation Paul Saginaw

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person viewing capacity at the three-story sportsbook

Jemaa at the NoMad Las Vegas

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SUMMER 2020

LADIES FIRST

POOL RULES Every week of the summer is going to feel like an over-the-top music festival at Wet Republic, the massive day club at MGM Grand. “Wet Republic will welcome millions of guests to a completely evolved experience,” says Rich Kenny, vice president of VIP marketing and customer development for Hakkasan Group, the global hospitality powerhouse behind the 54,500-square-foot hot spot. “Our venue will continue to uphold its world-renowned reputation of being a Las Vegas staple and one of the top pool parties, but in an enhanced setting. Everything from our additional plunge pools to our new LED structure and sound system will take the experience to the next level.” The multimillion-dollar revamp of Wet Republic was led by the esteemed New York City-based architecture firm Rockwell Group. Upgraded cabanas

and bungalows are perfect settings for high rollers who want a luxurious experience while enjoying DJ sets from headliners like Zedd, Steve Aoki and Tiësto. Sound-system enhancements include L-Acoustics Kara and ARCS II speakers, which are also used at Coachella, Tomorrowland and Hakkasan Group’s Omnia nightclub. Get ready to hear the beat drop again and again. wetrepublic.com For a more intimate daylife option, there’s Jemaa, which aims to be an alternative to mega clubs. This weekend soiree at the Jacques Garcia–designed NoMad rooftop pool features DJs who also spin at Park MGM’s On the Record speakeasy and club. If you’re bored with bottle service, Jemaa offers “Cocktail Explosions” like a pineapple daiquiri that serves 15. jemaalv.com

Elizabeth Blau, the restaurant development superstar who has recruited A-list chefs at both Bellagio and Wynn Las Vegas, is aiming to revolutionize the hospitality scene again. Blau, whose current restaurants include Honey Salt and Buddy V’s Ristorante, has teamed up with Mary Choi Kelly and Jolene Mannina to create the Women’s Hospitality Initiative. The goal of WHI, which is sponsored by Elaine Wynn’s family foundation and many casinos and restaurants, is gender equity. WHI is implementing programs that empower women to achieve leadership positions at restaurants. “While many graduating culinary students are women, females represent just a small portion of executive chefs or restaurant owners, especially in Las Vegas,” Blau says. “Rather than just talking about the problem, we’re taking action. WHI will meet the clear need to educate and train women, from those in high school and college to those already in the business, to thrive in the restaurant industry.” elizabethblau.com

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Elizabeth Blau; members of the Women’s Hospitality Initiative


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THIS IS MAJOR David Chang goes bigger than ever at Majordomo Meat & Fish BY ANDY WANG

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a scallop dish; Shaking Beef

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exterior of Majordomo; David Chang; his Eat a Peach memoir

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Iconic chef Charles Phan, a prominent pioneer of modern Asian cooking in America, has opened The Slanted Door Las Vegas inside The Forum Shops at Caesars Palace. This is Phan’s first restaurant outside the San Francisco Bay Area, and he’s giving Vegas contemporary Vietnamese hits like crispy imperial rolls and shaking beef. But the James Beard Award– winning Phan is also showcasing Vegas-exclusive dishes: There are wood-oven-baked clams and a Klingeman Farm pork chop that’s grilled over mesquite charcoal; the clams come with lemongrass, ginger, Thai chile, cilantro and lime; and the pork chop is accompanied by charred leeks and chili-garlic soy sauce. A Phan-tastic voyage indeed. slanteddoor-lasvegas.com

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ith a popular Netflix series, an award-winning podcast and his new memoir Eat a Peach out in September, David Chang has become the food world’s king of all media. But he’s still very much a chef and restaurateur who’s committed to creating spectacles in Las Vegas. Chang opened Majordomo Meat & Fish at The Venetian’s Palazzo tower last December, and he quickly followed it up by unveiling adjacent slider restaurant Moon Palace in January. Now he’s working to open another eatery in the back room of Majordomo Meat & Fish. He’ll be cooking with Korean flavors and Brazilian-style techniques for the back-room “meat house,” which will take advantage of the first churrasco grill he’s ever had. “We’re playing around with different names and styles of service there,” says Chang, who’s been considering the possibility of a buffet. Vegas, where Chang also runs Momofuku at The Cosmopolitan, gives him the ability to try things he’s never done before. At The Palazzo, he has his first wok station, which Majordomo Meat & Fish is using to cook live king crab from his first crustacean tanks. “The scale of everything is bigger and more celebratory,” Chang says. “More carts, live crustacean tanks—Vegas gives us so many opportunities that are hard to pull off anywhere else.” Chang has seen many differences between Majordomo in L.A, which he opened in January 2018, and Majordomo in Vegas. “We’re always learning so much in Vegas,” he says. “We designed this to be celebratory, but this is on another level. In L.A., the whole-plate short rib is a big entree. In Vegas, people are ordering it as a mid-course between pastas and mains. That’s nuts. We sell about 25 of those a night.” But while Vegas is often about extravagance unlike anywhere else, Moon Palace is an accessible alternative where you can get a slider and hot chips for less than $10. Life, as Chang knows well, is about balance. So, what can we expect to learn in his memoir? “I put a lot of myself out there in my podcasts and interviews, but the book is quite personal, even for me,” he says. “The memoir covers a lot of ground, including stories from my upbringing, of the restaurants—including the opening of Majordomo L.A.—and the ups and downs in between.” venetian.com


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This Is About Humanity fight for families who’ve been separated at the border

