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IN SUPPORT OF THE UNITED NATIONS 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS V O L U M E 12 N U M B E R 2 | 2 0 2 1 S I N G A P O R E


FOREWORD Dear Readers,

This is a special edition of Design In Print. It is a testament to DP's commitment to place sustainability squarely at the heart of our design and action. In framework, we align our advocacy and principles in design with the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This is a shared vision with DP’s founding philosophy of designing with a deep concern for the built environment and to enrich lives. Through design, we aspire to minimise negative environmental and social impacts, uplift human and planetary health, and create a better future. In approach, we mapped a selection of our projects through the lens of the 17 SDGs in relation to the targets and indicators. To better appreciate the role architecture and design plays in the SDGs, we’ve intentionally presented and examined their impact in accordance to these goals. This issue comes at an unprecedented time, with the world in the shackles of a pandemic. COVID-19 highlighted the fragility of everyday life, revealed the depth of interconnectedness and reminded us that our actions, or inaction, directly correlate to human and environmental health. Compounding the pressures on our health, urban and social systems are the complex challenges of climate change, ageing demographics and social equities, to name some. The message is clear: we need to and can do more. These challenges call for action and highlight our responsibilities as architects, designers and built-environment professionals when designing for interdependent ecosystems. They also reinforce the mindset that change starts with us. Ripples of individual efforts can collectively become positive waves of change. The revamp of DP Architects’ Attributes of Purposeful Design, or the APD Matrix, – in tandem with the ethos of UN’s 17 SDGs, BCA’s Green Mark 2021 and the SG Green plan 2030 – is a step towards deepening our sustainable agenda, and accelerating circular and well endeavours holistically. Through evidence- and outcome-based actions with clients, fellow professionals, builders, institution and industry collaborators, we can achieve more. With more responsible, people-centric and regenerative design, we aspire to harmonise our natural, social and built capital; and ultimately shape healthier, more delightful and resilient environments for all. We are not going to settle for the old or the new normal. Join us in our pursuit towards a better and more sustainable normal!

Seah Chee Huang Chief Executive Officer


PREFACE: A Retrospective Review The United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) were adopted in 2015 as a rallying call to achieve a poverty-free future society, protecting the planet and providing peace and prosperity for all. It has since become an internationally pervasive sustainability benchmark for all developments. While some of the UN SDGs are intuitively applicable to architecture, such as Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities, we wondered if built-environment professionals could also play a more significant role to enable the other goals. How can architecture contribute to reducing poverty, eliminating hunger, and promoting gender equality? To what extent can the built-environment contribute to climate action and promote peace? We also wished to glean lessons from our past work on the practical realities of achieving these sustainable development goals. During our research, we were inspired by the An Architecture Guide to the UN17 Sustainable Development Goals Vols 1 & 2, first published by the International Union of Architects (UIA)1 in 2019, which collected architectural case studies from all over the world that contributed to the realisation of the UN 17 SDGs. Many other institutes and academies subsequently adopted the case study research format to publish similar guides of their own.2 We also closely referred to the UIA SDG Dhaka Declaration 20193, articulating how architectural practice can achieve sustainable development goals. Adopting a similar method of inquiry as the architecture guides mentioned above, we determined if the case studies had qualities that contributed to any of the 169 SDG targets. The process of creating this book rewarded us with a deeper understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of our past projects, and a practical method to evaluate them against the SDGs. We learnt that most projects, especially public buildings, contributed to achieving more than one SDG and that the socially-oriented goals were less commonly addressed through architecture than the environmental ones. It was also heartening to learn that architecture can play a part in achieving the 17 goals and make a difference in creating a better future for us all. Through this publication, we hope to inspire others to play their part in achieving the UN 17 SDGs. Chan Hui Min Director 1 THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY, THE DANISH ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS AND THE UIA COMMISSION ON THE UN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS JOINTLY FIRST PUBLISHED “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS” IN 2018. THEY PUBLISHED A SECOND VOLUME OF THE GUIDE IN 2020. (HTTPS://UIA2023CPH.ORG/THE-GUIDES) 2 THE JAPAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS (JIA) ALSO PUBLISHED “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS: JAPAN VERSION” IN 2019. (HTTP://SYS.JIA.OR.JP/NEWS/DETAIL HTML?ID=1119) 3 UIA COMMISSION ON THE UN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS, UIA SDG DHAKA DECLARATION (JOINTLY DECLARED BY THE INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS BANGLADESH AND ARCHITECTS REGIONAL COUNCIL ASIA), 2019 (HTTPS://WWW.UIA-ARCHITECTES.ORG/WEBAPI/UPLOADS/ RESSOURCEFILE/264/DHAKA_DECLARATION_FORPUBLICATION.PDF)


CONTENTS END POVERTY IN ALL ITS FORMS EVERYWHERE 9 Khatib Court 11 Dak R’tih Lake Eco-Tourism & Urban Area

END HUNGER, ACHIEVE FOOD SECURITY & IMPROVE NUTRITION & PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE 15 17

Herb & Spice Gardens @ Sengkang Eco-Community Garden @ Tampines

ENSURING HEALTHY LIVES & WELLBEING AT ALL AGES 21 Sengkang General Hospital 23 GoodLife! Makan 25 Datansha Master Plan

INCLUSIVE & EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION & LIFELONG LEARNING 29

Singapore Institute of Technology @ Singapore Polytechnic & @ Ngee Ann Polytechnic

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ITE College West Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine Novena & Yunnan Campuses NUS University Town Master Plan Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary)

ENSURE AVAILABILITY & SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER & SANITATION FOR ALL 41 Gabon Airport City

ENSURE ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE, RELIABLE, SUSTAINABLE & MODERN ENERGY FOR ALL 45 Infrastructure for Network & Energy Security @ Labrador

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Renewable Energy @ NS Hub Sunray Woodcraft Construction Headquarters

PROMOTE SUSTAINED, INCLUSIVE & SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH, FULL & PRODUCTIVE EMPLOYMENT & DECENT WORK FOR ALL 53 Heartware Network

BUILD RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE, PROMOTE INCLUSIVE & SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIALISATION & FOSTER INNOVATION 57 59

Design & Construction Technologies in Midwood The Woodleigh Residences & The Woodleigh Mall

REDUCE INEQUALITY WITHIN & AMONG COUNTRIES 63 Dak R’tih Lake Eco-Tourism & Urban Area

MAKE CITIES & HUMAN SETTLEMENTS INCLUSIVE, SAFE, RESILIENT & SUSTAINABLE 67 Punggol Town Hub 69 SAFRA Choa Chu Kang 71 Bonnevaux Centre for Peace

ENSURE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION & PRODUCTION PATTERNS 75 77 79

Advocating Responsible Consumption @ Our Tampines Hub Bukit Canberra DP Architects Headquarters

TAKE URGENT ACTION TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE & ITS IMPACTS 83 Zero Energy Building @ BCA Academy


The Team 85 Lusail City Commercial Boulevard

CONSERVE & SUSTAINABLY USE THE OCEANS, SEAS & MARINE RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 89 River Safari

PROTECT, RESTORE & PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE USE OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS, SUSTAINABLY MANAGE FORESTS, COMBAT DESERTIFICATION & HALT & REVERSE LAND DEGRADATION & HALT BIODIVERSITY LOSS 93 Temasek Club

PROMOTE PEACEFUL & INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; PROVIDE ACCESS TO JUSTICE FOR ALL, & BUILD EFFECTIVE, ACCOUNTABLE & INCLUSIVE INSTITUTIONS AT ALL LEVELS 97 HomeTeamNS Khatib Clubhouse 99 NS Hub

STRENGTHEN THE MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION & REVITALISE THE GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 103 Plantation Village 105 S ino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City Master Plan 107 C apstone Project with SUTD 109 C onstruction Declares

EDITOR IN CHIEF Angelene Chan

EDITORS Chan Hui Min Belle Chung Ng San Son

CONTENT Josy Koh John Utanes Luke Wee

GRAPHICS Rebecca Jin Amanda Lin

PHOTOGRAPHY Alvin Arre Bai Jiwen Chiok Jun Jie Rory Daniel Pocholo Mauricio Ethan Mok Marc Tey Studio Periphery

CONTRIBUTORS DP Green DP Sustainable Design Toh Bee Ping

PEOPLE & PLANET 111 Afterword 112 Quotes

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 113 Our Partners

THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF DESIGN IN PRINT REFLECTS DPA’S COLLABORATION WITH THE UN ASSOCIATION OF SINGAPORE (UNAS), A NATIONAL VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATION WHOSE MISSION IS TO PROMOTE THE AIMS AND IDEALS OF THE UNITED NATIONS AS WELL AS SUPPORT ITS WORK.


How to read Goal Description

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Legend 1 Main Title 2 UNSDG Icon 3 Overview 4 UNSDG Colour Representative Tab 5 Project Title 6 Project Details 7 Other UNSDG Contribution(s) 8 Context & Contribution 9 Photos/Perspectives

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How to Read this Issue of Design in Print Design in Print Vol. 12.2 was conceived with the goal of advocacy in mind and in support of the UN’s 2030 SDG agenda. Its purpose is to champion greater effort and measures for sustainability within the built environment industry by demonstrating key relevance and to show that achieving the goals is not impossible. As such, the issue comprises 'Goal Descriptions' that provide context of the specific SDG and how the built environment relates to it. This is followed by 'Architectural Examples for Each Goal', which highlight projects and how they contribute towards mitigating the impacts or achieving the agenda of a specific goal. While


Architectural Examples of Each Goal

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most project examples meet multiple goals, their descriptions focus on architectural aspects that directly address the goals against which they have been benchmarked. Goal Description The SDGs are identified by a specific set of colour codes, which has been used as a visual marker on the righthand page of the ‘Goal Description’. This is supplemented by the respective SDG icon on the top-right corner and slogan as the main title to help readers identify and grasp the agenda of each goal at a glance. An overview of the SDG is then provided along with an introduction on how the built environment can contribute towards meeting the goals.

