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SPRING 2017

THE GRACE AND GLORY OF

BILL NIGHY PLAYS BRITISH DANDY, SPRING’S BOLD AND BRILLIANT GEMS AND ITALY’S NEWEST HOTSPOT, THE DARKLY BEAUTIFUL MATERA


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ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. All artist’s or architectural renderings, sketches, graphic materials and photos depicted or otherwise described herein are proposed and conceptual only, and are based upon preliminary development plans, which are subject to change. This is not an offering in any state in which registration is required but in which registration requirements have not yet been met. This advertisement is not an offering. It is a solicitation of interest in the advertised property. No offering of the advertised units can be made and no deposits can be accepted, or reservations, binding or non-binding, can be made in New York until an offering plan is filed with the New York State Department of Law.


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SPRING 2017

CONTENTS

126 The dapper Bill Nighy, urbane and witty as ever

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MASTHEAD

34

CONTRIBUTORS

STYLE 40 STYLE NEWS Guess turns 35; florals go baroque; watches to wear now

66 THE SKY IS THE LIMIT A New York high-rise attracts scenesters of all sorts

48 HIDE AND SEEK Men’s wardrobe staples reimagined in neutral leathers

68 PEAK TO PEAK Travelogues from two distinctive American high-altitude destinations

54 THE REVENANTS Flower- and vitamin-infused elixirs to reboot post-winter

74 THE ART OF THE DEAL Whether frugal or flush, haggling is a way of life for one DuJour editor

56 RENAISSANCE ON THE RUNWAY Fashion’s new breed of art patron

78 KNEAD TO BE LOVED Our editor in chief shares the story of her culinary inheritance

LIFE 62 FIDO GETS A FACELIFT The booming business of pet plastic surgery

80 THE EAGLE HAS LANDED Headline-making cases define the career of hotshot attorney Alex Spiro 84 A TALE OF TWO SPAS How a luxe modern bathhouse compares to its age-old Russian counterpart

ON THE COVER “Modern Future” coat, $6,500, GUCCI, gucci.com. Photographed by Mary Rozzi, Styled by Lorna McGee. Floral art by Clare Sykes.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMES ROBJANT

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26 THOUGHTS DUJOUR Letters from our editor in chief and CEO

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24 DUJOUR.COM Your 24/7 source for the latest in style, culture, and luxury


SPRING 2017

CULTURE 88 GIRL ON FIRE The Good Fight star Rose Leslie is a breath of fiery air 90 DOCTOR STRANGE-ART Psychiatrist-cum-artist Keith Ablow ushers in an era of conservative art 92 GRAB ‘EM BY THE PLAYBILL Outspoken, powerful women take Broadway by storm

94 RUBBLE ROUSERS A debut novel interprets “I’ll take Manhattan” literally 96 A LIFE IN PICTURES Accidental photographer Phillip Leeds on the origins of his career 98 FREAK OF NATURE An avant-garde sculptor gets his due

FEATURES 101 SALMA Goddess, immigrant, mother, boss— cover star Salma Hayek is larger than life By Bridget Arsenault Photographed by Mary Rozzi

112 THE OFFICE TURNS A CORNER Once a reliable perk, the lavish corner office is facing extinction by Adrienne Gaffney 118 CANDY CRUSH The brightest, boldest gems of the season Photographed by Stephen Lewis 126 BILL Actor Bill Nighy plays the British dandy By Frances Dodds Photographed by James Robjant 132 MATERA RISING The new luxury of Italy’s 9,000-yearold city By Tania Strauss

101 Salma Hayek is a vision in black

Turleneck, MAX MARA, similar styles available at maxmara.com. Opaque 80 tights, $61, WOLFORD, wolfordshop.com. Edie Sling-back pumps, $995, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO, ysl.com.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARY ROZZI

CONTENTS


MAXMARA.COM


CONTENTS

SPRING 2017

CITIES 140 Acclaimed interiors house de Gournay makes its U.S. debut in San Francisco 141 ASPEN/DENVER A state-of-the-art spa steps from Lift 1-A; Hotel Jerome launches private residences

Men in leather Suit, $3,545; Hoodie, $5,395,

142 DALLAS/FORT WORTH B&B Italia brings a touch of farniente to the Lone Star State; the Adolphus Hotel is reborn

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI,

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143 HAMPTONS Tour the region’s distintive vineyards; how to buy a home out East 144 HOUSTON Beauty boutiques abound; a burgeoning local skateboard business

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145 LAS VEGAS What’s new at the Wynn; the Dorsey elevates the Strip’s nightlife scene 147 LOS ANGELES Martha Medeiros opens on Melrose; the Dream Hotel arrives 148 MIAMI Fisher Island’s hautest penthouses; artist Romero Britto’s hot spots 150 NEW YORK CITY Where to stay, eat, shop, and see the hottest art in the Big Apple right now 152 ORANGE COUNTY The Webster opens; a stylish San Diego hotel is the perfect getaway 153 PALM BEACH What to do in the Warehouse District; the International Polo Club’s new look 154 SAN FRANCISCO Curated shops in the Bay Area; dining out in Napa 155 TRI-STATE Buy Katharine Hepburn’s Connecticut retreat; a weekend in Saratoga 156 PARTIES 158 BINNSHOT

ARTIFACT 160 THE EMPEROR’S OLD HAT Charting the history of one of Napoleon’s signature headpieces

Kale tabouleh at Boutros, New York

From top: The Penicillin, a cocktail at The Dorsey, Las Vegas; a rendering of the pool deck at the Ritz Carlton, Miami

HIDE AND SEEK/PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLÉMENT PASCAL. RITZ CARLTON/RENDERING BY DBOX. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

212-334-1010


TOURBILLON G-SENSOR RM 36-01 SEBASTIEN LOEB


SPRING 2017

CONTENTS “Lady Gaga’s Most Iconic Looks”

IS YOUR DAILY DOSE OF STYLE, CULTURE, LIFE ...AND MORE “Behind the Exhibit: Art Light”

DOWNLOAD DUJOUR TO YOUR IPHONE, IPAD, AND ANDROID

“See the Beautiful Master & Dynamic x Bloomingdale’s Collab”

FOLLOW US! @DUJOURMEDIA

LADY GAGA/PHOTO BY PINTEREST. CANOUAN ISLAND/PHOTO BY PINK SANDS CLUB. ART LIGHT/PHOTO COURTESY OF CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY. HEADPHONES/PHOTO BY MASTER & DYNAMIC.

“The Weekender: Canouan Island”


Thoughts DuJour

I

wasn’t alive in 1968, nor am I American, so I can’t

personally speak to the national devastation that occurred after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, following the murders of his brother President John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., all within the same decade. One can only imagine a light went out that day, the aftershocks of which people continue to carry. The bewilderment that blanketed the nation in the wake of November’s election obviously pales in comparison to the heartbreak of that era—in the ’60s they lost their noblemen; today we run the risk of losing the castle. While certainly not immune to the pervasive sense of shock (as you’ll see in the pages ahead), the DuJour staff was nonetheless hopeful and excited for our Spring issue, the first of the year. A woman for all seasons, the stunning Salma Hayek—actress, producer, mother, Mexican immigrant, and feminist pistol— seemed a natural decision for our inaugural cover of 2017. We shot Hayek in London, where she has relocated with her husband, Kering CEO François-Henri Pinault, and their daughter, Valentina. The British capital is also the longtime home of the irreverent actor Bill Nighy, his handsomely rakish figure tailor-made for our slim suiting story on the eve of his latest film, Their Finest.

SPRING 2017

Work perks of another era: a receptionist at Time and Life building, 1960

For the best in spring bling, we present big, bright, beautiful gems from the world’s most revered fine jewelry houses, and for the modern man, we showcase two new sartorial trends—tailored leather pieces and cool, muted tones—in one fresh take. When it comes to the modern workplace, the corner office as a status symbol is fast becoming outdated. Prodded to become ever more social in our private lives, we’re now expected to follow suit at work as well. (The French would say, “Vive l’égalité;” we, on the other hand say, “Au revoir, intimaté!”) And these days, it’s a feat to find a sunny and majestic pocket of Italy that isn’t a well-worn tourist trap. But the medieval Southern city of Matera is a uniquely beautiful destination—both untouched and under-populated, yet dripping in the indulgences expected of an Italian getaway. Pardon the blossoming clichés, but as the season is traditionally a sign of new beginnings—a glorious rebirth, a deliciously anticipated return to sunnier days—let’s rally together, and may hope spring eternal.

Fiona Murray

TIME AND LIFE/PHOTO BY MARGARET NORTON GETT IMAGES. PORTRAIT/PHOTO BYMAARK SAGLIOCCO, STRINGER GETTY IMAGES.

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ED LETTER


pamellaroland.com

#pamellaroland


SPRING 2017

CEO LETTER

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F

2

3

4

rom the beginning, my favorite part about DuJour has been

that the topics that pique our interest run the gamut. Whether it’s real estate, culture, entertainment, or fashion, our goal is to invite readers to the places where luxury lives. One such place, of course, is Hollywood, and over the course of the recent awards season it was a joy to hear about the buzz surrounding the group of actors we highlighted in the previous issue. The real estate world is another arena where luxury quite literally lives, and as of late, I’ve been honored to foster deeper connections than ever with many of the industry’s leaders. When the Naftali Group unveiled their chic West Village property, the Shephard, we fêted guests at the condominium’s gorgeous garden space in celebration of their accomplishment. When Douglas Elliman presided over two days of presentations at the City of Tomorrow Real Estate, Architecture and Design Summit, we served as the media partner for the event’s VIP cocktail party on opening night. For this issue, our writers looked at some very exciting new real estate developments including the Ritz Carlton Residences’ impending arrival in Miami, and Moinian Group’s amenity-filled Sky building. Art is another thing we tend to celebrate, and there’s no better place to do that than Miami. We kicked off Art Basel at the Confidante hotel along with JetSmarter, InList, and good friends like Mayor Philip Levine, Karolina Kurkova, Larsa Pippen, and Chris Bosh. As a nod to our love for the city and its ever-growing art scene, we had Romero Britto share his top picks with us for this issue. Of course, art encompasses film and music as well, and DuJour recently had the honor of hosting a screening of Simon Aboud’s This Beautiful Fantastic. We celebrated the inspiring film with a cocktail party in the Park Hyatt New York’s luxurious Onyx Room, and were thrilled to welcome music royalty Sir Paul McCartney. A special thanks is owed to Ernie Arias for making the night a success. The most important luxury of all is family and friends. Recently, my children and I were fortunate to enjoy a memorable trip to the Greenbrier, in West Virginia, and I’d be remiss not to mention the fun-filled celebration we held at Megu at the Dream Downtown in honor of my birthday. Many thanks to Jon Bakhshi, DJ Fulano and the friends who attended. After all, what is life without good people around you

Jason Binn

Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn

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1. Jason Binn, Casamigos Tequila founder Rande Gerber, and Cindy Crawford at the Four Seasons 2. Catch owner Mark Birnbaum, Four Hundred CEO Tony Abrams, SBE Entertainment Group partner Philippe Zrihen, Jason Binn, SBE CEO Sam Nazarian, Richie Akiva 3. Tico Torres, Scott Greenstein 4. Hearst Magazines publishing director Michael Clinton, Hearst digital media SVP Todd Haskell, Jason Binn 5. Philipp Plein, Jason Binn 6. Jason Binn, Material Good founder Rob Ronen, Chrissy Teigen, John Legend 7. Tony Robbins and JetSmarter CEO Sergey Petrossov


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

Ray, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores New York: 150 E. 58th Street - 135 Madison Avenue Other B&B Italia Stores: Austin - Dallas - Houston - Los Angeles - Miami San Francisco - Seattle - Sun Valley - Washington DC - Belo Horizonte - Sao Paulo Please call 1 800 872 1697 - info.usa@bebitalia.com Time_Less Program: select B&B Italia pieces now in stock: www.bbitaliatimeless.com Milan Design Week: April 4th/9th 2017 B&B Italia Store Via Durini, 14 - B&B Italia, B&B Italia Outdoor and Maxalto new collections Microsoft House by Herzog & De Meuron, Viale Pasubio, 21 - B&B Italia Outdoor special presentation


SPRING 2017

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HANDPICKED

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8. Starz COO Jeffrey A. Hirsch, Elaine Wynn, Jason Binn 9. Bon Jovi at Miami’s Faena Theater 10. Fortune International Group CEO Edgardo Defortuna, Ana Cristina Defortuna 11. Rolls-Royce Motor Cars regional marketing manager Tamara Grove, Russell Simmons, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars marketing GM, Sabine Brown 12. Jason Binn, MoÍt business development manager Trisha Cancilla 13. HBO CEO Richard Plepler, Jason Binn 14. Saks Fifth Avenue/Gilt Groupe Cheif Merchant Kristen Sosa, Zach McDuffie, Matthew Morrison, HBC president of outlets Jonathan Greller, Jason Binn 15. Bruce Weber, Nan Bush, Jason Binn, HBC president of outlets Jonathan Greller, Miami Beach Mayor Phillip Levine 16. David Lipke, Jason Binn, Virginia Carnesale

Alberto Junco Alex Levin Allie Kieva Andrew Ergas Andrew Heiberger Artie Rabin Ashley Priest Ashley Orfus Ashley Spitz Benoit Vulliet Bruce Schoenberg Caitlin Koles Celeste Fierro Chauncey Bell Christine Squilante Colleen Rizzo Dana Power Daniel Minkowitz David Newman Daymond John Ernie Arias Francoise Bezzola GiGi Ganatra Henri Barguirdijan Iesha Reed Jacob Entel Jacques Panis Jarod Webber Jason Morrison Jean Zimmerman Jennifer Connelly John Howard Jon Vogel Josh Gaynor JP Lind Julia Erdman Katie Kinsella Ken Wyse Kerry Sulokowicz Kristen Sosa Kristina Buckley Lauren Snyder Lepa Galeb-Roskopp Lizzie Grubman Maddie Gibbs Mark Patricof Marti Crampshee Mary Hamilton Matthew Pastorius Mattia Crippa Mauricio Xavier Solodujin Michael Delellis Micheal Shvo Michael Woodside Molly Enby Natalie Gilmore Natalie Johnson Natasha Vardi Nicola Richards Nicole Berlyn Peter Malachi Peter Webster Pierre Goyenetche Pooja Johari Richard Plepler Rob Ronen Robby Schnall Robert Souza Sarah Fleisher Scotty McPherson Shauna Brook Susan Silver Veronique Gabai-Pinskey Vinny Ottomanelli Virginia Cademartori Virginia Carnesale


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EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

FEATURES DIRECTOR

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Fiona Murray

Jason Binn

Anthony Rotunno

Leslie Farrand SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

ART + PHOTO + FASHION

EDITORIAL

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

SENIOR EDITOR

Nathalie Kirsheh

Frances Dodds

ART DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

Alexander Wolf

Atalie Gimmel Rachel Wallace

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

Casey Stenger

COPY CHIEF

Gabriella Fuller

FASHION MARKET DIRECTOR

Paul Frederick

RESEARCH EDITORS

Maura Aleardi Samuel Anderson

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Harriet Salmon

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

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William Pelkey

Araceli Franco JUNIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Berggitte Maeser ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES

Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France), Susy Scott (Italy) EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTS

Brianna Montalto Dominique DellaMaggiore INTEGRATED SALES PLANNER

Alexandra Schwab INTEGRATED MARKETING MARKETING MANAGER

Jennifer Lentol DUJOUR.COM

MARKETING DESIGNER

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Caitlin Heikkila

WEB PRODUCER

WEB ASSISTANT

Kasey Caminiti

Rachel Barber

Chelsea Hernandez EVENT COORDINATOR

Sara Strumwasser

CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen/Denver), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas/Fort Worth), Laura Itzkowitz (Hamptons, New York City, Tri-State) Rebecca Kleinman (Miami, Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco), Jessica Ritz (Los Angeles, Orange County), Andy Wang (Las Vegas)

PRODUCTION IT MANAGER

Kevin Singh PRINT CONSULTANT

CALEV Print Media

FINANCE MANAGER

Alex John Beck, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Michael Oh, Victoria Stevens, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger INTERNS

Carmen Li, Dee Usaha

Aaron Paper

FINANCE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Alyssa Giacobbe, Rhonda Riche CONTRIBUTORS

PAPER SOURCING

John Domingo

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

CONTROLLER

Dahlia Nussbaum

BOARD ADVISOR

Jonathan Greller

GENERAL COUNSEL

John A. Golieb

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 844-385-6871 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


Welcome to the Centre of Attention. F R O M S A K S F I F T H AV E N U E T O C M X C I N E M A , S T O R E S , E N T E R TA I N M E N T & E AT E R I E S W I T H S T Y L E .

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CONTRIBUTORS

SPRING 2017 MARY ROZZI

An American photographer working in Paris, New York, and Los Angeles, Rozzi is known for her feminine, intimate, and emotive portraits. For “Salma” (p.102), the Parson’s School of Design graduate sought to portray the cover star as a strong female voice, in images showcasing both vulnerability and strength. Of the shoot, Rozzi says, “Salma was gorgeous, lively, and vibrant. She was very collaborative and our exchange was seamless. A truly wonderful woman!”

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CLARE SYKES

STEPHEN LEWIS

“I feel lucky to have been given such wonderful jewelry to work with,” says Lewis, who photographed “Candy Crush” (p.118). “It’s rare to see pieces that can stand up to the kind of scrutiny I’ve given them. Several of these photographs are composed of 20 to 30 separate images that are assembled afterwards, so everything needs to stay very still.” Over the past year, Lewis traveled the world to similarly photograph watches as fine art for a new book, coming out this fall. “Ideally, my work hits a sweet spot between laissez-faire and uptight,” he says.

Sykes’s passion for painting—long centered in a love of color and texture—has evolved into a totally new art form, which she calls “floral architecture.” Thick impasto petals and leaves characterize her trademark style. Of her work for our cover and “Salma” (p.102), the artist says, “My goal was to create something soft, yet bold and beautiful, to complement the actress who has such a passion for her work and life.” Sykes notes that none of her pieces can ever be replicated. “Each is painted in the moment of my emotion,” she says.


CONTRIBUTORS

SPRING 2017

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TANIA STRAUSS

Strauss, who graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in creative writing before working in film and book publishing, loves that she has found ways to turn her interests—writing, photography, travel, and culture—into a career. “It’s a ton of work, but I do have a lot of freedom over what my life gets to look like,” she muses. Of the Italian city that inspired “Matera Rising” (p.132), Strauss says, “It is totally unlike any other place, both due to its history and its gorgeous, strange scenery.” She particularly loved wandering Matera’s ancient Sasso Caveoso. “It felt slightly haunted,” she says, “especially at night!”

JAMES ROBJANT

Robjant got his start when he told celebrated photographer Alasdair McLellan that Matt Le Blanc has a better name than Luke Skywalker. McLellan made the younger photographer his assistant and the rest, as they say, is history. Shooting Bill Nighy for “Bill” (p.126), Robjant aimed to create classic, natural images. “My style is boring,” Robjant says. “But I like boring. [Because it allows the subject’s personality to shine,] boring is interesting.”

ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

“What I loved about doing my deep dive into offices was seeing how much they reflect the attitudes and values of the times,” Gaffney says of “The Office Turns A Corner” (p.112). The writer cut her teeth at the Village Voice before working at Vanity Fair and WSJ magazine. Now, as a contributor to DuJour, the New York Times, and Town & Country, she says, “My office is my apartment and my desk-mate is my terrier.” Gaffney also wrote “The Eagle Has Landed” (p.80).


T H E S U M O F A L L D E TA I L S Versions of legendary components, integrate to master all maneuvers. Available at The Invicta Watch Stores: Boca Raton Town Center Mall . Miami International Mall . Tampa International Plaza . Westfield Brandon Mall . Lenox Square Mall . Mall of Georgia . Christiana Mall . Woodbridge Center Mall . Garden State Plaza Staten Island Mall . Sarasota Mall at University Town Center . The Mall of San Juan Queens Center Mall . Orlando’s Florida Mall . Aventura Mall . Times Square, NYC The Mall at World Trade Center

www.invictawatch.com


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STYLE

NEWS

To celebrate the 35th anniversary of Guess, chief creative director Paul Marciano reveals a beloved, never–before–seen image from the archives “If I had to choose a [favorite], it would be Claudia Schiffer’s 1989 campaign, shot in Viareggio, Italy, by the legendary

Ellen Von Unwerth. Claudia exemplifies everything the Guess woman stands for: Her timeless, distinctive style and infectious energy have kept her at the forefront of fashion for decades. She immortalizes the glamour of the era. The key to building a successful brand is associating it with a strong image, so it won’t be dependent on the season’s whims. The picture is not about what’s in style at any given moment, but about what creates dreams. Any girl can be beautiful, but the gift of translating beauty into a photograph is something else. To this day, when I look at Claudia’s pictures, I dream.”

PHOTO BY ELLEN VON UNWERTH. COURTESY OF GUESS.

Pin-up Dreams


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Earrings, $420, ETRO, net-a-porter. com.

Jean Louis Prevost, “Flowers,” circa 1905, oil on canvas.

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BROCK COLLECTION

Rococo ring in 18-karat yellow gold with peridot, $6,300, FABERGÉ, faberge.com.

Antique Flemish tapestry, $7,300, TREASURE KEEPERS, 1stdibs.com.

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Addison slipper, $835, ERDEM, erdem.com.

This spring, patterns harking back to the Baroque infuse the season’s mandatory florals with painterly drama

Handbag, $830, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300.

Master Pieces Mules, $695, DOLCE & GABBANA,

dolcegabbana.it.

CHAIR/PHOTO BY DEA J. M. ZUBER, GETTY IMAGES

DUJOU R .COM

CAROLINA HERRERA


Vine necklace, $850, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, oscardelarenta.com.

Hat, $1,390, GUCCI, gucci.com.

VALENTINO COUTURE

Boot, $3,550,

ZAC POSEN

SELIM MOUZANNAR,

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ALEXANDER MCQUEEN,

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Scalloped Floral Drop earrings in 18-karat rose gold with blue sapphires and diamonds, $12,345,

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Louis XV-style armchair, 18th century


STYLE

N E WS

Richard “Scrumbly” Koldewyn, a leading light of hippie fashion, in his iconic doily suit, 1972

Fighting the Man, in Style

A new exhibit at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design showcases the clothing of the counterculture BY ATALIE GIMMEL

R

esistance movements shape the societies they challenge ,

nowhere more than in the United States: The country’s entire narrative can be schematized as a series of transformative fights against “the Man, starting with the American Revolution and culminating in today’s mass marches, with seminal battles for abolition, suffrage, civil rights, women’s rights, and queer rights stretched across the arc of our history. The irony inherent to countercultures, of course, is that when they succeed they stop being counter and instead become emblematic of their period’s political and societal discourse—in other words, of its popular culture. This evolution from fringe to front-and-center is at the heart of “CounterCouture Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture, at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design through August 20. Revolutionaries have long used clothes to further the cause, from suffragettes’ willfully conventional white dresses to punks’ intentionally confrontational destruction-chic. But in staging the show, designer and guest curator Michael Cepress zeroed in on fashion’s pivotal role in the resistance movements of the 1960s and 70s, when—thanks in part to post-war affluence and the availability of mass-produced materials—how one dressed for the first time became a signifier of what one believed in. Rejecting the conformity and materialism of their parents’ generation, the free spirits of Haight-Ashbury and Greenwich illage hand-crafted a new identity, one centered on self-sufficiency and self-expression. Its descendents are everywhere, from the vapid Coachella’s bougie-boho vibes to the transformational the collective

SCRUMBLY KOLDEWYN/PHOTO BY JERRY WAINWRIGHT, AS PICTURED IN NATI E FUNK AND FLASH SCRIMSHAW PRESS, 197 . FAYETTE/PHOTO THE ESTATE OF CLAY GEERDES.