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Winkler Reinis visiting children at the Yes We Can Mobile Schools Program in Tijuana, Mexico, in February; Winkler Reinis flanked by partners Elsa Marie Collins and Yolanda Selene Walther-Meade

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A MOTHER’S LOVE Zoe Winkler Reinis and

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efore she co-founded This Is About Humanity, Zoe Winkler Reinis was a preschool teacher for a decade. She then worked as a therapeutic companion who helped children with social and emotional development. “When I had my third son, I stopped working and was just going to be a stay-at-home mom,” says Winkler Reinis, whose boys are now 8, 4 and 2. But when she started learning about families who had been separated at the U.S.-Mexico border, she knew she had to do something. “I couldn’t get it out of my mind,” she says. “I was just a mom looking at these moms. And in those mothers, I saw my own face. And in those children, I saw my children.” In 2018, Winkler Reinis and two friends, sisters Elsa Marie Collins and Yolanda Selene Walther-Meade, started This Is About Humanity to raise awareness and provide support for separated and reunified families. Since then, they’ve taken 20 bus trips, primarily to Tijuana to bring supplies to shelters, build kitchens, bathrooms and roofs, replace tents and beds. They’ve raised more than $1 million. If that wasn’t enough, they’ve also joined forces with Yes We Can World Foundation to build a school in a retrofitted bus. Winkler Reinis, whose father is actor Henry Winkler, has hosted charity dinners at her parents’ L.A. home to raise money for the Immigrant Defenders Law Center and other like-minded organizations. At these dinners, head chef Ruffo Ibarra has cooked alongside culinary luminaries including Tyler Florence, Ludo Lefebvre, Chris Bianco, Jessica Koslow, Ray Garcia, Bricia Lopez and Burt Bakman. “It’s funny that I do this in my parents’ front yard, and I just take over their house,” Winkler Reinis says. “Sometimes, the chefs will stay after dinner and do shots in the yard. My parents are asleep in their room and have no idea. It’s like high school.” Winkler Reinis has long known that you can simultaneously have a good time and do good for the world. Her entire life, she’s seen her parents fight for human rights and support many charities. Henry and Stacey Winkler’s activism includes cofounding the Children’s Action Network. “I grew up watching my mom and dad fight for children who didn’t have a voice,” Winkler Reinis says. Now she’s found her own cause and is getting other A-listers involved. Her friend Minka Kelly, who was part of the first bus trip to San Diego in July 2018, helped brainstorm a salon where speakers included immigration activists Mark Lane and Alida Garcia. Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent were so moved by a visit to Tijuana that they donated two years of rent for a LGBTQ shelter, and bedding for another shelter. “There’s nothing like the raw power of a mother’s love,” says Sophia Bush, the actress and activist. “Zoe took the love she has for her own boys and turned it toward the most vulnerable children and families at the border. She’s brought together so many people, ideas and resources, and helped raise an unbelievable amount of awareness.” Jamie-Lynn Sigler, who became familiar with This Is About Humanity through her friendship with its co-founders, echoes this sentiment. “We all can see atrocities in the world and take a moment, donate, pray, etc.,” she says. “But to see these women take actual action and call upon their community and give us a chance to be hands-on and help, I’m forever grateful to them and to the change they are making in this world.”


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SKIN IN THE GAME

Shani Darden, the skincare guru behind the faces of Jessica Alba, Chrissy Teigen and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, recently debuted her first freestanding skin clinic studio in Beverly Hills. (The facialist and skincare entrepreneur previously worked out of her guest house.) “I wanted it to be central to most of my clients, yet still private,” Darden says. She and designer Jake Arnold renovated and reimagined the interiors into a serene oasis with four treatment rooms (one houses her full-body LED light bed) and a large reception area. Darden’s best-selling Retinol Reform Serum is available for purchase, along with her other eponymous products. For appointments and information, email booking@shanidarden.com

Splits59, the women’s activewear brand based in downtown Los Angeles, has launched summer collections that are both sleek and sustainable, including a zero-waste upcycled legging made of repurposed fabric scraps. “It’s a vibrant patchwork of our favorite fabrics and colors from previous seasons,” says co-founder Jonathan Schwartz. Meanwhile, a locally made Earth Day collection boasts leggings and bra tops fabricated from recycled plastic bottles extracted from the ocean. Not one to rest on its laurels, the brand, which was founded in 2008, has also partnered with luxury fashion retailer Net-a-Porter on a bohemian tie-dye capsule collection. “As we continue to grow, we understand the importance of reducing waste and contributing to the health of our planet,” says co-founder Keith Peterson. splits59.com

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This summer, LACMA will host a retrospective of Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara, curated by Mika Yoshitake. Spanning over 30 years from 1987 to 2020, Yoshitomo Nara showcases the artist’s work through the lens of his longtime passion—music. Featuring album covers Nara began collecting as a teenager, paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics and sketches, this exhibition shines a light on Nara’s conceptual process. “Yoshitomo Nara is among the most important Japanese artists of his generation, and one of the most recognized artists working today. We are excited to be organizing this international retrospective,” said Michael Govan, the museum’s CEO and director.