Architectural Examples of Each Goal Based on the purpose of each UNSDG, we have carefully curated architectural examples in DPA's body of work. Context explains the economic, social and/or environmental challenges faced and Contribution describes the specific urban and building design strategies employed to help alleviate those issues. Each example is accompanied by photos and illustrations to demonstrate characteristics, relevant location, specialists involved, client, and year of completion. The respective colour of the goal is shown on the outer sides of the pages as Colour Tabs. Any other UN SDGs that a project meets are listed to the right of the Project Details. 6


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END POVERTY IN ALL ITS FORMS EVERYWHERE

Poverty is not only defined by unemployment and lack of income for a sustainable livelihood. It is also the inability to access food, water, shelter, basic healthcare and services for a decent quality of life.1 While global poverty rate has been halved since 2000, intensified efforts are still required to create employment, establish fair minimum wages, improve accessibility to basic services and needs, and achieve food security. This is especially so with the setback in the progress made on poverty reduction, as global extreme poverty rate rose for the first time in over two decades following the COVID-19 pandemic. 2 The Built Environment industry cannot eradicate poverty. It can, however, work with institutions and government bodies to develop urban design solutions to mitigate the impact of poverty on people’s lives. These range from master planning works that revitalise precincts, create market relevance and add value to environmental sustainability design so as to uplift livelihoods and the lives that depend on it, and engage local communities. Architects, through the power of design, can enable marginalised and poor citizens to integrate into and gain ownership of the environment – both built and social – that they are a part of. 3 1 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOL. 1”, P.10 2 UNITED NATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS & SOCIAL AFFAIRS, “SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL 1: PROGRESS AND INFO”, 2021, HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL1 3 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOL. 1”, P.11

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KHATIB COURT COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2017 GFA 26,700SQM CLIENT HOUSING & DEVELOPMENT BOARD, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP GREEN

Context Singapore’s public housing system, managed by the Housing & Development Board (HDB), has and continues to successfully achieve two things: provide affordable and inclusive housing for all, and function as a vehicle for nurturing social cohesion within the nation’s multi-racial fabric. Staying true to its primary focus, HDB has rolled out a 2-room short lease/flexi flat scheme for low-income families, including the elderly. Designed to deliver quality of life and basic standard of living, it returns a sense of ownership to the marginalised and the poor; inspiring feelings of belonging and community within them. Contribution Khatib Court was envisioned as a residential development that is tailored to 9

the homeowners’ socio-economic needs while incorporating the live-work-play model. Ideas of wellness and community bonding are weaved into the design of the building which features lush landscaping and rooftop gardens. These serve as vital biophilic cues that allow residents respite from the hustle and bustle of city life. Functioning like living spaces that extend beyond the units, the gardenscapes are community living rooms for safe and inclusive multi-racial and multigenerational interaction. Located beside Khatib MRT Station, Khatib Court also provides convenient access to affordable public transport options.


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DAK R’TIH LAKE ECO-TOURISM & URBAN AREA COUNTRY DAK NONG PROVINCE, VIETNAM

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2021 (MASTER PLAN) SITE AREA 1700HA CLIENT T&T GROUP JOINT STOCK COMPANY COLLABORATION DP ARCHITECTS IN COLLABORATION WITH HAAD

Context As one of the least developed provinces in Vietnam, Dak Nong has largely depended on agriculture, forestry and mining. However, the Dak R’tih Eco-Tourism project, which is part of a larger part of a geopark tourism development in Dak Nong, will contribute to the diversification of the economic portfolio and boost socio-economic development in the province. This urban redevelopment plan follows the UNESCO’s recognition of Dak Nong Province as the country’s newest Global Geopark. Contribution The Dak R’tih Eco-Tourism project is located at the centre of Ghia Nghia, the capital city of Dak Nong, and is envisioned to be the centre of the geopark tourism in 11

the area. The master plan proposes eight Geopark-themed resorts and two culture centres at the Dak R’tih Lake; transforming it into an attractive tourism hub and unique international destination. The future development is expected to bring in investments in hospitality, infrastructure and other sectors, which will generate an estimated 6,000 direct and approximately 12,000 to 15,000 indirect employment opportunities across these industries. With new urban infrastructure and redevelopment in place, market diversification and greater employment opportunities are created. These, in turn, can help to reduce poverty and disparities between Dak Nong and well-developed provinces in Vietnam.


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END HUNGER, ACHIEVE FOOD SECURITY & IMPROVE NUTRITION & PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

Can we feed the world and ensure no one goes hungry? With statistics showing that some 821 million people are considered to be “chronically undernourished”, hunger is still on the rise.1 Concerns about food security, however, are not limited to those in vulnerable regions or groups. The closing of geopolitical borders around the world in early 2020 when the pandemic struck, have also resulted in uneasiness surrounding food supply chains and reserves within communities in developed countries. The real issue at hand is perhaps less about food shortage than food distribution. In a 2019 news release, the UN reported that while enough food is being produced today to feed everyone on the planet, poor purchasing power amongst those in underdeveloped nations and insufficient infrastructure hinder food accessibility. On the other hand, climate change, increasing amount of food waste and mono-crop agriculture are undermining soil health and ecosystems necessary for plant diversity and sustainable food production. Seemingly insurmountable odds aside, the targets of Goal 2 are not a lost cause. Through architectural and landscape design and planning, the built environment can present solutions for achieving food security and sustainability. For one, well-thought design development can create conditions that support and integrate sustainable farming as a fundamental part of building complexes. Conceived in collaboration with arboriculture expertise, the built environment also can and must assist with maintaining and rehabilitating species diversity in a city’s landscape.2 1 UNITED NATIONS, SDGS, “CAN WE FEED THE WORLD AND ENSURE THAT NO ONE GOES HUNGRY?”, 3 OCT 2019, HTTPS://NEWS.UN.ORG/EN/STORY/2019/10/1048452 2 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS (UIA), ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS, GOAL #2: ZERO HUNGER, P.13, OCT 2019.

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HERB & SPICE GARDENS @ SENGKANG COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2018 AREA 774SQM CLIENT MINISTRY OF HEALTH, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP GREEN, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Generally referred to as ‘rooftop gardens’, they began as an innovative way to replace greenery in our built environment while providing the community with accessible, inclusive spaces for relaxation and refreshment. Today, these spaces in our urbanscape increasingly feature an added function: rooftop urban farming. 3 Although still principally recreational, they present interesting case studies on how integration of purpose and function through intentional design can expand the potentiality of existing urban spaces. One such unique example can be found on the rooftop of Sengkang General Hospital (SKH Campus), where a seemingly simple Herb & Spice Gardens is able to provide rehabilitation, recreation and insights to a greater solution for sustainability and food security. Contribution The landscape design framework at SKH Campus is influenced by the hospital’s Contemplative Healthcare philosophy which emphasises care in treatment and prevention so as to bring its patients from a place of ‘illness’ to ‘wellness’. Leveraging the eco and healing benefits of biophilia, 15

user-centric and inclusive green spaces were mindfully and strategically integrated throughout the healthcare development. The intention is to allow patients to fully immerse in nature through proximity and participation. The Herb & Spice Gardens thus feature smoothly looping pathways for easy maneuvering and custom easy-to-reach planters for elderly patients and wheelchairusers. Organised for clear line of sight without contrasting changes in material colours and textures, the planter design also facilitates ease of supervision by healthcareproviders and presents a therapeutic environment for patients with dementia. Through the capacity of landscape design, the success of this urban garden space is testament to a built environment that boldly presents solutions and spatial models for sustainability, security and well-being. 3 NG, JUN SEN, THE STRAITS TIMES, “MORE ROOFTOP GARDENS, URBAN FARMS PLANNED”, 10 NOVEMBER 2017, HTTPS://WWW.STRAITSTIMES.COM/SINGAPORE ENVIRONMENT/MORE-ROOFTOP-GARDENS-URBAN FARMS-PLANNED


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ECO-COMMUNITY GARDEN @ TAMPINES COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2017 AREA 960SQM CLIENT PEOPLE’S ASSOCIATION DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP GREEN

Context Without a large amount of land nor natural resources, Singapore has relied on strong market cooperatives and worldclass infrastructure for its food supplies, effectively ensuring food security for its people. Following the pandemic and global lockdown, however, there has been growing interest and discourse on how our food supply system can be more deeply and locally rooted in the community. This has resulted in a shift in perspectives on the potential of community urban farming plots that have been established at grassroot levels. Contribution The Eco-Community Garden, located on the rooftop of Our Tampines Hub (OTH), exemplifies this. Conceived with the ethos of “Engage, Enrich and Empower” in mind, it primarily functions as a space that invites community participation and offers an experience with nature that will enrich the well-being of the residents of Tampines. This is enhanced through the application 17

of universal design principles with planters of differing heights for easier reach by the elderly, children as well as wheelchair-users. As an educational platform, the garden plot equips residents across different age groups with know-how in sustainable urban farming through participation and handson experience. This includes providing participants with an understanding of how a circular system can contribute to sustainable practices; specifically, how food waste generated daily within the development are converted by the Eco-Digester Centre at OTH into non-potable water, liquid plant nutrients and organic fertiliser for use in the EcoCommunity Garden. Produce, such as spices, fruits and vegetables, are harvested bi-monthly and carefully managed to ensure minimal to no food wastage. These are used in the culinary classes conducted at the cooking studio in the co-adjacently located Tampines Regional Library and are also distributed to residents within the precinct.