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Costume designer Fayette Hauser, 1971


Fashion designer and wearable art pioneer Kaisik Wong, 1974

C-Suite Showdown

Jason Rabin, president and CMO of Global Brands Group (which includes Calvin Klein and Kenneth Cole), and Jamie Salter, chairman and CEO of Authentic Brands Group (home of Juicy Couture, Spyder, and more), trailblazers both, have stamped their mark on the oft-impenetrable fashion industry. But the honchos have taken very different paths to the top. Below, we compare their vital stats for a closer look at each man’s success. —ATALIE GIMMEL

JASON RABIN

JAMIE SALTER

53

University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida

ALMA MATER

Carleton University, Ottowa, Canada

YEARS ON THE JOB

Seven

Eight

Megan Fox, Shaquille O’Neal, Judith Leiber

KAISIK WONG/PHOTO BY JERRY WAINWRIGHT, 197 COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN. HUDSON/PHOTO BY JON KOPALOFF GETTY IMAGES. PERRY/ PHOTO BY JEFFREY MAYER GETTY IMAGES. FOX/PHOTO BY JOHN PARA GETTY IMAGES. SHA /PHOTO BY ERIKA GOLDRING GETTY IMAGES.

STARS IN ORBIT

action of a renaissant feminist movement . But its macram and tiedye remnants remain as well, buried in old trunks and musty attics. “There’s the great surprise of how much of the actual clothing still exists, and how unnoticed and uncelebrated it’s been, Cepress says. “It’s the most breathtaking wearable art imaginable, and in so many cases, the pieces are in the hands of folks who were convinced they were completely forgotten. Traveling the country to dig through strangers’ personal effects, Cepress unearthed singular artifacts, from embroidered denim and delicate crochet to handcrafted jewelry. “All of that color, that celebration of pattern, pushes against the darkness of everything that was going on , he says of the joyful garments born against the backdrop of ietnam and the civil rights movement. “They’re smack-up opposed to the sober, conservative lines that were otherwise in fashion. The styles in glass cases bear an uncanny resemblance to those worn at today’s protests. Counterculture or not, fashion is cyclical. Curatorial assistant Barbara Gifford notes their “sense of humor, used to grab attention. It’s a lesson taken to heart by the millions of women and men who marched the streets of America wearing bright pink pussy hats, grabbing back.

His father, Arthur, founded his own successful fashion company, Wear Me Apparel, in 1972.

FAMILY TIES

His son, Corey, tipped the mogul off to the lifestyle fitness brand Tapout while in college; soon after, ABG bought the company, now one of its most lucrative.

Two (his CBG works with Drew Barrymore, DEGREES OF who graced the cover SEPARATION FROM MARILYN of a 1996 issue MONROE of George dressed as Monroe).

One (his ABG owns the rights to Monroe’s estate).

PORTRAITS BY ALIZA STONE HOWARD

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Kate Hudson, Katy Perry, Jennifer Lopez

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STYLE The Ones to Watch

For Ruediger Albers, president of the American Wempe Corporation—home of the singular timepiece—this season’s dials are all about the details. From blue accents to retro twists, here are his seven favorites COMPILED BY RACHEL WALLACE PHOTOGRAPHED

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BY JENS MORTENSEN

“Worldtimers keep evolving. PATEK PHILIPPE ’s is not only practical (with an at-a-glance display of world time), its movement can now be seen through a crystal on the gold case back.” $47,620

“Light and comfortable, VACHERON CONSTANTIN’s redesigned Overseas offers an automatic movement. It’s an everyday piece for stylish women.” $24,900

“The rich blue dial on the IWC Portuguese Annual Calendar is mesmerizing—it was love at first sight. If only my wrist were a tad larger.” $20,900

“The new high precision movement of GLASHUTTE ORIGINAL’s Senator Excellence boasts an impressive 100-hour power reserve. It’s perfect for those who like to fly under the radar.” $9,700 “From the instantly recognizable case shape to the more pronounced tapisserie dial pattern, this AUDEMARS PIGUET

Royal Oak—one of the world’s most recognized for 40 years—won’t go unnoticed.” $44,100

“The Type XXI’s vintage design is cool yet sophisticated, and evokes memories of BREGUET’s days as an aircraft producer.” $13,900

“One of my favorite complications, an eye-catching moon phase indicator, further enriches CARTIER’s iconic Ballon Bleu.” $34,200


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STYLE

Hide and Seek

Nature meets neutral in spring’s subtle leather staples PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLÉMENT PASCAL STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK


Suit, $2,295, RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Shirt, $3,880, JIL SANDER MENSWEAR, jilsander.com. Opposite: Suit, $5,995, PAL ZILERI, 212-751-8585. T-shirt, $75, VINCE, vince.com. Loafers (worn throughout), $695, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE, zegna.com.

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Sweater, price upon request, ISAIA, isaia.it. Saint Germain pants, $7,150, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Classico watch, $13,800, ULYSSE NARDIN, 212-257-4920.

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Suit, $1,375, BOGLIOLI, 646-870-8250. Shirt, $3,880, JIL SANDER MENSWEAR, jilsander.com. Sweater, $995, PAL ZILERI, 212-751-8585. G-Frame watch, $850, GUCCI, gucci.com.

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HIDE AN D SE E K

STYLE STYLE


Jacket, price upon request, ISAIA, isaia.it. Polo, $895; Trousers, $925, VALENTINO, valentino.com. The Guardian watch, $675, SHINOLA, shinola.com.


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Iconic Gianni jacket, $5,995; Sweater, $825, VERSACE, versace.com. Trousers, $400, FENDI, fendi.com. Golden Ellipse watch in white gold, $26,531, PATEK PHILIPPE, patek.com. Model: Sol Goss at VNY. Grooming: Matthew Tuozzoli at Atelier Management using Dior Homme.

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HIDE AN D SE E K

STYLE STYLE


STYLE 1. Olio Cosmetico Vitamin Body Oil, $90, SANTA MARIA NOVELLA, smnovella.com. 2. Côte d’Azur Luminous Hair & Body Oil, $75, ORIBE, oribe.com. 3. Eau de rhubarbe écarlate, $175, HERMÈS, hermes.com. 4. Neroli Portofino Body Oil, $72, TOM FORD, tomford. com. 5. Satin Oil for Body and Hair, $60, DIPTYQUE, diptyqueparis.com. 6. Rose Oil, $68, AERIN, aerin.com. 7. Olio Lusso Body Oil, $130, RODIN, oliolusso.com.

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The Revenants Floral notes and vitamins make these nourishing oils and potions the season’s ultimate skin rejuvenators BY RACHEL BARBER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JENS MORTENSEN

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STYLE

Those atop today’s luxury fashion conglomerates have rebranded themselves as the art world’s most powerful patrons BY RHONDA RICHE

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ven in this tumultuous econ-

omy, the art market is estimated to generate about $64 billion a year. So it makes sense that luxury brands would follow the money in creating collectible designs for their well-heeled clients. In doing so, those brands, and the executives who run them, aren’t just helping their bottom lines—they’re acting as modern-day patrons, not only sponsoring artists to act as ambassadors and in-house creators, but going so far as to establish cultural institutions that will surely outlast any trend. To be fair, collaborations like this are rooted in history. Starting in the 15th century, Italy’s Medici banking dynasty commissioned both private family portraits and religious paintings for public display from artists like Fra Filippo Lippi and Sandro Boticelli. It could be said that, as an architect, painter, and sculptor, Michelangelo worked as a sort of creative director for the Catholic Church. And by championing painters like Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock, Peggy Guggenheim, an heiress to her family’s mining and smelting fortune, ushered in the era of the Abstract Expressionists (her Peggy Guggenheim Collection, in Venice, is perhaps that city’s most important modern art museum). Similarly, her uncle Solomon Guggenheim’s collection of works by abstract artists such as Robert Delaunay, Wassily Kandinsky, and Fernand Léger would form the basis of New York’s Guggenheim museum and foundation. Today, businessmen like Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy chairman Bernard Arnault, Kering chairman François-Henri Pinault (who oversees luxury houses like Gucci, Saint Laurent, and Balenciaga), and Richemont chairman Johann Rupert (whose corporation holds Cartier, Montblanc, and IWC) lead the charge in bridging art and commerce. The men’s passion has had a trickle-down effect on the brands each oversees. And, like generations of art patrons before them, they’ve formed cultural legacies that should prove lasting. Here, a closer look at this new breed of benefactor.

Through its Fondation Cartier, the famed jewelry house has commissioned limited-edition works, including lithographs by auteur David Lynch and a glass-piece box set by the radical Italian architect Andrea Branzi.

A highlight of designer Nicolas Ghesquière’s 15-year reign over Kering-owned Balenciaga was the 2010 debut of his collaboration with Cindy Sherman, for which the American photographer portrayed fictional characters, all dressed head-to-toe in the brand, in a series of six self-produced images.

GOOD INVESTMENTS

The benefits of Rupert’s patronage are perhaps nowhere more evident than in Richemont-owned watchmaker Vacheron Constantin’s exclusive— and expensive—Métiers d’Art line, which is treasured by collectors for exquisite details like engraved and enameled dials and gem settings.

LVMH’s Louis Vuitton has a history of inviting artists to use their handbags as canvases (a popular 2001 line with Stephen Sprouse revitalized his career). Others who’ve lent their talent to the brand include Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Yayoi Kusama.

CELEBRATED COMMISSIONS

Dior’s collaboration with Marc Quinn

For the Lady Dior Art Project—which debuted at Art Basel Miami Beach last year—LVMH-owned Christian Dior commissioned of-the-moment artists Mat Collishaw, Ian Davenport, Daniel Gordon, Chris Martin, Jason Martin, Matthew Porter, and Marc Quinn to design limitededition bags and scarves that, at upwards of $6,000, are more artwork than accessory.

As the demand for limited-edition artist multiples grows, accessories like Damien Hirst’s skull scarf for Kering-owned Alexander McQueen have risen in value (the scarf retailed for $880 when it was released in 2013; today, it sells for $1,100— still a bargain for a Hirst).

Louis Vuitton bag in collaboration with Stephen Sprouse

VUITTON/PHOTO BY LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

Renaissance on the Runway


GucciGhost hand-painted bomber jacket

JOHANN RUPERT Not long after Alessandro Michele took over as creative director at Kering-owned Gucci, in 2016, some of the most talked-about pieces were bags, furs, and jackets tagged by New York graffiti artist GucciGhost (aka Trouble Andrew, née Trevor Andrew).

Also at last year’s ABMB, LVMH-owned watchmakers TAG Heuer and Hublot announced partnerships with two different rising stars. TAG Heuer tapped street artist Alec Monopoly to create artworks for its stores as well as collaborate on product designs. “A traditional fine artist would not fit our concept,” says CEO Jean-Claude Biver. “I want a provocateur who can disrupt us.” Hublot debuted a timepiece designed by tattoo artist Maxim Büchi, who’s created typefaces for Rick Owens and inked celebrities like Kanye West.

TALENT INCUBATORS

LASTING LEGACIES

Last year, Rupert cofounded the Michelangelo Foundation, a Genevabased nonprofit that fosters the applied arts. Still in its infancy, the organization was inspired by the work of artisans at an Irish linen mill, a ceramic shop in Palermo, a bookbindery in Milan, and a family-owned Ferrari restoration shop in Modena.

FRANÇOISHENRI PINAULT Work by Daniel Buren at the Foundation Louis Vuitton

Perhaps fueled by a friendly competition with fellow collector Pinault, Arnault opened the Frank Gehrydesigned Fondation Louis Vuitton in 2014 to house his own collection of contemporary art. Among its exhibitions, the recent “Icons of Modern Art: The Shchukin Collection” was recognized for showcasing the important, little-seen catalogue of prominent Russian collector Sergei Shchukin.

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Pinault, recognized as one of the world’s biggest contemporary art collectors, is set to open a corporately funded museum inside the old Commodities Exchange in Paris’ First Arrondissement to display his private collection of works by Mark Rothko and Damien Hirst. And certain Kering-owned brands, like the jewelers Boucheron, are known to transform their stores into modern-day salons (exhibitions by photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto and multi-media artist Mathias Kiss are among those hosted at the jeweler’s Paris boutique).

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VUITTON/PHOTO BY BERTRAND RINDOFF PETROFF. ARNAULT/PHOTO BY JACOPO RAULE. PINAULT/PHOTO BY DAVID M. BENETT. RUPERT/PHOTO BY CLIVE ROSE. ALL IMAGES VIA GETTY IMAGES. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

The Young Artist Worldwide Patronage Programme at Richemont-owned Montblanc (purveyors of distinguished pens, watches, and leather goods) commissions emerging creators like the Los Angeles–based collective FriendsWithYou to visually transform its boutiques around the globe.

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BERNARD ARNAULT

Big Bang Song Bleu, Hublot’s collaboration with Maxim Büchi


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From tummy tucks to testicle implants, the rise of pet plastic surgery is fast transforming man’s best friend into his bestlooking one, too

BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE

Our humanization of pets is officially complete. Today, should they know to look for it, four-

legged companions can find tailored versions of practically everything that makes people-life worth living: wine for cats, spas for dogs, Blue Apron-esque meal delivery services, Casper-brand dog beds, and Whistle, a Fitbit for pudgy pooches. If The Sartorialist made humans more conscious of how we look outside the house,

PHOTO BY JAMIE CHUNG/TRUNK ARCHIVE

Fido Gets a Facelift


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FIDO G ETS A FACE LIF T

you could say the same of The Dogist, for dogs. When I read about the Denver-based company making feline wine, I naturally ordered some for my cat, Joanie, sold by the promise, “Our special blend will entice your cat to become as classy as you. Last night, post-indulgence, I busted her peeing on the bath mat. Still, we keep trying. In 2016, Americans spent an estimated $60 billion on our pets. We demand the same level of medical care for them as we do for ourselves, and are ever more willing to shell out for it—and to imagine the possibilities. Joanie, for example, has a belly that drags on the floor. It’s loose skin, not fat—to be honest, most of the weight is in her hips—and often I wonder if she might be more comfortable moving through life without skimming the hardwood. Turns out a surprising number of people wonder the same thing. Toby Mayer, MD, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, frequently fields requests from patients who inquire whether he might take a look at their dog, too For one thing, the technology is there. “A lot of what we do now in pet care is practice a very integrated approach similar to what’s being done in human medicine, says Kathleen Ham, D M, an assistant professor in the department of veterinary sciences at Ohio State University. “And some newer surgical advances very much mimic what’s done on people. When it comes to plastic improvements, this might include eye lifts or tucks, nose jobs, facial-fold reductions or full-on facelifts , lip tucks, boob jobs, tummy tucks, skin grafting, and prosthetic implants—not only for replacing limbs but also, in the case of Neuticles a line of testicular implants made semi-famous by Rocky Kardashian, Kim’s boxer , for making neutered cats, dogs, and horses feel masculine again. According to Edgard Brito, a S o Paulo vet often described as “the world’s preeminent plastic surgeon for dogs, when compared to plastic surgery in humans, the reasons for procedures may vary, but the goal is the same to be more lovable. “I often say that a clean dog with well-kept teeth will always be in better contact with its owners. Otherwise the dog ends up being put to sleep , says Brito, whose work includes perfecting imperfect ears and corrective eyelid surgery. He also uses Botox to help alleviate arthritis the same way I use Botox to, ahem, cure my migraines and Restylane to correct depressions after tumor removals. An animal that’s physically appealing, he says, will get walked more, fed more, cuddled more. And some pets, like some people, need the edge. Hillary Rosen runs the L.A.-based non-profit A Purposeful Rescue, which she started in 2012 to save high-risk dogs from area kill shelters. She calls her hard-luck cases “magical unicorns. They’re the dogs that hide in corners. Or need a little more discipline. Or, perhaps, look more like armadillos than dogs, but often can become some of the best companions—if she can help someone get past their looks. Aesthetic improvement is a regular part of that. “Pickle is this six-pound Chihuahua we have now, says Rosen. “She has this saggy, dangling mass off her side, and it’s huge. We call it her change purse. It’s probably nothing, but yeah, we’re gonna remove it. Pickle will also undergo dental work to fix her “ranky teeth. Rosen has removed skin tags, ugly bumps, and warts. She’s taken dogs for eye lifts and tummy tucks. Many of the dogs that she rescues have been neglected, if they’ve ever had homes at all. “We had a Labrador mix who was dumped because her people decided she wasn’t of use anymore, says Rosen. “She’d had so many litters, her boobs hung to the floor— we nip-tucked that away. L.A. vet Jennifer Cola, D M, who works with A Purposeful Rescue and other groups, as well as in private practice, has performed facial reconstruction on a dog burned by firecrackers and reconfigured a foot that got caught in an escalator. She also once performed a lip tuck on a Newfoundland because it was drooling

WHEN I READ ABOUT FELINE WINE, I NATURALLY ORDERED SOME FOR MY CAT. LAST NIGHT, I BUSTED HER PEEING ON THE BATH MAT"

too much. “The owners said they were going to get rid of the dog if it couldn’t be helped, she says. “Some might consider that surgery elective, but I don’t. Of Pickle, she says, “That’s an animal who may have a hard time getting someone to take her home. But for me, it’s a 15-minute fix. If we can get more shelters to do that, it means fewer pets are getting euthanized. Hangy boobs and lumps and bumps make people uncomfortable. Others maintain that even the best intentions are bad ones. “This is really the worst thing I’ve ever heard of, says Cornelia Guest, a longtime animal advocate who sits on the board of the Humane Society of New York. A while back, the Manhattan philanthropist, author, and socialite had a Great Pyrenees named Bear. He was a rescue, like most of her pets over the years, which at present include seven dogs, one cat, about 0 miniature horses which she rescues and re-homes through her non-profit, Artemis Farm Rescue, in upstate New York , and a tortoise named Socrates. Guest admits that, in New York City particularly, a pet can be more of an accessory, “like, can your dog fit in your Birkin But there’s a limit. She’ll never forget the time she took Bear, “the most wonderful, big hunk of a dog, to a pet store on the Upper East Side. “We get there, she remembers, “and they immediately begin spritzing him with perfume. They put a bow on his head and started going for his feet with the nail polish. The look on Bear’s face—he was mortified. Guest, in fact, thinks the ugliest dogs are the ones who get adopted first. Like her Chihuahua, Oscar, who came from a dumpster and “has an underbite a mile long. Her friend Wendy’s dog, Priscilla, is “the ugliest, funniest-looking dog you’ve ever seen, says Guest. “And people want to adopt her from Wendy all the time Boston-area pet communicator Danielle MacKinnon, an MBA who quit corporate life to give readings across the country, says she’s worked with plenty of animals that have had surgeries of all kinds. “And, she says, “they’re usually always happy about anything that improves their lives. As Linda Olle, whose collection of some 200 photos of Manhattan dogs inspired a 2015 art show at the East 96th Street Library called “Dogs of the Upper East Side, puts it, “I knew someone who planned to get his bulldog puppy ball implants. He said he thought it would make the dog look and feel better about himself. Olle thought it sounded preposterous. “But then I saw that my friends’ dogs feel so happy and affectionate when they’ve had a haircut, she adds. “Maybe pets really are aware of their looks. We’ll likely know soon enough—now that we’ve found a way to reinflate Fido’s manhood, the technology to give him the mellifluous voice to match can’t be far behind.


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LIFE The Sky’s the Limit

design and where you can find Porzi is and pals playing ball when they’re not at the Garden . “Carmelo made sure the court was two things, says Mitch Moinian, Sky’s developer. “One That it was unique in terms of design—that’s where David Rockwell came in with patterned flooring and floor-to-ceiling wood. Two He insisted it be professional grade. Recently, I was shooting hoops with some friends Why athletes, models, and scenesters and missed—which rarely happens—and the Knicks’ point are lining up to live in this guard Derrick Rose caught the ball and gave it back to me. I’m New York apartment building not kidding That’s normal at Sky. “I consider it my personal court—it’s basically got my name BY RACHEL WALLACE on it Anthony says. “I come with my teammates to practice in our free time. We love it. I’m happy so many people get to enjoy it—except Mitch I beat him every time. But make no mistake Life Time isn’t just love hat do model Nina Agdal, and basketball. Part of what makes the athletic Million Dollar Listing New club—and the building as a whole—such a hot spot York star and real estate agent is the trendsetting crowd of residents and non-resLuis D. Ortiz, and New York idents who flock there to see and be seen. So catch Knicks power forward Kristaps some rays at the resort-style pool, gram one of Yayoi Kusama’s seminal pumpkins in the motor Porzi is have in common Celebrity, sure, but more inter- court it’s on permanent display , or take a salsa estingly They’re neighbors at class with Ortiz. “I’m Puerto Rican, so I was obviSky, a sleek 71-story high-rise that towers over midtown ously a part of that, he jokes. No matter how you Manhattan’s west side, with views of the Hudson River and play it, Sky is a little piece of hobnobbing heaven beyond. Designed by the Rockwell Group the firm behind Ian on earth. “I’ve probably met more people in the Schrager’s New York Edition hotel , Sky’s 1,175 apartments, building than I have in my daily life, says Ortiz. “And that’s saying a lot. glamorous to be sure, are only part of the draw. Ironically, the building’s crown jewel sits at its bottom The Life Time Athletic club, a state-of-the-art fitness facility with one indoor pool, two outdoor pools, and a regulation size basketball court that another Knickerbocker, Carmelo Anthony, helped

Clockwise from left: River views from the David Rockwell model unit at the Sky; Instagram posts of the building and its pool by Carmelo Anthony and swimwear designer Orlebar Brown; Yayoi Kusama’s “Large Pumpkin,” 2014, in the tower’s motor court

INSTAGRAM POSTS/PHOTOS BY CARMELOANTHONY, YOGADANIELLEBROOKE. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

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Sunset over downtown Telluride.


