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SPRING + SUMMER 2019

the

Hustle

THE SEX INDUSTRY IN THE DIGITAL AGE

LET'S TALK PERIOD SEX

Every Body is a Beach Body

These swimwear brands are doing inclusion right.

drakemagazine.com | 1


TRIXIES SALON

trixiessalon.com


Features SPRING + SUMMER 2019

16 Primarily Berries If pineapple can go on pizza, so can berries.

28 Boss Babes This is how you work it.

36 The Burnout Kids It's not just a phase— it's a generation.

Feature TOC

40 Small Business Survival In the Age of Amazon What it takes to keep the lights on.

44 The Hustle

Sex sells. Meet the women making the profits.

Cover photo by Madison Kelly

drakemagazine.com | 1


DRAKE MAG EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Morgan Noll

Print ART DIRECTOR

PHOTO EDITOR

Madison Kelly

Ale Diaz

MANAGING EDITOR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Madi Koetting

Nathan Maughan

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Samantha Jones

Kaili Miller

Online EXECUTIVE ONLINE EDITOR

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Mia Tirado

Emma Brustkern

Media PR / ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR

Samantha Miller

Cheyann Neades

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Nikki Lund

Art PHOTO Jenna Cornick Josie Lie Melissa McElin Anna Niedermeier Mollie Ryan Maric Salocker

DESIGN Fatima Calderon Ceron Ellie Detweiler Anna Gleason Abby Lashbrook Kate Segler

Words Kim Bates Megan Bohall Emily Bondura Savanna Bous Bailey Coronis Ren Culliney Zoe Hanna Peyton Johnson Samantha Jones Savannah Kluesner Alexus Kreft Abby Lashbrook

Natalie Mechem Samantha Miller Will Muckian Anna Niedermeier Hannah Nuss Hallie O'Neill Jacob Reynolds Taryn Ripple Mia Tirado Helen Trisko Elizabeth Weyers Maddie Willey

Special thanks to: Catherine Staub, Jeff Inman, Sarah McCoy, Neil Ward, Kathleen Richardson, Christian Printers, Trixies Salon, Halberstadt's, The Loft DSM, Malique Miller, and all of our models. Copyright 2019 by Drake Mag and Drake Magazine. Drake Mag is published with the support of the Board of Student Communications. Opinions expressed in the magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Drake University. Letters to the Editor are encouraged and may be published online at www.drakemagazine.com. Please direct any questions, comments, or concerns to drakemag@gmail.com.

2 | spring + summer


Contents SPRING + SUMMER 2019 BITS + PIECES 6

THE CAMPAIGN GAME How to decide your vote without a dart board.

7

MODERN SELF-HELP BOOKS

7

APPS THAT HOLD YOU ACCOUNTABLE

8

Practical advice for living your best life.

Struggling to stay on top of it all? There’s an app for that.

TRAVEL BAG ESSENTIALS Going somewhere? We'll help you pack.

9

ASMR

9

TRASH TO TREASURE

Can you feel it? Here's the dirt on composting.

FOOD + DRINK 10 SUMMER ON A STICK Gourmet treats from your freezer. 12

MOCKTAILS

14

DRESS IT UP

Hold the alcohol, please. The secret's in the sauce.

FASHION + BEAUTY

51

GUT HEALTH There's more to that gut feeling.

22 BEAUTY ON A BUDGET Quality makeup, attractive prices.

52 THE BLOODY TRUTH ABOUT PERIOD SEX It's all about the benefits.

23 BROW MAINTENANCE How to shape the (arguably) most

53 LESBIAN SEX MYTHS Where porn gets it wrong.

important part of your face.

24 NAILED IT DIY nail art you can actually do. 25 SWIMWEAR FOR EVERY BODY These brands get it right. 26 STATEMENT EARRINGS Become your own conversation piece.

HEALTH + SEX 50 SELF CARE FOR YOUR ZODIAC SIGN We see some R+R

in your horoscope.

51

PIERCING CARE

Because infections really kill the vibe.

Get the recipe for this refreshing blueberrymint treat on page 11.

53 VAGINA HYGIENE How to care for down there.

MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT 54 ANCIENT POSSE Synth sounds, real emotions. 55 COMEDY QUEENS Raunchy and relatable. 56 FOREIGN FILMS Get familiar with these films. 57 THE ACCESSIBILITY GAME Games for all, all for games. 57 QUEER ARTISTS TO FOLLOW Give 'em a listen. drakemagazine.com | 3


Editor's Letter SPRING + SUMMER 2019

W

hen it comes to representing women and vaginas, the media

often falls short. So when we assign stories to our writers, a lot of times we’re really asking them to engage in a process of rewriting. Add in the fresh perspective and personal narrative, subtract the stigma and shame. Sometimes rewriting the narrative is all about going straight to the source. To learn more about the modern sex industry, we listened to what sex workers had to say (page 44). To debunk the myths about lesbian sex, we explored what mainstream porn gets wrong (page 53). To affirm that women are funny—a statement I can’t believe we still have to make—we talked with women who are getting the last laugh (pg. 55). And to expand the definition of the beach body, we found swimwear brands that are doing inclusion right (pg. 25). Now I’m not always great at giving up control, but I’m fully confident passing the baton to

ADD IN THE FRESH PERSPECTIVE AND PERSONAL NARRATIVE, SUBTRACT THE STIGMA AND SHAME.

next year’s Editor-in-Chief Madi Koetting. She’s already more organized than I’ll ever be. She’s managed to keep the same pens for three years, so I know she has all the right tools for the job. My biggest take away from this experience with Drake Mag is the importance of collaboration. It takes a whole team of diversely creative and ambitious minds to make a magazine (and endless

moral support from names that aren’t in the masthead). So please, add your voice to the mix and let us know what you think, and what Being hype woman is one of my most important roles at photoshoots— and these boss babes made it easy (page 28).

4 | spring + summer

stories you’d like to see told—or retold—next. Reach out to us at drakemag@gmail.com and read on at DrakeMagazine.com.

MORGAN NOLL, Editor-in-Chief


DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM Drake Mag doesn't stop at print. Catch up on our latest digital stories by visiting drakemagazine.com.

SEX ISN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE WORDS KIM BATES PHOTO MOLLIE RYAN

Follow writer Kim Bates' sex column as she explores everything from one-nightstands and broken condoms to the politics of bisexuality.

INSTAGRAM

@drakemagazine

FACEBOOK

@drake.magazine

TWITTER

@drakemag

Story ideas or inquiries about writing for online? Reach out to us at drakemag@gmail.com.

SKINCARE TRENDS: SCAM OR SENSATION? WORDS NATALIE MECHEM PHOTO HERBIVORE

You may have heard about jade rollers and eye masks that social media influencers swear by, but whether or not these products actually work miracles has been a neverending debate.

SEVEN DAYS OF SELF CARE WORDS CHEYANN NEADES ILLUSTRATION ELLA NEADES

Writer Cheyann Neades tried out some of the most common self care trends and shared her experience along the way.

ORGANIC FEMININE + SEX PRODUCTS WORDS NATALIE MECHEM PHOTO MADISON KELLY

The vagina is the most permeable organ in the female body, which means anyone who has one should be extra careful about the products they use for sex and periods.

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BITS + PIECES

THE CAMPAIGN GAME THE POLITICAL LANDSCAPE CAN BE HARD TO NAVIGATE. BUT DON'T STRESS, WE'RE HERE TO HELP. WORDS JACOB REYNOLDS ILLUSTRATION KATE SEGLER DESIGN FATIMA CALDERON

6 | spring + summer

Buckle up—the next election cycle is quickly approaching. If you’re unsure of where you fall on the political spectrum, this can be a period of immense confusion. And without a background in politics, making an informed decision can seem out of reach. Luckily, there are accessible methods and resources to educate yourself and feel more empowered when entering the polls. Staying up to date with candidates’ campaigns can be tricky in today’s fast paced political environment, but there are practical ways of staying in the loop amidst a busy lifestyle. “One of the

really easy steps people could do is to just make a habit about checking in with the news every day,” Justin Whitely Holmes, political science professor at the University of Northern Iowa says. For a more guided approach, you can turn to the internet to sort out your personal views. Start by taking a political alignment quiz, like the one found on isidewith.com. The quiz asks users about their views on various political topics, from gun control issues to tax increases. From there, the test matches you with a political candidate and party that most aligns with your beliefs and values. Once you have a better idea of where you stand, you can use resources to look through presidential candidates’ views and learn how they’ve voted on issues in the past. Founded in Des Moines, Iowa, Vote Smart is a nonpartisan organization that “provides free, factual and unbiased information on candidates and elected officials,” according to Annie Peterson, their Director of Officials Research. The organization gathers information by sending a Political Courage test to politicians which helps determine where candidates stand on issues. Voters can take the test themselves to see how well they know certain candidates—making the process a little more fun and less intimidating. “During the election season, we actually have an election-specific tool called ‘Vote Easy,’ and it allows you to fill out the ‘Political Courage’ test,” Peterson says. “That can help if you’re not really sure where you stand and you don’t want to vote by party.” At the end of the day, watching for candidates whose values and goals most align with what you want to see accomplished in government is the most important thing you can do. Stay informed and walk into this election season with confidence.


BIT OF LIT:

Modern Self-Help Books THE TYPICAL SELF-HELP BOOK CAN FEEL A LITTLE TOO MUCH LIKE A SERMON. THESE PICK-ME-UPS CAN GIVE YOU (SOME OF) THE ANSWERS, WITHOUT ALL THE EYE ROLLS. WORDS SAVANNAH KLUESNER

30 BEFORE 30 BY MARINA SHIFRIN A good read for all college students, Marina Shifrin tackles disappointment in adult life. Shifrin shares her personal experiences with her “30 Before 30” bucket list, including anything from “adopting a dog” and “quitting a shitty job” to “going to a nude beach” and “submitting an essay to the ‘New York Times.’” Full of humor and wit, Shifrin’s essays remind readers that adulthood doesn’t have to mean you have it all figured out— not having a plan can be just as meaningful.

I USED TO BE A MISERABLE F*CK: AN EVERYMAN’S GUIDE TO A MEANINGFUL LIFE BY JOHN KIM John Kim, “the angry therapist,” reveals lessons he’s learned about success in careers, relationships, and even workouts through this colloquial collection of ideas on becoming an adult. Filled with both humor and heart, this is a must read for any guy who feels a little under the weather.

12 RULES FOR LIFE: AN ANTIDOTE TO CHAOS BY JORDAN B. PETERSON In the classic vein of self-help, Jordan B. Peterson answers some of life’s biggest questions, juggling ancient ideas and their relevance today. Through the seemingly inconsequential—like how to approach stray cats, and how the nervous systems of lobsters can help us with self-realization— Peterson mixes modern and past science to deliver new, more fulfilling ways of living.

THE WISDOM OF SUNDAYS BY OPRAH WINFREY Filled with short interviews between Oprah and her advisers, inspirational quotes, and awe-inspiring pictures, this short chronicle is a journey in faith. One of the world’s most beloved and adored women shares the secrets behind her success in this book of daily snippets.