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“Deodorant is personal,” says Randi Christiansen, CEO of clean skincare brand Nécessaire. “There is simply not a ‘one product fits all’ approach. However, we feel we have a solution that will make a difference.” The brand, co-founded by Christiansen and fellow L.A.-based entrepreneur and former Into the Gloss editorial director Nick Axelrod, spent more than two years developing a new unisex product that’s simply known as The Deodorant. A multimineral formula of active ingredients including silica, zinc and kaolin clay keeps you dry while a gentle combination of lactic and mandelic acids neutralizes odor. The eucalyptusscented deodorant also features a mild blend of essential oils. necessaire.com

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ROOM REQUEST, The new Presidential Skyhouse at the Harbor View Hotel offers arguably the finest location on the island, looking out over the ocean, lighthouse, outer harbor and Chappaquiddick Island. The suite was previously the private residence of the hotel’s former owner, and was recently renovated from top to bottom. “My goal when we decided to renovate the Harbor View Hotel was to make it the best luxury boutique hotel, not just on Martha’s Vineyard, but in the Northeast,” says owner Bernard Chiu. “We’ve done that with the addition of the Presidential Skyhouse.” Natural light streams through the suite’s expansive windows. A palette of blue, sand and crisp white reflects the island setting. Vaulted ceilings with exposed beams and wide-planked hardwood floors enhance the beachy feel, while white marble kitchen countertops and a freestanding deep soaking tub in the master bedroom add modern luxury to the experience. “It captures the feeling of being on Martha’s Vineyard with modern amenities,” Chiu says, “and it has the best view on island by far.” harborviewhotel.com

THE HARBOR VIEW HOTEL: DAN CUTRONA

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TAKE A CHILL Before launching Lord Jones, the maker of CBD-infused wellness products like tinctures, rubs and gumdrops, Cindy Capobianco and her husband, Robert Rosenheck, spent years operating Hollywood Hills Wellness, a nonprofit medical cannabis collective in California. It’s an experience that has served them well. The brand’s CBD-infused offerings aim to restore skin from harmful effects of overcleansing and exfoliating, and in their latest move, the pair has introduced premium skincare into their best-selling product line. “The acid mantle is a delicate film that acts as a shield against bacteria and other environmental contaminants,” says Capobianco. “This barrier helps retain moisture to maintain hydration levels in your face. Our new Acid Mantle Repair CBD Moisturizer rebalances the acid mantle.” Salte Martha’s Vineyard is the local retailer for the brand’s newest CBD skincare products, like the High CBD Body Lotion, Heavy Duty Chill Balm and Royal Oil, which have garnered a devoted following on island and off. lordjones.com

This summer, the Serena & Lily design shops across the country (including the nearby Boston location) are partnering with local interior designers to host a series of special events. In addition to informative seminars, guests will have the chance to workshop common design hang-ups on a range of topics including how to style a bed, how to mix and match colors and patterns and how to design your outdoor seating area.


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ARTS & LEISURE Where Caroline Cronson comes to unwind BY NATASHA WOLFF

What are some standout local arts organizations? Vineyard Arts Project, which brings companies and individuals to the Vineyard for residencies from theater, musical theater, dance and filmmaking. The Yard, a year-round space bringing a slew of new and exciting dance to the island. The Martha’s Vineyard Film Society owns and runs three wonderful movie theaters and also organizes the Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival in the fall. How do you like to dine on the island? I rely on my husband Paul to be in the kitchen most of the time. He loves cooking and he also has a great wine cellar! You can get fresh fish from Edgartown Seafood or Edgartown Meat and Fish, and the Black Sheep is incredible for charcuterie and cheese. What’s your go-to hostess gift, and what’s your favorite gift to receive? If I’m going to dinner, I might take something from the wonderful

Martha’s Vineyard Glassworks. Personally, I love getting any scented candle from Jo Malone or Diptyque. What’s your go-to hostess ensemble? I love that nothing is ever too formal. I have a collection of very colorful shirts, tunics and caftans from Pucci and J. McLaughlin. I wear them with white pants, Jack Rogers sandals, Hermès wedges or Birkenstocks along with fun vintage jewelry. What commissions are you proudest of over your tenure? Ryan McNamara’s work with John Zorn, and bringing commedia dell’arte to our Rotunda Projects. What commissions are you excited about this fall? Ephrat Asherie, who is bringing her club dance sensibility to concert choreography with UnderScored, and Omari Wiles’ New York Is Burning with his Les Ballet Afrik. He synthesises contemporary dance, West African dance and the club scene into quite spectacular choreography, and both are going to be fun and informative and bring in a really interesting audience.

Ashley Bouder Project at Vineyard Arts; Caroline Cronson at a Works & Process program at the Guggenheim Museum

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What are your favorite local haunts? Menemsha Hills for hiking, the Agricultural Fair, Chappy for cycling, Arrowhead Farm for riding, the Flying Horses Carousel in Oak Bluffs and all the lighthouses.

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rts producer Caroline Cronson, who runs Works & Process, a performing arts series that runs at the Guggenheim Museum every season, has been coming to Martha’s Vineyard for 30 years. “As soon as you land on this magical island, you can take a deep breath and you’re transported into a different, kinder place,” says Cronson. She loves to sail around Edgartown and the Harbor and enjoys the unspoiled, pristine nature of the area including beaches like Lighthouse, Katama and Wasque, where she kayaks and takes long walks with her dogs. For Cronson and her family, spending summers on the island is a tradition and also helps inform her work back in NYC. “We first discovered choreographers Michelle Dorrance and Caleb Teicher on the island and went on to commission both at Works & Process,” says Cronson. Here’s how Cronson spends her summers. guggenheim.