I

THE ROCKIES By Amiee White Beazley loaded my snowboard and took the sixth seat

inside the Telluride Gondola. “Raise your right hand and repeat after me,” a guide instructed my fellow passengers and me. “I solemnly swear never to tell anyone how good things are in Telluride. I promise, instead, to tell others the food is terrible, the skiing is terrible, and the people are mean.” Everybody laughed, but the directive hung in the air like a melting icicle. Little did he know this silent spectator was mulling over a narrative for her exposé on Colorado’s uncut gem. In the West, Telluride is known as a bit of an outlier. It’s located in a narrow box canyon enclosed on three sides by the San Juan Mountains, a range in the Rocky Mountains of Southwestern Colorado. The place has always had a reputation for attracting rebels and pioneers: Its founders were silver and gold miners on a treasure quest. It’s where Butch Cassidy kicked off his bank-robbing

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How do weekends spent in two North American alpine towns compare? From Colorado’s Telluride to West Virginia’s The Greenbrier, here’s how to do high altitude in style

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Peak to Peak


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Village, where a nest of more conventional ski resort establishments (a Fairmont, a Starbucks) have sprouted up. Lifts from Mountain Village access most of the trails, including the intermediate runs off of Prospect and Sunshine Express, as well as the stunning double-black steeps of Revelation Bowl and Palmyra Peak. The views from atop Telluride are some of the most beautiful in Colorado, surrounded by the largest concentration of 13and 14,000-foot peaks in the country. Riding up on the lift for a last time, I take in the breathtaking perfection. It’s a “Colorado Bluebird Sky” day, without a cloud in sight, and the sun is warm on my face. To my right, Wilson Peak—recognized by many as the iconic pinnacle that adorns Coors Light’s beer cans—sparkles under a fresh blanket of snow. It strikes me that millions of people have unknowingly glimpsed this natural wonder as they crack a brew—certainly an unmemorable moment. But watching it rise before my eyes is anything but forgettable. Right then I realize that maybe this is a secret worth holding after all. So let’s make the Telluride pact: We’ll keep this between you and me. career. It was home to the first long-range AC power plant— though not, contrary to legend, the first electric streetlights. But many fled after the silver bust at the end of the nineteenth century, more were drafted into WWI and never came home, and those who stayed began mining for coal and minerals, an industry that persevered until the late 1970s, when the last mine finally closed its doors. Telluride is small: everyone knows everyone. The entire town is a National Historic Landmark District, and little has changed aesthetically since its settlement. Colorado Avenue, its main thoroughfare, is 12 blocks of brick and wood buildings that include Victorian landmarks like the New Sheridan Hotel, the Last Dollar Saloon (aka “The Buck”), and the Nugget Theatre, which opened in 1935 and is home to the Telluride Film Festival. Following the Telluride Ski Co.’s 1972 transformation of the former mining area near Gold Hill into a recreation zone, the hippies who’d been squatting in its abandoned buildings began to mingle with miners and skiers. Together, they forged a laid-back culture that continues to define the current population, an equally diverse mix of artists, ranchers, CEOs, and celebrities like Ralph Lauren, Jerry Seinfeld, and Tom Cruise. When I arrived at the Dunton Town House, a new luxury boutique hotel, three days of nonstop snow had blanketed the town in two feet of Colorado powder. People crunched along the sidewalks, but in such a skier’s paradise, snow is not an inconvenience—it’s the mother lode. Still, many people claim that Telluride’s summers, with idyllic weather and a different festival every weekend, are the closest thing to heaven. No matter one’s reason—or season—for coming, people don’t care much about how many acres you’re on or whether you drive a Range Rover. A thirty-something skier I met explains: “The rich go to other mountain towns to be seen. They come here not to.” On my first night in town, I visit The New Sheridan’s saloon. It’s packed. Observing the crowd, I notice it’s mostly a sea of men. “No, there is no rosé served in the middle of January,” the bartender says to one of the few other women in sight. He isn’t rude, but he doesn’t seem too concerned about catering to a stranger’s demands. In a state where so many historic towns have rushed to attract tourists, Telluride locals seem determined to keep their home as it always has been—which makes it all the more attractive to the rest of us. As enticing as its warmer weather and local charm may be, Telluride’s real thrills are on the hill. Tipping the scales at more than 2,000 acres, the main ski area is conveniently situated: it’s 13 minutes by gondola from the south side of town to Mountain

PART 2:

I

THE APPALACHIANS By Frances Dodds t’s nearly midnight, and I’m in an empty ball-

room with a bellboy. One room over, a solitary bartender polishes tumblers beneath a chandelier from Gone with the Wind. Downstairs in the casino, neon lights wink and whirl in time with bleeping slot machines, and somewhere below that, a 25-ton cement door guards the entrance to a labyrinth of rooms frozen in perpetual readiness for the nuclear apocalypse. Outside, the mountains of West Virginia loom in the darkness. If my life were an endlessly rolling indie film, I’d be certain that Wes Anderson directed this portion: A Weekend at the Greenbrier Hotel. Located in West Virginia’s White Sulphur Springs, a town nestled in Appalachia’s Allegheny mountains, The Greenbrier’s sheer grandiosity—11,000 acres, 710 rooms

The audience at the Telluride Film Festival (left). The Greenbrier resort’s Cameo Ballroom (below)

PREVIOUS SPREAD: SUNSET/PHOTO BY TELLURIDE TOURISM. THIS PAGE: FILM FESTIVAL/PHOTO BY VIVIEN BEST. GREENBRIER/PHOTO BY GREENBRIER COUNTY CVB. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

LIFE


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(done in a decidedly non-minimalist style by interior designer Dorothy Draper in 1946)—is astounding. Upwards of 2,000 employees operate 20 dining and lounge venues, 38 retail shops, five golf courses, an expansive mineral spa, a bowling alley, a movie theatre, an Olympic-size indoor pool, and an outdoor infinity pool the size of a small lake. As Larry Klein, vice president of the Greenbrier Sporting Club, says, “Anything that doesn’t involve an ocean, we’ve got you covered.” The area’s geography is overpowering: mountains frame all entries to the resort. On site, adventurers can traverse 23 miles of rolling green highlands. Fish shimmer in babbling brooks; hawks cast their silhouettes against crisp blue skies. It’s a setting straight out of a John Denver song. In 1778, travelers began coming to the Greenbrier Valley in the summer months to “take the waters,” or escape the heat of the city while luxuriating in the cool mountain springs. (The original hotel was built in 1858, and the current structure in 1930.) The next morning, after a breakfast among the majestic columns of the main dining room, I decide to adhere to this custom, and slip into my suite’s Jacuzzi-style bathtub to read up on the hotel’s history. Twenty-six presidents have visited. The last sitting one to make the trek was Dwight Eisenhower, who allegedly came for the golf but was more likely here to oversee construction of what has become The Greenbrier’s most fascinating contribution to American history: the Cold War bunker, a subterranean, postWWII chamber designed as a relocation facility for Congress in the event of a nuclear attack on Washington. I deliberate the odds that Ike and I have “taken the waters” in the same tub. Many describe the property as the feather in the cap of West Virginia. Since 2009, that cap has been resting on the head of Jim Justice, now the state’s governor. When the resort went bankrupt nearly a decade ago, Justice, a native coal mining and agriculture tycoon, bought the property and gave it a $350 million facelift. After his 2016 election he divested from the business, but his daughter Jill still runs its day-to-day affairs. While much of The Greenbrier’s appeal is rooted in nostalgia, management continues to cast an eye to the future. Klein says they see The Greenbrier and its neighboring town of Lewisburg—a beacon of West Virginia’s arts community—as a harbinger for the state’s tourism industry. “We just need to get the word out,” he says. “There’s no reason White Sulphur Springs or Lewisburg couldn’t be the Vail of the East.” Transforming a single resort into an international tourism hub requires investment in many areas, including real estate. That’s where the Greenbrier Sporting Club comes in: Launched

in 2000, its members pay not only an annual fee of $120,000, but are also required to own property here. Today there are more than 400 private homes (pro golfers Bubba Watson and Nick Faldo are among their owners). After a last supper at Draper’s, the hotel’s bubble-gum pink, 50s ice-cream parlor eatery, I stroll the grounds, passing a romantic gazebo, and then stumbling upon a trail. I wander up and up, past cozily lit cottages and past clusters of elegant chalets. I climb higher, swallowing deep gulps of cool mountain air. Eventually I reach a small clearing overlooking the great white Greenbrier, unfurled across the valley below. I wonder how many have stood here before me, taking in the grandeur and the glamour, sad to the see the credits roll on A Weekend at the Greenbrier Hotel.

Looking toward the Victorian Writing Room at the Greenbrier

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LIFE The Art of the Deal

From the Apple Store to the local bodega, no retailer is safe from an editor with a haggling habit BY ANTHONY ROTUNNO

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JENS MORTENSEN

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am not a wealthy man. But I’m no penny-pincher, either. With an

upbringing somewhere between “comfortable” and “cushy,” I really can’t recall an instance when I didn’t get what I wanted—including the American Girl doll, Molly, that I desperately coveted as an eight-year-old boy. Like most Americans, I learned the value of a dollar as a teenager, when I landed my first job as a receptionist at my local church, greeting visitors and answering phones for five bucks an hour. But I really learned it from my father. Now, I would never call him cheap, but the man loves a deal. Much as Cher Horowitz viewed grades in Clueless, he sees sticker prices as a jumping-off point to start negotiations. Honestly though, who doesn’t? From ancient civilizations to modern metropoles, try to name a place without its own version of a public market—and the deal-making that goes down there. Commerce and bargaining go hand-in-hand, whether you’re hoity-toity or hoi polloi. My earliest memory of haggling—which Merriam-Webster defines as “to argue, especially over a price”—is as a college student, when my HP laptop fried just before senior year. The details are a bit hazy now, but I remember telling a customer service drone that I deserved a free replacement, not the discounted option company policy dictated. It didn’t matter that I had already bought a brand new MacBook—I wanted that free HP, damn it, even if it would sit untouched in my parents’ basement. Somehow, my


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arguments worked, and a free laptop arrived on my doorstep days later. To say the tech was swayed by my eloquence would be giving myself too much credit. It was more likely my sheer persistence, but still: I had argued especially over a price, and won. To the uninitiated, I will say there’s no feeling quite like getting what you want for less than what someone else decides it’s worth. Especially when you know you’re going to buy whatever it is anyway. Even so, I realize that when it comes to my passion for public deal-making, I’m in the minority. Take my boyfriend: like most people who fail to recognize the best things in life are half-off, he couldn’t be more embarrassed when I start negotiating in a crowded store. Recently, while buying a box of pasta at our local bodega, I noticed the sticker price—of three dollars and change— was much higher than the one I saw on the same product at Whole Foods. “Don’t,” my boyfriend said, noticing the gleam in my eye. But on principle, as we checked out, I couldn’t resist declaring to the cashier, “Three dollars for pasta? You know, Whole Foods sells this for $1.49.” I let my words linger for a moment, hoping they would prove to be that jumping-off point. “Three dollars for pasta, the cashier confirmed, as my boyfriend pretended we were strangers. You can’t win ‘em all. I tend to have better luck with florists, which, when you spend as much time and money on flowers as I do, is really good for both my bottom line and what I like to refer to as my “practice”. Whether driving down the price of a planter’s box of paperwhites by twenty percent, or negotiating a free Yucca plant in exchange for a “defective” (read: over-watered, by me) Umbrella tree, I usually can—and will—talk an unsuspecting green thumb into parting with his foliage at a discount. Ironically, I’ve yet to succeed with what should be the easiest target of all the flower vendor who sells stems from a stall inside my local subway station. Not long ago, eyeing a bucket of cut palm leaves priced at $10 each, I went in for the kill: “I’ll give you $7,” I said. “$10 each,” he answered. “$15 for two,” I offered. “$20 for two,” he replied. “Suit yourself,” I said, thwarted. “They’re just going to die down here anyway.”

THERE’S NO FEELING QUITE LIKE GETTING WHAT YOU WANT FOR LESS... ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU’RE GOING TO BUY IT ANYWAY

Surprisingly, I’ve found that haggling at big-box establishments, like the Apple Store, can be worth the stigma of being labeled the guy who haggles at bigbox establishments like the Apple Store. On a recent visit, intent on buying my boyfriend an iMac for his birthday, I pondered how I could walk out with one for less than its $1,099 price tag. In a store full of Geniuses, I had to be smart. Using one of the machines on display, I Googled our desired model to find where else it was sold, and discovered its twin at Best Buy—for $100 less. Armed with this valuable information, I flagged down a passing employee, excited to get to work. “Best Buy is selling this model for $999. If you’re willing to match the price, I’ll walk out with one today,” I offered. He told me he’d have to confirm that Best Buy was selling the exact model, down to the serial number. “Of course,” I said, as I tapped the mouse of the Apple Store iMac, dramatically revealing its competitor’s bargain-basement price. “Please, see for yourself.” Cha-ching! Has haggling saved me enough to put a down payment on a house? No. It likely hasn’t even saved me enough to pay this month’s rent (yet . But I have found it’s made me bolder, more assertive, and more confident. Which are priceless traits, especially when you consider that life is filled with all sorts of important negotiations, not all of them mere cash-for-goods. When you know you have nothing to lose and everything—or even a hundred bucks, here and there—to gain, not taking a risk simply isn’t getting your money’s worth.

WEALTH MANAGEMENT 101 According to life-improvement guru Tony Robbins, trusting your own instincts— not following the herd, and risk-taking, sometimes against experts’ predictions— are keys to smart investing. As your savings stack up, these tips from Robbins’ latest how-to, Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook, will make that money last. Millennials, invest now “I’m heartbroken to see that so many millennials aren’t investing,” writes Robbins. “Let me tell you: if you live in fear, you’ve lost the game before it ever begins.” In other words, if you want to eventually stop living month-to-month, instead of running out for the new iPhone upgrade, buy some Apple stock. Don’t believe everything you hear Following the financial crash, Robbins asked preeminent economist Alan

Greenspan what he would do if he were still chairman of the Federal Reserve. “Resign,” Greenspan replied. In the same vein, citing Warren Buffett, Robbins writes: “The only value of stock forecasters is to make fortune-tellers look good.” Robbins claims that 90% of financial advisors are actually brokers in disguise, so you have to be mindful about what you’re putting in and getting out. Mediate risk but embrace uncertainty Robbins claims that the market “never took a dollar from anyone.” A major theme of Unshakeable is focusing on the variables you can control instead of worrying about those you can’t. After all, “you can’t predict the future,” “no risk, no reward,” etc. “[Billionaires] share the same obsession: how to reduce risk while maximizing returns,” writes Robbins. How do they do that? Well, you’ll have to read the book. —SAMUEL ANDERSON


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LIFE Knead To Be Loved The news of inheriting a family “tradition” inspires a stunted baker to discover her commitment to the kitchen BY FIONA MURRAY


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you inherited the “baking gene,” unlike those for high cheekbones or a full head of hair. You need a little time to develop a more nurturing side to your personality—an appreciation for life’s cozier things. I was spawned from a lineage of women who dazzle on the stove-front; the desire to bake should be in my breeding. And yet, aromas of warm bread emanate from my kitchen only when I’ve burned toast. When it comes to matters of hearth and home, it would seem that I’m rather half-baked. My maternal grandmother could whip up a cake from scratch in less time than it would take to queue outside Magnolia Bakery. Owing to a “light hand,” her specialty was a Victorian sponge and her afternoon-tea table was a showcase of homespun elegance. Around the centerpiece of a china teapot were, varyingly, paper cases of fairy cakes, their delicate wings dusted with icing sugar and balancing on a soft mound of chocolate buttercream; a vanilla chiffon cake, sliced and triple-layered with homemade blackberry jam and fresh cream; or an exquisite duck-egg sponge, fragrant and pastel, with real lavender icing. Deftly mixing cake batter while selecting horses from the weekend racing form, my Nanna once advised me that I should start with a batch of scones as there was less chance of messing them up. Whether thoroughbred or thorough bread, her instincts were always stellar. Then there’s my mother, who, with all the ripe, rustic instincts of a heavy-handed artisan, is a woman willing to get her hands dirty for her craft. With a masterly touch she double-handedly slaps and cajoles bread dough from a soggy mess to a pristine, breathing lump—watching her wrangle it is akin to watching a card shark shuffle. The most outstanding element of this domestic portrait is that my mom produces lumpy, crusty wonders from a sourdough bread starter she has been maintaining for the last 23 years. From what I am told, this is an impressive feat for a professional baker, let alone a recreational one. For the uninitiated, a bread starter is a living, “breathing” culture that bakers use in place of commercial yeast to naturally leaven bread. A natural one is the plum ingredient to elevate the taste and quality of your loaf, and an age-old variety—one that has garnered ripeness over multiple years and environs—is a rare prize indeed. Conceived from stuffs as simple as flour and water, then allowed to ferment to a yeast-bacteria cocktail, the starter is the kitchen pet my mom will never let die. With regular feeding, “Flo” has lived to a ripe old age in our family—her growth slowed by the temperature at which she’s stored (kept on the countertop she requires a daily top up of flour and water; when refrigerated, she’s tended to a few times a week). Like good wine, artisan bread is the refined product of

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PHOTO BY DAN SAELINGER/TRUNK ARCHIVE

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t can take a minute to determine whether

its raw environment. And like great wine, its taste develops complexity over the seasons and absorbs the goût de terroir distinct to a particular period. I’m convinced our bread’s robustness speaks to the sweltering Australian summers or pollen-y springs of my youth. Then there’s the winter my father took to smoking a pipe and was banished to the garden for his habit. A dethroned lord of the manor, he would sit puffing in a bottomed-out lawn chair just under the kitchen window. It wasn’t sabotage, but loaves from that period had a smokiness guests couldn’t quite put their finger on. I like to refer to the baked goods from this era as the “Ready-rubbed Vintage of ’83.” On a recent and rare visit home, I sat around the family table throwing back my mother’s raisin loaf with chunks of Gorgonzola and thin slices of pear. Savoring this homefired manna, I looked at my three brothers from one to the other, and as I chewed, everything slowed. Contemplating that we were as much a product of our mother’s nurturing as the bread we were breaking, I experienced a moment— just a small one—of overwhelming connectedness. As I watched her chatting at the end of the table, I got it. The commitment, the clucking, the devotion. I got it, right before it was gone. But not completely. A couple of nights later, during a lively session of “What are you going to leave me when you die?” (an old chestnut I like to ignite on occasion to gratify my dark humor), my mom informed me that she was going to bequeath Flo to me. Needless to say, this time I was not amused. Angling for some heirloom jewelry, I had instead secured a breathing mound of bacteria. “I know you won’t let her die,” said my mother matter-of-factly. I looked at her and she at me, and that was that. Having returned to New York, I still eat out at least two meals a day, no less than five days a week. But one of these days, it seems I may just inherit that baking bug after all.


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I The Eagle Has Landed i h pro le lients and hot tton iss es de ne the areer o risin ew or attorney le piro BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANRONG XU

t’s understood the courtroom can produce performers as memorable

as those born in a more traditional theater. Of course, because they typically represent high-profile clients and command fees to match, these legal stars usually have decades of experience to back up their bravado (see: Gloria Allred, Johnnie Cochran, Alan Dershowitz). But Alex Spiro, the telegenic young attorney who’s lately become a favorite of the legal tabloids, is not typical. In four short years, the Harvard Law School graduate has gone from pleading out petty crimes as a Manhattan Assistant District Attorney to representing some of the most headline-making defendants in recent memory: Princeton grad Thomas Gilbert Jr. (who, in 2015, was accused of killing his father for cutting his allowance); Atlanta Hawks’ shooting guard Thabo Sefolosha (who, weeks before the playoffs, suffered a broken leg in an altercation with the N.Y.P.D.—for which he was arrested); and rapper Bobby Shmurda (who, last fall, accepted a plea deal on charges that included conspiracy to commit murder, in a case that would have hinged in part on whether lyrics are admissible as confessions and could have had chilling First Amendment consequences). But how did Spiro get here, and so quickly? Especially considering the lawyer, now 3 , intended to pursue a career in psychiatry. While briefly directing a program for children with autism at Massachusetts’ McLean Hospital, Spiro saw a side of policy that led him to believe his silver tongue would better serve the legal profession. He went to Harvard, did a short stint at the C.I.A. (about which he is reluctant to talk, although it’s listed on his LinkedIn profile , and was then referred to the D.A.’s office. There, eager to take on as much as he could, as fast as he could, Spiro began volunteering for the more thankless cases. Then he began winning them. “Like in any job, you can say ‘I will do what I have to do,’ or you can say, ‘I will do as much as anyone will let me—for the city, for the people, and for myself,’” Spiro says. During his four years as A.D.A., he moved from prosecuting misdemeanors to murders— among them additional charges against Rodney Alcala, a 1970s-era serial killer with shades of Ted Bundy. (Alcala was already on death row in California, but by winning further convictions Spiro helped close two 40-year-old homicides.)


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TH E E AG LE HAS L AN DE D

Considering his early work as a prosecutor, Spiro’s 2013 decampment for the office of Ben Brafman—a self-described “short Jewish guy” who also happens to be one of New York’s most famous private defense attorneys—was surprising. Still, “it’s not like an N.B.A. player going to play hockey,” Spiro says. “The laws and procedures are the same. Both take a certain amount of creativity, but different kinds.” Different kinds of creativity, maybe, but the same level of energy: full throttle. While work ethic and education are certainly factors in Spiro’s meteoric rise, it’s clear that personality, too, is a significant ingredient: Spiro’s is outsize. Tall, with a baritone voice, he’s assertive, talkative, highly confident, and intensely energetic—a fast-dealing big-city lawyer straight out of central casting. He’s also close in age to most of his clients, another reason young men in the public eye who end up in trouble might find him easy to relate to— and trust. “I really do have a relentless way of working,” Spiro says. “A detective I used to work with used to say, ‘Spiro, put a tack in your shoe.’ What he meant was I don’t have to go a hundred miles a day. But some people only know one speed.” Despite an impossibly packed schedule, Spiro replies to emails seemingly before they’re sent, an attribute those paying a premium to retain him surely find appealing. Athletes facing legal trouble are among those who appreciate Spiro’s speed. He represented Sefolosha, the basketball player who was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest after an altercation with police outside a Manhattan nightclub left him with a broken leg. Sefolosha was acquitted (Spiro is now representing him in a civil suit against the N.Y.P.D.) and his case became part of the national dialogue about police brutality against black men. More work with the N.B.A. followed, as did a growing

awareness of the ways in which some of its players’ experiences with law enforcement aligned with—and could be used to highlight—issues championed by the Black Lives Matter movement. Sefolosha’s case was followed by that of Shmurda (née Ackquille Pollard), the 22-year-old Brooklyn rapper who, in 2014—just as his hit single “Hot Boy” landed him a record deal— himself landed on Rikers Island with a $2 million bail requirement on allegations he ran an East Flatbush gang, his lyrics the blueprint for their crimes. (Fourteen other young men were arrested with him.) Unable to make bail, Pollard spent two years in jail awaiting trial. Then, last year, prosecutors approached him with a plea deal Spiro urged him to take. He did—before reportedly telling the judge he no longer wished to waive his right to trial and wanted to fire his lawyer. The deal went ahead Pollard got seven years in October. Two months later, one of his co-defendants, Santino Boderick, went to trial and received a 130-year sentence. While Pollard’s legal battle was rabidly followed by Billboard and The Fader, Spiro sees its core concerns, like those in Sefolosha’s proceedings, as running parallel to the disturbing cases of less notable young black men from the inner city. “It’s rare that a poor kid from a poor neighborhood, [who is also] a person of color, is injected into a high-profile case, Spiro says. Pollard’s case, and especially the cases of his co-defendants, “touch on a lot of issues—in terms of bail, conspiracy law, change of venue, juvenile justice, second chances, and length of incarceration.” Spiro believes the unique position he’s achieved among highprofile figures in sports and music can allow him to help move the needle on criminal justice reform. He chairs the Legal Advisory Council for the Fair Punishment Project, a Harvard Law initiative on justice system reform, and helps advocate for Gideon’s Promise, a non-profit that trains public defenders. Perhaps more visibly, he’s served as a conduit between the advocates working on these issues and the athletes and entertainers invested in them, facilitating celebrity attendance at fundraisers hosted by Jason Flom, the music mogul–cum–founding board member of the Innocence Project, and Jonathan Rapping, the president of Gideon’s Promise. He’s most recently been retained to represent Walter “Hawk” Newsome, the president of Black Lives Matter of Greater New York. Still, not all of Spiro’s cases naturally align with civil rights. Besides Newsome, his two biggest clients are currently Gilbert Jr. and Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriot facing his second murder case in as many years. Both will likely be tried later this year, and neither seems to have much obvious nuance—but you can bet Spiro doesn’t see it that way.

PHOTOS ON LEFT BY JEFFERSON SIEGE, NY DAILY NEWS VIA GETTY IMAGES

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Alex Spiro in his Midtown East office. Below from left: Spiro and Thomas Gilbert Jr. in Manhattan Criminal Court, January 9, 2015. Thabo Sefolosha leaving court with Spiro, October 5, 2015.