APPS THAT HOLD YOU ACCOUNTABLE BECAUSE YOUR PARENTS AREN’T ALWAYS AROUND TO KEEP YOU ON TRACK. WORDS SAVANNA BOUS

Keep the Momentum Growing We’re all guilty of checking our phones while working, but with the Forest app, staying focused becomes a fun challenge. Before sitting down to work, set a personal timer on the app for the amount of time you want to stay focused. For every minute that passes, your own virtual tree will slowly grow. Don’t wander off the app though, or your virtual tree will die. As you check things off your to-do list, not only will your digital tree grow taller but so will a real tree, planted by Trees for the Future. You’ll get your work done and also help save the planet. Color Me Emotionally Aware Year in Pixels is a time capsule for your feelings, letting you track trends in your daily mental health. Every day, shade in a box with a color that reflects your emotions, from joyful to remorseful. You can also write a few lines about each day to create a small digital diary. At the end of the year, you’ll be able to see how your mental health has changed over time. More Water, Please Drinking enough water is universally important, but also commonly forgotten. Luckily with Gulp, staying hydrated is simple. You determine the right amount of water to drink each day based on your lifestyle, and with the tap of a screen, you can log big or small gulps and track how much water you’ve had.

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BITS + PIECES

Travel Bag Essentials PRACTICALITY FEELS LIKE LUXURY WITH THESE ON-THE-GO PRODUCTS. WORDS BAILEY CORONIS | PHOTO MOLLIE RYAN | DESIGN FATIMA CALDERON

1

Mario Badescu Facial Spray with Aloe, Herbs, and Rosewater: It may not seem like a necessary product to travel with, but facial sprays can enhance your travel experience in unexpected ways. This facial spray is dualpurpose, so you can use it for fresh and hydrated skin and for styling your hair on the go. You’ll be ready for a photo-op at any moment. Find at Ulta, $7.

2

3

Aveda StressFix Concentrate Rollerball: Sometimes it’s hard to find a moment to slow down and just take in your surroundings on-the-go. By rubbing this oil onto your wrists, the calming aroma of lavender and sage will help relax your body amidst the hustle and bustle of traveling. Find at Aveda, $24.

GoodWipes Hypoallergenic Wipes: Let’s be real, traveling isn’t always as glamorous as it looks, and long days can leave you feeling gross. These hypoallergenic face and body wipes will ensure comfortable traveling without all the grime. Find at Amazon, $10.

4

Weighted Sleep Mask (not pictured): With plane changes, layovers, and late-night drives, traveling can do a number on your sleep schedule. Packing a lightblocking eye mask will allow you to catch some shut-eye, even in sunny locations. This mask is weighted to activate key pressure points and deepen your relaxation. Find at gravityblankets.com, $30.

3 2

Bare English & Co. lip balm, $5.

1 Polaroid 300 camera, prices vary

Target planner, prices vary

S'well water bottle, $35.

Kah & Kee backpack, $34

8 | spring + summer


Trash to Treasure WE'RE BREAKING DOWN EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT COMPOSTING. WORDS ANNA NIEDERMEIER

ASMR THOSE TINGLING SENSATIONS AREN'T ALL IN YOUR HEAD. WORDS ELIZABETH WEYERS PHOTO JOSIE LIE

Fingers tapping on the cover of a book. Quiet low whispers into a microphone. The popping of an air-filled pile of slime. A knife shaving off pieces of wet chalk. This isn’t the process of creating movie sound effects—it’s ASMR. ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response. In layman's terms, it’s a tingling sensation in the neck, scalp, or spine caused by various sensory triggers. For people who experience them, these sensations are often accompanied by a somewhat unexplainable feeling of pleasure and relaxation. Some even call these responses a “head orgasm.” Despite this description, ASMR typically isn’t sexual in nature. But just like sex, everyone has their preferences. For some, the idea of chalk being sliced into might sound like a mild form of torture. But for Rida, owner of popular instagram account Chalk.ASMR, it’s what works. “I used to play with chalk and sand when I was in school, and used to feel so satisfied,” Rida says. “I love the texture and the feel.” She searched #chalk on social media platforms and found a community of people who loved the sensation as much as her. Now she has 88,000 followers on her Instagram

account that’s filled with videos of chalk shaving, cutting, and crumbling. In the last few years ASMR has skyrocketed across social media platforms. Even Cardi B and Zoë Kravitz have joined in on the fun with their own viral videos. But ASMR isn’t just for the sake of entertainment. Researchers have started tapping into this internet sensation to study the health benefits many viewers claim to experience. Although the research on ASMR is still relatively slim, some studies have found that people who experience these tingling sensations also experience a drop in heart rate similar to what happens during meditation. Many of the followers of Chalk.ASMR and other popular ASMR accounts are loyal because of the calming responses they have to the videos. “I have so many people messaging me telling me my content helps them with their anxiety and depression,” Rida says. Danika Werner, a college student attending the University of Iowa says that early last year she had frequent anxiety and panic attacks. “One of my friends recommended I watch an ASMR video,” Werner says. “Within the first 30 seconds of the video I began to find some grounding and peace— it took my mind away from all the millions of things making me anxious.” ASMR isn't for everyone, but if something as simple as a 30 second video can offer some relaxation after a stressful day, then this trend is worth plugging into.

Greens and browns are really coming back into style. That is, the green and brown ingredients you need to start composting. And reducing your carbon footprint is a trend we can really get behind. Unless you’re one of the few people who eats the entire apple core and bites into banana peels, you’ve probably thrown out your fair share of “greens”: fruit and veggie scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, etc. As for “browns,” anything like tree leaves, pine needles, brown paper bags, or cardboard boxes will work. Pro tip: even those greasy pizza boxes you can’t recycle can be thrown into your compost pile. If you think it sounds stinky, don’t worry. As long as you refrain from things like meat, dairy, and pet wastes, there’s no need to worry about odors or their accompanying insect and rodent pests. The actual composting process is as easy and inexpensive as you make it. Don’t have the yard for an outdoor compost pile? Buy an indoor bin. Don’t have a ton of money to spend? DIY it. Your compost is ready to use once it looks and smells like dark soil. Once you’ve curated your compost concoction, do with it what you will. If you’re not the avid gardener looking to form some humus (the broken-down, richin-nutrient remains you’re left with after composting), many communities have compost drop-offs that will gladly take your eco-friendly scraps. In fact, Debra Danley, a business waste representative at Des Moines Metro Waste Authority, says that different facilities can pick up your compost via curbside collection if you choose to donate it. By incorporating composting into your daily routine, you won’t have to feel guilty about not finishing every scrap of food or accidentally letting that produce go bad. Instead, you can help give back to the environment one toss at a time.

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FOOD + DRINK

Summer on a Stick

THESE TREATS ARE MADE WITH REAL INGREDIENTS TO CHEER YOU UP AND COOL YOU DOWN. WORDS MEGAN BOHALL | PHOTOS JOSIE LIE | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

Green Health Kick 1 1 1 2 1

cup sweetened almond milk cup spinach banana Tbsp. lemon juice whole kiwi

Blend almond milk, spinach, avocado, banana, kiwi, and lemon juice until smooth. Fill molds and freeze for six hours.

Banana Coffee ½ cup almond milk 1 whole banana 3 Tbsp. peanut butter 1 cup brewed coffee 1 cup chopped walnuts 1 cup chocolate chips Blend almond milk, banana, peanut butter, and coffee until smooth. Fill molds and freeze for six hours. Melt chocolate chips in a bowl for 30 second increments, stirring in between. Once frozen, remove ice pops from molds and dip into melted chocolate and chopped walnuts. Place them on a plate and freeze for two more hours.

10 | spring + summer


Refreshing Blueberry Mint

Strawberry Sweet Tooth

1 cup lemon-lime soda ½ cup blueberries 4 Tbsp. lemon juice Handful of fresh mint leaves

½ cup milk ½ cup plain yogurt 6 strawberries 1 cup white chocolate chips Blend milk, yogurt, and strawberries until smooth. Fill molds and freeze for six hours. Once frozen, melt white chocolate chips in a bowl in 30 second increments, stirring in between, until fully melted. Remove ice pops from molds and dip top half into white chocolate. Place on a tray and freeze for three more hours.

Chop mint leaves and fill the molds ¾ the way full with the lemon-lime soda. Add blueberries, mint leaves, and a few drops of lemon juice into molds and freeze for six hours.

Tropical Vacation 2 cups coconut milk ½ a mango, sliced ½ cup pineapple, sliced 6 strawberries Blend coconut milk, sliced mango, sliced pineapple, and strawberries until smooth. Fill molds and freeze for six hours.

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FOOD + DRINK

Mocktails THESE VIRGIN COCKTAILS ARE JUST AS GOOD AS THE REAL DEAL—MINUS THE HANGOVER.

WORDS NATALIE MECHEM | PHOTOS JENNA CORNICK | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

Paloma Mocktail 4 1 2 2 1

oz. grapefruit juice Tbsp. agave syrup oz. lime juice oz. club soda grapefruit Salt

Moisten the rim of a glass with grapefruit juice and dip in salt. Add ice, grapefruit juice, agave syrup, lime juice, and club soda and stir. Garnish with a slice of grapefruit or lime.

12 | spring + summer

Blackberry Mojito Mocktail

Cosmopolitan Mocktail

12 oz. fresh blackberries 10 fresh mint leaves 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar 1 liter club soda 1 oz. lime juice

4 2 1 2

Add blackberries, mint leaves, and sugar to a mason jar. Muddle the ingredients with gently for about 30 seconds. Add ice. Fill the glass the rest of the way with club soda and stir. Add lime juice to taste and garnish with a lime wedge.

oz. cranberry juice oz. orange juice oz. lime juice oz. club soda

Combine cranberry juice, orange juice, and lime juice in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake for 30 seconds, then strain into a cocktail glass and add club soda. Garnish with orange peel.


Mango Mocktail 2 1 2 2 1

oz. boba pearls oz. coconut milk oz. pineapple juice oz. mango nectar oz. lemon-lime soda

Prepare boba according to the package instructions. Add boba to a glass and top with coconut milk, pineapple juice, mango juice, and lemon-lime soda. Stir.

Sangria Mocktail 1 orange 1 lemon 1 lime 1 apple ½ cup sliced strawberries 3 cups red grape juice ½ cup cranberry juice ž cup apple juice 2 cups club soda

Slice fruit and add to a pitcher. Add grape, cranberry, and apple juice and refrigerate for at least four hours. Before serving, add club soda. Serve in wine glasses.

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FOOD + DRINK

Dress it Up SAUCES AND MARINADES CAN TRANSFORM ANY BORING MEAL. WHIP UP THESE RECIPES TO ADD SOME FLAVOR TO YOUR LIFE.

Pesto Balsamic Vinaigrette

WORDS HELEN TRISKO | PHOTO JENNA CORNICK | DESIGN MADISON KELLY

Pesto Balsamic Vinaigrette A flavorful variation on your basic homemade balsamic vinaigrette. Use for: Drizzling over a green salad, pasta salad, or a margherita pizza; marinating chicken or vegetable kabobs. ½ shallot 1 large garlic clove ½ cup balsamic vinegar ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

French Dijon Vinaigrette A light and sour vinaigrette that is a staple of a French kitchen. Use for: Making pasta salad with veggies, herbs, and cured meats; drizzling over your favorite green salad; pickling onions, beets, or cucumbers. ½ shallot 1 clove garlic ½ cup red or white wine vinegar 1 cup extra virgin olive oil ½ cup fresh squeezed lemon juice

14 14 || spring spring + + summer summer

1 tsp. Dijon mustard or powdered mustard, preferably whole grain 3 Tbsp. pesto ½ Tbsp. white sugar or honey 1 tsp. sea salt Black pepper to taste Mince shallots and garlic clove and place in mason jar. Add balsamic, olive oil, mustard, pesto, sugar, salt, and pepper. Screw on lid and shake. Let vinaigrette rest in a fridge for two hours. Store the vinaigrette in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Shake well before use.