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PLAYING BRIDGE Fashion insider Kate Fleming

connects creatives to environmental causes through her nonprofit BY REBECCA KLEINMAN

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ccessories designer-turned-environmental activist Kate Fleming grew up playing with the seahorses that bobbed in her Biscayne Bay backyard. The Miami Beach native remembers how their delicate tails would curl around her 5-year-old fingers. She left home to attend the Parsons School of Design in New York City and got caught up in the fashion world for decades, designing for Thierry Mugler, Diesel and Tory Burch, whose bestselling Fleming bag is named after her. Meanwhile, the seahorses and most of the bay’s other marine life disappeared to development. “New Yorkers can become so career-focused that they forget they’re on this planet. Some days, I didn’t even look at the sky,” says Fleming, who had an epiphany during a National Geographic expedition to Antarctica. “If even animals in the most remote places were suffering, I thought, what can I do as a designer to connect scientists with creative people with far bigger voices than mine to spread the word?” The natural-born connector founded Bridge Initiative, a “PR for Planet Earth” nonprofit that organizes and funds artist residencies and large-scale collaborations to raise awareness about climate change. In 2018, its inaugural project partnered artist David Benjamin Sherry with the Alaska Whale Foundation; his residency’s resulting photographs were exhibited on billboards from Manhattan to Nebraska. Waterproof Miami, a series of site-specific public art projects co-presented by local, artist-run space Bas Fisher Invitational, hits close to home—her beloved bay. “Coral City Camera” live streams rare, urban coral reefs in Biscayne Bay to expose their resiliency despite the odds. It’s a collaboration with Coral Morphologic, a marine biologist and musician duo, who combine their careers into a call to action to save endangered coral. “I use it as my screensaver, because it’s very soothing,” says Fleming of the work that premiered at Design Miami in December and traveled around Miami by mobile billboard in 2020. (It has also inspired several complementary playlists on SoundCloud.)

Kate Fleming

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Haute Hippie

The series continues this summer with artist Carlos Betancourt’s cutouts of mangroves and indigenous avians on the InterContinental Miami Hotel’s exterior digital display (yes, the one that infamously features a gyrating woman). Heat Wave, a summer residency followed by a group show during Miami Art Week 2020, pairs three emerging artists with scientists. Resortwear brands like Figue and Kai Lani signed on for a fundraising barbecue and shopping party at the Standard Spa Miami Beach timed for Miami Swim Week in July, too. “Rather than look at climate change from a state of fear, art has the power to make people fall in love with something and want to protect it,” says Fleming. bridgeinitiative.org

Not your mother’s 1970s-era clodhoppers, Roger Vivier reimagines orthopedic wooden sandals for the millennial-minded. Its Bal Harbour boutique’s Viv clogs come in sweet floral prints with crystal buckles for an eyeful of glam. Creative Director Gherardo Felloni’s handcrafted, retro throwback will hopefully inspire a summer of love outside one’s shoe closet. rogervivier.com


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A renovated guest room at The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach; the resort’s new pool

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latest makeover. Dining concept Fuego y Mar for Latin American bites also debuts among her reimagined vignettes for Lapidus Bar and the dune-skimming DiLido Beach Club. “The essence of Miami played an integral role in the new design’s inspiration,” says general manager Sase Gjorsovski of the extensive historic research that went into the years-long project. “Guests love how it combines vintage Art Deco but feels very contemporary and glamorous.” ritzcarlton.com

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For its new sister property in Palm Beach, Nantucket’s White Elephant Resort took the local pink-and-green palette off the table. Instead, cream and gray interiors and black-and-white striped awnings dominate the renovated historic hotel with 13 rooms and 19 suites including a penthouse with views of Bradley Park and the Intracoastal Waterway. A 7-foot white elephant statue by artist Fredrick Prescott greets guests, who can book excursions on Barton & Gray yachts and hop on complimentary bicycles for rides on the nearby Palm Beach Lake Trail. The owners also brought down beloved restaurant Lola 41 for onsite dining. Its eclectic menu (Asian, Portuguese, American) is the toast of Nantucket. whitelephantpalmbeach.com The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach has had many lives, beginning with the Morris Lapidus-designed Hotel DiLido in the 1950s. More recently, Meg Sharpe, a New York–based designer who has worked for Kelly Wearstler and Mark Cunningham, was tapped for the 376-room property’s

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This summer, chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Red Rooster flies south from New York to Miami’s Overtown neighborhood. Though the chef imports the Southern comfort food that made him famous, his culinary curiosity also references the city’s Caribbean population and other Latin American communities. Haitian dishes like accra (veg-friendly fritters) and griot (fried pork shoulder with citrus and scotch bonnet peppers) have a particular place in his heart. The space, formerly Clyde Killens Pool Hall, sings again with the jazz and R&B music that are embedded in the neighborhood’s heritage. Collaborations with African American artists, such as Theaster Gates for furniture and Derrick Adams for original artworks, further celebrate its unique place in local history. redroosterovertown.com


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Housed in the old Starlight Theatre, The Gaslight Nantucket is a new Japanese restaurant with a focus on izakaya cuisine, Japanese bar snacks. The restaurant offers craft beers and natural wines alongside nightly live music sessions in the summer featuring musicians like The High Divers, The Ballroom Thieves and Liz Cooper & The Stampede. gaslightnantucket.com Feel-good pizza spot Oath Pizza will reopen this summer at its Straight Wharf location. What started as a tiny shack on the water has spawned offshoots in Boston, New York City, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. Devotees swoon over the Spicy Mother Clucker, with roasted chicken, pickled red onions, Sriracha and mozzarella, and the Chocolate Chunk Cookie Pizza, a dessert pizza featuring chocolate chunk cookie dough, ricotta and powdered sugar. oathpizza.com

Scandavian home design store Eleish Van Breems, which has made a name for itself in Westport, Connecticut, opens an outpost on the water this summer. Owners and authors Rhonda Eleish and Edie Van Breems wanted to bring their signature aesthetic to the island. “Our furnishings and accessories reflect the timeless allure of indoor-outdoor living and entertaining with a focus on high-quality natural materials and small artisan makers,” says Eleish. “We have our own Scandinavian point of view focused on ease of living on the water that we are bringing to the island. We are drawn to the special light, the sailing, the dramatic southern shore beaches on the Atlantic, but most of all to the wonderful community found on this historic island,” says Van Breems. evbantiques.com