LIFE

Public bathhouses are as old as time. How does a recent luxurious iteration compare to an age-old institution? A well-pampered pro takes the plunge BY NICOLE BERRIE

I

’m a self-care addict. There has yet to be a therapeutic treatment—no matter how

obscure—that I haven’t explored. Microcurrent facials? I’m in. Craniosacral therapy? Sign me up. Sensory deprivation tanks? Why not! I’ve been poked and prodded by sturdy Brazilian masseuses and scrubbed raw by loofah-wielding Korean women. But one indulgence has remained a constant enigma in my physical regimen: the bathhouse. That is, until now. Let’s be clear: Therapeutic baths aren’t new. Whatever you call them—in Japan, there’s the onsen; in the Middle East and North Africa, the hammam; and in Russia, the banya—the practice spans continents far and wide, and many cultures have long relied on it to cure myriad ailments. Today, a new crop of dewy and desirable faces promoting public bathing brings the centuries-old tradition into the present: Model Irina Shayk recently revealed that the baths are her best-kept beauty secret and actor Colin Farrell has said they’re his favorite place to detox. And let’s not forget The Spa at Trump SoHo, which calls itself “the first luxury Manhattan day spa that incorporates this Middle Eastern bathing tradition”—an ironic boast considering a certain someone’s recent ban, but I digress. The constant buzz around bathhouses was enough to spur a spa obsessive like me to investigate: In an era when “luxury” and “authenticity” grow ever more synonymous, how does the latest high-end incarnation— say, the chichi Aire Ancient Baths, in Manhattan’s Tribeca—stack up against the age-old shvitz, like the

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

A Tale of Two Spas


EVERY CELL IN MY BODY IS SINGING, OR SCREAMING… I THINK, THIS IS WHAT A NEWBORN MUST FEEL LIKE: PURE AND WILDLY CONFUSED

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HISTORIC IMAGE/PHOTO BY WEEGEE (ARTHUR FELLIG) INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY GETTY IMAGES.

Opposite page: The plunge pool at the Russian and Turkish Baths in New York’s East Village (left) and the warm, hot, cold, and ice pools at Tribeca’s Aire Baths (right). This page from left: Men wait near a sign advertising “Ladies’ Day” at the Russian and Turkish Baths, New York, circa 1945. The warm pool, or tepidarium, at Aire Ancient Baths.

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give me a quick once-over and wade in the other direction. I feel slightly self-conscious but proceed to scoop up a handful of salts to scrub my body. As I float weightlessly, I muse aloud, “This is what Helen of Troy must have felt like. After sufficient sloughing, I hop into a glass-encased steam room where a willowy blonde in a high-waisted Eres bikini canoodles in a corner with an elderly gentleman. Having left my husband at home for this go-round, I feel conspicuously single—there are only 13 people allowed at Aire at a time, and most are couples. I move on to the cold-plunge frigidarium—an ice bath that runs 50-degrees cold. Though not as punishing as the Russian plunge, it’s still a white-knuckle experience. I hop into the warming soak of the caldarium and my skin stings in that delicious, thoroughly cleansed way. Soon, I’m beckoned to my massage by a diminutive Thai man who leads me behind a beaded curtain overlooking the baths. As I recline on a plush, terry cloth-covered bed to a soothing Sufi soundtrack, he begins to knead my stiff back with smooth, purposeful strokes. It’s a stark contrast to my frenetic platza treatment days earlier. After 30 minutes of rendering my tense muscles into a supple heap, he leads me to a heated marble bench. With no clocks or vibrating cell phones to jolt me back to reality, I sip mint tea in uninterrupted bliss. It would be easy to siphon off hours of the day here were it not for the bell indicating it’s time to go. Back in the locker room, I catch a glimpse of myself in the mirror. I’m serene and glowing. Is it a face, and a body, to launch a thousand ships? Perhaps. At the very least, it’s enough to get me a cab right out front. In the car, I reflect on both experiences. Starting at $77, Aire is certainly the more luxurious. Amid its devotion to detail and topnotch service, however, perhaps it overlooks one important facet of public bathing the public. At $ 5, the Russian and Turkish Baths, on the other hand, are unapologetically utilitarian. But what they lack in frills, they make up for in authenticity. As has been true for centuries, there are no secrets at the bathhouse—and that’s part of the fun. So while Aire may be an oasis for harried urbanites, if legitimate communal catharsis is what you seek, head East. Nostrovia.

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East Village’s Russian and Turkish Baths, the ne plus ultra of oldschool sweat lodges? First thing first The Russian and Turkish Baths are not a spa. They’re an institution—a gritty sliver of old New York in a perpetually gentrifying neighborhood. Despite (or thanks to) a storied past involving Russian expats, police raids, and mafiosos, the Baths—open 365 days a year—have lured devout, even cultish, fans since 1892. (They celebrate their 125th anniversary this year.) This faceted history comes into focus as my husband and I walk through the iron doors on East 10 th Street one glacial February afternoon. It’s actually our second attempt—the week prior, I was brusquely turned away by a grumbly Hasid who informed me that Thursday afternoons are “men only.” In the lobby, which most closely resembles a military bunker, a gentleman clad in a velour robe (open just enough to display a gleaming gold cross) orders us to leave our valuables at the front desk before handing us papery robes not unlike those at my obgyn’s office. I undress in a curtained-off locker room, in front of two long-limbed models and a turbaned Kundalini yogi. Nearly naked, I head to the canteen, which hawks Russian delicacies including blinis and Baltic herring—the latter too authentic for even my born-in-the-U.S.S.R. husband to try. I order a bottle of water as a Bolshevik-chic émigré in a white fur sips a bowl of borscht while cradling a glass of red wine. Holding (ok, clutching) my husband’s hand, I descend into the bathhouse. First up: the cherrywood sauna. The benches are packed. An aging rocker chugs a can of beer half-concealed in a plastic bag. The conversation ranges from Bernie Sanders to sauerkraut juice to a friend’s screenplay. Nearly everyone is on a first-name basis—it’s Cheers with flip-flops. Half an hour later, following a visit to the eucalyptus-infused Aromatherapy Room, it’s time for our platza: a treatment wherein the skin is beaten with a bundle of oak branches, or venik, to promote circulation—or as the Baths’ website calls it, “Jewish acupuncture.” Inside the Russian Room, a sauna that runs close to 200 degrees, a shirtless Vin Diesel doppelganger guides me to a bench and slaps a cold towel over my head. He begins to thwack me with the venik. Suddenly, he douses me with a bucket of ice water, and I nearly choke gasping for air. (Apparently, the repetition of hot and cold at schizophrenic intervals speeds detoxification.) I’m instructed, “Go to pool.” The body of water in question is a 46-degree arctic basin that makes polar plunges sound idyllic. I dunk myself in the frigid water. Every cell in my body is singing, or screaming—I can’t tell which. As I emerge, I think, this is what a newborn must feel like: pure and wildly confused. My husband and I decide we’ve had enough. I’ve never been so dizzy or thirsty in my life. As we step back out into the urban tundra, dried and dressed, I’m not sure what was ailing me, but I feel healed. Across town, inside a massive, subterranean former textile factory in Tribeca, Aire Ancient Baths (which, by comparison, turns five this year is a nod to the tradition of thermal baths that date back to the Roman Empire. Sitting beneath the soaring ceilings and towering Corinthian columns, I can almost feel the spirit of past emperors marching by—until I realize those vibrations are actually the thumping bass of a nearby Tracy Anderson Method cardio studio. Even though it’s a midweek afternoon, the lobby is abuzz with people in stylish puffers tapping away on their Apple Watches. Apparently public bathing is the new power lunch. I’m given a futuristic bracelet and a matching digitized locker where I find a cool pair of scuba socks that I’m instructed never to remove. I walk past a row of hair dryers long enough to rival any uptown salon’s and arrive at the entrance of a 16,000-square-foot candlelit grotto featuring six urban lagoons. My first stop the salt flotarium, where two couples luxuriate in briny water meant to mimic the composition of the Dead Sea. They


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Girl on Fire In her newest scene-stealing role, Scottish actress Rose Leslie, Game of Thrones’ sexiest wildling, is a woman to be reckoned with BY RACHEL WALLACE PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID ROEMER

HAIR BY MATTHEW MONZON AT JED ROOT USING ORLANDO PITA PLAY; MAKEUP BY GEORGI SANDEV AT STREETERS USING CHANEL ROUGE COCO GLOSS; MANICURE BY YUKO WADA AT ATELIER MANAGEMENT USING DIOR VERNIS

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n estimated two percent of the

world’s population are natural redheads, so it’s very important for true gingers to present a united front. “We have to stick together,” says Rose Leslie, tucking a scarlet strand behind her ear when we meet for breakfast in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where she’s been doing her best to blend in for the last couple of months (she even bought Doc Martens and a fedora). “Growing up in Scotland, gingers are less of a rarity. But then my family moved to France for about three years when I was 10, and at school they called me poil de carotte, which means ‘carrot top.’ I remember taking that so badly. I was like, ‘What?! Is that a thing?’” Perhaps it should come as no surprise, then, that Leslie makes a habit of seeking out roles that set her apart from the crowd. “[In characters], I’ve always looked for the outcast,” says the 30-year old actress. “Someone who doesn’t conform to society—or if they do, are in a situation where they’re forced out of their comfort zone.” Her latest turn, as Maia Rindell on The Good Fight (the hotly-anticipated spin off of The Good Wife) is no exception. On the CBS courtroom drama, Leslie plays a first-year lawyer and the goddaughter of television’s favorite litigator, liberal boss lady Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski). When The Good Fight begins, it’s a year after the original show’s season finale, and Lockhart has just lost everything in a Ponzi scheme for which Maia’s parents are to blame. Major questions of ethics are shot through a courtroom drama that touch on some of today’s ripped–from–the–headlines topics, like police brutality and fake news. “It holds up a mirror to society,” Leslie says. “You realize they’re pinpointing political events. Without ramming it down your throat, they’re being commentators.” As the gay daughter of disgraced billionaires, Maia is a meaty role, but Leslie is ready; after all, she cut her teeth on two of the decade’s most popular series. On Downton Abbey, she played Gwen, a maid with loftier ambitions, and on Game of Thrones she

was Ygritte, Jon Snow’s fiery wildling lover. On a show that established itself as a take–no–prisoners bloodbath from the word go, Ygritte’s love affair with Snow provided a bit of romantic relief—until, of course, she met the same fate as most of the series’ best characters. Nearly two years after Ygritte’s tragic death, Leslie and the reallife Jon Snow, Kit Harington, finally confirmed their frenzyinducing, long-rumored relationship. But even without the offscreen romance, a beloved role like that is hard to shake, so perhaps Leslie chose to don a suit in The Good Fight to escape her wildling past. She gasps at the idea. “I hope fans will always see me as Ygritte!” she exclaims. “I adore that character.” As she finishes her omelette and French press, I ask if she plans on staying in Brooklyn after The Good Fight wraps. “No,” she says, almost apologetically. “London is home, it’s where my mates are… But New York is incredible. It’s bustling, it’s versatile, it’s energized.” She says she’s nailed most of the touristy staples, but still wants to make it to Ellis Island before she heads home. It’s fitting the passionate actress would seek an audience with another inspiring woman—but unlike Lady Liberty, who’s not going anywhere, Leslie has nowhere to go but up.

“IN FRANCE THEY CALLED ME POIL DE CAROTTE, WHICH MEANS ‘CARROT TOP.’ I WAS LIKE, ‘WHAT?! IS THAT A THING!?’”

Above: Vest, $3,845; Trousers, $945, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Paloma’s Melody ring in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $25,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Opposite: Gown, $1,525, PAULE KA, 646-649-5562. Styled by Paul Frederick.


CULTURE Doctor Strangeart

The psychiatrist Keith Ablow has been doling out prescriptions to America on Fox News for years. Now he’s transformed his pad into a canvas

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BY FRANCES DODDS

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his is the prescription, made out to

“You:” Adderal RX 20 Mg Swallow the whole truth about yourself every a.m. Blown up to 24x36 inches, on archival paper fused to die-bond aluminum, it’s hanging in an airy art gallery on New York’s Upper East Side. The signature that runs along the bottom is that of Keith Ablow, MD, a middle-aged man with an eggish bald head, who is standing beside me and talking with Vivian Horan, the gallery’s owner. Watching her face, I realize that this must be one of the first real conversations she has ever had with Ablow. Her polite, panicked expression recalls that of a dinner guest who’s just taken a bite of something foul, but is trying very hard to swallow nonetheless. The funny taste Horan seems to be processing is the revelation that the man standing in front of her is a dyed–in–the–wool, trumpeting Trumper. Right now he’s detailing his idea for a Mount Rushmore-esque monument of Trump—but bigger. “It would create a lot of construction jobs,” Ablow offers. When I call her the

following week, Horan has regained her composure. “I don’t have a lot to tell you,” she says. “I didn’t know anything about his politics. Except what he said that day, which was pretty astounding to me. But I don’t want to be political.” This is not the first time Ablow has stirred the pot. In fact, he’s made a career out of it. A member of the “Fox News Medical A-Team,” the psychiatrist has made headlines for years with inflammatory sound bites. For example Obama allowed Ebola to enter the U.S. because he thinks Americans “should suffer,” Newt Gingrich’s marital infidelities would make him a good president, and men should be able to veto women’s abortions. (Ablow is controversial among peers; Columbia University’s chairman of psychiatry, Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, has called him a “narcissistic self-promoter of limited and dubious expertise.”) Still, Ablow continues to practice medicine in the small town of Newburyport, Massachusetts, as well as in New York. And recently, he debuted a series of artworks called Project Prescription, many of which have sold—at around $25,000—to high-profile individuals like the billionaires Steve and Alexandra


ABLOW IS NO ARTIST—WHICH IS WHY HE MAY BE THE MOVEMENT’S BEST MOUTHPIECE YET

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Opposite page: Keith Ablow’s untitled prescription piece (Rx#1453). Above: Ablow on Fox News.

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weren’t babies. I see no evidence, so I don’t believe there is such a thing as a bad seed. The idea that some people are not worth trying to save strikes me as false. I’m not a death penalty person.” This glimmer of hope hovers in the air like a buoyant little lightning bug. Alas, Ablow wastes no time reaching up to squish it between his fingers. “Another of my absolute truths is that sexual behavior does not reflect anything else about you.... I think one of the misunderstood moments in Trump’s march to the presidency was the revelation of that tape. He simply told the truth. Nobody wants to talk about the truth. The truth is that when you’re a billionaire and you’re on TV you can touch pretty much any woman. A lot of women will let you do it and we don’t know why, and we should think about it.” Shocked to attention, I seize the moment to discuss a piece of Ablow’s that particularly interests me. “Be fearlessly female twice a week,” I ask. “What, exactly, does that entail?” “Here’s what I meant,” he says. “I think that Freud was right. He talked about penis envy and people were like, Oh what a schmuck.’ But if you look around, you’re like, wait. I saw Rhonda Rousey on TV getting pummeled by another woman, and I thought to myself, how preposterous. Who talked women into trying to be hyperbolically male? It’s patently absurd. I think the culture has not honored femininity, because last time I checked, women are more vulnerable physically. When you get into pregnant women being in combat on the frontlines, I would say, well obviously they shouldn’t be. But then I’d get a lot of pushback. ‘What are you saying? That a woman can’t choose to be in certain situations because she’s pregnant?’” I point out that “pregnant women on the front lines” are not a thing, and that his reasoning treads a slippery slope. And then Ablow says something that I find very interesting “Having been bullied as a kid, there’s some value, I’ve learned, in saying to yourself, ‘I refuse to budge.’ I do that as a way of reminding myself I exist. If I think I know for sure, I’ll say I know for sure. Which gets people going. So yes, I think it’s obvious that if you’re a pregnant woman, you don’t want to go to the front lines. But, to other people, it might not be.” The artists of social movements often provide insight into the psychic workings of their fearless leaders. They hone the cacophony into a single melodious note of meaning. I refuse to budge. I do that as a way of reminding myself I exist. It’s a flawless, gleaming Trumpism of Descartes I stamp my foot, therefore I am.

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Cohen, Meijer supermarkets chairman Doug Meijer, and Ronn Torossian, the founder of public relations company 5WPR. When I meet Ablow for lunch in New York in January, he explains Project Prescription’s origins. “The idea was to take a culturally powerful medium, the prescription, and to say things that are bigger than, ‘Take this medicine this many times a day.’ These are suggestions for living, ways of looking at the world.” Among his artistic prescriptions: Made out to the “Next Generation:” l lfl ; to “You:” Facebook the truth today; to “You:” Fall apart, pick up only the best pieces; to “USA:” Support gun crime control; to “Women:” Be fearlessly female twice a week. Ironically, Trump is not a patron of the arts. His Administration, like that of many Republicans before him, has vowed to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts. Which may be one reason openly conservative artists have rarely gotten much traction in the modern art world. They’d tell you the artistic elite are intolerant to diverse ideologies, while liberal artists would say the lack of diversity espoused by conservatives’ realworld views limits their ability to produce nuanced work. And as many conservatives place their hope in a Twitter-obsessed reality television star, it appears they have less time for nuance than ever. Trump is no politician; Ablow is no artist—which is why he may be the movement’s best mouthpiece yet. In person, I have to admit, he’s much less offensive than his bellicose TV personality would lead you to believe. He listens carefully; I can fathom how he made it through medical school. He’s personable, courteous, charming even. “A lot of psychiatry is about process,” Ablow says. “You’re looking for feedback. So there is a fantasy in these [prescriptions] that you could say to someone, ‘Look, this is what you have to do.’ Psychiatrists aren’t very prescriptive—I may be one of the planet’s more prescriptive ones. The medium is tempting, because it’s not a debate. It’s just like: ‘I told you what the prescription is. Deal with it.’” The piece that Ablow sold to Torrossian hangs in his Manhattan office, and when I visit he shows me the directive in question: Say what the fuck you mean. Torossian, who’s seen conflict over his own politics, answers my delicate query about whether he might be sympathetic to Ablow’s views. “I’m a proud Republican. I plead guilty in the city of New York. But to be fair, that’s not why I bought Keith’s stuff. I think Keith is a visionary in many ways, and, from an investment standpoint, if Steve Cohen is going to buy someone’s art, it’s not a difficult decision to make.” (It was actually Cohen’s wife, Alexandra, a longtime friend of Ablow’s, who purchased the piece). A walker and talker, Torossian paces down the halls of his office, pointing out the work of other artists he’s collected: Jim Dine, Mel Bochner, Andy Warhol, Vik Muniz. “‘Say what the fuck you mean’ is certainly the mantra of this political moment,” he says. The fact that Ablow is actually a doctor—a psychiatrist, no less—who has counseled real patients for twenty years can be easy to forget amidst all of his rabble-rousing. But every now and again he says something that surprises me. When we start in on the topic of “absolute truths,” I prepare myself for the worst. “I think there are absolute truths,” Ablow says. “There are irreducible truths, like that people are unconditionally loveable. I don’t believe anyone is born evil. As a forensic psychiatrist I’ve talked to people who have done unspeakable things, but they


CULTURE Grab ‘em by the Playbill

More than the curtain is rising on Broadway, as theater’s powerful leading ladies react to the nation’s political tragicomedy BY CHRISTOPHER BARNARD

Saturday that was January 21, the Women’s March on NYC—a protest against the arguably misogynistic temperament of the new administration— saw an estimated 400,000 frustrated New Yorkers slowly but determinedly snake up Fifth Avenue. A few blocks away, on West 45th Street, Laura Dreyfuss, who plays one of the young leads in the hit musical Dear Evan Hansen (which has drawn sold-out crowds since opening last November) was not going to miss this historic day, 2:00 pm matinee curtain be damned. Dreyfuss made it in time to march—granted, it was just a few blocks east—and documented her participation with a photo of her

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n the bright, unseasonably mild

posing triumphantly on a street lamp with a “Pussy Galore” poster. Condola Rashad, who will star as Nora Helmer’s daughter in A Doll’s House, Part 2—a hotly anticipated redux of the Ibsen classic that begins previews April 1—braved a 5:00 am flight from Atlanta with a severely ill fiancé to walk with those who feel that the last few months (and let’s face it, the last few centuries) have given fresh reason for women to stand up and demand more. “There wasn’t going to be any excuse to miss it,” Rashad says emphatically. And though the march itself may be over, it would seem that the determined community spirit realized that day on Fifth Avenue is far from extinguished: One need only look a few blocks west, where a surfeit of powerful, complicated, honest, and downright delicious women’s stories are being told eight times a week on Broadway by some of the most fearless and dazzling stage actresses today—and not a moment too soon. From known powerhouses like Rashad, Bette Midler (who portrays Hello, Dolly’s titular heroine in a reprisal opening in April), and Patti LuPone (who stars as Helena Rubinstein in War Paint, a new musical debuting in March) to rising stars like Dreyfuss and Jenn Colella (who embodies the trailblazing female pilot, Beverley Bass, in Come From Away, a musical opening in March), the boards this spring could not be more on message. “You’re not just seeing sad women look beautiful on stage,” Dreyfuss says about the current season’s slate. Her role as Zoe in Evan Hansen offers a glimpse into the moral ambiguity of teenage life in the era of viral fame. It’s complex, challenging, and totally real—sadly all too rare for a teenage female on the Broadway stage. “I think it’s important to show we don’t have to be likable all of the time. Or any of the time, actually,” says Dreyfuss. One can be sure that boilerplate “likeability” is not something that stage legend LuPone concerns herself with. When asked how she is processing the last few months of crassness and calamity, she writes: “I am stymied, confused, disgusted, horrified, and feel helpless. I don’t know where to start or what to do.” And what about her War Paint character, a cosmetics legend and all around boss? “Helena [Rubinstein], on the other hand, would probably create a new cream.” LuPone, for her part, is channeling her

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From left: (1) Phillipa Soo in the Center Theatre Group production of Amélie, 2017 (2) Condola Rashad in The Trip To Bountiful, 2013 (3) Christine Ebersole in War Paint, 2016 (4) Laura Dreyfuss in Dear Evan Hansen, 2016 (5) Patti LuPone in War Paint, 2016. Far right: Christy Altomare and the company of Anastasia, Hartford Stage, 2016.


PILLIPA SOO/PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS. CONDALA RASHAD/PHOTO BY ROBIN MARCHANT GETTY IMAGES. CHRISTINE EBERSOLE/PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS. LAURA DREYFUSS/PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURPHY. PATTI LUPONE/PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS. CHRISTY ALTOMARE/PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS.

frustration constructively: “I’m donating to the A.C.L.U. I wish I could protest but I’m in rehearsal. To be honest, I feel silly prancing around the stage because so much of the American way of life that I grew up with is in peril.” But perhaps some creative channeling is just what the present moment demands. What better time than now to tell the story of Rubinstein, a Jewish immigrant who built a thriving business and defied every male—and a few female—naysayers in the process At its core, War Paint, which also stars Christine Ebersole as Rubinstein’s rival, Elizabeth Arden, is a tribute to the grit and glamour of the American dream—especially for those who’ve arrived from other shores. Blocks away, a slightly more subdued but no less compelling story is being told by Phillipa Soo, who is originating the role of Amélie in the titular musical, based on the classic 2001 film, that begins previews in March. “Amélie does her small part to better the world around her. We forget that simply being nice to others can make such a huge impact,” Soo says of her character, offering that parity—political or otherwise—starts at home, as it were— with a gesture, a smile, and an open heart. But Soo is hardly retiring on the subject of politics in the arts “I find it interesting when people say things to artists like, ‘Why don’t you just go sing or act and stay out of politics.’ I’m baffled because art is political. It can change the way people think about the world. Sometimes it leaves an impression on its audience without them knowing it.” And Soo would know—last year, she earned a Tony nomination for her performance as Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton in Hamilton, a musical that is arguably one of the most cogent and powerful illustrations of our national identity. A lesser known, but just as inspiring, American tale is that of Beverley Bass American Airlines’ first female captain and one of the steadfast pilots who re-routed passengers north to Canada on September 11. The very real Bass (played by Colella) is a main

character in Come From Away, which tells the story of a small Newfoundland hamlet that experiences an influx of displaced passengers in the days after the Twin Towers fell. On the importance of shedding light on the low-key hero, Colella says, “The sad truth is that women are still not viewed as equal human partners on this planet. Beverley’s story is a necessary reminder that our fight for equality is still on. Beverley is a badass who climbed the ranks in a male-dominated industry with passion and grace, so her beautiful brand of bravery and fortitude serves as a beacon for us all.” In a season of flying aces and business tycoon-esses, it might seem that a princess story would feel out of place. Not so with the April Broadway premiere of the inexhaustible legend of Anastasia, the Romanov princess, that’s based on the 1997 animated film. Anya’s heartrending plight is brought to life by Christy Altomare (Spring Awakening and Mamma Mia!), who sees the story less as a Cinderella romance and more as a powerful celebration of the arduous journey her character takes to escape violent Bolshevik Russia and connect with her past. To the young women in her audience, Altomare offers: “Anything is possible. If you have a dream, go for it. Don’t forget to keep an open heart and to listen to your gut. The journey will transform you if you choose to walk the path.” On that historic Saturday last January, Rashad was struck by a particular group of women in hijabs who had come to march with their babies. “What we are fighting for has to go beyond our convenience. These women were in the middle of the street with their newborns. What was so wonderful to see was the way that people immediately made way for them, the way that we were responding to each other.” It was a powerful day to be sure and, given the march’s proximity to Broadway’s theaters and its echoing chants and choruses, it wasn’t a stretch for those in attendance to imagine the event as a definitive Act II barnstormer for democracy, with Fifth Avenue as the stage.