1 heaping Tbsp. French Dijon mustard, preferably whole grain 2 tsp. sugar 1 tsp. sea salt Black pepper to taste Mince shallots and garlic clove and place in mason jar. Add vinegar, olive oil, lemon juice, mustard, sugar, salt, and pepper. Screw on lid and shake well. Let vinaigrette rest in a refrigerator for two hours. Store the vinaigrette in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Shake well before use.

French Dijon Vinaigrette


Lime, Cilantro, and Sriracha Aioli Lime, Cilantro, and Sriracha Aioli

A zestier version of mayonnaise. Use for: Spreading on veggie burgers or sandwiches; dipping veggies or French fries. 1 lime 1 cup mayonnaise ½ cilantro bunch with stems

Spicy Soy and Ginger Marinade A spicy and fragrant sauce great for marinating basically anything. Spicy Soy and Ginger Marinade

Use for: Marinating meats or vegetables; making a stir fry sauce (add 1 tsp. of cornstarch). ½ tsp. minced garlic or 1 small garlic clove 1 green onion ¾ tsp. ginger ½ cup soy sauce or tamari 1 tsp. rice wine vinegar

½ Tbsp. Sriracha 1 whole garlic clove Juice lime into blender, add mayonnaise, cilantro, Sriracha, and garlic. Blend for 1 minute, or until ingredients have combined. Place in bowl and cover. Leave bowl in refrigerator for 1-2 hours, allowing the flavors to merge. Store the aioli in the refrigerator for up to 10 days.

2 tsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. sriracha A dash red pepper flakes Mince garlic, chop green onions and shred ginger into bowl. Add soy sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar, red pepper flakes, and Sriracha. Whisk ingredients together with a fork until the sugar and Sriracha have dissolved. Let marinade rest in the refrigerator for at least two hours before using. Store for up to two weeks.

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FOOD + DRINK

Berries PRIMARILY

BERRIES ARE BACK IN SEASON, SO WE'RE HAVING THEM FOR EVERY MEAL OF THE DAY. WORDS MIA TIRADO | PHOTOS JENNA CORNICK | DESIGN MADISON KELLY

Strawberry Smoothie Bowl Prep: 10 mins Servings: 2 INGREDIENTS 1¾ cups frozen strawberries ½ cup plain Greek yogurt 1 banana 2 Tbsp. honey 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 tsp. granulated sugar TOPPINGS • Cacao Nibs • Banana slices • Chia Seeds • Strawberry slices Place frozen strawberries, banana, Greek yogurt, honey, vanilla, and sugar in a blender on high speed or until smooth, 1-2 minutes. Pour smoothie mixture into a medium serving bowl. Garnish with cacao nibs, banana slices, chia seeds, and strawberries.

F O R B R E A K FA S T


F O R B R E A K FA S T

Blueberry-Lemon Pancakes with Ricotta Prep: 20 mins Cook time: 5 mins per batch Servings: 4-6

INGREDIENTS 1½ cups fresh blueberries ¼ cup lemon juice 1 Tbsp. lemon zest 4 large eggs, separated 1 cup all-purpose flour 1½ tsp. baking powder 1 cup whole-milk ricotta ¾ cup buttermilk 2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 Tbsp sugar 1 tsp. kosher salt

• butter (for griddle) • maple syrup and roomtemperature butter (for serving)

Whisk lemon zest, flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Set aside. Whisk lemon, egg yolks, ricotta, buttermilk, and vanilla in a separate medium bowl. Mix egg

yolk mixture into the dry ingredients with a rubber spatula. Cover and set aside. Beat egg whites with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Gently fold egg whites into the pancake mixture, being careful not to deflate them. Heat a griddle or large skillet over medium-low heat. Once heated, lightly

coat the surface with butter. Scoop ½-cupfuls of batter onto griddle. Top each pancake with 2-3 Tbsp. of blueberries and cook until bottom is golden brown, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes. Serve pancakes stacked with maple syrup and butter to taste.

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FOOD + DRINK

Spring Salad Prep: 30 mins Servings: 2 INGREDIENTS ¼ cup water 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 tsp. sugar ⅛ tsp. salt ¾ cup red onion, thinly sliced

FOR LUNCH

18 | spring + summer

4 ½ ½ ¼

cups of herb salad mix (packaged) cup strawberries cup blueberries cup blue cheese, more to taste Salt Pepper

Combine water, vinegar, sugar, and salt in a small

bowl and whisk until sugar and salt are dissolved. Add onion and toss to coat. Marinate at room temperature for 30 minutes to 1 hour. Drain. Pour dressing into a large bowl. Toss the salad greens and berries gently to coat.

Top with cheese and pickled onions. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Refer to page 14 for a delicious French dressing recipe that adds a savory component to this sweet salad.


FOR LUNCH

Blackberry Bruschetta Prep: 5 mins Cook time: 5-6 mins Servings: 4-6 INGREDIENTS 1 loaf French bread 1 Tbsp. butter, more to taste ½ cup blackberry preserves 4 oz. honey goat cheese 1 package of blackberries, chopped 4 Tbsp. fresh basil 1 Tbsp. olive oil Salt Pepper Combine chopped blackberries, basil, olive oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Set aside. Melt butter in a pan. Slice French bread into 1½ inch pieces and toast in skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Once cooled, smear blackberry preserves and goat cheese over slices of bread. Top with blackberry and basil mix and enjoy.

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FOOD + DRINK

Raspberry and Prosciutto Pizza Prep: 10 mins Cook: 15 mins INGREDIENTS 14" pizza dough (homemade or prepackaged) 2 Tbsp. olive oil ¼ cup honey goat cheese, softened ½ cup raspberries ¾ cup ricotta 1 cup shredded mozzarella ½ tsp. salt, more to taste Ground pepper to taste 10 pieces of prosciutto, thinly sliced 2 cups arugula 2 Tbsp. fresh basil, chopped Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Roll out pizza dough on a lightly floured sheet of parchment paper. Lightly coat baking sheet with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Place dough onto baking sheet. Drizzle 1 tablespoon of olive oil over the top of the dough and coat well with a pastry brush. Mash raspberries in a bowl with a fork and combine with honey goat cheese. Spread raspberry-cheese mixture over the dough and top with mozzarella and ricotta. Top with whole fresh raspberries and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 8-10 minutes. Remove from oven, and top with prosciutto, arugula, and basil. Slice with pizza cutter and serve.

FOR DINNER

20 | spring + summer


FOR DINNER

Blackberry Ginger Glazed Salmon Prep: 10 mins Cook: 30 mins Servings: 4

INGREDIENTS ¾ cup water 1½ cups blackberries 1 inch piece ginger, sliced ½ lemon, juiced 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. olive oil 4 skinless salmon filets (unfrozen) Salt Black pepper

Set oven to 400 degrees F. Set a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Mix in water, blackberries, ginger, and lemon juice. Reduce to a simmer until berries break down, about five minutes. Remove from heat and strain into a bowl, using a rubber spatula to push the

blackberry pulp through. Return blackberry mixture to small saucepan, add brown sugar and return to a boil. Reduce to medium heat and simmer until reduced by half, about 20 minutes. Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil

and place salmon filets on top. Season with salt and pepper, then lightly brush blackberry sauce over filets and bake for 4 minutes. Take the salmon filets out of the oven and brush with the blackberry sauce once more. Set oven to broil, and broil filets for 3 minutes.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

BEAUTY ON A BUDGET "FAKE IT 'TIL YOU MAKE IT" APPLIES TO BEAUTY PRODUCTS TOO. WORDS + DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK | PHOTO JOSIE LIE

Who says you have to spend a fortune to achieve an iconic look? Here are some budget-friendly dupes for those who want the high-end look without the high-end price tag.

1.

MAYBELLINE FIT ME FOUNDATION ($8) vs NARS SHEER GLOW FOUNDATION ($45)

2.

COLOURPOP NO FILTER CONCEALER ($6) vs MAC PRO LONGWEAR CONCEALER ($24)

3.

COTY AIRSPUN LOOSE FACE POWDER ($6) vs LAURA MERCIER SETTING POWDER ($23)

4.

COLOURPOP PEARLIZED HIGHLIGHTER IN “LUNCH MONEY” ($8) vs BECCA SHIMMERING SKIN PERFECTOR PRESSED HIGHLIGHTER IN “MOONSTONE” ($38)

5.

NYX LIQUID LIPSTICK ($7) vs MAC VELVET TEDDY ($16)

6.

NYX PROFESSIONAL MAKEUP MICROBROW PENCIL ($6) vs ANASTASIA BEVERLY HILLS BROW WIZ ($21)

7.

L’OREAL LASH PARADISE ($8) vs TOO FACED BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA ($24)

8.

NYX (DEWY OR MATTE) SETTING SPRAY ($8) vs MAC FIX + SETTING SPRAY ($21)

9.

MORPHE BEAUTY SPONGE ($8)● vs BEAUTY BLENDER MAKEUP SPONGE ($20)

9. 7. 3. 4.

tips & tricks Get the most out of your makeup products with these easy hacks.

Add 1-2 drops of eye drop solution to a mascara tube to loosen clumps and prolong its lifespan.

• ● Avoid spending money on

special makeup brush cleaners by using household products. Olive oil is great for cleansing brushes and will also moisturize the bristles to keep them soft.

• ● Storing cosmetics in the fridge

will keep them from oxidizing and going bad. Fun fact: Perfumes also last longer when stored in cool places.

• ● To extend the longevity of

water-based foundation, simply add a few drop of alcohol-free toner and mix well.

22 | spring + summer

2.

8.

6.

1.

5.


Brow Maintenance

EYEBROWS: THEY TAKE UP SO LITTLE SPACE, BUT THEY CAN BE A HASSLE TO GROOM. HERE ARE FOUR EASY TECHNIQUES TO MAKE SURE YOUR BROWS ARE ALWAYS ON POINT. WORDS EMILY BONDURA | PHOTO MALIQUE MILLER | ILLUSTRATIONS KATE SEGLER

TINTING

WAXING

THREADING

MICROBLADING

Lauren England, a student at the Iowa School of Beauty, recommends dyeing your eyebrows if you have sensitive skin. It’s a great way to make your brows look full without actually doing any hair removal, just make sure that you’re not sensitive to any of the chemicals being used. Lasts: 3-4 weeks. Price: $20.

According to England, waxing can be more effective than tweezing because it removes the eyebrow hair from its follicle—taking it longer to grow back. But it can be rough on sensitive skin. “It can cause breakouts, especially on sensitive skin,” England said. “If you’re dead set on waxing, ask your beautician not to use the oil wax remover and ask for aloe vera if they offer it.” Lasts: 3-5 weeks. Price: $10-$45.

Threading focuses on removing short rows of hair with two intertwined threads. This provides the eyebrow specialist precise control over the shaping of your brows. It’s also gentler on the skin than waxing. Lasts: 2-6 weeks. Price: $5-$20.

Microblading is a technique used to enhance the natural shape of your brow without pulling any hair out. Color pigment is sketched in thin strokes with a needle blade that mimics hair and fills your brow to its full potential. Lasts: 1-3 years. Price: $350-$800.