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garden at Life House, Nantucket; the dining room at the White Elephant Loft at 32 Main Street

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Life House, Nantucket is a new boutique hotel housed in a 1830s building in downtown Nantucket. Featuring 14 guest rooms, a communal living room, honor kitchen and lush garden lounge, the property offers everything you need for a visit to the island—minus all the extras you don’t. Amenities include Le Labo bath

products, Marshall speakers and Revival luxury linens. lifehousehotels.com Tucked on the second floor of a 19th-century brick building on cobblestoned Main Street is the White Elephant Loft at 32 Main Street. The 2,500-square-foot, three-bedroom loft apartment offers guests the best of both worlds, with all the comforts of a private home plus access to the amenities of the White Elephant resort, like pool and complimentary bikes. You also get access to a 2020 BMV SUV to use during your stay. whiteelephantnantucket.com


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Best in Show

Taking place July 30-August 1, the annual Nantucket by Design festival, hosted by the Nantucket Historical Association, showcases the best of local American design. Design luminaries such as this year’s keynote speaker Alessandra Branca will host panels, lectures events and antiquing tours. nha.org DUJOUR.COM

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SHELLING OUT With Cru, managing partner Jane Stoddard

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has created a timeless, popular institution that is always the hottest reservation on the island BY NATASHA WOLFF

NANTUCKET BY DESIGN: ELEANOR HALLEWELL PHOTOGRAPHY

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ru has cemented its status as the local hotspot for seafood and rosé, among other seasonal offerings. “Cru is a love letter to the island, and our customers tell us that it’s transporting,” says managing partner Jane Stoddard. The entrepreneur has deep ties to the island, having worked in marketing for Juice Guys Care, Nantucket Nectars’ nonprofit arm, and then as development director for the Nantucket Boys & Girls Club. Stoddard and Cru’s executive chef and co-owner Erin Zircher have worked tirelessly to create the Nantucket Shell Recycling program, which sends oyster shells back into the waters to help rebuild reefs—80,000 pounds have been planted to date. This summer, Cru will host private oyster tours and shucking lessons with Zircher and master shucker Rick “Rocco” Sorocco alongside local oyster farmer Simon Edwards to give visitors a chance to experience shellfishing up close and

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get a hyperlocal taste of the island’s unique shellfish. crunantucket.com

Jane Stoddard; Chablis and oysters on the half shell

What’s special about Cru’s location? It drove our entire concept. It is an iconic location. We fell in love with the spot when it became available—and we committed so much time and energy in restoring this historic wharf-front location. We wanted to create a waterside destination that is a must-visit, but accessible enough to feel like your favorite neighborhood spot. The magic of the location combined with chef Erin Zircher’s local, subtly elevated cuisine makes us special. What are the secrets to your success? Pristine seafood served with warm hospitality. We have the most amazing staff who always deliver a welcoming experience. What led you to create the Nantucket Shell Recycling program?

We helped create it with Nantucket’s Natural Resources Department in 2014 in an effort to preserve and restore the reefs around the island. Now, we recycle approximately 16,000 pounds of oyster shells per year, helping to rebuild the reefs. It helps protect and enrich the ocean environment, which is so critical for the island.


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THE SCULPT MASTER Fitness instructor Megan Roup is crafting the bodies of women, one crunch at a time BY KIM PEIFFER

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rom inside the confines of her New York City apartment, fitness trainer Megan Roup is hard at work creating new dance and sculpting routines for her incredibly popular digital streaming fitness app, The Sculpt Society. The former professional dancer teaches private classes and group sessions at spaces like Nolita’s Project by Equinox. Roup has developed a cult following and, during the COVID-19 crisis, has expanded her digital offerings with content filmed in her own living room. The workout guru offers a mix of workouts for all levels, combining both simplified dance cardio and body sculpting workouts with targeted quickie sessions (anywhere from 8–15 minutes) that zero in on specific muscle groups. Each month on the app, she offers a new program targeting every body part, and all of her older workouts are stored in a vast library of content—so there’s no excuse not to exercise. Unlike many dance workouts and classes out there, you don’t have to have dance experience to be able to master the cardio sessions; Roup teaches them step-by-step as she goes. Models like Elsa Hosk and Martha Hunt and influencers like Hannah Bronfman clamour for her cardio (jumping jacks, grapevines and dance steps) mixed with hand and ankle weights, sliders and bands. The combo of cardio and weights torches calories and ensures no body part is left unsculpted. thesculptsociety.com

STRETCH IT OUT

Megan Roup

Stretching studios are popping up across the city, offering New Yorkers a way to work out all those kinks. Below, we round up our favorites. SLT founder Amanda Freeman teamed up with expert trainers to open Stretch*d in the Flatiron, offering 25-to-70-minute customized stretching sessions to build flexibility and range of motion while you zen out. stretchdspace.com Tucked away on a quiet cobblestoned street in Tribeca, Lymbr focuses on recovery from competitive sports and active lifestyles, for those with injuries and those looking to keep their bodies healthy and mobile while they continue on their wellness journeys. There are also locations on the Upper East Side and in the Hamptons. belymbr.com

ABOVE:

Outer Reach’s Tribeca studio

Founded by Aimee Cho and Alex Drexler, Outer Reach in Tribeca offers both one-on-one and group stretching classes that can help improve your core and posture. “Our dynamic stretching helps you get a deeper, more effective stretch,” says Cho. “The work that you put toward increasing your mobility and flexibility with us will have the added benefit of sculpting, elongating and toning your muscles as you engage them to stretch.” outerreach.com Dancer Donna Flagg opened Chelsea’s Lastics studio using the same techniques professional dancers use to stay limber and elongate muscles. Group classes are also on offer. lastics.com


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BATHING BEAUTY

A redesigned room at The Mayflower Inn & Spa

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Housed in a renovated 1930s Dr. Brown’s soda factory in Williamsburg, Bathhouse is a fitness buff’s dream. Co-founders Travis Talmadge and Jason Goodman wanted to redefine the traditional bathhouse model to provide cuttingedge, performance-enhancing therapies in a contemporary setting. “Wellness trends have largely focused around nutrition and fitness, and although these are major pieces of the puzzle, if you’re serious about performance, recovery has to be part of that equation,” says Talmadge. With three thermal pools, two spacious hammams, multiple sauna and steam options, cryotherapy, a sensory deprivation tank, massage treatment rooms and a private ritual bath area, there are an incredible number of treatment offerings. The owners wanted to create a relaxing respite but also a social space for people to gather. To that end, there’s also an all-day cafe serving salads, eggs and entrees like duck confit in an airy, plant-filled space. “Hospitality has pivoted in a more experiential direction, and Bathhouse is a recovery oasis that is inherently social,” says Talmadge. abathhouse.com

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BATHHOUSE: ADRIAN GAUT

This summer, The Mayflower Inn & Spa in Washington, Connecticut, now part of the Auberge Resorts Collection, is unveiling a fresh look thanks to designer Celerie Kemble (who’s responsible for making Playa Grande Beach Club in the Dominican Republic a must-visit resort). The contemporary country estate aesthetic favors light Scandinavian furniture and bold and colorful textiles—a modern update in time for the hotel’s 100th anniversary. Chef Lacey Lou Franklin, an alum of Napa Valley’s Auberge du Soleil, has transformed the restaurant’s menu, while the spa is just as spacious and luxurious as it’s always been. aubergeresorts.com/mayflower Set in a former 20th-century convent in Peekskill, New York, the new Abbey Inn & Spa boasts 42 guest rooms in a historic Hudson Valley location. The four-room spa offers luxurious treatments, an in-house restaurant elevates American classics and the surrounding area has a plethora of activities to choose from. theabbeyinn.com

SUMMER 2020

A Weekend Away


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As a leading celebrity photographer and music video director, Matthew Rolston has been capturing and shaping visual culture for decades. He’s also worked in a unique capacity as a creative director for hospitality groups such as Virgin Hotels and sbe. In recent years, Rolston has turned his talents to documenting a beloved Orange County institution: the Pageant of the Masters. The Laguna Art Museum will host the exhibition Matthew Rolston, Art People: The Pageant Portraits, featuring 20 large-scale photographs from June 28 to September 20, accompanied by the publication of a fully illustrated catalogue. lagunaartmuseum.org

FOR MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES AMBER WAVES Interior designer Amber Lewis has amassed a loyal following both on social media and in real life, thanks to her two buzzy home boutiques in the L.A. area and her full-service design studio. This summer, Lewis is bringing a third Shoppe by Amber Interiors south with a new outpost at Lido Marina Village. Now, O.C.-area Amber Interiors fans can peruse her signature breezy California style, with pieces from her original furniture collection mixed with vintage finds, earthy textiles and eclectic accessories. shoppe. amberinteriordesign.com

Amber Lewis in front of her Pacific Palisades boutique

E AT H E R E N O W . New York City-bred, Dallasbased chef and Top Chef contestant John Tesar is expanding his culinary reach to Southern California. Tesar showcases his seafood expertise at Outer Reef, located in the Laguna Cliffs Marriott Resort & Spa in Dana Point. “Outer Reef sits at the Dana Point Marina and looks out into the ocean. Being a seafood restaurant, what chef wouldn’t get excited about that?” says Tesar. “We also have the freshest seafood and produce available at our fingertips.” Highlights include pounded bigeye tuna with ’nduja croutons, live diver

Scallops with uni at Outer Reef

scallop with shallot brown butter, wild mushroom dashi and shaved black truffle and kimchi-glazed Pacific halibut with uni butter and crispy pork belly. marriott.com

SUNNY OUTLOOK For the first time since its founding in 1976, iconic Newport Beach boutique A’maree’s has partnered with another distinctly Southern California brand for a bespoke collaboration. The capsule collection of sunglasses designed with Salt is available in three styles dubbed Un, Deux and Trois—two of which are unisex—and each come in four chic colorways. amarees.com

AMBER LEWIS: MARISA VITALE; OUTER REEF: KEVIN MARPLE

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DRESS REHEARSAL


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KITCHEN CONFIDENCE Avid home cooks have a new destination to visit in Irvine. The Dacor Kitchen Theater, located at The Boardwalk complex and designed by leading firm CallisonRTKL, showcases the full suite of products from the luxury appliance company. The state-of-the-art showroom also hosts special events and boasts work from Santa Ana-based glass makers Siemon & Salazar and artist Alex Turco. dacor.com

FROM TOP:

a Newport Beach project of his design; Chris Brandon

P OWER PL AYER

while pushing design forward in Orange County and beyond BY JESSICA RITZ

Visitors have eagerly headed to San Juan Capistrano for centuries, but it’s only been since this spring that the historic town can look forward to providing them accommodations. The newly constructed Inn at the Mission San Juan Capistrano, which is affiliated with Autograph Collection Hotels, boasts 125 guest rooms including suites and three larger villas. The sprawling landscaped grounds also contain special event facilities and a spa, all within walking distance of the namesake landmark mission itself. The olive grove makes for a picturesque spot to watch the cliff swallows make their annual return to San Juan Capistrano each spring, too. innatthemissionsjc.com