“WE STILL HAVE INEQUALITY, MISOGYNY, SEXISM, AND WE ARE STILL FORCED TO FEND OFF UNDESIRED ADVANCES FROM BEWIGGED PUSSY-GRABBING ASSHOLES” —PATTI LUPONE

Still, as much as it was an invigorating moment of action, the day also served as a stark reminder that, despite outward appearances, we haven’t come nearly as far as we’d like in the last hundred years—a truism not lost on LuPone. “Helena Rubinstein’s journey in the 19th and 20th centuries is equivalent to our journey in the 21st century,” she offers. “Just as in her time, we still have inequality, misogyny, sexism, and we are still forced to fend off undesired advances from bewigged pussy-grabbing assholes. There was a time when goddesses ruled the earth. What happened?” As our noble artists and activists continue to search for an answer, one thing’s for sure: Even if goddesses are not ruling the earth, or even the country (yet , they are definitely reigning over Broadway—at least for the next few months.


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Rubble Rousers

A debut novel examines the heartbreak of being in love with the ever-changing landscape of New York—including the 1920s building that packed up and disappeared overnight BY ANTHONY ROTUNNO

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ou don’t find people who “like” New

York. Its 305 square miles, packed with close to 9 million bodies, are the definition of polarizing. You either love it or you hate it. Those who choose the former often see the city itself as an organism: A living, breathing thing you develop affection for like you would a particularly unruly pet. The mere sight of your favorite bodega can lift your spirits—just as signs of scaffolding, signaling its imminent demise, can induce mourning. All too often, what you love about New York is lost— and just as quickly replaced—leaving you to reconcile the city’s ever-changing reality with whatever nostalgic ghost is burned into your memory. In his debut novel, The Gargoyle Hunters, native New Yorker John Freeman Gill, an architectural writer for the New York Times

and The Atlantic, explores the relationship the city can have with its residents—and the lengths to which certain New Yorkers will go to preserve the place they adore. Like 2015’s critically acclaimed opus City on Fire, Gill’s work of historical fiction centers on a teenage boy coming of age in 1970s Manhattan, striving to build lasting bonds as his city, all but crumbling around him, careens toward bankruptcy. Passages of aseline-lensed fiction are expertly woven with well-researched fact, yielding a delightfully readable—and highly believable—tale. “Growing up, old New York was alive and well in my apartment: My mother’s been painting street scenes since the 50s. The week after I graduated from an MFA program [in the mid 1990s], I banged out 15 or so pages of what ended up being the first chapter, explains Gill, who grew up in the same brownstone as his protagonist. “Then I became a reporter and learned about preservation and the history of the city. That’s what gave the book two layers: The


very intimate story of a disintegrating family, [and] the larger story about the near death of New York. Gill’s childhood home isn’t the only true-life talisman to animate the novel. The titular gargoyles were very real too— before many were demolished to make way for today’s glassand-steel skyline. Also real The “hunters who broke the law to save them. Says Gill “ So you stole them, I said to a man who was telling me about his adventures. He paused a second and said, I’m not prepared to confess.’ Perhaps the book’s most significant plot point is also ripped from the headlines The 197 theft of a disassembled cast-iron Tribeca structure known as

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55 Wall Street This grand chamber was built by Isaiah Rogers circa 1842 and landmarked in 1965. It housed the Merchants’ Exchange, the Stock Exchange, and other commercial institutions before becoming the home of Cipriani Wall Street. “I love the majestic columns, the grand interior with the beautiful domed Wedgwood ceiling, and the rich history behind it,” says owner Giuseppe Cipriani.

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768 5th Avenue (The Plaza) Designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh, the iconic 1907 property is a pop-culture Zelig, guest-starring in everything from children’s book series Eloise to the movie Home Alone 2: Lost in New York. When the building—the city’s only landmarked hotel—underwent a mid-2000s overhaul to incorporate private residences, Gill got a tour of the construction site—and then got locked in. “It was an absolute ghost town. Wandering through was so bizarre,” he says.

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2 East 61st Street (The Pierre) While Schultze and Weaver’s 1930 building isn’t landmarked itself, it’s part of the Upper East Side Historic District (a neighborhood designated for preservation in 1981). The property’s top floors have lived multiple lives: During the Depression, they housed a restaurant frequented by Broadway chanteuse Kitty Carlisle and socialite Edith Bouvier “Little Eddie” Beale; today, they’re a penthouse for a new generation of bluebloods.

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233 Broadway (The Woolworth Building) Once the headquarters of the F.W. Woolworth Company—and the tallest building in the world—the Cass Gilbertdesigned skyscraper (built in 1912, landmarked in 1983) was partially purchased by Alchemy Properties in 2013, refurbished by designer Thierry Despont, and is now topped by luxury condos that give the city’s fastspawning needle towers a run for their money.

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(1) Ceiling ornamentation in 25 Broadway. (2) Columns and vaulting in the ballroom of 55 Wall Street (3) Architectural detail at the Plaza Hotel

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New Yorkers can often be heard collectively agonizing over changes to their city’s veneer. Thankfully for the nostalgic, the Landmarks Preservation Commission—established in 1965 in response to the demolition of McKim, Mead, and White’s original Pennsylvania Station— works to keep the past intact by declaring certain neighborhoods, buildings, and even facades off-limits to developers. Still, many historic-looking structures, their forms intact, have undergone transformations in function. Here, a look at five notable New York buildings that are markers not only of the past, but of the passage of time. —RACHEL WALLACE

25 Broadway Once a ticketing hall for Cunard Steamship Line, this seminal 1921 structure, conceived by Benjamin Wistar Morris and landmarked in 1995, has retained its nautical decor through years as a post office and, now, a Cipriani venue. “Aside from the elegant limestone facade, what struck us was the unique maritime interior decorated with shells, seahorses, and Columbus’ ships sailing routes,” says Maggio Cipriani, son of the current owner.

Previous page, from left: The Bogardus Building, New York, circa 1933. John Freeman Gill’s The Gargoyle Hunters, out March 21. A study of the landmarked Woolworth Building by T.R. Johnson, 1911.

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PERVIOUS PAGE: BOGARDUS BUILDING AND WOOLWORTH BUILDING/PHOTO BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. THIS PAGE: PLAZA HOTEL/PHOTO BY CHRIS HONDOROS GETTY IMAGES.

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the Bogardus Building. To this day, its disappearance is shrouded in mystery. As with most romances, the New York one falls in love with is the New York one recalls most forgivingly—and the New York one most wants to protect. Case in point: “It’s horrifying that the Rizzoli Bookstore, on West 57th Street, was torn down for yet another monster high-rise, Gill says of a recently lost former haunt. Alas, time’s passage can’t be stilled, as Gill and other preservation-minded New Yorkers know all too well. Until it can, if nothing else The Gargoyle Hunters gives new meaning to the old refrain I’ll take Manhattan.


In an excerpt from his new book, Big Shots!, photographer and one-time tour manager Phillip Leeds reveals how a Polaroid obsession kickstarted an unexpected calling

Kristen Kish

ALL IMAGES © PHILIP LEEDS, RIZZOLI INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHERS.

A Life in Pictures

Greg Dacyshyn

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Juliette Lewis

CULTURE


Ryan McGinness

?uestlove

Colby Parker Jr.

Danny Trejo

hen I was young, there were no cell phones or

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Big Shots! will be published by Rizzoli on March 28.

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tablets. The objects that I gravitated towards were my father’s Nikon F, his stainless steel Timex, his ZERO Halliburton silver briefcase, his Polaroid SX-70. I never considered “being” a photographer. Still, I never lost the desire for that Nikon, and when I was 12, I got one for my birthday. Thus began one of my only longtime hobbies. As I got older I really took a liking to Polaroid cameras. I loved the instant gratification of seeing if you “got the picture” within minutes of taking it and that the photo was a “one of one.” In college, my love of all things vintage and antique, which I get from my mom, took me to many garage sales and thrift stores and I began collecting vintage Polaroid cameras. Fast-forward through a lot of Polaroid 667 and 669 film to 200 , when I went to an opening for an Andy Warhol exhibition called “Warhol: Red Books.” It was a display of Andy’s Polaroid portraits, in conjunction with the release of the box set of books of the same name, which replicated the way he had kept his portraits in red Halston photo albums. At the end was Andy’s Polaroid Big Shot camera, which he had used to shoot all the portraits in the show. The Big Shot was made in 1971 by Polaroid, and despite being made of lightweight molded plastic, it was bulky and of limited use, as it is a fixed-focus portrait camera. With disappointing sales, it was discontinued after one year. So I went home and bought a used one off the Internet and began shooting portraits of friends who would come to my house. At the time, I was working as tour manager for Kelis, N.E.R.D, and Pharrell. I would always travel with a lot of cameras, but the Big Shot stayed at home, being too bulky to travel with. In 2006 I stopped touring and began working for [Pharrell’s line] Billionaire Boys Club. I kept the Big Shot at the showroom, taking pictures of people who visited. I shot Snoop, Chris Brown, André Leon Talley, Tyler the Creator, DMC, and Jasmine Sanders. Snoop was the first person to ask me, “Why don’t you have a book deal You should definitely make a book ... so I asked him to be my book agent (he declined). I am constantly crossing paths with other amazing people to photograph, and this project will continue long after this book has been published: As it was in the beginning, Phillip taking pictures for Phillip.


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inside a shell that replicates a Brancusi mask. But one does, and he (she?) is a prime example of why Pierre Huyghe (pronounced “hweeg”) will receive the second annual Nasher Prize—a $100,000 award that promotes contemporary sculpture on a global stage—on April 1. “Sculpture has evolved dramatically. It includes many different practices and ways of making, and conceiving, art,” explains Jeremy Strick, director of Dallas’ Nasher Sculpture Center. “Pierre’s works represent that change in that they encompass many different elements.” Among them: An active beehive enveloping the head of a reclining figure in a park, with the artist’s white Ibizan hound—one foreleg painted neon pink—wandering nearby; a forest of living trees onstage at the Sydney Opera House; a film of Huyghe’s Antarctic expedition, with orchestral accompaniment, projected over a rink of smoking black ice in New York’s Central Park. “Pierre is interested in living systems and allowing them to evolve and change, not under his direction,” notes Strick. “He really makes you think about sculpture in a different way.”

Freak of Nature French artist Pierre Huyghe represents a new breed of sculptor BY HOLLY HABER

PORTRAIT/PHOTO BY PHILIPPE QUAISSE. A FOREST OF LINES/PHOTO BY PAUL GREEN. ZOODRAMA/PHOTO BY GUILLAUNE ZICCARELLI. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

From top: The artist Pierre Huyghe, Huyghe’s “A Forest of Lines,” 2008,“Untilled (Liegender Frauenakt),” 2012, “Untilled,” 2011-12 and “Zoodram 4,” 2011


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Goddess. Immigrant. Mother. Boss.

By Bridget Arsenault Photographed by Mary Rozzi Styled by Lorna McGee Illustration by Clare Sykes

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Salma Hayek has life by the balls and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about to let go

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VEN WHEN SHE ENTERS THROUGH THE BACK DOOR, YOU

know Salma Hayek has arrived. We arrange to rendezvous on a chilly London afternoon in a corner suite of an unremarkable chain hotel. After climbing a set of metal exterior stairs to enter through the building’s rear, Hayek emerges on her own, no publicist in tow. The muted room, with its squeaky, not-quite-leather chairs and Ikea-esque art collection, quickly comes alive with Hayek’s character and charisma. At 5’2”, the actress—dressed simply in a caramel cashmere turtleneck and structured navy trousers— appears diminutive, but she is breathtakingly lovely and formidably present. We jump right into it: to “B” or not to “B”—not the Shakespearean dilemma, the movie-star version. “I don’t believe in Botox because your face doesn’t move, and it’s something you have to do for the rest of your life, more and more every time,” Hayek says. “I don’t look at things short term; I think of longevity. Listen, if there was something you could do that would keep you looking good, I would do it. But I’m in love with my husband, and I want to look like a lovely lady when I’m 70. I want him to see me and think, ‘Okay, my girl is old now, but there’s still beauty there.’” If this is the new, unassisted face of 50 (Hayek reached the milestone in September), we should all be advocates of keeping it real. If only it were that easy. Hayek’s skin is smooth and glowing; then there are the angular cheekbones and perfectly geometric features—not to mention the otherworldly proportions, which could be passed on to the makers at Mattel. The only adornment Hayek is wearing are those rings A five-carat oval-cut engagement rock, surrounded by trillion-cut diamonds, and a pavé wedding band, with a sparkle one imagines might be seen from space. Apart from being an actress, producer (of the hit TV show Ugly Betty, as well as 2002’s Frida, for which she earned an Oscar nomination portraying the titular artist), mother, and businesswoman (she started her own beauty brand, Nuance, in 2011), Hayek is also the wife of a billionaire. In 2009, the Mexican powerhouse married François-Henri Pinault, the French CEO of


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luxury conglomerate Kering (a swelling multinational fashion company with brands like Gucci, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, and Stella McCartney in its portfolio). Two years before they wed, Hayek, at 41, gave birth to their daughter, Valentina. She and Pinault are obviously very much in love— Hayek tells me of her plans to wake at 00 am for a flight to Milan the next morning so she can sit alongside her husband at Gucci’s runway show. A bit of basic math and it’s pretty obvious that Hayek doesn’t need to work. “[But] I like it, it’s fun. I also think my family likes it,” she says. “And I don’t have the pressure I had when I was younger.” In the year ahead, the actress has four films slated for release The Hitman’s Bodyguard, How to be a Latin Lover, Drunk Parents, and Beatriz at Dinner— and they couldn’t be more different. “A lot of the time I choose the movies I do by convenience,” she explains. “I just take it one day at a time, I don’t do strategy. The most important thing in my life is my family, easily. I’ve never been away from my daughter for more than two weeks. Sometimes I do a movie [just] because I like the people.” That’s precisely why she signed on to How to be a Latin Lover, a clever comedy with a big, beating heart that features Rob Lowe, Raquel Welch, and Kristen Bell, as well as Hayek’s longtime friend, Eugenio Derbez, as an actor and producer. “I was so excited that Eugenio got his movie,” she says. “Nobody deserves it more than him.” The actress has been number one and two at the box office with commercial fare like Grown Ups and Puss in Boots—to which she lends her voice, a lucrative instrument that proved its worth again in last year’s surprise animated hit Sausage Party (which brought in a meaty $97 million). In the movie, Hayek plays a lovelorn lesbian taco (yes, you read that right). “I love comedy,” she says. “It’s what I do best—I think it’s a musicality, a matter of timing.”

When Hayek got the call for The Hitman’s Bodyguard, a high-octane action blockbuster starring Samuel L. Jackson and Ryan Reynolds, she admits she was surprised: “Now that I’m older, I don’t get [the sexy sidekick roles] as much,” she says. But it’s clear she hasn’t lost her appetite for them. “I did my own stunts. They said, ‘We have a stunt double, and some of the things are quite hard.’ And I said, ‘Well, let’s give it a try.’ And guess what? I can still kick really high! Mind you, the next morning I was full of bruises and I couldn’t move for two weeks but, man, did I show off that day!” Beatriz at Dinner, a hit at January’s Sundance Film Festival, reveals Hayek in a completely new light—literally. “At some point, [director Miguel] Arteta has the camera on my face for a long period of time. I thought people might find it boring: I had no makeup and it was badly lit on purpose. But I felt liberated to look ugly—imagine the freedom. You don’t have to spend time in hair and makeup. If you didn’t sleep the night before, you don’t have to mask it. It was so lovely. I would never have gotten the role of Beatriz if I had done something to my face,” says Hayek, who notes aging gracefully does have its benefits. “Sometimes with age, you get better characters. I love to play the mother, and I’ll be excited to play the grandmother. How boring to play that [sexy] part for the rest of my life. I think I’d shoot myself.” An astute film with contemporary relevance, Beatriz at Dinner follows Hayek, as a Los Angeles–based massage therapist who unexpectedly finds herself at a wealthy client’s supper party, seated next to an unconscionable property tycoon. Sound familiar? Variety calls it “the first dramatic comedy for the Age of Trump.”` Although Hayek now lives with her family in London (they relocated from Paris in 2014), she is of Mexican heritage and has spent much of her life in the U.S.—including


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a brief period as an illegal immigrant in the ’90s, when her visa expired. (She’s since become a naturalized citizen). The actress has some thoughts on the country’s new president: “What do the supporters see? Every day the lies are being explained with facts, and then he says the press lied, and it’s like a parallel universe of disinformation. I find it really interesting how he constantly accuses people of the things he does. Crooked Hillary—he’s not crooked?!” Hayek says, her voice rising as she answers her own question: “Liar! He kept saying she was one, but then he was lying all the time. It’s terrifying.” (In the run up to last November’s election, Hayek revealed a previous spat with Trump who, after allegedly soliciting the actress’s former boyfriend for her phone number, asked her out and was rebuked. Somehow, the news wound up in the National Enquirer, which reported Trump wouldn’t date Hayek because she’s “too short.”) Hers is not a rags to riches story; rather, Hayek has built her career on a foundation of hard work. She was raised by a cultured family in the coastal town of Coatzacoalcos, Mexico; her father worked in the oil business and her mother was an opera singer. Creativity coursed through their children—Hayek’s brother is now a furniture designer—and the actress cites the 1971 film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory as an early inspiration. At 24, despite speaking little English, she left behind a career in Mexican telenovelas to try her luck in Los Angeles—and discovered she has dyslexia. A lesser force might have moved back home, but Hayek explains, “I’ve managed to find my way around it. Sometimes we make a bigger deal of our problems than they really are. So it’s good to talk about it. I don’t think people with dyslexia should think it’s an impediment. I read a script and it takes me double, maybe triple, the time of everyone else, but I only read it once and you can ask me anything.”

What’s next for an accomplished woman who loves the challenge of learning new things? “I’m going to direct,” Hayek says. “I did once, for Showtime’s The Maldonado Miracle. It’s very hard for a woman to be supported in that world, and to get her movies made, but [paradoxically] I think some of the things that made it easy for me had a lot to do with being a woman.” Hayek won an Emmy for the project. But she did no publicity; she didn’t even appear at the awards ceremony to collect her prize. “My agent told me, ‘Let’s keep it quiet, they won’t hire you as an actress again,’” she says. “And it was true. It was just after Frida, and I didn’t work for three years—the longest I’ve gone without working.” But now she’s older, wiser, fiercer, and has nothing to lose. Hayek recalls something Showtime’s former programming chief, Jerry Offsay, said after he attended a couple of meetings about projects she was producing. “‘You know, you’re not really a producer; you might not even be an actress,’ he said. ‘You’re a director—your brain is wired like a director’s.’ This is who I really am, ” she declares. As the mother of a nine-year-old daughter, Hayek thinks a great deal about how to convey the state of the world today. “You have to balance presenting it realistically, but because my daughter is extremely curious, you have to be careful about the amount of information,” she says. “You have to raise honorable, responsible human beings. At the same time, you have to keep them hopeful for the future.” Hope, hard work, and a certain well-honed fearlessness in the face of life’s vicissitudes have served the actress well thus far: “I stay hopeful because I believe the best teacher in the world is your mistakes,” she says. “Maybe we will learn a lot from what is happening. I really do think things have to go a little bit south for people to come together and bounce back in a better way. This is how I see it.” And at that, our time is up. The goddess has spoken.


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Turns a Corner

THE LAVISH CORNER OFFICE WAS ONCE THE ULTIMATE PERK AND A FITTING STAGE FOR A POWERFUL ONE-MAN SHOW. BUT AS A NEW BREED OF WORK SPACE TRADES WALLS FOR TRANSPARENCY, DOES DEMOCRACY SPELL DEMISE FOR A ROOM OF ONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OWN? BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY


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Ted Turner with his sailing trophies in his office at Turner Broadcasting System, 1977

The common area at WeWork’s Fifth Avenue space, New York

WHEN

JACK

WELCH RULED OVER GENERAL ELECTRIC, HE DID IT FROM UP HIGH.

His 53rd-floor office offered expansive views of Central Park and Roosevelt Island, and left no question who was steering the ship. But these days, the workspaces of executives are often indistinguishable from those of their staff. Take Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, who leads from a simple, no-frills desk surrounded by lesser-titled colleagues. While the ability to toil alongside the proletariat has a made a massive industry out of co-working, it begs the question Whatever happened to the corner office Ted Turner, now 78, perhaps epitomized the notion of office as manifestation of executive ego. His space in CNN’s Atlanta headquarters was handsomely decorated with ornate wood furniture. Less typical were the endless cabinets and shelves designed to hold his hundreds of sailing trophies , walls covered with dozens of framed magazine covers bearing his photo, and multiple trinkets displaying his mantra, “Either Lead, Follow, or Get Out of the Way. A level of personal comfort may have been necessary—during the network’s launch, Turner virtually lived in the space, sleeping on a Murphy bed and wandering the halls in his bathrobe, before eventually upgrading to a small apartment a level above his office. When Barry Diller

PREVIOUS SPREAD/PHOTO BY LAMBERT ARCHIVE PHOTOS GETTY IMAGES. NEUEHOUSE/ PHOTO BY EMILY ANDREWS. TED TURNER/PHOTO BY TOM HILL/WIREIMAGE GETTY IMAGES.