*

Important Things to Know Before Getting Your Eyebrows Done: Follow the natural shape of your brow, research the studio before going in, and be honest with your eyebrow specialist. If you don’t like what they’re doing, say something.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Nailed It

BETTER CANCEL YOUR NEXT NAIL APPOINTMENT. YOU’LL WANT TO TRY THESE THREE STYLISH, DIY NAIL DESIGNS THAT DON’T BREAK THE BANK. WORDS ALE DIAZ | PHOTO + DESIGN MELISSA MCELIN

La Pecosa

Apply base coat. Once dry, apply 2 to 3 coats of black polish, allowing time to dry between coats. Next, dip the end of a detail brush (an old lip or watercolor brush will work) into a tan polish. Lightly dot onto the middle of each nail close to your cuticle. Add top coat for extra shine and protection.

El Mal Ojo

Apply base coat. Take a beige polish and apply 2 to 3 coats to each nail and let dry. Dip a small detail brush into a white polish and stroke the brush along the cuticle to create a crescent moon shape. Continue to apply more polish to create an almond shape resembling an eye. Let dry. For the iris, dip the bottom end of a detail brush into the blue polish, press onto the center of the eye and let dry. For the pupil, take a bobby pin and dip the rounded tip into the black polish, pressing onto the middle of the blue iris. Using a black polish on the end of a small brush, stroke along the top line of the eye to create the top lash line. Apply small strokes to create lashes. Once dry, apply top coat for extra shine and protection.

24 | spring + summer

The Two Hue

Apply base coat. Place a small piece of scotch tape along the bottom half of each nail, applying pressure to seal in place. Apply a brightly colored polish (here we used orange) to the top half of each nail and add coats until opaque. Once completely dry, slowly remove the tape. Apply top coat for extra shine and protection.

TIPS FOR A BETTER MANICURE 1. Stay away from quick-dry nail polish. They contain ingredients that are dehydrating and can dry out your nails. 2. Never shake your nail polish. Instead, holding the polish vertically, roll it back and forth between your hands. 3. Always apply thin coats of polish—this helps it dry faster. Typically, three thin coats will work best.


Swimwear for Every Body SUIT UP. THESE BRANDS ARE MAKING SURE THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. WORDS ALEXUS KREFT | PHOTO MARIC SALOCKER | DESIGN MELISSA MCELIN

Every body is a beach body, but not every beachwear retailer realizes it. Fortunately, there are both niche and mainstream brands working to reverse this, designing a variety of size and coverage options.

Target

Size-inclusive swimwear options are wonderful—but they can also be expensive. Target brands, like Shade & Shore, provide accessible swimwear options for people of many shapes and sizes. Plus, the price tags are hard to beat. They also proudly display diverse bodies on their ads and promotional materials, proving their swimsuits are more than just spandex—they’re a statement. ON LAUREN (left): Bikini Top, Shade & Shore, $28. Bikini Bottom, Shade & Shore, $18.

LYRA

For those searching for modest yet modern swimwear options, LYRA has the answers. The SOFIA suit provides not only coverage, but also mobility, personalization, and endless amounts of style. While it comes with a swim-top, swim leggings, skirt, and swim turban, each piece can be added or removed according to personal preference, creating a truly customizable experience. ON SURAYA (right): SOFIA in Olive, LYRA Swimwear, $105. Headscarf, model's own.

Rebirth Garments

Rebirth Garments: Rebirth Garments specializes in accessible clothing for all, whether it’s queer, gender non-conforming, or disabled communities. Based in Chicago, Rebirth Garments sells swim shorts, binders, and crop tops that are unisex and focused on affirming—not denying—identities. With bold patterns and colors, this brand is all for visibility. Price Range: $25-$75.

Lilly & Lime

People with D-cup bra sizes and up are often left in the dust (or rather, sand) of the beachwear industry. One-pieces and bikini tops that cater to larger cup sizes are usually matronly and dowdy. Lilly & Lime seeks to change that with their effervescent and modern styles that provide coverage and support. Their balconette style even has removable straps for a pretty and practical strapless option. Price Range: $35-$85.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Emot-Icon

Pro-texters can communicate in images alone. Your earrings can too. Shapes of hands, plants, fruits, and more hold an entire conversation on their own.

Geometric Gang

Embrace a new shape outside of the classic hoop. Triangles, hexagons, and everything you learned in geometry now applies to fashion. Step out of your comfort zone and into the geometric—we dare you.

Statement Earrings DITCH THE STUDS. TRY THESE EARRINGS ON FOR SIZE.

WORDS PEYTON JOHNSON | PHOTOS ANNA NIEDERMEIER | DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK + MADISON KELLY

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Material Girl

Reimagine what an earring can be made of. Look for wire, Plexiglass, yarn and wood. Feeling crafty? Try taking your own charms and adding them to hooks or hoops.

Social Mixer

Choose different earrings per piercing. One dangling, one cuff, one shiny, one dull. Don't be afraid to mix it up.

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DEPARTMENT

Boss Babes PROFESSIONALITY, MEET PERSONALITY. THESE POWER OUTFITS WILL BE THE TALK OF THE OFFICE. BETTER YET, THESE LOOKS ARE COOL ENOUGH TO TAKE YOUR BUSINESS TO THE STREETS.

Pencil Me In

The knit texture and colorful stripes add a twist to the traditional pencil skirt. Polish the look off with a poised mock-neck and a structured blazer or jacket. ON SOPHIA: Blazer, Calvin Klein; shirt, model's own; skirt, Lou & Grey; shoes, model's own.

STYLED BY MORGAN NOLL + MALIQUE MILLER | HAIR + MAKEUP TRIXIES SALON | PHOTOS ALE DIAZ | DESIGN MADISON KELLY

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Put a Pin In It Trade the solid suit for a pin stripe. Dress it down with a plain white tee or turtleneck and clean white sneakers.

ON BRANDON: Suit, Suit Supply; turtleneck, ASOS; shoes, Vans.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Highlighter Hues

A bold blazer can go a long way. Let it shine with an all black look underneath, or throw it over a striped tee and a skirt for the perfect sophisticated-casual balance. ON EMMA (left): Blazer, Mural; top, pants, and shoes, thrifted. ON SOPHIA (right): Blazer, Forever 21; shirt, model's own; skirt, thrifted; shoes, model's own.

30 | spring + summer


Bright Ideas

Playful stripes paired with a tailored jewel-toned pant and white pumps are sure to brighten up the 9 to 5. Throw on a leather jacket to take this look from day to night. ON MORGAN: Sweater, BP; Pants, Leith.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Power Players

Take a structured piece—like a dress pant or a black blazer— and pair it with something unexpected, like a mixed media pattern or bright leather skirt. Everybody will know to listen up. ON SOPHIA (left): Bodysuit, Forever 21; Pants, WAYF; shoes, model's own. ON MORGAN (right): Blazer, Calvin Klein; shirt, model's own; skirt, Topshop; shoes, Forever 21.

32 | spring + summer


Lay it On the Line

When styled right, stripes can take you from Monday meetings to Friday happy hours. Rich, deep hues and loafers create a more polished look, while bright colors and sneakers keep it casual. ON TIM (left): Shirt, model's own; pants, J.Crew; shoes, ALDO. ON BRANDON (middle): See page 29. ON ELI (right): Shirt and pants, model's own; shoes, Converse.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Breakroom Basics

With some layering and simple-yet-bold accessories, the classic white button down gets a refresher. The standard slacks can make a statement in a bright color. Pair them with a band tee and slipon sneakers for a Friday kind of cool. ON EMMA (left): Shirt, H&M; dress, Good Luck Gem; shoes, A New Day. ON ELI (right): Shirt, PacSun; pants, ASOS; shoes, Vans.

34 | spring + summer


Pull Up A Chair

There’s nothing stiff about this style. Opt for textured patterns and eye-catching solids for a dressed up but chilled out look. ON TIM: Suit jacket, Halberstadt's; shirt, J.Crew; pants, Topman; shoes, ALDO.

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DEPARTMENT

The Burnout Kids

TODAY’S COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE STRESSED, SLEEPDEPRIVED, AND OVER-STIMULATED, CREATING UNHEALTHY HABITS FOR LIFE OUTSIDE OF COLLEGE. HERE’S WHY. WORDS SAMANTHA JONES | ILLUSTRATIONS KATE SEGLER | DESIGN MADISON KELLY

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O

ne minuscule task. That was all it took to put her over the edge. It was a Sunday night, right before junior at the time Kathryn Allen was about to head back to college after a weekend at home. Her computer had been malfunctioning a little—just one of many things that had gone wrong that week—and she’d enlisted her dad’s help in trying to fix it. Kathryn was in a hurry to get back; she had homework due, her apartment was a mess, she had a group project to work on before class the next morning. She didn’t have time for all this. When her dad suggested she call the software company and ask about the computer’s warranty, Kathryn lost it. “I broke down in tears,” Kathryn remembers. “This simple task seemed so overwhelming that I broke completely. I remember my parents weren't quite sure how to react—they had never seen me fall to pieces over something so minuscule.” It’s a common reaction among today’s college students. Post-millennials across the U.S. are stressed—more than any other generation before. We find ourselves overwhelmed by to-do lists, stacking our schedules like Jenga blocks and then having meltdowns in our dorm rooms when everything comes crashing to the floor. Older generations look on and scoff, calling today’s college students spoiled. Weak. Too emotional. “It’s time to grow up,” they say. “Life’s not that hard,” they say. And yet, university counseling centers across the country are overbooked with students experiencing severe mental illnesses like depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. The American Psychological Association says today’s average high schoolers are now more anxious than a typical 1950s psychiatric patient. Somehow, we have become so over-committed in every area of our lives that we cannot function. Are we really that incapable of handling stress? Or is something else going on?

BURNING THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS In reality, it’s not that college students are weak—we’re just overbooked. Psychologists refer to it as “burnout”—a state of chronic stress leading to exhaustion, negative feelings toward self, and detachment from things you once enjoyed. But people don’t just wake up one day and have burnout—it is a long, slow process of overcommitment, high self-expectations, mounting stress and ultimately the sickening reality that you can’t accomplish everything you said you could. Students today are inundated with more information than any other generation before us—in a few clicks, we have access to infinite amounts of knowledge on any subject. With that knowledge, we can accomplish tasks more quickly, educate ourselves on a broader spectrum of topics, aim higher in our goals. But in doing so, we have unintentionally created a vicious cycle of pursuit, achievement, and breakdown. According to certified counselor Shaly Moyal, post-millennials’ habit of always reaching for more plays a major role in the burnout we later experience. “People can’t handle tons of information at one time,” Moyal says. “We need to learn in stages. You don’t try to teach a five year old algebra, you teach them basic numbers. When someone is thirsty, you don’t try to get a drink out of a fire hose. But that’s what we are doing with the amount of information that’s being thrown at us.” Our schedules have become overpacked with to-do lists: classes, internships, campus activities, homework. We learn to survive on Ramen and 5-Hour Energies. And if, by some miracle, we get more than five hours of sleep at night, we almost feel guilty for the lost time that could have been spent studying. “I was not taking care of myself,” Kathryn says about her own experience with burnout. “Rather than a positive outlook and seeing challenges as opportunities, getting excited about what is next, or focusing on how far I've come, I was focused on how overwhelming everything

felt, how much I had left to do, and was constantly worried.” And while ambition can be a good thing, the way humans respond to it mirrors the cycle of addiction. When people are stressed, we don’t know how to slow down and we lose the ability to recognize problems in our behaviors. We become emotional to the point of dysfunction over tasks we cannot complete. We forget how to say ‘no.’ Our generation has become obsessed with achievement.