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ENSURING HEALTHY LIVES & WELL-BEING AT ALL AGES

While there has been progress in many areas of health, we have not achieved a desired lead on healthcare matters ranging from access to healthcare and childhood immunisation to disease eradication. With the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, disruptions to healthcare may not only impede the rate of improvement. More worryingly, it may also begin to reverse decades of progress made. Yet, there has been a silver lining. Global lockdowns as communities retreat into the safety of their homes have led to a re-examination of the concept of Health and Well-being; sparking deep discussions around what health truly encompasses and how our systems can put 'care' back into healthcare to better meet the needs of patients. Essentially, this goes beyond medical aid and looks at health as a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being1. Considering the milestones that remain ahead, a global coordinated effort is needed in order to meet the targets set for Goal 3. Countries must have comprehensive health strategies and increase spending on health systems to meet the urgent needs of communities they serve and protect health workers. To this, the Built Environment sector can contribute meaningfully through a more environment-conscious and human-centric approach. As our indoor climate plays an essential role in supporting health and well-being, building design must ensure healthy indoor environments. This ranges from office design that injects positivity and promotes productivity, incorporation of workout equipment in public parks, to hospital developments that bring a contemplative healthcare environment and deeply patient-centric service, and transformation of public void decks into meaningful spaces conducive to the mental and social well-being of the elderly. 1

DEFINITION SET OUT BY THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION IN 1948. 20


SENGKANG GENERAL HOSPITAL COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2018 GFA 288,000SQM CLIENT MINISTRY OF HEALTH, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP GREEN, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Located in the residential heartland of Sengkang, Singapore, the hospital campus is part of the Government’s Healthy Living Master Plan which aims to increase accessibility to good healthcare, wherein facilities are built to connect all residents to healthy options as part of the Health Community Ecosystem. This initiative is in line with the Land Transport Master Plan 2040, whereby good healthcare is planned within walking or biking distance of residents in an effort to reduce the need to travel to the ‘city’ for their healthcare needs. Contribution The development was thus conceived with community- and patient-centricity in mind. The former is articulated via the Community Heart. An outdoor space that is used for community events, it forms a vibrant pedestrian concourse with soft and hard landscaping. Accessibility to the hospital campus and its Community Heart is further encouraged by extending pedestrian links to the neighbouring areas, the Light Rail Transit network and the National Cycling Path Network, which is slated to link up nationwide by 2030. 21

Exploring the concept of Contemplative Healthcare, patient-centricity is expressed through complementary well-being design and environmental sustainability design principles to achieve a healing environment. For example, inlet/outlet ratio for openings optimised through Computational Fluid Dynamic analyses and applied in combination with wind directors such as louvres to accelerate air-flow velocity, allows for deeper penetration of natural ventilation. This orchestration of air flow in response to specific programmatic allocation simultaneously improves indoor comfort levels for patients and the environmental performance of the hospital wards. Outside, expansive landscaped gardens introduce a green oasis in the midst of the urban environment, contributing sensory and therapeutic experiences for patients and staff. Vertical sun-shading screens allow ward-bound patients to enjoy maximum views out while preventing excessive thermal heat-gain indoors; further contributing to a comfortable and delightful healing environment.


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GOODLIFE! MAKAN COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2015 GFA 350SQM CLIENT MONTFORT CARE

Context Making healthcare accessible is not limited to policy-making nor cost. Sometimes, it requires thinking out-of-the-box in order to effectively reach out to those in need of care; specifically, the vulnerable groups such as stay-alone elderly. With a rapidly aging population, community care providers in Singapore seek to meet this challenge by providing well-being support that goes beyond conventional aid in order to address the mental and emotional health of its elderly. Contribution: A modest and delightful social facility, GoodLife! Makan 2 taps into the ‘third places’ in the heartland neighbourhood, specifically the common void deck, to create a modest but welcoming social facility purposed to reintegrate vulnerable groups of elderly back into society. As an exploratory discourse, its design concept is simple: instil stewardship through food-centric programmes in an inclusive and borderless setting. Designed with respect to the spatial quality of the social housing void deck, 23

it capitalises on the porous setting to create a fenceless compound that provides a safe, inclusive and accessible recreational facility, anchored by a communal kitchen at its nucleus. Colours, textures and iconographies were then cleverly incorporated to ensure a universal yet distinctive and vibrant environment that appeals to seniors from all walks of life. A space where once socially isolated elderly persons can bond over the joy of cooking and sharing a meal, the project helps promote their social and mental wellbeing through the power of design. A robust ground-up approach also facilitates multigeneration exchange and participation from the community; effectively building social understanding and resilience. The project was conferred Design of the Year at the 2020 President’s Design Award, Singapore’s highest honour for designers and design across all disciplines.

2 MAKAN IS A COLLOQUIAL MALAY TERM THAT MEANS “EAT”.


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DATANSHA Master Plan COUNTRY GUANGZHOU, CHINA

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2020 GFA 6.04 MILLION SQM CLIENT CAPITALAND

Context In considering the health of its citizens a precondition to the sustainable social and economic development of the country, China’s Central Party Committee and State Council have approved and rolled out the Healthy China 2030 Planning Outline. This national level medium- to long-term strategic plan in China’s health sector not only aims to address the health issues of the country at large. It is also indicative of China’s commitment to participate in Global Health Governance and fulfil the UN Sustainable Development Goals agenda. 3 Contribution The Datansha Master Plan was thus conceived with the goal of creating a sustainable model of development with healthcare and well-being as its main driver. To leverage the strong medical and wellness resources already available in 25

Guangzhou and re-envision the island as a prime healthcare district for the region, the proposed urban planning strategies were symbiotic with the current city fabric. They also carefully considered land-use coordination with transport systems. This enabled the master plan to create a conducive environment for the establishment of a mixed-use health chain that includes medical treatment, medical education, research and tourism. At the same time, the densification of the urbanscape was consciously balanced with the integration of landscape design so as to deliver a liveable, delightful and healthy built environment. 3 EXTRACTED FROM WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION, 9TH GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON HEALTH PROMOTION, SHANGHAI 2016, “HEALTHY CHINA 2030 (FROM VISION TO ACTION)”, HTTPS://WWW.WHO.INT/ HEALTHPROMOTION/CONFERENCES/9GCHP/ HEALTHY-CHINA/EN/


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INCLUSIVE & EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION & LIFELONG LEARNING

Quality education is a foundation for creating sustainable development. In addition to improving quality of life, inclusive access to education can help equip locals with the tools required to develop innovative solutions to socio-economic problems. Access to and quality of education, however, remain disparate and the reasons are numerous, including the lack of adequately trained teachers, poor conditions of schools and equity issues related to opportunities provided to rural children.1 In developed countries, problems surrounding equity and opportunities are more nuanced. Here, quality is defined by how holistic the curriculum is and access is defined by the availability of alternative pathways of formal education and training that cater to diverse learning needs. This, the Built Environment sector can contribute to, by developing sustainable and energy-efficient infrastructure and facilities for learning, and designing them to respond to evolving pedagogical and community needs. Architecture design, through raising the bar for institutional typology, can embody the values of inclusivity, fairness, well-being and equality; propagating opportunities for the growth and development of the next generation. 1 INFORMATION EXTRACTED FROM UN’S SUSTAINABILITY GOALS, AVAILABLE FROM HTTPS://WWW.UN.ORG/SUSTAINABLEDEVELOPMENT/HUNGER/

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SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY @ SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC & @ NGEE ANN POLYTECHNIC COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2014 GFA SIT @ SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC: 28,900SQM SIT @ NGEE ANN POLYTECHNIC: 15,000 SQM CLIENT SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP GREEN

Context The degree programmes from the Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) feature a signature Integrated Work Study Programme that embodies the best of university-industry collaboration and exposes students to real-world working conditions, giving them practical job skills and improving their employability. Through the buildings at Singapore Polytechnic (SP) and Ngee Ann Polytechnic (NP), the curriculum of SIT provides greater opportunities for joint education programmes and knowledge exchange.

This seamless flow of space encourages and expresses the spirit of cross-institutional interaction and learning.

Contribution The design aesthetic for SIT simultaneously reflects its aspirations of being an educational hub and enables its curriculum goals through a learning environment that encourages collaboration and innovation. SIT @ NP, for example, is strategically located along the pedestrian network of the main campus while spatially programmed to connect and effectively integrate into it.

Besides providing state-of-the-art facilities for education, the architectural scheme for both campuses places emphasis on sustainability. Passive design strategies such as deep overhangs or recesses, sun-shading devices in the façades and performance glazing, naturally-ventilated atriums and natural daylighting were adopted for a more energy-efficient building.

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In SIT @ SP, the design iteration maximises the contemporary open floor plan and breaks the undulating terrains into a shorter series of platforms for gradual ascents and use as activity decks. These multi-level environmental deck connections improve the linkages from the SIT Campus to other parts of SP; thereby, creating opportunities for dynamic interaction between institutions and disciplines.


SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY @ SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC

SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY @ SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC

SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY @ NGEE ANN POLYTECHNIC

SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY @ NGEE ANN POLYTECHNIC

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ITE COLLEGE WEST COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2010 GFA 114,500SQM CLIENT GAMMON PTE LTD DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP DESIGN

Context Following the Government’s decision that every student in Singapore must be equipped with at least 10 years of general education, the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) was established in 1992 as a post-secondary institution for technicallyinclined students. Since then, the institute has been moving towards offering a more career-centric rather than a technical skillfocused curriculum. The aim was to put in place a more structured work component for all its students by 2020 to improve their employability and more importantly, to ensure that they will be better equipped to move with industry trends 2 . To date, there are three ITE colleges in Singapore including ITE College West. Contribution Hallmarked as a ‘business town’, the architectural scheme of the 10ha campus pushes customary vocational and technical education to the next level. Facilities, including functioning restaurants, shops, a hotel and a convention centre for student training, replace conventional classrooms and promote hands-on, experiential learning. 31

This ethos is expressed through the use of curvilinear architecture and generous greenscape, which generate a sense of energy and dynamism. Further embodying this, the buildings are organised along an ‘Innovation Walkway’ – the campus’ circulation spine. This curvilinear, elevated path joins the individual academic blocks and links all students to the central sky plaza, enabling cross-disciplinary interaction, and inviting students to view the interior workings of the gallery-style learning environments through glazed façades. Ground-floor circulation spaces are designed in a free-plan manner, which allow students to explore the facilities, architecture and landscape. Gentle curves guide students along to the many pocket-spaces purposed for both relaxation and study. 2 LEE, PEARL, THE STRAITS TIMES, “ITE AIMS TO ENSURE STUDENTS ARE CAREER-READY”, 17 FEBRUARY 2015, HTTPS://WWW.STRAITSTIMES.COM/SINGAPORE/ EDUCATION/ITE-AIMS-TO-ENSURE-STUDENTS-ARE CAREER-READY#:


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LEE KONG CHIAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE NOVENA & YUNNAN CAMPUSES COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION NOVENA CAMPUS: 2017 YUNNAN CAMPUS: 2015 GFA NOVENA CAMPUS: 43,900SQM YUNNAN CAMPUS: 21,000SQM CLIENT LEE KONG CHIAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP GREEN

Context Learning flourishes when room is created for unique learning styles, knowledgesharing and collaboration to take place. To this end, thoughtful architectural design can directly contribute to the development of a conducive environment supported by quality infrastructure that fosters research, innovation and exchange. Contribution All elements at The Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, which is housed in two separate campuses – the Clinical Sciences Building (CSB) at Health City Novena and the Experimental Medicine Building (EMB) at Nanyang Technological University – are designed for flexibility and with learner-centricity in mind. State-of-theart learning labs at the CSB, for example, can accommodate an entire cohort where students are engaged in large-group seminars or be transformed into spaces for small group sessions. This facilitates a vibrant learning environment necessary 33

for innovative medical education and translational medicine research. Located within the Biomedical Cluster, the culture of cross-disciplinary interaction, sharing and skills acquisition at the EMB finds architectural expression in a linkway on the 3rd storey that connects it to the existing school of biological sciences at the university. This provides an ideal creative learning environment for students and researchers to engage in. In addition, to provide a healthy learning and working environment for users, strategies that ensure thermal comfort and reduced energy and water usage were applied. Both buildings also utilised sustainable products as certified by the Singapore Green Labelled Scheme. Envisioned as drivers to strengthen Singapore’s medical expertise and capabilities through world-class and sustainable campuses, the campuses not only raise the bar for quality education but have long-term benefits for the global medical field as well.


EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE BUILDING (EMB) AT NTU MAIN CAMPUS

CLINICAL SCIENCES BUILDING (CSB) AT NOVENA CAMPUS

TEAM-BASED LEARNING STUDIO

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NUS UNIVERSITY TOWN MASTER PLAN COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2007 GFA 229,200SQM CLIENT NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE COLLABORATION DP ARCHITECTS IN COLLABORATION WITH SKIDMORE, OWINGS AND MERRILL LLP, USA.

Context There has been growing diversity consciousness in institutions of higher learning, where education is not only made equitable to people of all ages, races and gender but also facilitates cross-cultural bonding. Greater importance has, therefore, been placed on availability of connecting and negative spaces that allow accessibility to resources and a thoroughfare that fosters cultural and multi-disciplinary exchanges among its occupants. Conceived as an international class campus and town centre embedded along a green corridor, the NUS (National University of Singapore) University Town Master Plan delivers a uniquely Singaporean interpretation of the residential college system for a holistic educational experience. Contribution The master plan expansion derived an organisational pattern of university living that increases academic activity and socio-cultural interchanges within a community setting of students and faculty. Crucial to this are the variety of social spaces (e.g. spaces for shared 35

meals and group collaborative activities) injected and dispersed throughout, and the replacement of the traditional dormitory with a group-living plan comprising six-bedroom apartment suites centred on a common living room and ensuite bathroom. Adding to the dynamism so as to facilitate the development of genuine and enduring relationships, each college is supplemented by seminar rooms, theme rooms, a multi-purpose hall and a dining hall on the lower levels. To ensure that the overall environment caters to user-comfort and well-being, environmental design strategies were also employed. This includes orientating the buildings on a north-south axis to minimise solar heat gain and maximise natural ventilation, which reduces reliance on air-conditioning without compromising indoor comfort. Detailed biodiversity analysis was also conducted, allowing the master plan to preserve the topography, hydrology and vegetation within the campus site. The result is a low carbon campus that respects its surrounding ecologically biodiversity.


CINNAMON & TEMBUSU RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES

CINNAMON & TEMBUSU RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE 4 & COLLEGE OF ALICE & PETERTAN

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE 4 & COLLEGE OF ALICE & PETERTAN

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Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary) COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2019 CLIENT MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP GREEN, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context The new Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary) (RGSS) campus at Braddell is designed to embrace the values of RGSS and to set a new benchmark in institutional developments. Characterised by movement, engagement and accessibility, its Evolving Campus concept provides student-focused, community-centred and versatile learning spaces for the nurturing of academic excellence, talent and leadership among young women. Contribution Careful spatial planning and thoughtful, user-centric design ensure that movement within the school is unencumbered; leveraging circulation flows and optimising land use to promote communion and communication – both of which are key in nurturing a culture of learning and a sense of community. 37

The planning strategy is based on three main rings: The Inner Ring, which comprises the amphitheatre and a student zone, is the heart of the campus and symbolises its student-focused values; The Outer Ring, which houses the library, performing arts centre, multi-purpose hall, sports hall, the field and the linear park along the canal, and stretches towards the northwest to create more courtyard spaces for outdoor learning; and The Central Ring which creates the circulation spine where the staff zone is located, positioning the teaching faculty within proximity of student-centric activity zones in both the Inner and Outer Ring. In addition to upkeeping the provision of quality education, various ‘green’ strategies were integrated into the campus design to optimise energy, water savings and ensure sustainable waste management practices so as to advocate an eco-friendly lifestyle.


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ENSURE AVAILABILITY & SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER & SANITATION FOR ALL

Access to safe drinking water and sanitation is a basic need and a human right, given that part of the fight against eradication of diseases depends on it. The case of ensuring availability and sustainable management of water is even more urgent when we recognise that this seemingly renewable and infinite natural resource is fast depleting. Agriculture alone uses up 70% of the world’s freshwater supply and climate change is drying up our aquifers1. This makes proper treatment of waste-water and sustainable management of our water resources a crucial aspect of the infrastructure in any and all built environments. Urban areas and buildings must be designed to avoid water wastage and excessive run-offs through the integration of rainwater harvesting systems as well as to protect and conserve freshwater resources. At the same time, infrastructure and sewage systems must be carefully planned to prevent contamination of clean water. 2 1 HARVEY, FIONA, THE GUARDIAN, “ARE WE RUNNING OUT OF WATER?”, 18 JUNE 2018, HTTPS://WWW.THEGUARDIAN.COM/NEWS/2018/JUN/18/ARE-WE-RUNNING-OUT-OF-WATER 2 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS. VOL. 1”, P.53

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GABON AIRPORT CITY COUNTRY LIBREVILLE, GABON

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2019 SITE AREA 4200HA CLIENT GABON SEZ, SINGAPORE COOPERATION ENTERPRISE COLLABORATION DP ARCHITECTS IN COLLABORATION WITH SMEC

Context The Government of Gabon is developing a new international airport at NKOK, next to Gabon Special Economic Zone (GSEZ), 30km away from the city centre. The Gabon Airport City project was initiated to integrate the city with the airport development and its surroundings, which includes the GSEZ. Envisioned as a new generation of urban development that is sustainable and liveable, the master plan sensitively considers the genius loci and responds to the topography. The planning outcome is a green city with international standards of infrastructure, including the expansion of clean water supply network and sanitation to the new airport city and its surrounding area. Contribution The scheme sets a new benchmark in urban and infrastructure development quality while expanding the power and water supply infrastructure and sanitation to the east of Libreville city. 41

The potable water supply infrastructure will be distributed from the new central reservoir, located near the entrance of the airport city. This is to take advantage of the main water supply pipe near the entry point and the existing hill on site, which will allow for potable water distribution by gravity. The waste water treatment system, planned and designed in response to the heavy undulating terrain, will be decentralised. Modular portable waste water treatment systems are proposed at strategic locations to minimise capital infrastructure cost and allow incremental developmental needs according to the development phasing. This system can also be easily replicated for its surrounding developments. Natural waterways in the area were purposefully preserved with its forested ecosystem and the installation of localised waste water treatment systems in selected locations. This ensures a sustainable solution to waste water management in the airport city and its neighbouring developments.


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ENSURE ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE, RELIABLE, SUSTAINABLE & MODERN ENERGY FOR ALL

The world is making good progress on increasing access to reliable, affordable and efficient energy, an essential resource that enables basic needs and economic opportunities. In fact, global electrification rate rose from 83% in 2010 to 90% by 2018 with countries in the developing regions of Latin America, the Caribbean and Eastern and South-Eastern Asia maintaining strong progress.1 However, there remains much to do and resolve. On a larger scale, industries need to buyin and shift towards greater adoption and integration of renewable energy as an end-use application; while sustained efforts to improve energy efficiency and to provide access to reliable, affordable and modern electricity must remain proportional to population growth. To this end, the Built Environment sector can play a crucial role in the efforts to meet the targets of Goal 7. Besides designing and constructing energy infrastructure, the industry must also be cognizant of its heavy consumption of energy across building life-cycles. This means contributing to global efforts by leveraging not only energy technology in buildings. It is also about the consistent and conscientious implementation of thoughtfully localised climate-responsive design strategies to limit energy consumption across all projects. 1 DATA AND PROGRESS INFORMATION EXTRACTED FROM UN SUSTAINABLE GOAL 7 HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL7

IMAGE COURTESY OF PAN-UNITED

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INFRASTRUCTURE FOR NETWORK & ENERGY SECURITY @ LABRADOR COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2024 GFA 34,800SQM CLIENT SP GROUP DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP ENGINEERS

Context Careful infrastructure planning has blessed Singapore with decades of access to steady and modern energy that has contributed to much of our economic prosperity. As the land-scarce country pushes ahead with its urban renewal plans for Central and Downtown Singapore so as to generate more diverse socioeconomic opportunities, the substation is an essential infrastructure that will support the precinct and its energy needs. Allocated in subterranean environment to optimise precious land resources for a development above, the complex nature of the project requires specialised engineering capabilities and planning. Contribution Analysis and design were conducted using Finite Element Modeling (FEM) software which produced data on both the performance of the structural elements 45

and the impact to the surrounding facilities induced by the excavation works. It concluded that a peanut-shaped structure as opposed to its rectangular-shaped counterparts, is better at withstanding ground lateral forces; thereby, providing good control of ground movement without the provision of temporary strutting during excavation. A raft foundation with a concrete mix design, formulated to include Ground Granulated Blast Slag (GGBS) from repurposed materials that would otherwise contribute to land pollution, was then applied. The combined approach not only promoted significant time and cost savings, but also kept sustainable practices in mind. During the course of the design work, intensive coordination with all related stakeholders was carried out to ensure that the structural provision is adequate for the underground substation to run its operation as intended.


IMAGES COURTESY OF PAN-UNITED

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RENEWABLE ENERGY @ NS HUB COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

CLIENT DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AGENCY, MINISTRY OF DEFENCE, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP FAÇADE, DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context National Service (NS) is the bedrock of Singapore’s defence; and for most new enlisting servicemen, NS Hub will be the place of their first encounter with the Ministry of Defence and Singapore Armed Forces. The architectural design sought to uphold the principles of NS and as a physical representation of Singapore’s unique NS commitment and culture, it also reflects the cohesion among the institution, communities and citizens. Contribution NS Hub aims to be among the top 10% of energy-efficient buildings in Singapore by harnessing renewable energy and adopting energy-saving solutions. The facility is designed to harness natural ventilation and 47

daylight to reduce the demands for energy, while also incorporating features such as green roofs, solar panels and rainwater harvesting to tap clean energy and water. When NS Hub is completed, annual electricity savings will be equivalent to the amount required to power more than 900 four-room HDB households. Through features such as daylighting, solar shading and a high-efficiency air-conditioning system, the annual carbon emissions will be reduced by about 2000 tonnes, equivalent to the effect of planting 124,000 trees. Water saved through rainwater harvesting will also be equivalent to the annual potable water consumption of 150 four-room HDB households.