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Recording studio “Studio A” at NeueHouse Hollywood, Los Angeles


Helen Gurley Brown in her office at Cosmopolitan magazine, circa 1965

Etsy’s Genslerdesigned work space, New York

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tasked Frank Gehry with designing IAC’s New York H , he wanted the ultimate perk A straight-on view of the Statue of Liberty. Gehry may not have come through on that, but the office’s private waterview terrace was an appeasing consolation prize. While women in the corner office may have been fewer and farther between, after iconic magazine editor Helen Gurley Brown got the top gig at Cosmopolitan, in 1965, her customized office decor became as legendary as the editor herself. The walls were papered in a floral print that matched the upholstered sofa, the rug was leopard, and the furniture antique. Topping it off were a collection of porcelain dolls and needlepoint pillows that featured bon mots like “Good girls go to heaven, bad girls go everywhere and “I love champagne, caviar, and cash. In today’s modern workplace, a reorganization of seating hierarchy may have been inevitable, it’s likely that a rash of recession-era scandals served as a death knell. In 2009, departing Merrill Lynch CEO John Thain was publicly excoriated when the details of his $1.2 million office renovation came to light. Overseen by celebrity designer Michael S. Smith a favorite of the Obama family , the redesign included expenditures like a $68,000

antique credenza and an $87,000 area rug. Coinciding as it did with the global financial crisis that took the bank down, the uproar among shareholders and the public alike was unsurprising. Former Citigroup head Todd Thomson’s 2007 departure was also, in part, attributed to his wild spending. With a jumbo fish tank, ornate chandelier, and fireplace, his office’s aesthetic was described as “Swiss chalet, earning it the geographically inconsistent nickname “Todd Mahal. Thomson also had the run of a deluxe marble-floored Citigroup boardroom. Though some predicted the demise of the corner office as early as the 1980s, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s 2001 decision not to move into the stately City Hall space occupied by his predecessor, Rudy Giuliani, but instead to fashion a bullpen-style work area he shared with his aides much as he did when running Bloomberg LP , broke the mold. “I’ve never understood why anyone would want to seal himself off from the rest of the organization. In the bullpen, there are no walls, no gatekeepers, and no communication barriers, the then-mayor told New York magazine in 2007. Many other companies came around to Bloomberg’s philosophy, even if their staffs did not. In 2009, Goldman Sachs moved its headquarters from 85


Broad Street to a new building on nearby West Street, leaving behind a litany of empty suites. While partners were still able to snag coveted windowed offices, managing directors were bumped to interior-facing spaces and Ps were shifted even further, to open-plan benched seats. For many, the transition was rocky, proving just how much seating plans reflected hierarchy and status. “If I had been at a bench my whole life, it would be fine, but I used to have an office, one P complained at the time to the Wall Street Journal. Goldman grumblers might have a point. Several surveys have indicated that the noise and stress of an open office takes a big toll on employee productivity and satisfaction. A 201 study by Ipsos and office-furniture manufacturer Steelcase’s Workspace Futures Team showed open-plan workers lose 86 minutes a day to distractions, and 31 percent of respondents said they often have to leave to concentrate and get things done. They’re also taking way more sick days—up to 70 percent more, according to a study by a Canadian insurance company. Likely a result of germs running rampant in common spaces. Don’t touch the door handles

The open-plan revolution even trickled down to the magazine industry, long known for extravagantly appointed chambers like Gurley Brown’s . When Cond Nast—where top editors once enjoyed private bathrooms and even showers, and nearly all mid-level employees were granted their own offices—relocated their headquarters from Times Square to 1 World Trade Center, in 201 , private spaces were all but a memory for everyone except those at the very top. Time Inc. publisher of Time, People, and others made a similar southern migration, leaving Midtown’s famed Time-Life building in 2015 for a cramped space on Liberty Street. Unlike in the company’s golden days, there’s no 00 pm bar cart making the rounds. There are also precious few offices, with even veterans like then-Fortune editor Alan Murray rumored to have been relocated to cubicles. Still, many argue that sharing space is more of a blessing than a curse. “Having an open floor-plan facilitates people sharing and communicating what they’re doing, which enables better collaboration, which is key to building the best services for our community, Zuckerberg said in a 2015

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Headquarters of the Skimm, New York


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video posted to Facebook—a statement that many in the tech community agree with. In fact, for many millennials, much of the corner office’s appeal feels dated and obscene. “There’s definitely been a shift away from hierarchy in general. A lot of companies are finding that a flatter organization seems to help boost morale in a lot of ways, says Natalie Engels, an architect with Gensler, the firm behind the office redesigns at Instagram, Adobe, and Etsy. “It seems counter-intuitive because you’re taking away an office, but it lets the senior management really know what’s happening with their business versus just hearing about what you want to hear about in meetings. When Gensler was brought in to redesign Adobe’s San Jose headquarters, the campus consisted almost entirely of private offices. “Most people didn’t have windows and it was really sad. How do you get people to talk to each other when they just go in and close their door Engels asks. Gensler’s transformation added multiple common-use areas and incorporated outdoor space, taking advantage of the city’s enviable weather. Employees are welcome to

work from any spot on campus, which includes conference rooms, phone spaces, a library, and a cafe. Engels sees the approach as more philosophical than logistical. “Everyone has embraced the idea that you need to get out and have a place to come together. We’re becoming more digital; our entire world is going to be so automated. We’re very much social creatures by nature We need to have this communal aspect, she explains. When Carly Zakin and Danielle Weisberg, the co-founders of media company theSkimm, designed their new headquarters in Manhattan’s West illage, community and a sense of individuality were major priorities for a business started on a couch in the pair’s shared apartment. Conferences rooms were named after their favorite characters from “Law and Order S U. “When you walk into our office, you don’t see any traditional conference rooms or tables, but you see a lot of couches. We wanted a space that felt like a living room, which goes back to how we started, Zakin says. The lack of traditional corner suites at theSkimm reflects a humility inherent in the company’s values, but also the logistics of its co-founders’ work habits. “Honestly, I never even sit at my desk. I’m always sitting on a couch with someone, or sitting on the floor, admits Weisberg. “We don’t hew to a preconceived notion of what an office should look like. Companies have the power to design offices that reflect their culture and values. The radical new approach to collaboration is epitomized by the massive popularity of co-working spaces like WeWork. Since the 2010 opening of its first location in post-recession New York, the chain the largest in a nowcrowded field has helped turn a niche business into a phenomenon. Between 2009 and 201 , the number of co-working companies around the world skyrocketed from 300 to 5,900, according to Deskmag.com. Last year, WeWork was valued at approximately $16 billion. The major companies try to distinguish themselves through an ever-increasing slate of amenities and programming options. The corner office may have been replaced by the open-plan, but there are still high-end perks to be found. At Alley, which has four locations in New York, CEO Jason Saltzman believes the key is making the space intrinsic to its members’ lives, an allpurpose solution to the vexing geographic complexities of daily tasks. He offers a nursing room, a barbershop, and legal office hours, all of which free up time for workers to spend, well, working. NeueHouse, which has spaces in New York and Los Angeles, cultivates a clientele of creative professionals and offers evening film screenings, book launches, and political discussions with luminaries like Hillary Clinton and the New Yorker’s David Remnick. “It’s a platform to inspire progressive thinking and foster meaningful connections. Both of which were lacking in the traditional corner office model, says CEO Karl Finegan. More important to many customers, however, is the sense of workplace camaraderie that thrives in close proximity. Brittney Hart, WeWork’s head of interior design, developed the company’s 125 locations around the idea that, properly synergized, each enterprise could inspire the others. “If you go into a typical law firm or hedge fund, the classic floor plan—and the hierarchy— still exist. But a large portion of the workplace has flattened, says Hart. “There’s a desire to learn from your peers. Just because you may be a little older, or have a little more experience, doesn’t mean you can’t learn something from the intern. Perhaps generously, Alley’s Saltzman sees this approach as indicative of a generational shift, away from pre-recession excess and towards a more entrepreneurial and philanthropic way of life. “That corner office is gaudy. It’s clich , it’s gross. In my world, which is the new-economy world, people don’t care about status. They care about intelligence and about connecting, he says. “It’s a give-first world, and the corner office is a symbol of that oldschool culture of greed. The sign you’ve arrived, then, is no longer your own private piece of office real estate, your windows, or your view. It’s being able to thrive in a classless society, and distinguish yourself without the trappings of power. It’s easy to be a boss from the 53rd floor. Now try doing it from a beanbag chair.

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A DELICIOUS MIX OF SUAVE AND SELFDEPRECATING, FOR ACTOR BILL NIGHY THE ENGLISH DANDY IS A ROLE CUT TO FIT BY FRANCES DODDS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES ROBJANT


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a banana. He arrived in L.A. the week prior (positively “a treat, coming from snowy, ice-bound London”), drove down to Santa Barbara for the film festival, and then up to San Francisco. He’s had his picture taken at the Bay Bridge and the City Lights Book Shop, and contemplated the burnt ashes of Jack London’s house at the author’s namesake museum. But today Bill has been very busy with official movie business, and it’s lunchtime, and he’s hungry. “I’m looking at a banana and I’m thinking, Will Frances mind if I eat the banana?” he says. “Because I am a bit faint. No disrespect to you, Frances, but I’m going to eat this banana while we speak. And I may have some coffee, which always makes me more interesting. A double espresso and I become fascinating.” Nighy is a virtuoso at that time-tested technique of addressing the person he’s speaking to by name, but when he does it there’s no trace of smarmy-salesman faux familiarity. A lifetime theater actor, Nighy has said he spent much of his professional existence in a state of near crippling self-doubt. But then a very unexpected thing happened the British thespian was cast as the indelible Billy Mack—washed-up “ex-heroin addict searching for a comeback at any price, in 2003’s Love Actually. (Nighy will reprise the role in Red Nose Day Actually, the highly-anticipated short film sequel airing on NBC on May 25. Ever since that late-in-the-game break, the 67-year old actor has had both feet planted firmly in the world of big-budget pictures. Before he returns as Billy Mack, however, Nighy will grace the big screen in Lone Scherfig’s Their Finest, a World War II romantic dramedy that follows a young woman hired to make a propaganda film aimed at boosting the troops’ morale. Nighy plays a high-maintenance aging actor—a charming, self-deluded, benevolently pompous older gentleman, if that sounds familiar. While Bill eats a banana, we chat about why he goes to the movies, why he loves suits, and why we—at this moment in history—find ourselves in a state of crisis. What drew you to Their Finest?

I love the film. It’s one of the best I’ve ever been involved in, and it makes talking to people easy because I don’t have to dissemble in any way. My thing with the movies, since I was a kid, is that you go to the cinema feeling one way, and you come out feeling different—hopefully with a bit of optimism and inspiration. That’s what this film does It makes you feel that things might just work out. And in current times, or any times, we really need things like that. In terms of feminism, it’s very important— particularly for a young audience—to see how women were treated not so very long ago, and how much progress there is still to be made. When you started working on this movie, did you think that its message would be so prescient?

I always knew it had great things to say. I wasn’t aware they would be so much more necessary now. To show how in truly dangerous times people can remain compassionate and come together and have the courage to be kind and inclusive with one another—rather than divided and toxic—is always valuable. But there is an emergency situation now, which makes it even more necessary.


Do you think there are too few leading roles for older people?

I was in a film called The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, which, very surprisingly—I think for everybody, at least for me—took in enormous amounts of money. So they realized that older people will go to the cinema if you make movies that interest them and feature them. And now there’s been a whole spate of films about the romantic concerns of older people. It’s all about marketing— which famously invented teenagers, you know, so they could sell them stuff. And now they’ve scheduled all of our lives for marketing purposes. That’s kind of bled into the way that people think about themselves. When they pass a certain age they feel they’re disqualified from certain things. They think, “I’m too old to wear that, I’m too old to do that, I’m too old to have love in my life or travel the world or do extreme sports —well, I really am too old to do extreme sports—but it’s almost funny, the fact that before marketing, none of that happened. There’s a role you often play—a charming older man with a slightly bloated ego. When did you first tap into your ability to play that comedic part so naturally?

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Suit by JOHN PURSE, Polo shirt by JOHN SMEDLEY, Shoes by CHURCH’S, Umbrella by DRAKES, all Nighy’s own throughout. Sittings Editor Way Perry at The Wall Group. Grooming Mira H. at face pro.co.uk using Anne Semonin. Production Laura Motta at 2DM Management.

There’s a funny moment in the film when you think you’re being cast to play the romantic lead, but then realize you’re going to play the drunk uncle. Has anything like that happened in your own life?

I think everyone’s slightly delusional, including me. I remember one particular call from my agent saying “Darling, it’s Hamlet. It’s Moscow, it’s 18 months, it’s a tremendous gig. And I said “I don’t want to play Hamlet, and she said “No, no darling, not Hamlet—Claudius. And then you realize you’ve become Hamlet’s uncle. I was 39 at the time, and I realized that the days I might be asked to play the Danish prince—even though I’d never wanted to—had in fact gone. There’s always that difficult period, in your late thirties, early forties, when you go up for parts and you hope it’s a good morning or a good hair day, because you’re treading a very, very thin line between a leading man and a character man. It’s a relief when you get to my time in life, because it really doesn’t matter what kind of day I’m having—I’m going to look like this anyway. So I’m fully over the line and into character world.

I don’t entirely remember, but I do remember that when I was young I found it very difficult to take myself seriously in a romantic role. I was deeply self-conscious because I made the mistake of thinking I had to “be it” rather than act it. The irony is that when I got old enough to realize that you just have to act out that stuff, I was too old to play those parts. But I had an agent who was clever enough to send me for parts that I wouldn’t normally be considered for. They used to call it counter-casting. It was a long time before I was given any comedy parts. I was in my thirties before anybody asked me to tell a joke. I never thought of myself in that way. Let’s talk about suits: You love suits.

I’ve worn suits since I was a young man, usually because they were costumes and I got them half-price. I never had any money, and you could always do a deal with the costume person. I’ve never recovered from the phenomenon of the two-piece suit, or what we used to call—and it makes me laugh—the “lounge suit.” The casual thing, I try not to think about it. I have a theory that people who were destined for white-collar futures, when they come into show business, they dress down. They make appalling mistakes like tracksuit bottoms and rugby shirts with the collar turned up. Sneakers, trainers. Or they’ll wear shorts, which is unforgivable. But men who are destined for blue-collar futures, which I was, dress up. When Jarvis Cocker, the lead singer of Pulp, was asked why he always wore suits, he said, “You never know who you might bump into,” which I think is a very good answer. Basically it’s because I’m very insecure about my body— I don’t like anything about it and I figure the suit will always be in better shape than I am. I put a suit on and think, “It’s over, it’s done. I can relax now.


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NESTLED ON AN ITALIAN HILLSIDE LIKE A MEDIEVAL CAVE METROPOLIS, ONE OF THE


WORLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST ANCIENT CITIES IS A SET-IN-STONE JEWEL

BY TANIA STRAUSS


Previous spread: The myriad original dwellings of Matera’s old town. This page, clockwise from left: The terrace at the Le Grotte della Civita hotel; Relief sculptures on the Sarcophagus of Rapolla, circa 200 AD, in the Museo Nazionale Archeologico di Melfi; A cozy table at the Baccanti trattoria. Opposite page: The interior of the Cathedral of Matera.

strange beauty can come as a stark surprise. The old town, known as the Sassi (Italian for “stones”), is a limestone labyrinth of buildings and ancient rock churches, built amid Paleolithic caves that pockmark the side of a ravine. Bleached and gleaming under the afternoon sun, the town takes on the lamp-lit mystery of a desert fortress by night. Due to its peculiar geography, the Sassi must be navigated in three dimensions and almost entirely on foot—its winding streets are frequently punctuated by staircases and, like those in Venice, are inaccessible by vehicle. But where the Northern capital is bright colors and baroque details, Matera’s whitewashed aesthetic is so ancient that both The Passion of the Christ and last year’s Ben Hur remake used its spare streets as a stand-in for biblical Jerusalem. While this visual landscape may seem at odds with the notion of creature comforts, pockets of luxury are flourishing behind the Sassi’s stone facades. Once so devastated by starvation and disease that they became the subject of a national scandal, the two Sassi districts have seen an incredible renaissance thanks to a 1993 UNESCO designation, and the work of enterprising residents who have transformed old cave dwellings into comfortable bohemian homes and charming boutique hotels. It follows that the destination has seen an upswing in tourism, though this influx is still largely made up of vacationing Italians who head south to the surrounding Basilicata region and neighboring Puglia. But with Matera’s recent designation as a 2019 European Capital of Culture, the stage is set for its profile to extend globally—and for good reason. The city is determinedly forward-looking, even as its 9,000-year lifespan makes it one of the oldest in the world. There may be no better evidence of this marriage between tradition and innovation than Matera’s modern “cave hotels,” so called because they’re built into the same spaces once inhabited by our troglodyte ancestors. The most spectacular might be Le Grotte della Civita, whose 18 rooms and suites occupy a network of caves that overlook Murgia National Park, a spectacular recreation area that encompasses many of the region’s ancient sites. Minimalistic wood and white furnishings complement the spare, rustic atmosphere of the cave interiors, which retain their original shape and texture through a process of careful refurbishment. Guests who desire indulgence beyond simply sleeping in a luxury cave suite can also book in-room

PREVIOUS SPREAD/PHOTO BY SIEPHOTO GETTY IMAGES. RELIEF SCULPTURES/PHOTO BY GUNDOLF PFOTENDHAUER. PALAZZO MARGHERITA/PHOTO BY GUNDOLF PFOTENHAUER. CATHEDRAL OF MATERA/PHOTO BY TANIA STRAUSS.

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N A COUNTRY FAMED FOR SENSUALITY AND ABUNDANCE, MATERA’S


WHILE MATERA’S VISUAL LANDSCAPE MAY SEEM AT ODDS WITH THE NOTION OF CREATURE COMFORTS, POCKETS OF LUXURY ARE FLOURISHING BEHIND THE SASSI’S STONE FACADES

A room at the Le Grotte della Civita.

LE GROTTE DELLA CIVIA/PHOTOS BY WWW.SEXTANTIO.IT #SEXTANTIO.

massages, or arrange for dinner at the hotel’s small restaurant, located in a candlelit 13th-century rock church. After a pasta-heavy night during my own stay in the Sassi, I woke determined to sweat off the carbs with a hike in Murgia park. A popular trail descends straight from the town down the side of the ravine, across the Gravina River, and up to a series of caves that overlook Matera from the opposite cliffside. This turned out to be much more strenuous than I had anticipated, especially since I was also sweating off a fair amount of the deliciously mellow red wine that had accompanied my decadent meal. So mellow was the wine and its consumption that I forgot to write down the name, but it’s Italy–it’s hard to go wrong with any bottle your server recommends. Even with the slight hangover, the rural scenery was spectacular and the views of Matera, other-worldly—as was the opportunity to wander freely into the homes previously occupied by Stone Age housewives. Tired and a little sore, I recovered from my workout with a massage in the underground spa at Palazzo Gattini Luxury Hotel. Situated across from Matera’s booming baroque Duomo, the Gattini is perched on the very edge of modern Matera, just before the drop down into Sasso Barisano. Though less visually spectacular, the upper city’s level topography accommodates the kind of commercial development and busy street life that’s impossible in the sinuous old town. With its suitably grand architecture, panoramic views, and all the requisite amenities, Palazzo Gattini is by far Matera’s most opulent hotel—and unlike many properties in the Sassi, it can be accessed by car. In need of a refuel after recuperating, I took a short walk to the whitetiled Via Domenico Ridola, a sunlit pedestrian thoroughfare that runs just above the Sassi. Lounging at one of many outdoor cafes, I could’ve easily spent an afternoon watching the steady stream of tourists and locals who stroll this bustling street in search of a snack or an afternoon glass of wine. The walkway ends at a panoramic overlook (the photo op is worth stopping for), before leading straight into Sasso Caveoso, the oldest and most otherworldly part of Matera. Here, modernized cave homes, quaint cafes, and tiny craft stores eventually give way to a time-defying landscape of crumbling streets, abandoned caves, and centuries-old rupestrian churches. Though private guided tours are advised I preferred to explore alone, and the sole official I saw didn’t seem inclined to stop me. Making my way through the vast, deserted caverns of Convicinio di Sant’Antonio, a group of four churches that were carved out of the rock in the 12th century, I felt I was someplace not quite of this world. The only traces of humanity were the saints staring down from the grey stone walls, their faded, peeling faces all that remained of a fresco stripped away by centuries of erosion.


I TRULY FELT I WAS SOMEPLACE NOT QUITE OF THIS WORLD. THE ONLY TRACES OF HUMANITY WERE THE SAINTS STARING DOWN FROM THE CHURCH’S GREY STONE WALLS

A day of traversing Matera’s wonders worked up an appetite for more of the rustic, agricultural cuisine the Basilicata region is known for. The most storied local eatery might be Trattoria Lucana, famous not so much for the food as for the fact that Mel Gibson ate there regularly while filming Passion of the Christ. Baccanti, a romantically lit space built into a series of caves in Sasso Caveoso, is also a standout. Its regional fare is elevated by fresh ingredients, modern presentations, an extensive wine list, and of course the one-of-a-kind ambience afforded by dining in an ancient cave. Reservations are, apparently, a must; without one I wound up at another local favorite, Le Botteghe, a white-tablecloth trattoria where I stuffed myself with a delicious local pasta dish involving breadcrumbs and crispy fried peppers. Washed down with, of course, more wine. Very satiated and a little sleepy, I took one more wander through the Sassi’s golden nightscape, this time to the soundtrack of a packed outdoor jazz concert in the Piazza San Giovanni. The concert was part of an annual performing arts festival put on by Italy’s public radio network, the RAI, which is just one of many programs that contributes to Matera’s emerging reputation as a cultural hotspot. Celebrations like this stand to multiply with the Capital of Culture designation: in order to be selected, a city must submit a detailed proposal for a yearlong event program meant to boost longterm growth and draw international attention. Matera’s proposal, centered around the idea of an “open future,” aims to explore how technology and public information can be used to bridge history, tradition, and the realities of an increasingly digitized and interconnected world. It’s a dichotomy not lost on locals and one that, in many ways, is epitomized by the story of the Sassi—an overlooked and abandoned place given new life by those who saw beauty in its strange and ancient architecture. This boom mentality is starting to spread beyond the city and outward into Basilicata. The most noteworthy new development in the greater province of Matera is surely the Palazzo Margherita, a 19th-century estate recently purchased and renovated by director Francis Ford Coppola. Located in the tiny hilltop town of Bernalda, where Coppola’s grandfather was born, its new owner specifically wished that the hotel appeal to families. (As such, he solicited considerable input from his own in conceiving the space.) The spectacular property features extensive gardens and an interior decorated with frescoes and custom tile work by Jacques Grange, who also designed some of the furniture in the palazzo’s several suites. Though an approximately 45-minute drive from the city, Palazzo Margherita—and the famous family that comes with it—seems to be of particular fascination for locals, who greet Matera’s resurgence with deep pride and a touch of trepidation. An academic I spoke with, who has summered there for years, feared the city’s impending boom would bring with it the sort of fussy, homogenized tourism that Matera’s entire vibe seems designed to subvert. Indeed, the Sassi’s stillness—the way its echoing stone streets seem to suspend the demands of time—is just as integral to its allure as fine restaurants and cushy cave renovations. But Matera’s most forward-thinking innovators seem to know that modernization goes hand-in-hand with preservation. So, in a city that’s been around since the Stone Age, the time to visit has finally arrived.

LEFT: COPPOLA FAMILY/PHOTO BY GUNDOLF PFOTENHAUER. GRID: AGF, UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES. LE GROTTE DELLA CIVIA AND SASSI DI MATERA/ PHOTOS BY WWW.SEXTANTIO.IT #SEXTANTIO. PALAZZO MARGHERITA/PHOTO BY GUNDOLF PFOTENHAUER. STREETS/PHOTO BY MASSIMO DI NONNO.

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This page: Sofia and Francis Ford Coppola at their Palazzo Margherita estate. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Tourists navigate the city’s tightly packed streets and terraces. Dusk view of Sassi di Matera. A suite at the Palazzo Margherita. A sunlit room at Le Grotte della Civita.