HIGH EXPECTATIONS But college students aren’t the only ones with high expectations—it seems that more and more, the outside world wants to tell us how to achieve success. We have been conditioned into the habit of “busy-ness” almost from infancy. There was soccer practice. Piano lessons. Out of town tournaments. Even arranged play dates. In school, we were taught to aim high, to chase our dreams and make them a reality. We were told that if we put our minds to something, we could accomplish great things. Being busy became the norm; unstructured time became a waste of time. These activities all sounded like a great idea at the time—it gave kids the opportunity to discover themselves and access to a wider range of opportunities—but ultimately it

"This simple task seemed so overwhelming that I broke completely. I remember my parents weren't quite sure how to react." — Kathryn Allen

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FEATURES

created a mentality in our young minds that we should always be doing something. In an effort to give their children the best, the older generation unintentionally created a broken system full of habitual busy-ness. As we grew older, the pressure increased. Now adults, we have the freedom to make decisions for ourselves, but we’re not used to having moments where we aren’t running from one activity to the next. So we stick with what we know. The mistakes and successes of earlier generations spelled out a seemingly clear path to prosperity—if you want to succeed, you must go to college, get good grades, find an internship, find a high paying job upon graduating. You must be a student and a friend and an engaged citizen. If not, you are a failure. According to a study published in the Psychological Bulletin in 2017, these constant pressures from outside influences have instilled in college students an innate desire to please. The study found that 33 percent more college graduates possess “socially prescribed perfectionism,”— feeling the need to meet the excessively high expectations of others—than graduates in 1989. Because the opinions of others seem uncontrollable and unfair, we feel stressed and anxious in the face of potential failure. And while in some cases this causes people to work harder to avoid failure, the study found that these people are more likely to deal with depression, anxiety and thoughts of suicide. Kim Waltman of fullCIRCLE Creative + Coaching says this perfectionist streak among post-millennials has caused us to lose track of our own personal motivations and instead allow outside influences to dictate what we do. In the process, we have forgotten about our own happiness. “When we don’t have a compass for our decisions and choices, we [tend to overcommit],” Waltman says. “We want to be helpful, so we start saying yes to everything. We’re emotionally charged, trying to get a bunch of stuff done and look at life as a bunch of tasks, instead of looking at life as a gift meant to be enjoyed.”

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CONSTANTLY CONNECTED The age of the internet plays a role as well, creating an environment of constant connection and feeding college students’ need to be perfect. While older generations had moments to rest and unwind from work and daily activities, we spend our free time scrolling through social media. A Harvard study in neuroscience outlines the four basic motivational factors that dictate behavior: desires to acquire, to learn, to defend, and to bond. The human brain is always comparing costs and benefits of each situation in order to achieve these desires. But with the added pressure felt through social media, the regular stress a person feels in trying to reach these goals is magnified. When misleading filters and the seemingly perfect lives seen on Instagram are compared to college students’ own gritty realities, it’s easy to feel like you don’t measure up. This insecurity doesn’t necessarily refer to face-to-face interactions. But how often do we put down our phones, even with close friends? When supposedly “resting,” we are still on our phones, scrolling through social media and being inundated with information. “Even when a phone is out on a table, it’s distracting you,” Moyal says. “You’re unconsciously glancing at it, waiting for it to light up. Your brain is running in the background, so you can’t be fully present and engaged in the conversation.” In these situations, the brain never gets a chance to rest and slow down the cycle of comparison. As college students continue to fuel themselves on caffeine and the false images of success, we inevitably overcommit. According to Waltman, the only way to break the cycle is to slow down, unplug, and allow yourself to rest. “We need to learn how to press pause,” Waltman says. “We do it on our TV’s, we do it with our music, we do it with Netflix, we press pause in the media all around us. But do we push pause in our own lives?”


Steps to Combat Burnout 1. REST. Your body needs time to recharge physically and emotionally. Take time away from the to-do list and do something that gives you a chance to unwind.

2. LEAVE YOUR PHONE BEHIND. Spend some time away from your phone and let yourself fully recharge.

3. MAKE A LIST OF PRIORITIES. Figure out what things are most important to you, and why. The next time you’re tempted to overcommit, compare each task to the list and accept only what’s most important to you.

4. LET GO OF BEING PERFECT. Instead of trying to live up to ridiculous standards of perfection, be yourself and focus on what matters to you. Who cares what anyone else thinks?

5. DEAL WITH STRESS NOW. Don’t let yourself go through another mental breakdown before you start dealing with stress. Instead, make daily steps to change your mindset.

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Small Business Survival In the Age of Amazon ADAPTING TO THE E-COMMERCE SHIFT. WORDS WILL MUCKIAN ILLUSTRATIONS KATE SEGLER DESIGN MADISON KELLY

40 | spring + summer

G

len Kamps might be the fastest shoe-tying expert in the TriCities, but there’s no way that his 65-year-old hands will ever outspeed an Amazon Dash button. He knows it too. But he lives a lot closer to his customers than any Amazon store does. “Bezos can fly it in on a drone by tomorrow,” he says. “Well, guess what? I got it there in a truck today.” Kamps is the fearless leader of Dick Pond Athletics, a local running shoe chain in the Chicagoland area. He’s been working there in varying capacities since he was 31. Now, he’s the store manager of the Saint Charles location in Illinois, and is fighting the same battle small businesses are fighting all over the country: the war of relevance in an online age.

THE VALUE OF A CORNERED MARKET Dick Pond Athletics was initially run directly out of Mr. Pond’s garage. The running shoe selection, which claimed to have shoes worn by the professionals, vastly

outnumbered that of conventional sporting goods stores. In essence, the small company controlled the running shoes market in the Chicagoland area. “To have a guy who had a garage of nothing but shoes that the marathoners in the Olympics were wearing, it was no trouble to just open the doors and count the money,” Kamps says. Eventually the company moved locations, branching into different Chicago suburbs and establishing themselves as the home for true running shoes. Today, Dick Pond Athletics is a five-store unit with a website that, while somewhat dated in design, establishes the brand beyond the confines of the Windy City. But as the store spread its name, the internet shopping age landed like a locust swarm. Amazon, Zappos, Eastbay, and Finish Line—suddenly, there were companies everywhere that were willing and able to provide the exclusive shoes that had once been Dick Pond Athletics’ specialty. “It becomes trickier,” says Kamps. “You’ve got to now get more creative to establish


yourself in the marketplace, whereas your uniqueness was the differentiation early on… Now you can get running shoes at Jewel, at Portillo’s,” he jokes. With the online boom, Dick Pond Athletics has done everything in its power to stay afloat. Lately, that has meant increasing their online presence. Kamps estimates that his store is roughly 70 percent in person and 30 percent online but he acknowledges the growing shift towards digital. Some store owners, though, are staking their claim firmly in the physical sales, even as online businesses continue to grow. “We’re hoping people come back to it at some time, they get tired of the online stuff and say ‘well, what are we doing?’” Sherie McGowan, owner of Cocoon in Geneva, Illinois, says. She describes Cocoon as a fusion of Anthropologie and Pottery Barn— home furnishings, gifts, candles and a collection of “one-of-a-kind finds.” McGowan actually beat most other small businesses to the online punch, establishing an online catalogue as early as 2001. But with the birth of Amazon and the arms

race for fast and cost-effective shipping, she shifted her priorities. Cocoon has been open in downtown Geneva for 24 years and McGowan is more than happy to maintain a storefront-first focus. “With [millennials], I feel like everything’s about experiences,” McGowan says. “[They] don’t care as much about possessions and things.”

“PEOPLE DON’T READ NEWSPAPERS” Of course, that doesn’t mean Cocoon remains cloistered from the online world. McGowan is fully aware of the benefits that online exposure can bring. “I used to spend a ton of money on print [advertising] but people don’t read newspapers anymore,” she says. “It’s actually better for us. The cost of putting things on Instagram or Facebook is minimal compared to what we paid for print ads.” Some towns also provide small businesses with a helping hand in the transition from concrete to computerized; that helping hand comes in the form

of Hans van Aardt and his company, MarketingNetz. Van Aardt is South African by birth and has lived in Saint Charles for three years. He’s also the founder and President of VoyagerNetz, the umbrella company that oversees MarketingNetz and other branches. Like

“Bezos can fly it in on a drone by tomorrow. Well, guess what? I got it there in a truck today.” — Glen Kamps drakemagazine.com | 41


FEATURES

42 | spring + summer


the businesses he helps, Van Aardt’s plans often revolve around connections. “The entrepreneurial mind wants to serve everybody. They don’t want to say no to anybody,” Van Aardt says. “But we try to advise them to pick one or two niches and then build their messaging around those niches.” Van Aardt says companies often have these niches without knowing or acknowledging them at first and fail to capitalize on those situations. “One thing that any entrepreneur learns over time is that you shouldn’t think what your customers want,” he says. “You should ask your customers what they want, ask what’s important to them, then that should flow into your messaging.” This laser focus allows MarketingNetz to move quickly and precisely. Once the team gets what their audience wants, they get to work, using SEO tactics to bump their clients’ landing pages to the front end of any Google or Bing search. All of this is central to Van Aardt’s core principle: “If customers are going to look for you, you need to be there.” That virtual omnipresence can be a huge boom for smaller companies, whose physical locations often don’t extend beyond a county or state radius. Cocoon has the benefit of a 24-year-long relationship with its surrounding area. As McGowan says, “When we’ve been here as long as we have, actually, people’s kids and their kids are coming now.”

POSTING + PR = PROFIT But few businesses have that cachet. Cocoon also has an established social media following, using Instagram to show off their eclectic supply and Facebook to set up events to draw new customers through their doors. And they aren’t the only ones. Kevin Kimle, an economics professor at Iowa State University, sees small businesses in Ames harnessing social media to slash their marketing costs. “They sell tickets to special events and they market it via email and Facebook,” Kimle says. “And it sells out. They don't have to spend a penny on advertising … What a fantastic opportunity for them. What a

fantastic opportunity for me as a fan of their business, not to have to wait or not to have to call them or hear through word of mouth.” At Dick Pond Athletics, Kamps and his employees are doing just that: plugging themselves deeper into their immediate community than ever before. After all, the store isn’t just selling shoes, but rather an experience. It’s a point that Van Aardt highlights as well. “For the traditional, in-store business to significantly compete, they will have to offer something else [besides] pure product,” he says. “They will have to offer an experience combined with the store. It’s the method they use to pull people into their store, but then the experience should flow into sales.” One way that manifests itself is through Dick Pond Athletics’ organized running groups. While this idea isn’t exclusive to its locations, a particular group has a special place in Kamps’ heart. “I’m training two groups of special needs [people],” Kamps says. “Half of them can’t talk, but they can walk and they can run. We’re [maybe] the only place in the nation, for sure in the state, that has a running club for special needs.” There’s a tangible smile in his voice as he talks about the special needs marathon, a summer-long event that has adults and teens run 25 miles over the length of the season, with the final 1.2 miles coming at the end of the Fox Valley Marathon. In video footage of the event, Kamps is an unmissable sight in his neon yellow shirt and ball cap: tying shoes, setting up watches, getting runners oriented, and embracing the finishers. Moments like this ingrain the business in the town’s consciousness, an essential part of small business survival. As much as he loves the events, Kamps is also well-aware of the business effects. “Against Amazon, you’ve got to do something, and they’re not teaching special needs kids how to run, for sure,” he says. It’s also why you’ll find the cherry red Dick Pond Athletics van at nearly every high school cross country meet. Kamps wakes up at 4:00 a.m. to get everything ready. He drives to forest preserves across

"For the traditional, in-store business to significantly compete, they will have to offer something else [besides] pure product. They will have to offer an experience." — Hans van Aardt the area to support the sport and provides the race shoes and replacement socks. It’s not a profitable trip. “We don't make any money at the meets,” Kamps admits. “It’s a waste of money. The time and effort and gas and trouble and getting up at four in the morning to load the truck and drive to sell, you know, two pairs of shoes, four little bags of spikes — it wasn’t worth the money at all.” Investments in the community eventually pay their dividends, but rarely immediately. “It had nothing to do with what I sold. You, now years removed from it, would still remember the van. That’s what sets [us] apart.” It can be easy to pit personal connection and internet shopping against one another, claiming the two work in opposite directions. But Kamps claims that’s not the case, and could be an important part of internet market spread. “What those technologies enable … is an ability to connect more efficiently and more directly to consumers than what we ever have,” he says. “You have the ability to develop your own brand, your own thousand fans that will be happy and delighted customers, [that will] pay more than what the market is paying them.” It’s exactly what Glen preaches, but in an entirely different medium. Nothing beats the importance of a solid relationship. As local businesses continue fighting the war against Amazon, their presence in a community is perhaps their most important weapon.