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Sunray Woodcraft Construction Headquarters COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2014 GFA 16,800SQM CLIENT SUNRAY WOODCRAFT CONSTRUCTION PTE LTD DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP ENGINEERS

Context The rate of global warming presents a very real environmental threat. In the face of this, environmental building design, when carefully and scientifically applied, can make effective and comfortable indoor environments in both tropical and subtropical climates without heavy reliance on mechanical means. This, in turn, translates to significant savings in resources, energy consumption and carbon output. Contribution Sunray Woodcraft Construction Headquarters leverages the capacity of design to tap into the advantages of the tropical climate of its geolocation; producing a development in articulate dialogue with the environ and its functional requirements. Key to this is the strategic use of aluminium louvres in the factory production and warehouse spaces, for example, to allow the maximum amount of natural ventilation and light in while offering shade from the sun and protection from the rain. This simultaneously keeps energy consumption 49

rate low and delivers indoor comfort to the workers. The eight-storey building also comprises a workers’ dormitory, a showroom and an office. Each is thoughtfully co-located in cleverly stacked boxes of slightly varied external articulations that reflect the different stages of production. Here, the deep recesses between boxes create intuitive points of entry and exit between spaces. By integrating fabrication and design in one building, it significantly reduces the energy, time costs and overall carbon footprint required for transport. These design considerations turn the problems faced in a hot and humid climate to a solution for reduced reliance on artificial cooling systems, and allow the weather to work in favour of the building and its end-users. The project was conferred Design of the Year at the 2015 President’s Design Award, Singapore’s highest honour for designers and design across all disciplines.


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PROMOTE SUSTAINED, INCLUSIVE & SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH, FULL & PRODUCTIVE EMPLOYMENT & DECENT WORK FOR ALL

Sustainable economic growth depends on the sum of three factors: accessibility to work opportunities, inclusivity built on meritocracy and job stability. Yet, efforts for change and betterment in these areas have been thwarted by a struggling global economy that has been further hit by the pandemic, resulting in the worst economic recession the world has faced since the Great Depression. As global unemployment increased by 33 million in 2020, a more sombre statistic is causing deep concern. An astounding 22% of the world’s youths, unchanged since 2005, who should form the backbone of global workforce and stewards of our communities, remain out of employment, education or training.1 Where policies will determine fair wages and provide aid to those in need, the built environment can directly contribute to economic growth. At the macro-scale, urban development has the capacity to revitalise districts, provide crucial infrastructure that attracts investments and facilitate job creation, and offer integration of the marginalised into society. At a micro-level, building design has the power to deliver safe spaces for the underprivileged to access the necessary aid in skills training and career networking; thereby, increasing their opportunities for full and productive employment. 1 DATA EXTRACTED FROM PROGRESS & INFO REPORT FOR UN SUSTAINABLE GOAL #8, 2020 TO 2021, HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL8

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HEARTWARE NETWORK COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2018 GFA 350SQM CLIENT HEARTWARE NETWORK DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP LIGHTING

Context Heartware Network is the result of one former police inspector’s teenage experience and his advocacy in rallying young Singaporeans to be stewards of the community 2 . Committed to transforming the lives of under-served children and youth, the charity organisation seeks to instil positive values and build strong character in those aged between 14 and 35 through programmes that nurture a spirit of volunteerism, entrepreneurship and leadership. As a safe space for training and growth, youths are engaged to be resilient, innovative, of service to others and entrepreneurs; thereby, gaining greater confidence in their abilities to set up a brighter future for themselves. The design goal for the charity’s new office was thus, to create a space of possibilities where youths would be able to gather, interact, and most importantly, be involved. Contribution Breaking away from conventional institutional outfits, a more socially 53

responsive design concept was applied to enable the innovative use of space. What resulted is a flexible, customisable and spontaneous work environment with a distinctive modular grid furniture system and interactive plug-in elements, encouraging participation among the youths. Green and smart-control features incorporated within the space boost youth awareness of the global movement on sustainability and smart-technology, emboldening them to take ownership of their part for the environment. Hanging mobiles and signages add distinct character to the space, showcasing and advocating what the organisation and their youths stand for – doves representing authenticity, planes representing the spirit of enterprise, boats for dedication and cranes for integrity.

2 A WORD FROM FOUNDER, HTTPS://HEARTWARE.ORG/ABOUT-US/OVERVIEW


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BUILD RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE, PROMOTE INCLUSIVE & SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIALISATION & FOSTER INNOVATION

Meant to trap heat from the sun to keep our climate habitable, greenhouse gases are now at levels that threaten the existence and survivability of all living things on this planet. To date, we collectively emit around 50 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. This is 40% higher than emissions in 1990, which were around 35 billion tonnes1. Among the contributors of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, an estimated 17.5% and 16.2% are attributed to energy use in buildings and transport, respectively. At the same time, embodied emissions of building materials such as iron, steel and cement contribute to an approximate 24.2% of wider industrial GHG emissions.2 Yet, urban development, infrastructure and industralisation are necessary for economic opportunities and growth. The Built Environment sector is thus faced with the urgent challenge of developing resilient infrastructure for industrialisation at increased resource optimisation, and greater adoption of environmentally-sound technologies and processes. For the industry to advance and achieve sustainability, it has to approach design and building with a zero-waste perspective from conception to completion. We must move away from the current ways by innovating building designs and leveraging technological innovations. This requires training and development of new competencies at all levels in the industry as well as buy-in from developers and partners to opt for green building alternatives. 1 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS – OURWORLDINDATA.ORG, HTTPS://OURWORLDINDATA.ORG/GREENHOUSE-GAS-EMISSIONS 2 RITCHIE, HANNAH AND ROSNER, MAX., 2016, “EMISSIONS BY SECTOR”, OUR WORLD IN DATA, ACCESSED 24 MAY 2021, HTTPS://OURWORLDINDATA.ORG/EMISSIONS-BY-SECTOR?COUNTRY=

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DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES IN MIDWOOD COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2022 GFA 44,000SQM CLIENT HILLVIEW RISE DEVELOPMENT PTE LTD (PARENT COMPANY: HONG LEONG HOLDINGS LTD) DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Design and building technologies are revolutionising the built environment industry. Prefabricated Prefinished Volumetric Construction (PPVC) with its modular approach to construction, for example, presents advantages by way of quality build at greater efficiency and costsavings and, more importantly, a cleaner process and site. When applied in tandem with design technology platforms such as BIM and CDE, as in the case of Midwood condominium, it facilitates smoother coordination between consultants; thereby, lessening design and site errors as well as enabling a speedier resolution of issues, which contributes to waste reduction in the overall design and construction process. Contribution Midwood, an upcoming PPVC residential development, is the first productivity-based tender award of its kind in Singapore. Comprising two 29-storey residential towers which form a total of 564 dwelling units in 14 different unit types, it requires 57

a total of 1,601 PPVC modules and 34 different module types to be deployed. The project also testbeds the use of Mass Engineered Timber, a new construction technology, in the design of its clubhouse. The complexity of its design and build demands greater efficiency in design coordination and downstream logistics management of off-site prefabricated components during construction. Thus, to ensure high accuracy in PPVC design and coordination prior to fullscale off-site prefabrication, architects, partnering consultants and contractors used the Integrated Design Delivery (IDD) approach. This enables close communication at every stage of the project. IDD also allows the building models to be kept 'live' and accessible on demand so that design changes and coordination are instantaneously seen by all parties involved; effectively minimising room for error and therefore, achieving efficacy, efficiency and construction waste reduction.


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THE WOODLEIGH RESIDENCES & THE WOODLEIGH MALL COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2022 GFA 95,400SQM CLIENT THE WOODLEIGH MALL PTE LTD & THE WOODLEIGH RESIDENCES PTE LTD C/O KAJIMA DEVELOPMENT PTE LTD & SINGAPORE PRESS HOLDINGS LTD

Context Governmental push for greater efficiency and effectiveness in land-use planning has led to a rise in mixed-use developments, designed with a live-work-play concept, in Singapore. Moving towards construction productivity as well, the combination of the two has presented the unique opportunity of using PPVC modules in mixed-use building types. The Woodleigh Residences and The Woodleigh Mall is one such project. Contribution The development will integrate with the existing Woodleigh MRT Station, and will house approximately 28,000sqm of retail, 11 residential towers of 11-storey each, a 6,000sqm Community Club and a 2,100sqm Neighbourhood Police Centre. Its 667 dwelling units of 18 unique unit types are achieved through the use of 2,360 PPVC modules. To navigate the tight site and construction complexities, forward planning strategically set the 11 residential towers in a horse-shoe configuration. This opened up a tower-free central zone 59

during construction which enabled critical manoeuvring of crawler cranes to safely launch and install the PPVC modules. It also functions as temporary space for PPVC storage, thereby reducing interruption to the construction of both the retail and residential components. The same architectural scheme goes a step further to fulfil the brief of minimising impact on its natural environs while maximising views of the landscaped surrounds. This is achieved by setting the podium back from the conserved trees and adopting a curvilinear form to accommodate the tree crowns. A stormwater treatment system is also integrated within the development and channels run-off via an extensive network of drains using gravity feed instead of mechanised means. Concealed by lush landscaping which enhances the living environment and communal spaces, the design leverages biophilic elements to ensure only filtered stormwater is discharged into Alkaff Lake from the development.