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A ROOM WITH A VIEW

The London-based interiors house de Gournay, known for exquisite hand-painted porcelain, fabrics, and wallpaper (like the jungle-scape “Amazonia,” pictured at the Fog design fair), arrives in San Francisco with a lavish Presidio Heights showroom. The new location, debuting in March, will be the brand's first U.S. outpost to open outside of New York since its founding more than 30 years ago. degournay.com —DAVID NASH

IMAGE COURTESY AND WALLPAPER HAND-PAINTED BY DE GOURNAY

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Chef Eric Ripert’s smoked salmon croque monsieur at Chefs Club Aspen

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Want to take your oenophile leanings to the next level This April, enroll in the Little Nell Wine Academy, a master class in wine knowledge, cocktails, food pairings, bubbles, and stemware led by Master Sommelier Carlton McCoy. thelittlenell.com

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Dining by Design

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A SPA FOR ALL SEASONS Just steps away from Lift 1-A, the Dancing Bear Aspen: A Timbers Resort’s Rejuvenation Spa offers residence club members and hotel guests a holistic alternative to après-ski (or a reason to skip the slopes entirely). The groundbreaking new facility is filled with progressive amenities to invigorate, renew, and restore. “It’s the first of its kind,” says Dancing Bear GM Anneke Scholten. “We’ve created something here to sooth every muscle and help the body recover in every season.” The experience begins with a seat at the oxygen station (to increase energy and circulation), before moving on to the warm-water pressure of two aqua beds to loosen muscles. The spa’s main attraction is its large, eggshaped Isopod: a flotation tank filled with 10 inches of Epsom salt solution that provides a dark, warm space where patrons achieve ultimate meditative restoration. Guests can wash away the salt at a cool-water dousing station before entering the oversized steam room, outfitted with two custom-cut marble chaise lounges. Every Tuesday, it becomes a ladies-only club, offering custom oxygen facials. dancingbearaspen.com

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Under culinary director Didier Elena and former creative director Dana Cowin, Chefs Club Aspen— named one of the country’s 100 best restaurants by Time—completely reimagines its menu with the help of the world’s finest toques. Belly up to the kitchen-side bar and kick off your culinary journey with stir-fried Singapore king crab legs by Food & Wine Best New Chef Bryant Ng, before choosing from among 21 dishes by 21 stars, including Daniel Boulud, Eric Ripert, and Marcus Samuelsson. chefsclub.com/aspen

Aspen native Barclay Dodge returns to his hometown with Bosq, a restaurant serving global flavors inspired by his travels. Dishes range from Asian-influenced (sweetand-sour crispy eggplant) to Spanish-inflected (cucumber-and-salmon ceviche and kale chicharrón), and the best seats in the house overlook Wagner Park. bosqaspen.com

ROOM REQUEST

Halcyon Hotel, the first new hospitality offering in Denver’s Cherry Creek in more than a decade, does not disappoint. Check into the penthouse Presidential Suite—two stories of modern, Restoration Hardware-designed living with floor-to-ceiling windows and the largest terrace in the neighborhood. halcyonhotelcherry creek.com

A rooftop cabana at Denver’s Halcyon Hotel

For its first residence program, the Hotel Jerome packs in the star power. The Hotel Jerome Residences at the Mill’s four units (designed by David Johnston Architects with decor by Alex Papachristidis Interiors) have all the hotel’s perks, including daily housekeeping—plus primo views of Smuggler and Red Mountains. themillaspen.com


The ninth edition of the Dallas Art Fair, at Fashion Industry Gallery, features a blue-chip roster of American and European dealers. It kicks off with a swish gala on Thursday April 6 and is open to the public Friday through Sunday. dallasartfair.com

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An Antonio Citterio-designed sofa with Ray outdoor fabric

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Adhering to the age-old adage that good things come in threes, the fine Italian furniture purveyors B&B Italia, in partnership with Internum, recently set up a 6,000–square– foot shop on Oak Lawn Avenue, in the heart of the design district (joining sister locations in Austin and Houston). The company—recognized for sleek, contemporary furnishings—could not have more perfectly timed its arrival: its latest collection, designer Antonio Citterio’s ode to outdoor living, is the perfect way to usher in the season in style. From sofas and armchairs in chartreuse and aquamarine to dining tables in handsome teak, the pieces bring a touch of la dolce vita to the Lone Star State. bebitalia.com

A Chaise lounge from the Mirto outdoor collection

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An Antonio Citteriodesigned chair

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A renovated penthouse is just one of the gems inside the historic Adolphus Hotel, located steps from Downtown’s Neiman Marcus flagship headquarters and nearing the end of a complete overhaul. The 23rd-story suite boasts sweeping skyline views and a bright contemporary palette. Coming soon: the re-opening of the hotel’s iconic French Room restaurant. adolphus.com

RESERVATION REQUEST

Bruno Davaillon, who gained recognition as executive chef of Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, promises a light take on French cuisine at Bullion, his hotly anticipated Downtown restaurant, opening in May. The Loire Valley native says he’ll serve classics like Dover sole meunière the way he prefers to eat them—with less butter, more herbed oils, and sauces without cream. bullionrestaurant.com

Seafood lovers have fallen hook, line, and sinker for California import Water Grill, which just opened its first out-of-state location in Uptown. With daily deliveries of delectable sea creatures, it offers more than a dozen kinds of oysters— plus a tank crawling with Alaskan king crabs and lobsters from both coasts. Save room for the caramel bread pudding. watergrill.com ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

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LOS ANGELES CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

Explore how a luxury car company nurtured remarkable creativity at “The Art of Bugatti, on view at the Petersen Museum through October 2017. petersen.org

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TRI-STATE

ALL LACED UP

It's hard to say no to friends like Sofia Vergara, who Martha Medeiros says urged her to open her namesake Melrose Place boutique. Medeiros, whose garments are made with the spectacularly delicate Brazilian renascença lace—previously unobtainable in the U.S.—built a reputation as fans like Vergara, Jessica Alba, and Beyoncé stepped out in her dramatic, intricate creations, which are handcrafted by a team of almost 500 artisans in northeastern Brazil. Now, with her atelier’s debut, everything from ready-to-wear skirts to bridal gowns can be customized on-site in L.A. “We are here to show the world real Brazilian luxury,” Medeiros says. marthamedeiroslabel.com

KEY TO THE CITY

Michael McCarty The restaurateur behind Michael’s—an esteemed institution in both Los Angeles and New York—just put the wildly talented Miles Thompson in his Santa Monica kitchen, known for contemporary California cuisine. Here, McCarty shares his (other) local hangouts. michaelssantamonica.com

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MARTHA MEDEIROS/PHOTO BY ALEXANDRE GODINHO. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

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An eating/art tour of DTLA’s Arts District: Breakfast at Eggslut (eggslut.com), lunch at Manuela (manuela-la. com), and dinner at Bestia (bestiala.com). And for an afternoon snack, check out The Smile's di Alba, a cool focacceria (eatdialba.com). For art, visit Hauser Wirth & Schimmel (hauserwirthschimmel.com), Night Gallery (nightgallery.ca), 365 Mission (356mission.com), Maccarone (maccarone.net), The Mistake Room (tmr.la), and, most importantly, the Institute of Contemporary Art Los Angeles (theicala.org), opening this fall. DATE NIGHT

Capo, in Santa Monica. caporestaurant.com HIDDEN GEM

Valentino, also in Santa Monica, serves great Italian food and wine for lunch—but only on Fridays. valentinosantamonica.com

RESERVATION REQUEST

After perfecting his pasta-making in his mother’s native Italy, Sotto chef Steve Samson returns to the kitchen at Rossoblu (rossoblula.com), where tortellini en brodo and eggplant condito (below) are served in a building that was once part of the city's oldest farmer’s market. Nerano (neranobh. com), the new eatery from the owners of Toscana, trades Tuscan cuisine for dishes from the Amalfi Coast like spaghetti alla Nerano, tossed with sautéed zucchini, squash blossoms, and provolone. Expertly pair any with an Italian Sazerac (made with Amaro Nonino and Cardamaro).

ROOM REQUEST

The 286-room James West Hollywood, with a prime Sunset Strip location, is among the neighborhood’s newest luxe destinations. LawsonFenning, a favorite local furniture and interior design firm, collaborated with the hotel on two tenth-floor suites, dubbed City and Hills. Both are equipped with tablets, for everything from room service to DIY checkout (a hotel-wide perk). jameshotels.com/ west-hollywood

Hollywood's hospitality makeover continues with the arrival of the Dream Hotel. Featuring 178 rooms, five restaurant-and-nightlife venues from the Tao Group, and a massive public rooftop, it burnishes Selma Avenue’s hot-spot credentials (the street was already home to hip boutique hotel

Mama Shelter). GM Ayo Akinsete recommends the Dream’s Guest House, with retractable walls, for its sweeping 270-degree city views. Vinyl geeks, take note: Curated music selections and Fluance sound systems can be found in every suite. dreamhotels.com/hollywood

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HAMPTONS CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

In collaboration with Wellthily, Gurney’s Montauk offers a variety of wellness pop-ups and retreats this season, like NYC’s Uplift Studio, LIFTED by Workout New York’s Holly Rilinger, and classes by Under Armour athlete Shauna Harrison. gurneysmontauk.com

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TRI-STATE

RESERVATION REQUEST

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HOW TO BUY IN THE HAMPTONS

Sagaponack's Wölffer Estate

Wells Fargo Southampton branch manager and home mortgage consultant Christine Curiale shares the inside scoop on getting a home on the East End

POP A CORK IN THE NORTH FORK

What advice can you give to prospective Hamptons home buyers? Put a great team together: real estate broker, lawyer, home mortgage consultant, engineer, and surveyor. Speaking with knowledgeable local professionals definitely goes a long way, as there are intricacies to buying out here. On the financing side, many people are surprised by the flexible options that are available— some that require as little as 10.01% down for jumbo buyers, without mortgage insurance! Wells Fargo offers several jumbo loan options for the upscale homebuyer, including a recast feature that gives buyers a way to lower their monthly payments without refinancing—after making a large principal payment, your principal-andinterest payments are recalculated.

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Kontokosta Winery, in Greenport

What’s the best time of year to look for a home in the Hamptons? Hamptons real estate has truly become a year-round endeavor. People come for the light, ocean, and space. The changing of seasons in spring and fall is always beautiful.

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Now is the perfect time to visit Long Island’s boutique wineries—before the Memorial Day madness sets in. Fifty-seven of them dot the North Fork and the Hamptons, some with grapevines overlooking the sea. Among the best are Kontokosta Winery (kontokostawinery.com), which occupies an energy-efficient building with a lawn that sweeps down to the Long Island Sound; family-run McCall Wines (mccallwines.com), in a repurposed horse stable; and Provence-inspired Croteaux Vineyards (croteaux.com)—the only American winemaker exclusively devoted to rosé (Jean George pours it at his restaurants). Back in the Hamptons, Sagaponack’s Wölffer Estate (wolffer.com)—one of Long Island’s most picturesque vineyards—just renovated its tasting room and boutique, opening up the space to enhance its light, airy atmosphere.

Which Hamptons towns are primed for real estate investment? Westhampton, Quogue, and Remsenburg are hot this year; [they're] the final frontier. Hampton Bays has emerged as an affordable alternative to traditional enclaves, with the ability to create instant equity and value. Sag Harbor is an enduring hot spot with a cool eclectic vibe, and in such high demand it's basically its own market. Southampton Village will always be the blue-chip investment, with proximity to sugar-sand beaches, prime shopping with a hometown feel, and the sophisticated nuances of prime real estate investments. It's also of easy access to New York City and other destinations further east. Across the region, I’m seeing many buyers choosing to custom-build homes. Wells Fargo’s exclusive Builder Best program is often a great fit for these folks, as it offers them the opportunity to protect themselves against changing interest rates while they build their dream house, with rate locks available for up to 24 months (with a required, nonrefundable extended lock fee).

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W LFFER ESTATE/PHOTO BY ICTOR RUGG. CHRISTINE CURIALE/PHOTO BY DANIEL GONZALEZ. KONTOKOSTA WINERY/PHOTO BY BRIDGET ELKIN CREATI E.

When a split between co-owners Gabby Karan de Felice and Maurizio Marfoglia resulted in Tutto il Giorno’s departure from Southampton last year, Marfoglia launched Dopo La Spiaggia in its place. The restaurant was such a hit, there’s now a second, larger location in East Hampton. Open yearround, it serves scallops with caviar, a decadent truffle-stuffed chicken that requires 24 hours advance notice, and other twists on Italian favorites. dopolaspiaggia.com


HOUSTON CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

April 8 marks the 30th annual Houston Art Car Parade. With 250 cars, bikes, skates, and more—each bedecked, bedazzled, and otherwise turned into a rolling canvas—it’s the largest event of its kind in the world. thehoustonartcarparade.com

LAS VEGAS

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NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

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ON A ROLL

How father-and-son-in-law bonding yielded a booming local skateboard business When Houstonian Jake Eshelman first met his now father-in-law, Hugh Crump, they forged an unexpected connection over their mutual love of skateboarding. “The difference was that he was skating back in the ‘60s, before it was really a thing,” Eshelman says. In 2013, inspired by the generation that dismantled their roller skates to make DIY boards, Eshelman set out to create a modern skateboard similar to those Crump rode. “It ended up being worlds better than I thought: Not only beautiful, but an incredible, responsive ride,” he says. Eventually, on the advice of friends and family, Eshelman launched Side Project Skateboards with an online pop-up shop. His one-of-a-kind creations are crafted in reclaimed woods handpicked from material “destined for the dump;” they start at $435. Made in Houston, each board is outfitted with Bennett Vector trucks, 3DM urethane wheels in vintage red to match the truck bushings, and custom-cut Horween Leather Company risers. “My favorite customers are the ones so taken by my work that they buy a board in order to learn,” Eshelman says. “It’s incredibly rewarding to hear that I’ve inspired someone to try something new.” sideprojectskateboards.com

Options abound at the 1,000-room Marriott Marquis Houston, a new luxury high-rise in the heart of Downtown. Our favorite? The 29th-floor presidential suite, a corner space that feels more like a city loft than a hotel room, with lookingglass windows and an open terrace off the master bedroom. No matter your accommodation, a dip in the Texas Sky River—possibly the only rooftop lazy river in the shape of the Lone Star State— is a must. marriott.com

A nail bar station at Paloma

RESERVATION REQUEST

The Heights’ hip new highlight, Starfish—a comfy oyster bar run by executive chef Armando Ramirez—is the seafood-centric sixth spot from restaurateur Lee Ellis. Ride the wave of senses that are the seared sea scallops with Texas rubyred grapefruit, crispy avocado, and jalapeño glaze. tar ou to com

FOR MORE ON HOUSTON, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Chef Hugo Ortega’s latest venture, Xochi (pronounced “sochee”), in Dowtown, is an ode to Oaxaca, Mexico—or “the land of the seven moles.” Take your time with the mole sampler plate, tetelas (cheesey blue masa triangles), and anything on the house-made chocolate menu. Bonus: The bar is stocked with 100 mezcals. xochihouston.com

About Face The city’s beauty landscape gets a makeover

Maryam Naderi’s new BLVD Place retreat, Paloma (paloma-beauty.com), the latest on a very short list of non-toxic nail spas, only uses carcinogen-free polishes like Chanel, Dior, and Lauren B., along with organic skincare by Weleda. Say goodbye to stinky acrylic! The edgy Birds Barbershop (birdsbarbershop.com) debuts its ninth location (and first outside of Austin) in a former Heights laundromat. With cuts for men, women, and children—plus vintage arcade games and ice-cold Shiners—it begs for a family excursion. Scent connoisseurs take note: Saks Fifth Avenue at the Galleria is now one of the few places in town—and the only Saks in the country—to carry French import Serge Lutens perfumes (us.sergelutens.com), a collection that includes the new L'Eau de Paille, an exquisite potion that smells of fresh hay, frankincense, and vetiver.

PALOMA/PHOTO BY BENJAMIN HILL. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

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ROOM REQUEST


LAS VEGAS CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

The $ 50 million transformation of the Monte Carlo Las egas Resort and Casino—slated for completion in 2018—will include a 292-room version of New York’s NoMad Hotel and the 2,700-room Park MGM resort. montecarlo.com/las-vegas

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TRI-STATE

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ENCORE/PHOTO BY BARBARA KRAFT. JARDIN/PHOTO BY JEFF GREEN. MOMOFUKU/PHOTO BY GABRIELE STABILE. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

Why stay in a room when you can book a mansion? Wynn Las Vegas and Encore have raised the accommodation stakes by offering their tremendous apartments and villas for rent, including the 5,829-square-foot Encore three-bedroom duplex, with its own massage room, billiards room, and 16-seat dining room. Guests who’ve had their fill of in-room dining would do well to book a table at Jardin, chef Joseph Zanelli’s new casually elegant restaurant inside the Encore. It’s the perfect spot for breakfast (Maine lobster Benedict), lunch (crispy buttermilk chicken sandwiches), and dinner (oven-baked prawns or a bone-in rib eye). The Moscow Mule cart (right) adds to the buzz, and the flowerpot dessert, a bouquet of chocolate and edible flora, is almost too pretty to eat. Almost. wynnlasvegas.com

RESERVATION REQUEST

At David Chang’s Momofuku inside The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, adventurous foodies will find everything from Cantonese seafood platters to Korean stews to fried chicken with caviar, all served in a dining room that overlooks the open kitchen. What’s dinner in Vegas without a show? cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

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CHECKING IN ON THE WYNN

The Encore Three-Bedrom Duplex Suite


LAS VEGAS Where to buy your Vegas dream home... There’s no greater luxury than a clear conscience, something Growth Luxury Homes knows all too well. The futureminded developer, which combines eco-friendly technology with the highestend designs, has unveiled two Mediterranean-style houses with home automation, energy-efficient appliances, movie theaters, wellness centers, and spa-inspired master bedrooms. Located in upscale Southern Highlands, the estates, with price tags of $4.2 million and $6.5 million, also come with resort-style pools and the requisite mountain views. growthluxuryhomes.com

...AND WHERE TO FURNISH IT To outfit your eco-sanctuary, look no further than Restoration Hardware’s Gallery at Tivoli Village, where discerning decorators can find the latest RH Modern designs, like Adrian Pearsall’s iconic Curve sofa, Robert Sonneman’s Orbiter II Task lamp, and metal artist Jon Sarriugarte’s industrial-chic light fixtures (top right). Go (home) in peace. rh.com

Cocktails and Conversation Catching up with David Rabin at The Dorsey New York nightlife and restaurant impresario David Rabin—the man behind such boîtes as Jimmy, The Skylark, The Lambs Club, and Cafe Clover—wants to make one thing clear about his new hot spot, The Dorsey: It’s “definitely not a nightclub.” “It’s for those nights when you’re looking to go out but you can’t face the idea of going to the club, where you can’t hear each other speak,” he explains. The 4,000-square-foot cocktail lounge is Rabin’s first venture in Vegas since running V Bar at The Venetian more than a decade ago, and he’s excited about the debut of what he calls a nightlife experience for grownups. Instead of sweating and Snapchatting the night away to bass-thumping electronic dance music, patrons of The Dorsey can perch comfortably on cozy sofas in a space that recalls a handsome library, as a sophisticated soundtrack of neo-soul, hip-hop, old-school house, and indie rock sets the tone. The elevated beverage menu, curated by ace mixologist Sam Ross (Attaboy), includes Ross’s calling card, the Penicillin (a smoky-sweet Scotch cocktail), as well as mojitos for two and bottles of fine Doyard grower champagne. “It’s all about the alchemy,” Rabin says of the Thomas Schlesser-designed lounge. And don’t be afraid to stick your hand into its fireplace—the flame doesn’t burn. You could Instagram it but, given the posh surroundings, we suggest using it the old-fashioned way: as a conversation starter. venetian.com

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The light-filled Gallery at Trivoli Village (left), the Axis Three-Tier Chandelier (above), and the Graydon Shagreen FiveDrawer Dresser (below)


MIAMI ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ROOM REQUEST

Feel the sea breeze, squared, when you book a Premier Oceanfront room at the Four Seasons Hotel at The Surf Club, hyper-modernist Richard Meier’s glass addition to the iconic resort. “You can watch the sunrise and sunset from the same wraparound balcony,” says GM Reed Kandalaft. And everything else from the floor-to-ceiling windows. fourseasons.com

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RESERVATION REQUEST

Stephen Starr’s hit New York brasserie Upland (uplandmiami.com) has arrived in the Sunshine State. (Score a seat at the chef’s counter to see James Beard semifinalist for Best Chef in America Justin Smillie in action.) Some say too many cooks spoil the broth, but not the men behind NYC’s The Smile: alongside Craig Robins and David Grutman, they debut the Design District’s OTL (otlmia.com), a coffee klatch and snack bar serving wholesome fare like banana quinoa muffins and basil lemonade. In Bal Harbour, celebrated chef Paula DaSilva reboots the Ritz-Carlton’s oceanfront dining room with Artisan Beach House, where her former 1500 Degrees regulars can reunite with her pork belly tacos— served here with kimchee and rice crackers. artisanbeachhouse.com Breakfast at OTL

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TRI-STATE

A NOUVEL NOTION

Just when it seemed there wasn’t room for another Pritzker Prize–winner in Miami, Jean Nouvel announced the arrival of Monad Terrace, in South Beach—the starchitect’s first project in the 305. From a framed fantasy lagoon to cabinetry in mirrored glass and bronze, Nouvel is keeping close watch on all design elements. His favorite? The building’s sawtooth façade. “It’s a bit like a fish skin with scales,” he says of the semi-reflective glass that welcomes natural light and offers unobstructed views. “It’s totally private. You are completely [taken by] the site.” monadterrace.miami

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PENTHOUSE PALACES

Even on swank Fisher Island, Palazzo del Sol is breaking records. One of the residential property’s three penthouses recently sold for $35 million, while another closed at $3,236 per square foot—an all-time high on the island. The amenities (from interior common areas to rooftop pools) aren’t the only reason buyers are investing. They view Palazzo del Sol’s turnkey models, designed by three very distinctive companies, as extensions of the city’s flourishing design scene. According to sales and marketing director Dora Puig, local firm Antrobus + Ramirez was a shoo-in for one of the units. “I’d been following their work, and they really nail the luxe beach house,” says Puig, who also commissioned models from Italy’s Henge and Brazil’s Artefacto. “They [all] understand that island living isn’t just flip flops.” palazzodelsol.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

CITIES


Chef Thomas Keller, who worked at the Palm Beach Yacht Club before earning three Michelin stars each for the French Laundry and Per Se, will return to South Florida with a more casual concept, set to open in Surfside in 2018. thomaskeller.com

Rendering of the lobby at the Ritz-Carlton Residences Miami Beach

KEY TO THE CITY

Romero Britto For the Miami artist, the city itself is a colorful canvas. Here, a roadmap to his local hot spots. CUP OF JOE

Panther Coffee is very artsy, and the java is delicious. panthercoffee.com POWER LUNCH

COCKTAIL HOUR

RITZ-CARLTON/RENDERINGS BY DBOX. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

FIELD TRIP

The Wynwood Walls. thewynwoodwalls.com

Rendering of the pool at the Ritz-Carlton property, due to open later this year

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In today’s world of luxury real estate, the amenity is king. As properties compete to make their residents’ lives as easy—and glamorous—as possible, the bar has risen so high that concierges, pools, gyms, cinemas, and spas now seem par for the course. The Ritz-Carlton Residences Miami Beach, scheduled for completion later this year, is no stranger to the perk game—its 111 condominiums and 15 standalone villas guarantee access to all the aforementioned, plus a particularly unique feature that sets them apart from other buildings rising across the Magic City: The Piero Lissoni–designed property will be home to an art studio, where residents will be invited to express their creativity through painting, sculpture, and more. The idea for the space came from local sculptor Tatiana Blanco: never without a blank canvas in her own home, she noticed how keen her guests were to pick up a paintbrush—and suggested the concept to the Ritz-Carlton. “There’s an artist in everybody,” she says. “It makes me kind of sad when people are like ‘Oh, I used to do art.’ Why stop? It’s so good for you.” theresidencesmiamibeach.com

DATE NIGHT

Fancy date night? The Forge. theforge.com

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Home Is Where The Art Is

At the Four Seasons, Edge Steak & Bar is casually elegant, chic, and private. fourseasons.com/miami

DUJOU R .COM

MC Kitchen, in the Design District. mckitchenmiami.com


NEW YORK CITY CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

ROOM REQUEST

Where to sleep like a king in the Big Apple right now Last fall, the Beekman, a Thompson Hotel debuted in one of the city’s most iconic works of 19th century architecture. Its two Turret Penthouses launch this spring, giving guests the unique opportunity to sleep in a duplex suite with 30-foot ceilings and a private terrace that recalls a bygone era. thebeekman.com