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DEPARTMENT

the

Hustle

HOW WOMEN ARE CLAIMING THEIR STAKE IN ONE OF THE MOST STIGMATIZED INDUSTRIES. WORDS HANNAH NUSS | PHOTOS MARIC SALOCKER | DESIGN ANNA GLEASON + MADISON KELLY

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W

hen Nikki Night was on the verge of being evicted, she had never heard of “camming.” She could barely operate her email account, let alone navigate the technical marketing of the online sex age. Recently divorced and unsure of her options, the former freelance makeup artist had no idea she would be tripling her income in just three short months with little more than a cheap webcam. Night got her fresh start by becoming a cam-girl. Cam-girls are online performers who broadcast live sex shows from the comfort of their own homes. Viewers pay to access the show and can tip the performer at their discretion. In chat rooms, users can shower the cam-girl with compliments or suggest what they would like to see. Still, the cam-girls are in full control of their show and whatever they may choose to perform. Besides giving Night total financial independence, camming has also inspired a sense of empowerment and a new bodily confidence. Like most women, Night has experienced her share of insecurities. She was painfully aware that her body didn’t match those of women in popular media. She engaged in the near-universal female ritual of comparing herself to others and felt let down every time. When she started camming, Night began to see herself through the eyes of her viewers who would fawn over her curves. She began to love her body. “I don’t compare my body to other people on the street anymore. I don’t have that constant thing in my mind. I just see my body for the beauty it is.” In Night’s eyes, camming has been one of the greatest things to ever happen to her. “I rely on nobody and nothing now… there’s an emotional side of things that make you feel a sense of power, like you’re in control,” Night says. “The hard work keeps you honest, the viewers keep you happy, and well, the orgasms also help.”

THE “CAM-GIRL COACH” After years of successful hustling as a cam girl, Night decided she could use her skills in a new way. Her heart has always been rooted in education—she comes from a long line of teachers and she's taught makeup seminars in the past. She now prides herself on being a cam-girl coach, giving young women seeking to join the industry a sense of direction and a leg-up (pun intended). Night holds a weekly online cam-girl class. The show is in the same format as any other cam show, only instead of performing sex acts, she’s giving invaluable advice. She chooses a weekly topic such as increasing tips, then asks her viewers to send her their experiences and questions. Night is passionate about the educational aspects of camming, so much so that she offers her classes completely for free. It’s just important to her to help anyone who wants to learn. If the girls learn anything from Night, it’s how to look out for yourself in this industry. She drives home multiple safety points. Don’t share the same photos on your cam profile and personal social media accounts. Take location tags off any photos you upload. Never share your personal life. Never meet up with fans in person. She also warns against using Paypal, since it requires your real name and info. If someone pays you on Paypal, they get access to your information. Some of her tips may sound obvious, but it’s easy to overlook small details. “When I first started camming, there was no one. So I just want be everything that I wish that I had,” Night says.

THE ONLINE SEX INDUSTRY There’s a huge amount of money to be made in the online sex world. Camming has grown to be a colossal industry, bringing in nearly $2 billion annually. By committing to the hustle, women all over the world have been able to pay off student loans, put themselves through school, put a payment down on a house, or even just have spending money. Where a day job can pay very little by the hour, hustlers can

make hundreds of dollars in a single day with little more than a camera phone. But camming isn’t the only method for those seeking to cash in on the online sex industry. Websites like Seeking Arrangements help connect “sugar babies” to “sugar daddies.” Daddies will do anything from showering their babies with lavish gifts to helping to pay their tuition. What they expect in return is a varying spectrum from simple company to sexual favors. It all depends on the terms set between the two parties. Other women have turned to selling risqué pictures and videos of themselves through platforms like Patreon, a site which allows patrons to set prices and distribute their content to loyal subscribers. Even social media has become an avenue for the online sex industry. Some women charge for access

“The hard work keeps you honest, the viewers keep you happy, and well, the orgasms also help.” — Nikki Night drakemagazine.com | 45


DEPARTMENT

to private Snapchats where they might post provocative pictures and videos. Others may also use Findom, a community on Twitter where men pay women to ignore or verbally abuse them. The options are endless.

RISK + REWARD Bente, a young woman from the Midwest who has recently relocated to Los Angeles, has engaged in many forms of “hustle” over the years. She’s been financially independent since before turning 18, providing herself a sense of control and stability. She’s done it all: private Snapchats, Patreon accounts, nude modeling, even allowing artists to take full-body casts of her. But Bente’s main hustle has been working as a stripper in various Los Angeles clubs. Bente was homeless when she first came to California. Finding work as a dancer helped to change that. “[Stripping] has honestly saved my life in many situations and that’s empowering…” Bente says. “Knowing

46 | spring + summer

that I can go from no money at all to having a dream LA apartment and a car and anything I want.” From Bente’s perspective, sex work isn’t at all unusual in Los Angeles—it’s more embraced than in different parts of the country, or at least less stigmatized. But she doesn’t plan on stripping forever. Two months ago, she started using her hustle earnings to put herself through school. She hopes to graduate and work as a massage therapist. But Bente’s self-made financial stability hasn’t come without a cost. Stripping has taken a huge toll on her mentally, physically, and even spiritually. “It’s hell on your body and it’s hell for you mentally too … to have people touching you all of the time. It’s not easy work at all.” At one point, Bente was getting assaulted in some form almost every day. She spent six months working in a club that proved to be dangerous, with men physically assaulting

her, verbally abusing her, or people trying to take advantage of her work without financial restitution. “It can go to extremes in the blink of an eye,” Bente says. Having faced the potentially violent reality of her work, Bente takes her own measures to feel safe. She has since left that club and is now very perceptive of those around her. She’s weary of those trying to “fill her with a dream—if they’re too nice too quick, then they’re up to no good.” She sets boundaries for herself and exercises her right to say no. “Before I started dancing, I was a different person, and now I’ve been exposed to darker parts of the world,” Bente says. “Stripping is a great opportunity, but it’s all about how you handle it. If you go in with a strong mentality, you just have to keep that mentality. Know where your boundaries are and never break them, otherwise it will eat you alive.” Night also admits that working in the sex industry has had adverse effects on


“Before I started dancing, I was a different person. And now I’ve been exposed to darker parts of the world.” — Bente

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FEATURES

" How dare you put value on my body or what I do." — NIkki Night

48 | spring + summer


her personal life, specifically in terms of intimacy. It can be hard to build new relationships; she sees the darker side of people in how they treat her after they find out she cams for a living. People are judgmental and for Night that can be infuriating at times. “How dare you put a value on me or my body or what I do. I love what I do. I don’t regret it even a day,” Night says.

THE LEGAL STRIFE OF THE SEX INDUSTRY Katherine Sears is a criminal defense attorney who’s passionate about the nitty gritty of the sex industry—that is, the decriminalization of sex work. There’s a reason it’s so important to her. She used to be a sex worker herself. Before graduating from law school, she worked in a legal brothel in Nevada for years. Given her background, she knows what she’s talking about both legally and personally, and when it comes to the law and sex work, she doesn’t like what she sees. “We have no business charging people,” Sears says. “It's consensual sex between adults, it’s not the state’s business what terms someone puts on their consent …

consensual adult sex is not illegal. There is no reason that we should be threatening people with an aggravated misdemeanor.” Given her passion and understanding, Sears has offered her legal services pro bono to those seeking defense for prostitution cases. Beyond the fact that prostitution is illegal in Iowa, sex workers face other legal hurdles regularly. Sears explained there are many issues in family law and custody battles in which sex workers are threatened with losing their children. What’s more, workers’ bank accounts are often frozen since they technically earn their money illegally. They have trouble finding and maintaining stable housing. If a landlord thinks they might be doing sex work in their home, the worker may get evicted.

COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS In many ways, sex is still taboo in mainstream society, so it's no surprise that the sex industry is widely stigmatized. With outside stigma and legal resistance, sex work typically isn't highly regarded. But most sex workers still know their worth. When it comes to sex work on the internet, women are able to control what they do on camera, for whom, and when

they do it. This agency has allowed girls across the world to make a sufficient living for themselves on their own terms. In Night’s eyes, camming and other hustles aren’t something a person gets cornered into doing. It takes guts to tackle and it’s a lot more work than most would assume. Most of all, the work can be a positive experience. “It's empowering,” Night says. “No one is telling you what to do. It's not shaming you.” Sears agrees that sex workers don’t necessarily do this job because they have no other options. “You should always have another choice…if your options are ‘I’m going to sell blowjobs or I’m going to work the drive-thru at Taco Bell,’ you can choose one of those over the other,” Sears says. “Whatever better fits your lifestyle and your preferences.” Even with all of the stigma that surrounds sex work on and offline, it’s important to remember these women aren’t so different from the rest of us. Night pointed out, “There are so many people who do it because they like it. Is everyone in the best place in their life? No. But can you say that for anyone who works in an office job? No.”

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HEALTH + SEX

ARIES Take a break from social media and comparing yourself to others. Your competitive nature often benefits you, but it can be exhausting.

TAURUS Treat yourself to a meal at a restaurant where you’ve never been. You love good food and trying new things, so why not combine the two?

GEMINI Try meditating. You’re an expert when it comes to communicating with others, and you deserve to get in touch with your own mind and body.

WORDS NATALIE MECHEM ILLUSTRATIONS KATE SEGLER DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK CANCER Let go of an old habit. Holding on to the past often makes it difficult for you to move forward.

VIRGO Start keeping a bullet journal. You live a busy life, and a little organization can relieve a lot of stress.

SCORPIO Try journaling. Talking about your emotions can be intimidating, but don’t bottle them up. Put them down on paper instead.

CAPRICORN Go to bed earlier. Your hard-working nature is one of your strengths, but it tires you out.

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selfcare for zodiac signs THE STARS SAY YOU SHOULD MAKE A HABIT OUT OF TAKING CARE OF YOURSELF. Self-care is all about you, so the way you go about it should be specific to your needs. Take some advice from the stars and follow your zodiac sign for the best ways to relax and recharge.

AQUARIUS Take a long bath. You love helping others, but it’s just as important to take time to unwind and focus on yourself.