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REDUCE INEQUALITY WITHIN & AMONG COUNTRIES

At the crux of major socio-political and economic issues, lies inequality. Severe income and opportunity inequality places children in the poorest 20% of the populations at three times more risk to die before their fifth birthdays.1 Social inequality, in its various forms from gender discrimination and racism to hate crime, alienates vulnerable and minority groups, and impairs socio-economic development. While it will require earnest continued efforts in legislation as well as fiscal, wage and social protection policies to empower and alleviate inequalities and discrimination, the built environment can act as an amplifier of equality. Design and planning of spaces and developments, when guided by social responsibility and inclusiveness, has the capacity to not only deliver accessibility and safety to all, especially women and children, religious and ethnic minority groups, and disabled citizens. 2 It also possesses the power to positively influence societal mindset and biases. Examples of this include institutions that are open to all, public toilets that are safe, and workplace and offices that adhere to universal design. 1 UNITED NATIONS, “GOAL 10: REDUCE INEQUALITY WITHIN AND AMONG COUNTRIES”, HTTPS://WWW.UN.ORG/SUSTAINABLEDEVELOPMENT/INEQUALITY/ 2 EXTRACTED FROM INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOLUME I”, P.077

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DAK R’TIH LAKE ECO-TOURISM & URBAN AREA COUNTRY DAK NONG PROVINCE, VIETNAM

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2021 (MASTER PLAN) SITE AREA 1700HA CLIENT T&T GROUP JOINT STOCK COMPANY COLLABORATION DP ARCHITECTS IN COLLABORATION WITH HAAD

Context Dak Nong Province, one of the least developed provinces in Vietnam, was awarded by UNESCO as the country’s newest Global Geopark. As part of geopark tourism development in Dak Nong, Dak R’tih Lake at the centre of Ghia Nghia, the capital city of Dak Nong, is planned to be the centre of the geopark tourism in Dak Nong Province. Its master plan seeks to transform the city from a quiet town into a vibrant tourism hub that attracts investments, boosts economic development and creates new employment for its residents. This is in line with Vietnam’s development goal and of reducing social inequality in the country by 2030. Contribution The provincial community and economy of Dak Nong largely depends on agriculture, forestry and mining. 63

The Dak R’tih Eco-Tourism project is part of a larger plan to develop the tourism economy in the province so as to diversify its economic portfolio and boost socioeconomic development in the province. The master plan proposes eight Geoparkthemed resorts and two culture centres at the Dak R’tih Lake; transforming it into an attractive tourism hub and unique international destination. The development plans are also expected to attract investment in hospitality, infrastructure and other sectors; thereby, generating some 6,000 direct and around 12,000 to 15,000 indirect employment opportunities across these industries. The development of the tourism economy in Dak Nong will push the economic growth and infrastructure development, create employment, reduce poverty and disparities between Dak Nong and well-developed provinces.


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MAKE CITIES & HUMAN SETTLEMENTS INCLUSIVE, SAFE, RESILIENT & SUSTAINABLE

Cities serve as hubs and crossroads for innovation, trade, research, productivity, community, culture and a myriad of other socio-economic activities. At their best, cities are essential drivers for national development and vice versa. However, with the rapid rate of urbanisation and the number of people living in cities expected to reach 5 billion by 2030, the world is pressed with problems of ensuring urban sustainability and liveability. Effective urban planning and management practices are therefore critical; and the Built Environment industry plays a pivotal role in making cities more inclusive, healthy, resilient and environmentally friendly. Through the capacity of design, buildings can be made more robust and energy-efficient; infrastructure can improve inter-state and transboundary connectivity and accessibility; integration of biophilia into the urbanscape can restore local biodiversity; and, traffic, waste, noise and light pollution can be mitigated for the well-being of its inhabitants. Urban design also has the capacity to counteract discrimination and marginalisation through early engagement and involvement of stakeholders in the design and planning process. This creates a safe space for meaningful exchanges between social groups, provides opportunities for integration of the marginalised, and enables the purposeful development of truly inclusive public institutions and facilities for all citizens.1 1 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS”, VOL. 1., P.95 TO 96

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PUNGGOL TOWN HUB COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2022 GFA 45,500 SQM CLIENT PEOPLE’S ASSOCIATION DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP FAÇADE, DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Since the 1970s, community centres have been offering recreational and social amenities and activities at affordable prices to all. Made publicly accessible, they have become communal spaces where opportunities for exchange and bonding among different cultural and racial groups were created – a vehicle for nurturing social cohesion within Singapore’s multi-racial society.2 Today, community centres have evolved into large integrated hubs. The building model amplifies the values of equality and inclusivity, and enables a deeper and more meaningful synergy of services and community activities. Strategically located and sensitively designed as the heart of the residential district they serve, integrated community and lifestyle hubs are a representative feature and an integral part of our urban fabric. Contribution Punggol Town Hub is among this new generation of integrated community hubs. Poised to be the ‘Heart of Punggol’, its architectural scheme is conceptualised with the intent of refreshing the kampung spirit and through its building layout, express community togetherness. 67

Accessible from all directions at ground level, it invites and leads users to the central atrium, the new Punggol Agora, which connects all storeys and stakeholders. Here, the open floor plan enables freedom of movement, creating and facilitating opportunities for meet-ups, interactions and chance encounters within the community. Visitors can take their routes to respective facilities and activities inside the integrated hub without becoming detached from the atrium space. In this manner, the development effectively communicates inclusivity through connectivity and encourages unity through interaction. With its variety of facilities and services co-adjacently located within a single development to serve a comprehensive user spectrum, Punggol Town Hub – like a village square where all can gather to bond, interact and learn – will contribute to the fostering of a harmonious, united and resilient society.

2 REMEMBER SINGAPORE, “60 YEARS OF COMMUNITY CENTRES”, 24 MARCH 2013, HTTPS://REMEMBERSINGAPORE.ORG/2013/03/24 HISTORY-OF-COMMUNITY-CENTRES/


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SAFRA CHOA CHU KANG COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2022 GFA 19,700SQM CLIENT SAFRA NATIONAL SERVICE ASSOCIATION DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP ENGINEERS, DP GREEN, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context SAFRA was established with the aim of recognising the contributions of the National Service (NS) men in the Singapore Armed Forces to the defence of the nation. It provides a network of shared environment for NSmen and their families to enhance camaraderie and strengthen bonds through social, recreational and sporting activities. With SAFRA Choa Chu Kang (CCK), this sense of connectivity to community and home is further iterated through strategic urban design that integrates the development and its users into the precinct. Contribution Located strategically along the park connector network and within close proximity to a Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) station, bus stops and the future integrated transport hub, SAFRA CCK acts as a condenser and activator; playing host to a thriving, multi-generational neighbourhood and fostering an active CCK community. 69

Nature and fitness form the core themes of its architectural scheme. Nestled in the heart of a public park – SAFRA CCK is purposefully designed to be acutely aware of its surroundings. The design draws the lush greenery inwards, blurring the boundaries between park and clubhouse. Programmatically, the development's spaces are sensitively choreographed to house SAFRA’s comprehensive suite of recreation and wellness facilities for its full spectrum of users from all ages. This not only creates a seamless experience for the enjoyment of both visitors and residents, but also delivers a fitness oasis that inspires play and interaction. Its exuberant and porous form also fosters a sense of inclusivity and connectivity through accessibility; thereby, contributing to community-building and reiterating a sense of home and belonging.


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BONNEVAUX CENTRE FOR PEACE COUNTRY FRANCE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2021 (PHASE 2) GFA 3,900SQM CLIENT WORLD COMMUNITY FOR CHRISTIAN MEDITATION DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN, PEN&PIXEL

Context With rapid urbanisation, good land stewardship is essential to create sustainable and liveable built environments. This ranges from environmentallyconscious agriculture as well as land and resource management, to effective urban planning and building design. To mindfully apply the principles of good land stewardship in the creation of human settlement may seem idealistic but not impossible. Neither does it require complex and expensive design technology as is evident in the architectural works for Bonnevaux Centre for Peace. Contribution The meditation retreat is located on a 65ha brownfield site that is home to over 20 habitats and a 12 th century abbey. Its architectural scheme was, therefore, conceived with great care for both the sustainability and conservation of the natural and historical heritage of the site. This meant restoring the old for new 71

use and purpose, and minimising human interference on the natural environment. To ensure indoor comfort during the winter months, existing building envelops are retrofitted with insulation and an efficient heating system powered by a biomass boiler is employed. While not as attention grabbing as solar panels or wind cowls, these passive approaches tend to be the most effective in terms of cost and performance in reducing carbon emissions. As a space for rest and restoration through meditation, Bonnevaux Centre for Peace is intended for all, regardless of religion. This is articulated in its master plan, which positions landscaping and buildings to define a variety of places. Some are intimate and private for self-contemplation, with inspiring views of the landscape and access to a picturesque lake. Others are large and public for group sharing and bonding. Yet, all spaces are grounded by the principal place, the Village Green, and engender a deep sense of community.


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ENSURE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION & PRODUCTION PATTERNS

While the world works toward greater economic and social progress, it ironically endangers the very systems on which future development depends on, causing degradation of the environment with the rapid consumption of natural resources and massive production of waste and carbon emissions. Continuing on this path will have dire consequences for all life on earth, and to reverse the impacts of climate change will require a collective change in mindset regarding our consumption and production patterns. The targets of Goal 12 entail promoting resource and energy efficiency, sustainable infrastructure, and providing access to basic services, green and decent jobs, and a better quality of life for all. These the Built Environment industry can contribute to through the incorporation of green practices, building designs that consider whole-of-systems approach for healthier and/or circular design outcomes, and the implementation of green systems that enable end-users to live more sustainably. The use of less material resources and the production of less waste must also be prioritised in the Built Environment industry – embracing and adopting new components and solutions that limit the use of nonrenewable natural resources and reduce construction waste while promoting the use of locally-sourced materials.1 When achieved, the effects reduce future economic, environmental and social costs, strengthen economic competitiveness, and reduce poverty. 1 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS, VOL. 1”, P.100-101

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ADVOCATING RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION @ OUR TAMPINES HUB COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2017 AREA 85SQM CLIENT PEOPLE’S ASSOCIATION DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP GREEN

Context In 2019, Singapore generated approximately 744 million kilograms of food waste. This increasing amount of waste is putting pressure on our resources as it will require more waste disposal facilities like waste-toenergy plants and landfills for incineration ash. For land-scarce Singapore, these are neither sustainable nor viable long-term solutions.2 Change in our consumption patterns and waste management systems is needed; and the road to reducing excess food wastage and production begins with education and advocacy. The seemingly unlikely but effective facilitator of this: architecture. Contribution Beyond form and utilitarian function, architecture can also be a powerful vehicle for change. Our Tampines Hub (OTH), which was envisioned as a new model of integrated hub with a live, learn and play concept, is testament to how architecture can hold space to inform, educate and influence community behaviour and perceptions. This is demonstrated through the Eco-Digester, which is one of the first in Singapore. Though in essence a waste management plant, it was conceptualised and planned as a 75

destination and learning laboratory for the community. Located in the basement of the hub development, the architectural scheme took into consideration the need for enhanced ventilation to cater to end-user comfort and ease of maintenance. To complement this programme, OTH also displays infographics on food waste generation to heighten awareness of food wastage. Young children and members of the community are encouraged and welcomed to visit the Eco-Digester to witness the conversion process, which puts into action a circular economy whereby food waste is converted to non-potable water as well as both liquid and solid fertilisers used for watering the landscaping around the development and for the crops in its Eco-Community Garden, respectively. All synergistically co-located within OTH, the Eco-Digester and community garden truly allow for community participation and learning about waste reduction, circular economy, urban agriculture and environmental sustainability. 2 MINISTRY OF SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENT SINGAPORE, “ZERO WASTE MASTER PLAN: FOOD WASTE”, 2021, HTTPS://WWW.TOWARDSZEROWASTE. GOV.SG/FOODWASTE/


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BUKIT CANBERRA COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2023 GFA 27,300SQM CLIENT SPORT SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Nestled in the heart of Sembawang Town, located along the northern coast of Singapore, Bukit Canberra is a collaboration between multiple government agencies – Sport Singapore, National Parks Board, National Environment Agency, Ministry of Health, and National Heritage Board.

circulation corridors and the employing of glass façades only for specific spaces that require them, allowing for a lower overall cooling load. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Incident Solar Radiation Analysis inform design decisions so as to ensure that the development responds to the environmental and site context.