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Among Brooklyn’s fresh crop of luxury properties, the Williamsburg Hotel stands out for its thoughtful design and soon-to-open rooftop bar, the Watertower. Book a Studio Terrace for floor-to-ceiling windows and 180degree views of Manhattan’s skyline. thewilliamsburghotel.com The 1 Hotels brand takes eco-consciousness to the next level with its newly opened 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge, where all accommodations incorporate organic cotton bedding, filtered water taps, and abundant flora. Reserve a corner suite and you’ll even get a hammock to lounge in while you gaze at the hotel’s famous namesake. 1hotels.com/brooklyn-bridge The Royal Suite at the Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown is the city’s latest chic crash-pad, with a marble fireplace, bespoke art, butler service, and plenty of space for entertaining—2,400 square feet, to be exact. fourseasons.com/newyorkdowntown

SHOP TALK

On Dumbo’s waterfront, a vacant warehouse has been transformed into the Empire Stores complex. West Elm was the first of its myriad boutiques, cafes, and offices to set up shop; an outpost of Detroit lifestyle brand Shinola is slated to open in May. empirestoresdumbo.com

Calling all beauty queens! Make Up For Ever’s latest flagship, at 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, is the cosmetics store of the future—complete with a virtual lookbook, digital lash station, and trending makeup bar where shoppers can try new techniques with the help of a pro. makeupforever.com

TRI-STATE


Real estate developer the Naftali Group has breathed new life into 77th Street with two apartment buildings, 210 West 77 and 221 West 77, that exude Upper West Side charm. Think Juliet balconies, terraced setbacks, and casement windows—classic luxury near Central Park. thenew77th.com

ON DISPLAY

Three of the season's must-see exhibits Georgia O’Keeffe’s first museum show, in 1927, was at the Brooklyn Museum, so “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern,” which opens there on March 3, is a homecoming of sorts. Pieces from the artist’s wardrobe are displayed alongside paintings and photographs of O’Keeffe and her homes, offering insight into the private life that informed her work. In April, an exhibition of Dale Chihuly’s whimsical glass sculptures at the New York Botanical Garden will complement the blooming flora. And in May, rising artist Kimia Ferdowsi Kline is set to debut a series of colorful paintings at the Lower East Side’s Turn Gallery. Kline is quickly making a name for herself (collectors include Argentine chef Francis Mallmann), so the time is ripe to invest in one of her expressive canvases.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Brooklyn Bridge,” 1949

KEY TO THE CITY

Chad Brauze

Bevy’s newly-installed chef shares where you can find him when he’s not in the kitchen CUP OF JOE

Irving Farm, at 79th and Broadway, is my favorite spot. My wife took me there on a hot tip from Le Bernardin’s old pastry chef and it did not disappoint. They make a pour-over with Honduran beans that transformed the way I think about coffee. irvingfarm.com

the launch of Southern Italian comfort food mecca Leuca (leuca.com) and rooftop lounge Westlight (westlightnyc.com). And at Boutros (boutrosbk. com), in Brooklyn Heights, Lebanese-Syrian chefowner Allen Dabagh serves eclectic Middle Eastern cuisine. Pro-tip: save room for the “unbaked” cheesecake. Philippe Chow’s Peking duck (left) and cotton candy Baked Alaska (below)

COCKTAIL HOUR

Wallflower, in the West Village, is handsdown my favorite bar. The owner/head bartender, Xavier Herit, has never made me a bad drink. Have a seat and tell him a few things you’re in the mood for (in winter I want bourbon and spice; in spring I need herbs and acidity; summer is Tiki time) and he’ll craft you an Instagramworthy beverage. allflo r c com RETAIL THERAPY

Head over to 36 East 31st Street, take the elevator up to the 11th floor, and experience cooking nirvana at JB Prince. They carry only the best-of-the-best cooking equipment. I’ve stocked both my home and professional kitchens here. jbprince.com FIELD TRIP

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I’m especially fond of the Neue Galerie, located in a 1914 building by Carrère & Hastings, designers of the New York Public Library. It centers on 20th century German and Austrian art. I’ve never seen an exhibit I didn’t want to return to. neuegalerie.org

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(bevynyc.com) high-design dining room boasts an installation by Random International (creators of MoMA’s Rain Room) and a new menu by chef Chad Brauze, formerly of Rotisserie Georgette (more on Brauze at right). Hit-maker Andrew Carmellini lands a one-two punch at Williamsburg’s William Vale hotel, with

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FOUR SEASONS/PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN HORAN.GEORGIA O KEEFFE/BROOKLYN MUSEUM; BE UEST OF MARY CHILDS DRAPER, 77.11/PHOTO BY BROOKLYN MUSEUM. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

RESERVATION REQUEST

The Upper East Side’s swanky Chinese restaurant Philippe (philippechow.com) recently debuted a new look and a new chef: John Villa, formerly of the Tao Group. “Our fully renovated top floor is decorated in bold red and gold,” Villa says. “We’ve brought new life to a New York favorite.” Steps from Central Park, Bevy’s

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POWER LUNCH

Thirty-eight dollars for three courses at Nougatine at Jean-Georges is lunch’s platonic ideal. My wife and I bring our 18-month-old daughter and sit in the back so she can peer into the kitchen as the cooks work. And the food? It’s JG—of course it’s amazing! jean-georges.com


ORANGE COUNTY CITIES

ASPEN/DENVER

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

Those who can, teach Check out the work of Ansel Adams’ and Dorothea Lange’s disciples at “The Golden Decade Photography at the California School of Fine Arts, 19 5-55, at the Laguna Art Museum through May 29. lagunaartmuseum.org

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TRI-STATE

The Webster Goes West

DUJOU R .COM

High-fashion boutique The Webster—already a must-visit for discerning shoppers in South Beach, Bal Harbour, and Houston—has arrived in California, in the form of a 4,000-square-foot South Coast Plaza haven. Of the eclectic goods hitting the SoCal location’s shelves this season, CEO and founder Laure Hériard Dubreuil counts Stella McCartney’s ruffletrimmed sweatshirt, Aquazzura’s block-heel sandals, and Thom Browne’s leather brogues (as well as his 10’ longboard) among her favorites. thewebster.us

THE NEW HISTORIC

A fresh San Diego hotel is the perfect weekend getaway How does a family known for its iconic hotels and resorts formulate an entirely novel brand? Ask Michael Fuerstman, son of Montage Hotels and Resorts’ founder Alan Fuerstman, who recently launched the Pendry San Diego in the bustling Gaslamp Quarter, a stone’s throw from Petco Park. “It’s a mix of Southern California heritage and modern luxury,” Fuerstman says of the 317-room property tailored to urban tastes. Lindsay and Raan Parton, of L.A.-based boutiques Alchemy Works and Apolis, bring retail savvy to Provisional, the hotel’s hybrid shop and cafe, while chef JoJo Ruiz serves a seafood-centric menu at its restaurant, Lionfish. For the ultimate Pendry San Diego experience, general manager Michael O’Donohue says, “the Pendry Suite offers our most expansive city vistas: up-close views of the Gaslamp Quarter from the living space and cinematic panoramas of the skyline from the bedroom. The Cabana Pool Suite provides private direct access to the pool, complete with its own cabana.” pendryhotels.com/ san-diego

Beloved O.C. bistro Marché Moderne ups the ante with the debut of its grand dining room in Crystal Cove Shopping Center. Florent Marneau’s Californiainflected interpretations of French cuisine—like seared scallops served over mijoté of horseradish, Beluga lentils, roasted salsify, and petite Red Meadow sorrel—shine when paired with a glass of William Fèvre Chablis premier cru, especially in the appropriately bright and breezy Newport Beach setting. marchemoderne.net

FOR MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Pacific City expands its culinary offerings in a major way with Bluegold, from Blackhouse Hospitality restaurateur Jed Sanford and chef Tin Vuong. From a killer cubano sandwich to Santa Barbara sea urchin risotto with hijiki, coddled egg, and truffle vin, Vuong brings the best of land and sea to Huntington Beach. Look for the unmarked door to LSXO, the 28-seat restaurant-within-a-restaurant where the chef explores the cuisine of his Vietnamese heritage in an intimate, subdued setting. dinebluegold.com

THE WEBSTER/PHOTO BY JERI KOEGEL. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

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Great music isn’t the only draw at SunFest May 3 7 this year. Fans planning to catch Fetty Wap, Tinashe, and the newly relevant 3 Doors Down’s performances will also be treated to nibbles curated by the folks behind the Palm Beach Food & Wine Festival. sunfest.com

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A primer to the area’s latest hip hub

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Trade a bed for a comfy chaise—or an oceanfront cabana with a flat-screen, fan, and fridge—at Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, which debuts a new pool-scape in time for spring break. Butlers ferry bites from Breeze Ocean Kitchen, where the vibrant decor is the latest phase of Jonathan Adler’s retro property redesign. The tuna-and-watermelon ceviche tastes even better with an ancho-and-passion fruit daiquiri. eaupalmbeach.com

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Devotees of Kitchen can now grab popular dishes like the farmhouse salad and the coconut cake to-go at the restaurant’s little sister, Prep Kitchen, which also sells grapefruitscented Nest candles and local potter Lani Goodrich’s ceramic kitchenware. kitchenpb.com

FOR MORE ON PALM BEACH, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

EAU PALM BEACH/PHOTO BY MORIS MORENO. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

FIELD OF DREAMS

Wellington Equestrian Partners, the new owners of the International Polo Club, aren’t horsing around. Even if you’ve never stomped a divot during halftime à la Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman—that polka-dot dress!—you’ll enjoy the slew of new amenities at the club, open through April 23. “It isn’t just about dressing up,” says principal Katherine Bellissimo. “There are pockets of different people having different experiences, like tailgating.” In the eastern Pavilion, Sunday brunches are literally cooler than ever before, thanks to a larger covered terrace with ceiling fans. Veuve Cliquot hosts an adjacent champagne garden, and tucked behind the hedges is the new Coco Polo Lounge—a private bar sponsored by Seminole Casino Coconut Creek. Relocating the after-party to its own venue on the field’s west side freed up the IPC’s pool, which has been revamped for members and their guests. Face-painting and a complimentary kids’ zone for pony rides bring this fun-filled family outing galloping over the finish line. ipc.coth.com

The Warehouse District, a swath of historic structures in downtown West Palm Beach, is the area’s new foodie HQ. In keeping with the food hall trend, its Grange Hall Market features local vendors and eateries like Rabbit Coffee (known for nitrogen-infused cold brew on tap), Little Red Truck (cheese boards and oysters), and Skinny Bird, where rotisserie chicken and butcher sandwiches are A Manta swimsuit at paired with Jura wines. South Elizabeth Ave Station Florida craft beer pioneer Tequesta Brewing Company’s Steam Horse Brewing (their third location) pours dozens on tap, including a few exclusives. At Elizabeth Ave Station, the curated selection of crafts and home decor includes Manta’s minimal, eco-friendly swimwear and HeartSwell’s hand-lettered stationery. Also on site: Damian Walker’s exclusive Palm Beach Squash Club, where only 75 members (and the occasional guest) have access to the courts. warehousedistrictwpb.com


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Boutiques by the Bay

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The interior of Emily Holt’s Hero Shop

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Trout crudo with plum, radish, and jalapeño at The Morris

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For unpretentious bistro dining in Portrero Flats, look no further than The Morris (themorris-sf.com). Its local, seasonal menu includes nose-to-tail cooking and an old-world wine cellar stocked with a number of impressive vintage Chartreuses. Find owner Paul Einbund at the back bar to arrange a tasting.

SAN FRANCISCO

Hotel Via, the city’s first “ground-up build” luxury hotel in almost a decade, debuts this spring in sunny South Beach, across from AT&T Park. No two rooms on a floor are the same. Old-school hospitality and high-tech amenities make it a king among hotels, and the rooftop bar—with 360-degree views of the bay and city skyline—is its crowning feature. hotelviasf.com

A slew of gallery-like shops up the city’s fashion ante

When correctly combined, San Francisco’s independent spirit and cosmopolitan landscape have fostered some seriously inventive retail concepts (the Bay Area is incubator central). Fashion boutiques in particular continue to crop up and, despite the city's 7x7 constraints (for non-natives, that’s its square mileage), there’s plenty of room for everyone. The Tenderloin is now home to former Vogue editor Emily Holt’s Hero Shop (heroshopsf.com), which carries Veronica Beard, Gabriela Hearst, and Creatures of the Wind. Downtown, Project Runway designer Jake Wall and business partner Nathan Johnson launched JAKE (jake.clothing); their made-toorder menswear and women’s custom gowns are gala-season favorites. The “fewer, better things” mentality at Cuyana (cuyana.com) makes it a go-to for chic techies stocking up on leather goods, unfussy accessories, and luxe staples like silk t-shirt dresses. Nearby, Moncler’s (moncler.com) latest concept boutique, a marvel of sleek design by architecture studio Gilles & Boissier, offers the latest high-performance sportswear from its Moncler Grenoble line. And on Fillmore Street, the newest location of stylists Emily Current and Merritt Elliott’s Current/Elliott (currentelliott.com) denim brand sells classic fits and unique silhouettes that transcend trend (because in Levi’s hometown, there’s no such thing as too many pairs of good jeans).

PALM BEACH

Thanks to Michelinstarred chef Hiroyuki Kanda’s expert knifework, reservations are a must for the 27-seat dining room at Napa’s Kenzo (kenzonapa.com), which serves a twist on the traditional Japanese prix-fix menu, with seafood flown in daily from Tokyo ($225). On Downtown Napa’s riverfront, The Corner Napa (cornerbarnapa. com) is a hybrid restaurant-bar-wine shop that features modern American cuisine, handcrafted cocktails, and an impeccable wine library. Pair the Corner Cocktail (Belvedere, lime, fresh granny smith apple juice) with a Foie Gras PB&J.

The $9 million renovation of the 28-acre Carneros Resort & Spa was worth every penny. While its 86 cottages and 14 suites— rustic farmhouse charm on the outside, clean-lined modern comfort on the inside—are equally well-appointed, we recommend booking a 2,400-square-foot private villa for the ultimate stay. Why? Because each comes with 1,400 square feet of private outdoor space. Enough said. carnerosresort.com

THE MORRIS/PHOTO BY ANESSA YAP-EINBUND. HERO SHOP/ PHOTO BY LESLIE SANTARINA. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

CITIES

The San Francisco Ballet, at the historic War Memorial Opera House, stages a series of standout performances this season, including “Must-See Balanchine, “Contemporary oices, and that eternal classic, “Swan Lake. sfballet.org


TRI-STATE CITIES

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The New York Distillers Guild’s just-launched website provides a wealth of information on the thriving small-batch distilleries of Brooklyn, the Hudson alley, and beyond. It’s perfect for planning a spiritsfilled hop through the state. nydistilled.com

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FOR MORE ON THE TRI-STATE, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

ON GOLDEN POND

New Yorkers have a new reason to trek upstate this season, thanks to the Brentwood Hotel (brentwood-hotel.com), Saratoga’s only accommodation with clear views of the city’s famed horse racing track. It’s the first property owned and operated by Brooklyn-based creative team Studio Tack, which is recognized for its sleek renovations of run-down motels and motor lodges, like Scribner’s in the Catskills. Go for a weekend and you’ll find there’s much more to Saratoga than the races (sorry, Seabiscuit). Its downtown is vibrant, and the Upper Hudson Valley wine trail—dotted with independent vineyards like Victory View Vineyard (victoryviewvineyard.com) and Amorici Vineyard (amoricivineyard.com)—is becoming known for recently-developed varieties like marquette and lacrosse grapes.

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A shoreline view from the newly constructed cottage at the Hepburn estate

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The Connecticut hideaway built in 1939 by legendary actress Katharine Hepburn is back on the the market following a faithful restoration by Sciame Development, an affiliate of Sciame Construction (the muscle behind some of New York City’s boldest projects, like The Shed, Hudson Yards’ 17,000-square-foot arts space in a retractable glass shell). When renovating classic homes, the family-owned firm prides itself on its meticulous attention to detail. But make no mistake: At 8,300 square feet, the six-bedroom Hepburn estate—on the Long Island Sound in the tony hamlet of Old Saybrook— is anything but small-scale. Following the On Golden Pond star’s 2003 death, the Sciames swooped in, intending to flip the windblown fixer-upper. But after a makeover that retained many of the house’s original details, like exposed brick and pine-paneled fireplaces, CEO Frank Sciame Jr.’s wife insisted they keep it; the family vacationed there for years. (Along with the main house, a 3,800-square-foot cottage that the Sciames added to the property is also for sale.) The price is upon request—but with panoramic water views and the aptly named Golden Pond out back, the home, and its history, can be better described as priceless. sciamedevelopment.com

DUJOU R .COM

BRENTWOOD HOTEL/PHOTO BY READ MCKENDREE. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

A summer playground for New England’s elite since the Gilded Age, Newport, RI, (about four hours by car from Manhattan; less than two from Hartford) will lure a fresh crop of savvy travelers with the debut of Gurney’s Newport Resort & Marina. Fans of the Montauk location will find the same mod-nautical style, plus a full-service spa, spacious pool deck, and an outpost of hit Italian bistro Scarpetta (opening in May). gurneysresorts.com/newport

Atlantic City’s Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa welcomes Angeline by Michael Symon this spring. The Iron Chef and co-host of ABC’s “The Chew” will bring his grandmother’s old-school Sicilian cuisine to the casino’s star-powered restaurant scene. “I can’t wait to be a part of the Borgata family and spend even more time with my fellow Iron Chefs and friends Bobby Flay and Geoffrey Zakarian,” says Symon. theborgata.com


PARTIES ASPEN/DENVER

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Lona Alia and Yesim Arslanbek

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Indira Cesarine Jason Binn, Archie Drury, Karolina Kurkova

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Dr. Richard Firshein, Jonathan Cheban, Jason Binn, Jason Strauss

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Adam Williams and Daniel Lazar

Adrienne Bosh, Jason Binn, Chris Bosh, Mr. Brainwash

Bill Hemmer, Miki Naftali, Frieda Naftali, Jason Binn Jason Binn, Audrina Patridge, Jonathan Greller, Oscar Feldenkreis, Alexandra Lasky

A Garden Party

Kicking Off Art Basel

Miki Naftali and Danielle Naftali The opening of the garden space at Naftali Group’s newest New York property WHERE: The Shephard at 275 West 10th Street

WHO: Audrina Patridge, Karolina Kurkov , Larsa Pippen, Chris Bosh, Nan Bush, and Bruce Weber WHAT: A poolside celebration with music from The Extortionists WHERE: The Confidante Miami Beach PRESENTED BY: Gilt, Hollie Watman, InList, JetSmarter, Kuro

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WHAT:

NAFTALI GROUP OPENING/PHOTO BY ASTRID STAWIARZ, GETTY IMAGES FOR DUJOUR MEDIA. THIS BEAUTIFUL FANTASTIC MO IE SCREENING/PHOTO BY ASTRID STAWIARZ, GETTY IMAGES FOR DUJOUR. ART BASEL/PHOTOS BY GUSTA O CABALLERO AND ASTRID STAWIARZ, GETTY IMAGES FOR DUJOUR. JASON’S BIRTHDAY/PHOTO BY ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR DUJOUR.

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DJ Fulano and Jason Binn

Ronn Torossian and David Seelinger

Camilla Olsson and Kevin Crawford Tamara Grove and Sabine Brown

Lilla Soria

Simon Huck and Lizzie Grubman

Nancy Shevell and Sir Paul McCartney

Fonzworth Bentley and Ernie Arias

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A Night at the Movies

A Birthday Bash

WHO: Simon Aboud, Paul McCartney, Mary McCartney, Lilla Soria, Lady Monika Bacardi, Andrea Iervolino WHAT: Cocktails and a screening of This Beautiful Fantastic WHERE: Park Hyatt New York and the S A Theatre PRESENTED BY: Elit vodka, EmpireCLS, Gilt, JetSmarter

WHO: DJ Fulano, Simon Huck, the DuJour team, Andrew Warren, Abigail Breslin WHAT: DuJour CEO Jason Binnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday party WHERE: Megu at the Dream Downtown


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1. New York’s Justin Davidson, Harry Macklowe, Jeff Blau, Ian Schrager 2. Douglas Elliman’s Gordon von Broock, Hundred Stories president Robin Dolch 3. Jason Binn, Stoli global CEO Dmitry Efimov 4. The Binn family 5. Jason Binn, Equinox CEO Harvey Spevak 6. Inner Circle Connect CEO and founder Merv Matheson, Jason Binn, 5WPR CEO and JetSmarter CMO Ronn Torossian, Talent Resources CEO Mike Heller, Jon Bakhshi 7. Andrew Rosen, Jason Binn 8. Luxe Collective Group CEO Walter Coyle, Hearst Magazines publishing director Michael Clinton 9. Tom Byrczek, Virginia Cademartori, Adriana Martone, James Shay, Fiona Murray, Jason Binn, Carrie Crecca, Berggitte Yossi Maeser 10. Jason Binn, JetSmarter CEO Sergey Petrossov 11. Marta Nowakowski, David Yurman, Sybil Yurman 12. Jason Binn, Scott Macpherson 13. Mara Roskopp, Jason Binn, Misahara Jewelry designer Lepa Galeb-Roskopp 14. Petra Nemcova, JetSmarter EVP of sales and operations Lolita Frangulyan, Perry Ellis, Jason Binn, Audrina Patridge 15. Jason Binn, American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault 16. Seminole Gaming SVP Emre Erkul, Jon Bon Jovi, Seminole Gaming COO Larry Mullin 17. Van Cleef & Arpels America president and CEO Alain Bernard, Jason Binn, Witkoff CIO Scott C. Alper 18. Jason Binn, Bella Hunter, Restoration Hardware CEO Gary Friedman 19. Instrum, Moinian Group SVP of residential properties Natasha Vardi, Jason Binn 20. Westime founder John Simonian, Jason Binn 21. Griffon CEO Ron Kramer, Apollo Global Management co-founder Marc Rowan 22. EMM Group owner Mark Birnbaum, Bungalow 8 owner Amy Sacco, Jason Binn, Maryam Emamian, Trec Worldwide CEO Alex Merrell, DJ Michelle Pesce 23. Richard Kirshenbaum 24. David Blaine, Bulgari North America CEO and president Daniel Paltridge


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The Emperor’s Old Hat

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iven how poorly Napoleon Bonaparte

cared for his trademark hats, it’s a wonder any are still in existence. The diminutive emperor (5’ 6’’ without a lid) was reportedly prone to throw and kick them to the ground when angry—which, famously, he often was—or simply lose them in battle, only to have the so-called “small hats” replaced by his royal milliner, Poupard. The caps were miniature works of art, made of lightweight felt with a gray silk lining and adorned with a red pompon—to distinguish the celebrated general from the military gen-pop. Today, Napoleon’s couture headpieces, which at one point numbered fifty, are scattered among a few museums and private collections—including one of Napoleonic artifacts housed at the

Maison Moët & Chandon in Epernay, France (which offers tours and tastings with its French history lessons). Moët & Chandon president Robert-Jean de Vogüé bought the relic in 1969 for 140,000 francs (roughly equivalent to $1,300 today)—a purchase more than worth every sous when you consider the intertwined histories of the emperor and the 275-year-old bubbly. The Epernay maison has records of Napoleon placing orders there as early as 1801, and he was known to pay personal visits to Jean-Remy Moët (the grandson of Moët & Chandon founder Claude Moët) while traversing the country on his military expeditions. His court artist, Jean-Baptiste Isabey, designed the official Moët & Chandon residence. And of course it was Napoleon who supposedly said, “Champagne! In victory, one deserves it; in defeat, one needs it.” So next time you want to pop bottles like a boss, do it in a bicorne cap. —SAMUEL ANDERSON

PHOTO © MICHEL JOLYOT/MOËT & CHANDON

How Napoleon’s signature chapeau wound up in the cellar of a distinguished château


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Spring 2017  

Salma Hayek gets candid about being 50; the season's most vibrant jewelry; the newest plastic surgery trend for pets and more.

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