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he O.C. is a hub for great design that really encompasses livability and a luxurious yet laid-back feel,” architect Chris Brandon says about the region where he lives and works. The Oregon native graduated from the architecture program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and honed his design skills working for multiple architecture firms before establishing his own practice in 2009. He and his team soon became sought-after for their understanding of Southern California living and how they translate coastal lifestyles to sophisticated residential and commercial projects. Whether it’s a hillside home with sweeping views of the Pacific featuring an open floor plan and cutting-edge materials, a shingle-clad beachfront home or a modern retreat in the Rocky Mountains, Brandon taps into the spirit of each place. “The region definitely plays a role in our projects, as most of our clients are located near the beach,” he explains about his Orange County clients. Maximizing indoor-outdoor flow is key, as is using materials that are both aesthetically pleasing and up to the challenges posed by coastal conditions. In recent years, demand has grown for Brandon’s services across the country, and he is currently working on projects in L.A., Santa Barbara, Colorado and on the East Coast. Locally, Brandon Architects’ dramatic, futuristic scheme for the luxury Strand Hotel in Dana Point remains highly anticipated. Meanwhile, Brandon continually hones his contemporary sensibility by listening closely to his clients and following technological advances in the field that enhance both practical considerations and the creative process. “Our capability to share our projects with our clients through our VR resources has really changed their level of engagement and the way in which we do business,” he says. “It’s been a huge change from simply looking at drawings. This has played an integral part in getting clients excited about their new homes.” brandonarchitects.com

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FROM THE GROUND UP Architect Chris Brandon’s work creates a sense of place


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Aleksandra Zee; wood panels and cubes; whitewashed furniture and accessories

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GOING AGAINST THE GRAIN Wood artist Aleksandra Zee carves a name for herself with a new book and one-of-a-kind furniture and sculpture BY JENNIE NUNN

O

akland–based woodworker Aleksandra Zee isn’t intimidated by turning heads when she walks through a lumberyard. “I feel like I’ve gone through such a journey as a female and I don’t have anything to prove, so it takes the pressure off,” says the former Anthropologie display artist, who once constructed elaborate designs such as paper dresses. “It’s about keeping doing and being confident in your own skill.” Zee—who ventured out on her own eight years ago with made-to-order intricate wood panels and private commissions awash in beiges, caramels and coffee tones—has recently penned her first book, The Way of the Woodshop, a DIY guide for budding woodworkers, and debuted Float, a furniture collection replete with linear tables, cubes and lighting. We sat down with the Orange County native (who just launched a line of functional sculptures incorporating hardwood and concrete) to talk about everything from her foray into furniture to her take on the San Francisco design scene. aleksandrazee.com

Why wood? Woodworking takes patience; building, refining and finishing all take time and detailed attention. It’s an imperfect material with cracks, knots and irregularities. As an imperfect being, I find that by working with wood and all its inconsistencies, I can also tackle my own. Why expand from art to furniture? My new work is an extension of the work I have been creating for the past 10 years. I wanted to interact with the space itself instead of being limited to the wall. My goal with my new sculptural work is to play with form, function and space. Almost like a run-on sentence, from the wall to the room, from non-interaction to function. My Float pieces can be used as tables, benches, seats, and can also stand alone in a room as sculpture, stacked on one another or all alone. I want them to be able to live anywhere.

How has design in San Francisco influenced you? It definitely reflects the California lifestyle: functional pieces, monochromatic colors and a focus on handmade. Being born and raised in California, I feel like my work fits within that aesthetic. When making my sculptural pieces I wanted to evoke a sense of calm, a moment to pause, pieces that enhance a space but don’t demand all of the attention. Name two art inspirations. Constantin Brancusi. His use of repetitive shapes, occupying a space with minimal shapes and the play with negative space and minimalism in his work is stunning. And Georgia O’Keeffe. Her watercolors are my personal favorites. What inspires me most about her is the love she felt for the desert, her home, and how she was drawn to the simple things in life.

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E AT H E R E N O W .

A corner suite at Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco at Embarcadero

ROOM REQUESTS ,

Fisherman’s Wharf has a new look thanks to The Kimpton Alton Hotel. The property features 248 guest rooms with hints of coastal elements, suites with retro-inspired record players and an all-day café and bar with an outdoor patio fit for evening cocktails. kimptonhotels.com Take in panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz Island and the Golden Gate Bridge at Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco at Embarcadero. Situated on the top 11 floors of a 48-story landmark building in the Financial District, the hotel boasts corner suites with deep soaking tubs. fourseasons.com/embarcadero

Cow Hollow newcomer Wildseed offers plant-based dishes in a sleek, botanical-inspired space lined with brass chandeliers, modern planter boxes, wooden tables and upholstered banquettes. Executive Chef and Partner Blair Warsham (whose culinary résumé includes The Restaurant at Meadowood in St. Helena) serves up beet poke with macadamia, baby cucumbers, ponzu and seaweed crackers; plant-based pizza with broccolini, chanterelle mushroom, chimichurri, smoked mozzarella and arugula; and Mexican corn cakes with cherry tomatoes, grilled corn, lime, chili and queso. wildseedsf.com

1,500 cups of tea poured since opening

635

Wildseed’s spicy yellow curry

10 25

countries tea is sourced from

tables

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price of the most expensive teapot to purchase, an Hermès Balcon du Guadalquivir

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CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Pippa Small, known for ethically sourced baubles (she works with Turquoise Mountain, founded by Prince Charles and Hamid Karzi to protect and promote traditional craft), has opened an eponymous Bay Area flagship location in the Marin Country Mart. The London– based jeweler’s new space houses pieces inspired by local traditions spanning a 22-karat gold herkimer diamond Tibetan ring and an 18-karat vermeil smoky quartz mureed three-drop necklace handmade by artisans in Afghanistan.