As an integrated sports and community development, Bukit Canberra is envisioned to be a people-centric, vibrant, inclusive and accessible hub that both celebrates and is inspired by Sembawang's natural and built heritage.

The application of sustainable technology also includes the adoption of Mass-Engineered Timber (MET) construction in the form of glulam columns, beams and cross-laminated timber roof for the large span Indoor Sports Hall (ISH). The partially exposed MET structures, visible from within the ISH, create public-awareness of sustainable and productive construction approaches.

Contribution Bukit Canberra employs a range of biophilic design strategies and productive construction processes from the initial design stages through to construction. One unique approach adopted, ideal for the site's triangular shape and hilly topography, is the use of the natureinspired hexagonal geometry and modules in spatial and massing planning, as opposed to the typical Cartesian rectilinear modules. This allows for the creation of a highly rational yet organic organisation of programmes on site, blurring the boundaries between landscapes and built areas, and encouraging new dimensions for social interaction. The design also places a key focus on natural ventilation with the design of external 77

In all, the sustainability features at Bukit Canberra are implemented as a wholeof-system approach in a bid to be aligned to evolving global sustainable goals: from eco-digesters being used in the hawker centre to convert food waste into biogas and viable fertilisers for the landscape areas within Bukit Canberra, to having bioswales and rain gardens weaved into the fabric of the development to facilitate sustainable stormwater management and enhance biodiversity, and even to programming with the introduction of a wide array of productive, therapeutic and accessible landscape areas.


PERSPECTIVES COURTESY OF SPORT SINGAPORE

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DP ARCHITECTS HEADQUARTERS COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2020 GFA 4,200SQM CLIENT DP ARCHITECTS DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context DP Architects was founded on a deep concern for the built environment and the people it designs for. Their works are driven by a conscious effort towards creating architecture of excellence, characterised by liveability and sustainability. In 2019, when the firm set out to consolidate its two studios in Marina Square, Singapore in a single office space, their design scheme intuitively sought to provide a working environment that not only cares for the well-being of its occupants but also its impact on the environment. Contribution With this eco-conscious mindset and approach to design, every decision DP made in the conceptualisation stage – from minimising wastage to material choice – was sustainably grounded. Through careful planning, the team leveraged the flexibility afforded by an open plan concept, allowing them to 79

retain and reuse 50% of their existing furniture stock. Circadian lighting, which has automated dimming that adjusts illuminance levels based on occupancy and daylight availability, helps create a work environment that improves mood, energy and productivity among employees, while further optimising energy consumption and reducing carbon footprint. To track and collate data on the rate of energy and resource expenditure, DP also integrated IoT (Internet of Things) smart sensors and software into the office space. These technologies function together as a holistic smart building infrastructural platform that offers seamless connectivity with future digital service applications while providing crucial insights into end-user behaviour, allowing the firm to meaningfully alter its consumption patterns for an ecofriendly and sustainable outcome.


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TAKE URGENT ACTION TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE & ITS IMPACTS

Climate change affects the whole world. It is affecting lives and undermining national economies; costing people, cities, and countries dearly today and much more in the future. Climate patterns shifting with extreme weather events are becoming more common. Sea levels are rising and greenhouse gas emissions have reached historic highs. Without action, the global average surface temperature is expected to rise by more than 3 degrees Celsius this century. As a global problem that transcends industries and national boundaries, coordinated effort in the adoption of affordable, scalable solutions is necessary for achieving sustainable development and more resilient economies. Within the Built Environment sector, we must collectively design and build with the aim of reducing carbon footprint while achieving energy and resource efficiencies. This entails the incorporation of sources of renewable energy into building infrastructure, application of climate-responsive designs for optimisation of energy usage, adoption of innovative building technology for reduction of construction waste, advocacy for regenerative architecture and emphasis on locally-sourced materials.1 Whether applied individually or in combination across building projects, each of these measures can and will enable circular and healthier design outcomes for a more sustainable built environment and future. 1 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS, VOL. 1”, P. 110-111

IMAGE COURTESY OF BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIT Y

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ZERO ENERGY BUILDING @ BCA ACADEMY COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2009 GFA 3,000SQM CLIENT BUILDING & CONSTRUCTION AUTHORITY

Context In order to deepen the knowledge base on sustainable design, the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) serves as a testbed for the integration of Green Building Technologies in existing buildings. It was conceived as a prototype for future institutional buildings that features excellent indoor environment and energy efficiency, and a hub for practitioners and students in the study of sustainability and green buildings. Not only is it a building that utilises strategies to reduce carbon emissions, but it helps propagate technology and strategies to further combat climate change. Contribution Zero Energy can be broadly defined as being energy-efficient and energy selfsufficient, in which a building not only reduces its power consumption but also internally generates 100% of all the needed energy through renewable resouces. In ZEB, passive design conceived in response to climate conditions are supplemented by intelligent active systems and work complementarily to achieve zero energy consumption. 83

Passive design, such as green roof and walls, shading devices, low-emissivity glass, solar film coatings and composite wall panels, are incorporated to moderate the building’s solar heat gain and natural ventilation. This is further supported by a solar-assisted stack ventilation system that uses heated air to create negative pressure indoors and induce cooler air from outside to flow in. Another passive design is the application of mirror ducts and a system of light shelves, pipes and tubes that carry natural daylight deep into the building’s spaces. Supporting these are a grid-tied system of broad spectrum solar panels and a smart Building Management System. The latter monitors real-time continuous data streams to control and minimise power consumption based on room usage, without compromising indoor comfort. The former allows surplus power to be distributed to the rest of BCA (Building & Construction Authority) Academy before supplying it back to the grid. Combined, the two active systems enable effective and efficient management of the energy powering the building.


IMAGES COURTESY OF BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIT Y

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LUSAIL CITY COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD COUNTRY LUSAIL, QATAR

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2021 GFA 760,000SQM CLIENT LUSAIL REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP ENGINEERS, DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Sustainability is a key consideration in the urban planning and design of Lusail City Commercial Boulevard. It was conceived in compliance with Qatar’s Global Sustainability Assessment System (GSAS) and in careful consideration of climate and locale. Contribution Located in a dry, subtropical climate with low annual rainfall, and intensely hot and humid summers, the design of Lusail City Commercial Boulevard necessarily looked into how to reduce solar heat gain, ensure indoor comfort and ultimately, mitigate heavy consumption of energy. Among the passive design strategies applied to improve the development’s thermal performance, is the implementation of a window-to-wall ratio of 0.4 or less to all façades. The windows also feature high-performance glazing with a U value of 1.3 and a shading coefficient of 0.2. This is complemented by a pre-cooled fresh air system for air-conditioning indoors. Coupled with exhaust heat recovery systems which turn waste heat energy into electric energy, these strategies improve the energy efficiency rating of the project and ensure sustainability. In addition, the material selection used for the roof and hardscape has high solar reflectance to reduce heat island effect. 85

In terms of water conservation, the landscape design excludes lawns to reduce water evaporation loss. On-site water retention systems function as flood mitigation. LED lighting is also extensively used for greater energy savings. In consideration of visual comfort, the illuminance, uniformity and lighting quality of the interiors are based on IESNA standards. A district cooling plant is shared by multiple buildings thus operating at a higher efficiency, providing chilled water using less electricity compared to conventional systems. To reduce material consumption and construction waste, building materials were locally sourced and the design leveraged existing surrounding infrastructure. The planning also consciously locates existing amenities with convenience in mind, thereby contributing to the further reduction in overall carbon footprint. Through an Environmental Impact Assessment, it was ensured that the larger master plan preserved the local habitat and water. Ultimately, the design of the development is in line with the culture, tradition and heritage of Qatar.


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CONSERVE & SUSTAINABLY USE THE OCEANS, SEAS & MARINE RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Producing over half of the world’s oxygen while absorbing carbon dioxide as well as regulating our climate and weather patterns, our oceans are crucial for making Earth habitable. The world’s industries, from food to transport, also rely on our oceans and marine resources. Yet, pollution, global warming, acidification and over-fishing are placing great strain on our marine eco-systems. This disrupts not only the communities they support but more worryingly, the climate systems that make Earth habitable. The impact of continuous deterioration will be nothing short of devastating. On a positive note, recognition of the crisis that looms ahead have led to progress through legislation and coordinated efforts, such as increasing protected zones in key marine biodiversity areas and regulating fishing. The forced reduction in human activity due to the pandemic has also provided our oceans with an unexpected respite.1 But, to meet the targets of Goal 14, there still remains much to accomplish and the Built Environment sector has a role in this. This ranges from careful design and planning of infrastructure for water management and landscape design to prevent pollutant discharge into natural water bodies (e.g. rivers, groundwaters) to reducing transport of building materials and construction processes in coastal regions and fragile aquatic ecosystems. 2 1 UNITED NATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS, “SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL #14”, HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL14 2 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOLUME I”, P.119

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RIVER SAFARI COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR OF COMPLETION 2015 GFA 88,100SQM CLIENT WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Context Nature-themed attractions such as River Safari Singapore can function as an experiential educational space that raises public knowledge and inspires stewardship of our natural environs. However, the conception of such a development presents numerous challenges. These include the imitation of the complex and diverse river topographies, maintenance of the freshwater habitats and immersion of the safari with its reservoir site without impeding on its local biodiversity. Contribution River Safari Singapore, sited along the Upper Seletar Reservoir, features eight freshwater habitats from around the world – the Mississippi, Congo, Nile, Ganges, Murray, Mekong, Yangtze and Amazon. Each presents unique microdynamics between its aquatic organisms and environment that required in-depth discussions with freshwater biologists and various environmental specialists. The architects also explored ways of synergising the architecture and the surrounding riverscape to deliver an immersive journey that is educational and sensitive to the reservoir site. 89

The Amazon Flooded Forest attraction, for example, is a submerged sensory cavity designed to dissolve and disguise the barriers between the paths of sub-aquatic creatures and the visitors. An immensely intimate sensorial experience, visitors enter a rich aquatic universe where they encounter and learn about the rich and diverse flora and fauna such as giant river otters and red-bellied piranha. Through this atmospheric stimulation of senses, visitors derive an understanding of the freshwater environment. These design considerations also led to the crafting of fine details and use of materials to create sustainable structures such as the huts scattered along the water edge. Modest yet unique, the design applies extensive treated bamboo screening underneath solid metal roofs, transforming the huts into lightweight canopies. Each is supported by a cluster of twisting structural steel columns that terminate at the apex and form circular skylights – a mimicry of the existing perimeter trees providing partial shading along the embankment.