LEO Have a night in with a glass of wine and your favorite sitcom. You have a great sense of humor and sometimes laughter truly is the best medicine.

LIBRA Go for a long walk. Spend more time in nature to satisfy your desire to know the world around you.

SAGITTARIUS Make time for reading each day. You have a hunger for knowledge that must be satisfied.

PISCES Learn a new artistic skill. Selfdoubt is a huge source of stress in your life and making art for 45 minutes a day is shown to help boost confidence.


Piercing Care

DON'T JUMP THE GUN. DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE GETTING YOUR NEXT BODY MOD. WORDS REN CULLINEY | PHOTO ALE DIAZ Sometimes body piercings are the product of an impulse decision, but doing a little research first will get you the best long term results. It’s important to take care of your piercing from start to finish. Here are five precautions to keep in mind, from choosing a piercer to keeping your new piercing healthy. CHOOSE A PROFESSIONAL. Check reviews before you go and make sure that your piercer is reputable. If possible, go to a piercer who’s certified by the Association of Professional Piercers. The APP has high standards for its members, and a certification is the easiest way to know for sure that your piercer is quality. AVOID PIERCING GUNS. While these might be standard at your local Claire’s, a piercing gun should never be used on anything other than lobes—and even those are safer pierced with a needle. Piercing guns cause far more trauma to the area, which can result in a difficult healing process.

GUT HEALTH IT'S MORE THAN JUST A TREND—IT'S THE ANSWER TO (ALMOST) ALL YOUR PROBLEMS. WORDS TARYN RIPPLE PHOTO JENNA CORNICK They say to trust your gut. But what does that really mean? Though the saying is commonly used in the context of trusting your instincts, the adage is also a solid piece of advice when it comes to

MAKE SURE IT FITS. New piercings should use jewelry that is loose against the skin. For example, if cartilage is pierced with a hoop, there should be a few millimeters between the ear and the jewelry to leave room for swelling. If your piercing feels too tight, or if there’s irritation where your skin is pressing against the jewelry, go back to your piercer to get it changed out. LEAVE IT THE HELL ALONE. Often abbreviated as LITHA, this is a common motto among piercing professionals. Avoid touching your new piercing as much as possible, and if you do, make sure it’s with clean hands. Saline rinses are recommended by the APP for gentle cleaning, but anything stronger than that should be kept away.

the gut and digestive tract play a significant role in the immune system. An unhealthy gut can exacerbate skin conditions like acne, rosacea, and eczema, but a healthy gut helps combat irritation by producing anti-inflammatory agents. When it comes to the skin, the outside reflects the inside. An abundance of unhealthy bacteria in the gut can also upset your overall system and lead to chemical imbalances in the brain. In fact, the connections between the gut and the brain are so prominent that the pathway between the two has been termed the gut-brain axis. Though there are a number of

maintaining your overall health. Focus first on

standard qualities that define a healthy

your gut, and the rest will fall into place.

gut, “gut healthy” is not a blanket term.

Healthy gut, healthy body. In more scientific

USE QUALITY MATERIALS. New mods should always be pierced with high-quality materials, such as 14-karat gold or 316L surgical-grade steel. Avoid jewelry that looks as if it has been coated with anything. If you have any metal sensitivities, let your piercer know—this is the easiest way to avoid irritation and infection in new piercings.

According to dietician Anne Cundiff, the

Eating foods with probiotics, like yogurt

terms, the gut houses billions of the bacteria

process of maintaining a healthy gut is

and kombucha, can help keep your gut in

that inhabit our bodies and maintain our

different for everyone.

check. However, Cundiff warns, probiotic

internal systems. This affects digestion, skin, the immune system, and even mental health. Many of the bacteria in the gut combat harmful viruses that can cause diseases, so

Cundiff recommends taking basic

supplements should not replace real food.

steps like getting enough sleep, staying

“You have to learn to eat well for your body

hydrated, and watching your daily sugar

before any supplement will help your health,”

intake to work towards a healthy gut.

Cundiff says. “Food first, always.”

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HEALTH + SEX

The Bloody Truth About Period Sex WORDS HALLIE O’NEILL | PHOTO MICHAELA SPIELBERGER | DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK

Period sex. See also: “stirring the paint,” “pussy blood fart,” “blowjob week.” You’re wrinkling your nose, right? Culturally, the activity is a bit more stigmatized here in America than in other places (hi, Europe), so there are probably a lot of facts about “crime scene sex” that you aren’t aware of. Theresa Hohertz, a nurse practitioner specializing in women’s health at the Women’s Care Clinic, helped us clear up some misconceptions. Period sex has a reputation for being a bit messy, so it’s not surprising that a lot of women are worried about involving their partner in their menstrual mayhem. But the thing is, most women lose less than 16 teaspoons of menstrual fluid during each period, and on average the monthly release is between just six to eight teaspoons. Divide that by days in the week and that one night you decide to have period sex will

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probably only yield a couple teaspoons of fluid. Not bad, huh? “I really think that [the couple] will be surprised at how little blood flow there really is, unless she’s actively hemorrhaging at that time,” Hohertz says. For what little fluid does come out, there are plenty of methods for minimizing the mess. It can be as simple as laying a towel down on the bed prior to getting it on, or moving the whole operation to the shower for an even cleaner alternative. “The most important thing is that the couple feels comfortable with each other in order to set up the situation, so if there is a large area of blood that is expelled during sex, it’s not really a big deal,” Hohertz says. You can even try out certain positions for optimal period sex satisfaction and minimal mess. In doggy style, the cervix is lifted, so that could mean less fluid

emission. A horizontal position could prevent a heavier flow too. Partners can also utilize toys to maximize sexual pleasure, and if you’re worried about making a mess, look for a tool that doesn’t require penetration, like a clitoral vibrator. Hohertz suggests using, “anything that’s going to stimulate the clitoral area more. Because basically, that’s the end goal: orgasm.” Messes aside, there are some pretty cool benefits that come with period sex. Menstrual fluid serves as a natural, ample lubricant—no further explanation needed. Sex in general is a mood booster through the rapid release of feel-good chemicals in your brain, so you can bid farewell to those pesky menstruation mood swings. Best of all, it could actually minimize menstrual cramping. “During sex, especially during orgasm, more blood flow is brought to that area,” Hohertz says. “The increased flow will help decrease the cramping.” That’s right—orgasms not only increase blood flow, but they relax the uterus and release endorphins. So, good news: this means masturbation is also a good practice while menstruating. Sounds pretty sweet, right? Of course, the rules for protection don’t change here—STIs are just as transmittable during period sex. So don’t cast the condom, dental dam, or other protection aside. Hohertz notes that even for women who track their menstruation cycles carefully, they aren’t completely safe from pregnancy during menstruation. “Likelihood of pregnancy is very low, but it’s not impossible,” Hohertz says. However, anyone on the pill or any form of contraception will still have the contraceptive benefits from birth control. Period sex certainly isn’t for everyone, of course. But it’s not as freaky as some rumors make it out to be. “It’s normal, it’s healthy, and there are absolutely no concerns for any health-related issues because of it,” Hohertz says. “There’s no reason why you can’t participate in sexual activity during menstruation.” Of course, it’s totally okay if you’re still not interested in having period sex. But if you’ve been convinced, go ahead. Part the red sea.


Lesbian Sex Myths WORDS ZOE HANNA PHOTO MOLLIE RYAN

A lot of lesbian porn is made with straight men in mind. As a result, the inaccuracies are overwhelming. Here are five myths about lesbian sex that mainstream porn often perpetuates.

1. LESBIAN SEX ISN’T REAL SEX

BECAUSE IT DOESN’T INVOLVE PENETRATION. Yes, some queer women don’t like penetration, but there are also plenty who love it. That’s where strap-ons, dildos, and other sex toys come into play. Also, sex can mean a lot more than just penetration, and knowing that can benefit everyone, regardless of sexuality.

2. ALL LESBIANS SCISSOR. In reality,

scissoring isn’t anywhere near as popular as it appears in lesbian porn. For a long time, scissoring was considered a myth altogether and thought to have originally been a ploy used by filmmakers to get two

actresses in one shot. However, it would be incorrect to say that now, as some people enjoy scissoring and incorporate it into their sex lives.

3. LESBIAN SEX IS JUST ORAL SEX,

AND VICE VERSA. Yes, oral sex is pretty common, but it’s not the only option. In fact, there are some women who don’t enjoy giving or receiving oral sex, just like some lesbians don’t enjoy penetration.

4. SEXUALLY ACTIVE QUEER WOMEN

DON’T NEED TO WORRY ABOUT SAFE SEX. Just like any other form of sex, lesbian sex can lead to the contraction of STIs. This is usually from things like sharing sex toys and uncleanliness. While the risk is lower for lesbians, contracting an STI is a very real possibility if you aren’t careful.

5. LESBIAN SEX CAN’T BE BAD. Since

there are two vaginas involved, there’s a misconception that all queer femme sex is inevitably amazing because both parties know what the other wants. But this isn’t always the case. Everyone has their own preferences, and just because the people involved share the same anatomy doesn’t mean they’re mind readers.

VAGINA HYGIENE THIS IS A DOUCHE-FREE ZONE. WORDS KIM BATES

Vaginas. Half the population has one, yet we still struggle with how to care for them. There are constant questions about what’s normal, how to keep them clean, and what it all means. So let’s break it down. For starters, scents are normal. Every vagina is different and they all produce different smells. You don’t need to douche, use perfumes or scented soaps to hide the smell. In fact, scented products can disturb your pH levels and cause yeast infections. According to Jami Shepard, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Coralville, Iowa, these products include the beloved bath bombs. “They put so many things inside [bath bombs] that seem great, but I’ve seen alterations of the vagina or vulva from using them,” Shepard says. “It causes contact dermatitis, swelling, redness, discharge… almost to the degree of chemical burns.” Contact dermatitis is a rash that occurs on the skin due to direct contact to that area of the body. This can happen when your underwear or a chemical substance rubs against the sensitive area of your vulva. Unfortunately, some are even more sensitive than others. According to HealthyWomen. org, some people are more susceptible to urinary tract infections due to the cells in the vagina and vulva being more easily invaded by bacteria. This can be caused by sex and tampons moving the bacteria around. This brings us to some important rules. Don’t insert anything into your vagina that isn’t clean. When you masturbate, make sure your fingers are clean, your sex toys are clean, and anything that isn’t meant for your vagina is covered by a condom. When you pee, wipe front to back. Doing this avoids pushing the bacteria from your anus into your urethra, which can cause a UTI. Finally, give your vagina a break. Wearing cotton panties and going commando is okay. You need to let your vagina breathe. Sleeping without underwear and loose shorts is better than wearing tight underwear made from synthetic materials. So, vaginas are delicate and they can be easily upset, but this can be avoided by keeping the area clean, dry, and aired out. “Less is more, that’s the take home,” Shepard says.