M A I S O N D A N E L : E M I LY M A R T I N E V E N T S

pippasmall.com

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Distinguished by classic green-and-white striped awnings and a Spanish Revivalstyle facade, the Palihotel San Francisco in Union Square is appointed with Danish modern platform beds, white brick walls and Smeg refrigerators. At the loft-style, on-site restaurant Fisher Loft, order the crisp, tasty Greenbrier salad or sip on cocktails like the Monk’s Delight concocted with tequila, yellow chartreuse, dry curacao and orange. palisociety.com

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TEA FOR TWO

Danel and David de Betelu (of the beloved Baker Street Bistro) have teamed up to open Maison Danel, an elegant Parisian patisserie and tea emporium with exposed brick walls, Louis XVI-style chairs, royal blue tufted benches and a sparkling oversized crystal chandelier. At afternoon tea, sip an exclusive vintage of Champagne and indulge in housemade madeleines, lemon meringue tarts and ham-and-cheese croissants made by head pastry chef Adrien Chabot. Danel’s favorite are the chocolate-and-yuzu macarons. “We went back to the basics to make them the traditional way, without any food coloring and much less sugar, to let the flavors of the natural ingredients shine through,” he explains. “The shells are light and fluffy, crispy on the outside and airy on the inside.” maisondanel.com


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M O D E R N M E N TA L I S T K E V I N N I C H O L A S AT C I P R I A N I DOWNTOWN

E M I LY R A T A J K O W S K I AND SAR AH HOOVER AT T H E A P F G A L A

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ID+C’S ALEX CHIESI WITH MAJA CHIESI AT T H E B O O M B O O M R O O M

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JFINE INC. FOUNDER JORDAN FINE

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W I T H P E N N Y, C E C E , AND OSCAR BINN IN SOHO

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AT E L I E R ’ S B E N I M E T S C H W I T H THE BLOND’S JULIO MONTERO

TER ANGA ’S SCOTT GEOFFREY S C H R O E D E R W I T H N E L LY M O U D I M E AT T H E N E W YO R K E D I T I O N

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ARTIST HUNT SLONEM WITH LI LI A N A C AV E N D I S H

WITH CECE AND OSCAR BINN AT T H E S M I T H

ICONIQ’S MIKE ANDERS, FOUR HUNDRED’S TONY ABRAMS, AND JEFFERIES FINANCIAL GROUP’S RICH HANDLER

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WITH BULGARI’S PRESIDENT DANIEL PAT R I D G E A N D LV M H C E O A N I S H M E LW A N I

TA G H E U E R ’ S ANDREA SORIANI

C I P R I A N I ’ S S T E FA N I A GIROMBELLI WITH HUSBAND D U C A AT E L I E R ’ S MAX GIROMBELLI

H E A R S T ’ S J A M E S D ’A D A M O W I T H C AT H Y GARR ARD AND VINCENT FORGIONE

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ARTIFACT

Wave of Influence

How this omnipresent image inspired the world’s most famed artists

BY EDWARD ESPITIA

K

atsushika Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” is among the most famous artworks in the world. It is ubiquitous, appearing on swimwear, mouse pads, Boucheron tiaras and Dior haute couture. It even has its own emoji. Yet, most of us know nothing of its history or the artist’s role in inspiring the work of Van Gogh, Monet and Debussy. Hokusai created the iconic ukiyo-e woodblock print as part of the “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” series during the Edo Period in 1831. At age 70, he began experimenting with the age-old ukiyo-e style. “The Great Wave” is unique among the series as it shows Hokusai’s exploration of European art, which he would have accessed through black market images smuggled into Japan by Dutch traders. At the time, the island nation was almost entirely self-isolated from the rest of the world. The Western influence on the print can be seen in the linear perspective and low horizon line of the image, giving it the dynamic, three-dimensional

aspect for which it’s revered. The striking, vibrant blue water is also European in origin. Prussian Blue was a synthetically made color new to Japan, and its use was pioneered by Hokusai. This discovery provided the deepest hues and resisted fading—the reason the print’s color is still vibrant nearly 200 years later. In 1854, political pressure from the United States forced Japan to open trade to the West. Instantly, the Japonisme craze swept the art world and ukiyo-e prints became de rigueur for art collectors. “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” is said to have intrigued Van Gogh enough that it inspired the churning sky in his illustrious “Starry Night.” Monet owned 23 of Hokusai’s works, and Japanese influence can be found throughout his oeuvre. “The Great Wave” was a key element in the creation of Debussy’s “La Mer,” and he used the epochal image for the cover of the score book. His “Great Wave” print can be seen prominently in photos of his studio in 1910. “The Great Wave Off Kanagawa” as well as two other Hokusai prints will be presented at Christie’s Japanese and Korean Art Sale this summer. christies.com

“ T H E G R E A T W A V E O F F K A N A G A W A” C O U R T E S Y O F C H R I S T I E S . RUNWAY MODEL: © GUY MARINEAU.

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FROM TOP: “The Great Wave off Kanagawa,” Katsushika Hokusai, 1831; John Galliano for Christian Dior Couture Spring/ Summer 2007; Cover of “La Mer” Claude Debussy, 1905; Boucheron Tiara, 1910


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