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MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT

Ancient Posse

FROM DSM TO NYC, THIS DUO IS ALL ABOUT THE FEELS. WORDS PEYTON JOHNSON | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION ANCIENT POSSE | DESIGN MELISSA MCELIN

The ethereal sound of “Runnin” echoes through the light filled apartment. Synth tones bounce off the walls in Ancient Posse’s jam session music video. Kamillah Jonaé and Steven Virgil Bergeron, partners in life and music, make up the duo. Jonaé covers the lead vocal duties and Bergeron plays synth to complement the sound. The members of Ancient Posse are very different, describing themselves as two people who “started at opposite ends of the universe and gave into each other.” “We met working at a restaurant. I was waitressing. We started jamming together casually one day. It started as love at first, and grew into something bigger than the

54 | spring + summer

two of us: a passion project. We helped each other reach their full potential,” Jonaé says. As their partnership grew, so did their notoriety around Des Moines, Iowa, and the rest of the state. They’ve played festivals like Hinterland and 80/35, but they became known for their intimate free performances on sidewalks and in Des Moines’ East Village bars where they engaged with fans and bared their souls. From the early creation of their music to their more recent shows, their material consistently celebrates emotion. “[Our music lets] people know it’s okay to feel. Life is the most beautiful thing, and you have to express it. We did that.

I sit out on our porch, feel the wind come over me and write,” Jonaé says. Ancient Posse’s otherworldly sound has carried Jonaé and Bergeron through multiple EPs, singles, and live shows. Now, it’s taken them away from Des Moines to Brooklyn, New York. Jonaé says that the decision was a sudden one, happening only weeks before they packed up and moved. They were convinced that New York was the logical next step. “It was just time to go. We both wanted a change of pace and something more artistically, so Brooklyn it was. The scene is active and creative,” Jonaé says. Their time in Brooklyn is already showing dividends, with the February release of their debut album “Wuttalyfe.” In the coming year, Ancient Posse says to expect more—more artistry, music, and completely original visuals. Catch a vibe with them on their social media and website: @AncientPosse or AncientPosse.com.


COMEDY QUEENS THESE WOMEN ENTERTAINERS ARE MAKING A NAME FOR THEMSELVES WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT. WORDS SAMANTHA MILLER | PHOTO AARON GRAFF | DESIGN MELISSA MCELIN

We know our Dave Chapelles and our Chris Rocks and our Jim Gaffigan's, but month by month we’re seeing more female comedians host Netflix specials, headlining tours and mainstage shows. While we applaud them for that, do they still get criticized for being “too much?” Taylor Tomlinson, a standup comic from southern California, was featured in the Netflix Comedy series, “The Comedy Lineup.” She’s performed on “The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon” as well as Conan O’Brien’s late night show, has opened for comic Brian Regan—and she’s only 25. “There have always been more men than women in comedy,” Tomlinson says. “That’s just the way it is, honestly, thanks to the internet, it’s just easier now for women to move up.” Tomlinson hails from a small town in California and was introduced to stand up in high school. “I never thought of myself as a ‘woman’ comedian,” Tomlinson says. “I was always just the youngest one and that was an advantage—they want to see someone different.” In one of Tomlinson’s jokes featured in “The Comedy Lineup,” she talks about the ever-present fear of walking alone at night as a woman. She calls out men in the audience with a disclaimer, “This one’s not for you.” I commended her for this. For not leaving this joke out because of its societal relevance, and because as a woman and someone who’s seen every episode of Criminal Minds, I get it. “I’m not going to change my set for the male ear, but I will call them out on it,” Tomlinson says. “That’s what comedy is, it’s looking for that discomfort and putting it in the light.” This is that conversation shift. Freedom to talk about sex. Or not. To talk about pregnancy, or not. To talk about life at your day job, or your kids, or an embarrassing date without worry of what some people will think. Onnalee Kelley, member of the improv troupe ChowDown, has been performing in

Des Moines, Iowa for three years. “I don’t change my stand up for [men],” she says. “I have a yeast infection joke, and if they cringe while listening to it for five minutes, I call them out, I have to deal with yeast infections for a week!” Tiffany Haddish, Ali Wong and Iliza Schlesinger are some of 2019’s top comedians and either have Netflix specials, headlining tours, or feature films. Paste Magazine named the top best comedy specials on Netflix in 2018, six of which were women. While these numbers are to be celebrated, there is still work to do. Forbes named the top ten highest paid comedians in 2018—none of which were women. “That ratio has always been skewed, there have always been more men,” Tomlinson says. While there may be less women in the industry, getting more on that list means more representation. More women in the audience that think, hey, I can relate to that. “There aren’t as many women stand up comics here as men, but that’s honestly

because they’re leaving,” Kelley says. She finds the Des Moines comedy scene to be a late-night-date-night kind of deal. An older crowd, or the people that continuously seek out their favorite local comics. It’s no New York or Chicago, so they’re not getting the exposure they need. As much as women are making strides in this industry, there is still a lack of women on stage. “I don’t think there are as many women comfortable in this type of environment,” Mari Moroz, a young comedian and podcast host in Des Moines, Iowa, says. “Because of the perception of women in comedy and because when I do standup sets it's just me and one other woman at an open mic and then fifteen other men, it's definitely not as welcoming.” Moroz makes sure she always brings a friend to her standup sets. While she’s confident the rest of the audience will find her sets funny, “having another woman in the audience guarantees that at least one person will get my jokes.” It’s less a matter of laughing and more a matter of connecting with someone out there. Women are grabbing hold of the mic and claiming their place on the stage. Hopefully, they’ll soon be securing their place on that Forbes list too.

Onnalee Kelley performing a set at Lefty's Live Music in Des Moines, Iowa.

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MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT

Foreign Films YOU MAY NOT SPEAK THE LANGUAGE, BUT THESE FILMS TELL A GREAT STORY. WORDS JACOB REYNOLDS | ILLUSTRATION KATE SEGLER | DESIGN ANNA GLEASON

If you’re looking to venture out into the world of foreign film but aren't sure where to start, don’t worry. We’ve compiled a list of films from the hilarious to the emotional to start you on your adventure.

Action

Drama

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Swedish, 2009)

Roma (Spanish, 2018)

Comedy

A better version of the 2011 American film about a journalist who teams up with an investigator to find out what happened to a missing woman, this thriller based on Steig Larson’s novel is more hard-edged and less gory by Hollywood’s normal tropes of overlyexcessive gore (not to say there isn’t intense violence, though). For being produced in a less distinguished Swedish film industry, this film hits all the right marks for an action movie. Available on YouTube, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play and Vudu.

Malcriados (Spanish, 2016) Watch if you like: Billy Madison, Young Adult, Meet the Parents This Colombian-Argentian arthouse film about a man who plans to teach his spoiled now-adult children life lessons has a lot going for it. From its campy tone to its hilarious performances, this film is silly, digestible, and fun to watch. Available on Netflix.

Fantasy Tropical Malady (Thai, 2004) Watch if you like: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Lake House. This experimental film is split between the story of a soldier and young man in love with each other in rural Thailand, and a story of a soldier lost in a forest who is visited by the ghost of a shaman. There is an endearing sweetness to the film, and the striking allegories and connections between the two stories call for a second viewing. In part from the structure and thoughtful direction, the film won the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004. Available on Disc at Amazon.

Watch if you like: Gone Girl, The Invitation, Atomic Blonde

Crime The Vanishing (Dutch, 1988) Watch if you like: Momento, Winter’s Bone A shocking and intense crime drama about a man trying to find his missing girlfriend, this movie gained acclaim from the likes of Stanley Kubrick, who said it was “the most horrifying film I’ve ever seen”—even more than his own "The Shining." An intense but satisfying thriller, it was ranked as one of Empire magazine’s “100 Best Films of World Cinema” in 2010. Available on Amazon Prime and iTunes.

Watch if you like: Gravity, The Color Purple, First Reformed Alfonso Cuarón’s Academy Award-winning film about the life of a working-class woman is heartbreaking in its scope and examination of the failure of human nature, from avoidance and violence to loss and bitterness. Yalitza Aparicio’s performance as the quiet protagonist Cleo is a force that conveys enough emotion to ditch the subtitles and still understand her dilemmas when she speaks. Available on Netflix.

Romance A Moment to Remember (Korean, 2004) Watch if you like: The Notebook, The Fault in Our Stars This devastating and poignant South Korean movie wrapped around tragedy involves a young wife’s early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The two main characters of Kim Su-jin and Choi Chulsoo develop a strong chemistry that transcends any language barrier the audience might have. Available on Netflix.

Musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (French, 1964) Watch if you like: La La Land, Singin’ in the Rain, Les Misérables Jacques Demy’s charming musical is vibrant in both its colors and the way it uses the cadences of the French language to make trivial matters gain operatic importance. A love story set in 1950’s France, it's also notable for its tearinducing ending—and for being a major influence for the structure and storyline of La La Land. Available on YouTube, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play and the Criterion Collection for DVD and Blu-ray.

56 | spring + summer


Queer Musicians To Follow WORDS ZOE HANNA

Anthony Amorim GAY he/him Genres: pop punk, alt-rock Our Picks: "Sometimes," "2004," "Torn"

Mal Blum GAY + NONBINARY they/them Genres: anti-folk, punk Our Picks: "New Years Eve," "Iowa"

Sidney Gish

THE ACCESSIBILITY GAME BRINGING EVERYONE TO THE CONSOLE WORDS MADDIE WILLEY | ILLUSTRATION KATE SEGLER

Microsoft’s 2019 Superbowl ad was different this year. They didn’t advertise a new Surface tablet. They didn’t advertise their Xbox One either. Instead, they used their one-minute slot to feature a product only a fraction of their customers will utilize: The Xbox Adaptive Controller. The ad features several children with motor impairments. One is Owen, a 9 year old with Escobar Syndrome. Owen describes the difficulties of playing video games on a standard Xbox controller and introduces the Adaptive Controller, showing how much easier it makes playing video games for him. The ad ends with the words, “When everybody plays, we all win.” The ad wasn’t designed to sell out Adaptive Controllers or encourage you to buy an Xbox. Rather, it plays into a trend that influences several facets of the gaming industry: accessibility. The Adaptive Controller fosters to those who might have trouble using a standard Xbox controller by giving them options for customization. Extra joysticks, buttons, and controllers can be added to

the main controller, which features two large, easy to press buttons. The accessibility trend could soon allow anyone with an internet connection and a smartphone to play the same video games that currently require a $400 console. Google’s recently announced Stadia, their first foray into video gaming, leads the charge. Stadia isn’t a video game console like we know them now. Through the process of streaming, Stadia users would be able to play games on their plain PC, phone, or tablet, no matter how old. Basically, it will function the same way as Netflix—just open up another tab and play your game instantly. Cutting the need for a TV, powerful computer, or a console, Stadia could mean more widespread access to video games. The Stadia announcement trailer began very similarly to the way the Xbox Adaptive Controller’s ad ended--claiming that the future of gaming is a place “where we can all play.” Whatever the future of video gaming is, industry leaders seem determined to include everyone.

BISEXUAL she/her Genres: indie pop Our Picks: "Friday Night Placebo," "Cokesbury," "Impostor Syndrome"

Syd, front-woman of The Internet GAY she/her Genres: R&B, funk, neo soul Our Picks: "Come Over," "Girl," "Wanna Be"

Christine + the Queens PANSEXUAL she/her Genres: synth pop Our Picks: "Girlfriend," "Comme Ci," "iT"

King Princess GAY + GENDERQUEER she/they Genres: bedroom pop Our Picks: "Pussy is God," "Upper West Side," "Holy"

Kevin Abstract GAY he/him Genres: rap, R&B Our Picks: "Empty," "Georgia," "Miserable America"

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We suit every lifestyle.

VALLEY WEST MALL | JORDAN CREEK MALL halberstadts.com


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Profile for Drake Magazine

Drake Mag Spring 2019  

The Spring + Summer issue of Drake Mag.

Drake Mag Spring 2019  

The Spring + Summer issue of Drake Mag.

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