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PROTECT, RESTORE & PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE USE OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS, SUSTAINABLY MANAGE FORESTS, COMBAT DESERTIFICATION & HALT & REVERSE LAND DEGRADATION & HALT BIODIVERSITY LOSS Forests are key to our survival. Covering some 31% of the Earth’s surface, they provide habitats for animals, livelihood for humans, protection for biodiversity and soil health, enable food resilience, and mitigate climate change.1 Alarmingly, despite increasing awareness and efforts to halt deforestation and sustainably manage Earth’s green lungs, the world is falling short on the targets to preserve and restore life on land. 2 Growing population, agricultural expansion and rapid urbanisation are placing our ecosystems under intense pressure. To reverse land degradation and stop biodiversity loss require urgent and united action across whole and all industries, including the Built Environment sector. Our design and construction works must be guided by a duty to restore biodiversity. 3 This means ensuring minimal encroachment into and impact of building developments on its natural surrounds, proportional green replacement, integration of habitats for local flora and fauna into the built environment, and preservation of vulnerable wildlife zones. Each of these measures can and should contribute to education on the importance of conservation of our natural habitats. 1 FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS, “THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S FORESTS 2020”, HTTP://WWW.FAO.ORG/STATE-OF-FORESTS/EN/#:~:TEXT=FORESTS%20COVER%2031%20PERCENT%20OF%2 THE%20GLOBAL%20LAND%20AREA. 2 UNITED NATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS, “SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL #15”, HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL15 3 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOLUME I”, P.127, HTTPS://UIA2023CPH.ORG/THE-GUIDES

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TEMASEK CLUB COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2015 GFA 21,100SQM CLIENT TEMASEK CLUB, KIENTA ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION PTE LTD DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP DESIGN

Context Greenfield developments must be approached with great sensitivity and consideration for the natural habitats and ecosystems within the site. Its design and planning must be guided by a responsibility towards the protection and preservation of biodiversity; ensuring not only minimal impact on the environ but also its integration into the built environment. Abutting the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, Temasek Club was conceived with great care for its green surrounds; ensuring sustainable conditions for the local ecosystem while leveraging its idyllic setting to create a sanctuary for its users. Contribution Achieving a harmonious relationship of the development with nature, preserving the topography and existing biodiversity on the site was a design priority. The club was therefore located within a natural valley which effectively reduced its visual impact on the nature reserve and created opportunities for enhancement of and engagement with the biodiversity through 93

a combination of site-sensitive landscape design and spatial programming. The retention of a large portion of trees within the site was crucial to minimise degradation of the natural habitat and ecosystem. Areas of tree conservation, such as those before the entry to the club, were carefully integrated into the architectural scheme to serve as a buffer between the road and the external spaces of the club. In line with this green agenda, the club’s guesthouses were built on stilts to minimise disturbance to the undergrowth and bio-swales, erected as a natural boundary between the club and the Nature Reserve, function as an environmental drainage feature to remove silt and pollution from surface run-off. To further minimise the environmental impact of the development, two naturallyventilated buildings connected via two circulation drums flank each end of the arrival hall. The roof, lifted at an angle, aids in the natural ventilation of the interiors while the horizontal louvres provide shade and mitigate indoor heat gain.


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PROMOTE PEACEFUL & INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; PROVIDE ACCESS TO JUSTICE FOR ALL, & BUILD EFFECTIVE, ACCOUNTABLE & INCLUSIVE INSTITUTIONS AT ALL LEVELS A peaceful and inclusive society depends on the political and justice systems governing it. Where fair laws and policies are effectively implemented, they deter exploitation of vulnerable groups, corruption at all levels, violence and organised crimes as well as create room for diplomacy over conflict in transboundary situations. Unfortunately, the progress made in achieving the targets of Goal 16 has fallen short. In 2019 alone, a global estimate of 437,000 fell victim to homicide and 79.5 million people were forcibly displaced by strife and conflict in their countries. Equally worrying is the 18% increase in killings of human rights defenders in 32 countries from 2019 to 2020.1 For positive change to happen, legislative efforts must push ahead. And while architecture cannot be an enforcer of justice and peace, it can be an expression of society’s values and commitment to accountability and democracy through design. 2 Public spaces and buildings such as parks, libraries, community centres and schools, must be planned and designed on principles of equitability. In this way, the built environment can provide safe, accessible and affordable spaces that nurture an inclusive and community-centric outlook for a fair and peaceful society. 1 UNITED NATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS, “SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL 16: PROGRESS AND INFO”, 2021, HTTPS://SDGS.UN.ORG/GOALS/GOAL16 2 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOLUME I”, P.137

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HOMETEAMNS KHATIB CLUBHOUSE COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2020 GFA 22,200SQM CLIENT HOMETEAMNS DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP GREEN

Context HomeTeamNS is a non-profit association set up to recognise the contributions of the National Service (NS) men in the Singapore Police Force and Singapore Civil Defence Force to the safety and security of the nation. It provides a shared environment for National Servicemen and their families to network and bond through social, recreational and sporting activities. Immersive, inclusive and sustainable, the architecture of its latest clubhouse at Khatib was guided by the quintessential constructs of home – security, warmth and trust; thereby, refreshing the ambience of sharing and bonding. Contribution This is realised by reinterpreting the universal concept of protecting one's home to embody the values of Singapore's forward-looking peacekeeping force in upholding the modern and inclusive society. One experiences this differentiation when approaching the weighted concrete frontage which is at once open and welcoming yet robust. Tartan-staggered walls and slenderly97

swelled columns envelop the programmes. This layering of multitude on magnitude in its architectural expression effectively reflects the unity among the members of the HomeTeam community. As a national institution that serves her citizens, it is important for its architecture to express its commitment and principles. The open frontage facing the bustle of the transportation artery communicates a sense of transparency and accessibility to visitors and passers-by. This is complemented by the fenceless setup, which extends a welcoming gesture to the general public at all times. Within the development, walkways and corridors hold both circulatory and education functions, serving as public galleries on the contributions of the HomeTeam. This is effected through a thoughtful rendition of historical artefacts — informing visitors of the institution’s heritage. Through these design strategies, HomeTeamNS Khatib stands as both a cornerstone and catalyst for peace, justice and security in the Khatib neighbourood.


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NS HUB COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTION

CLIENT DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AGENCY, MINISTRY OF DEFENCE, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP DESIGN, DP FAÇADE, DP GREEN, DP LIGHTING, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context National Service (NS) is the bedrock of Singapore’s defence and for most new enlisting servicemen, NS Hub will be the place of their first encounter with the Ministry of Defence and Singapore Armed Forces. The architectural design sought to uphold the principles of NS and as a physical representation of Singapore’s unique NS commitment and culture, it also reflects the cohesion among the institution, communities and citizens. Contribution The design scheme tackled a diverse range of issues: creating an icon for generations of NSmen, encouraging public participation, integrating with the surrounding landscape and rich biodiversity of the rail corridor, and adoption of sustainable solutions. These conversations led to the curation of the institution’s features. 99

The façade of rotated bricks fronts the entrance of the development, greeting visitors and service personnel alike. Solid yet porous in form, it symbolises the institution’s commitment to transparency, accountability and accessibility. Its intricate composition is achieved through the stacking of bricks pivoted along a common grid of varying angles — a novel design that celebrates the resilience and unity of our society. Another feature is the Service Centre, a one-stop location for services ranging from NS registration and medical screening for pre-enlistees to IPPT training for NSmen. The building programmes are organised for security, safety and functionality, with spaces established for purposeful interactions between service personnel and the public. At the heart of the building, daylight and the bustle of transit fill the voluminous space and charge it with an atmosphere of vigour.


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STRENGTHEN THE MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION & REVITALISE THE GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

2020 marked the start of the Decade of Action – a period of planning, strategising and accelerating responses to the world's gravest humanitarian and climate challenges in order to achieve the targets of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, has hindered progress made in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and, in some instances, exacerbated existing issues such as an increase in consumption of plastic waste, rise in incidences of discrimination, and stunted access to healthcare and work opportunities. Yet, the Decade of Action is not to be a tale of a series of unfortunate events. Unexpectedly, the global health crisis has also alleviated negative impacts on the climate and revealed systemic weaknesses. Change for the better is, therefore, necessary. It is also sustainable. Advancing the agenda of the SDGs is a massive task, though not insurmountable. Our success depends on effective collaboration and inclusive partnerships between governments, the private sector, civil society organisations and ordinary citizens. It is more crucial now than ever for advocacy to move into action. Architects, designers, planners, developers and builders, can and must contribute through partnership for the goals. Together, the Built Environment sector can develop a liveable and sustainable future via knowledge sharing, promoting sustainable solutions, engaging in collaboration, test-bedding new practices and discarding old ones; ensuring commitment and ownership across all levels of the construction chain and building life-cycle.1 1 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS, “AN ARCHITECTURE GUIDE TO THE UN 17 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS VOLUME 1”, P.147

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PLANTATION VILLAGE COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION LATE 2022 (EST.) GFA 191,200SQM CLIENT HOUSING & DEVELOPMENT BOARD, SINGAPORE DP SPECIALIST INVOLVED DP GREEN

Context In the same way that a city is built by many hands – government bodies, urban planners, architects, designers and industry experts – the Built Environment sector can only achieve the targets of the 17 sustainable development goals through partnerships between stakeholders. The success of Singapore’s social housing system, managed by the Housing & Development Board (HDB), is proof. Though government-led, the high standard of Singapore’s HDB estates are the culmination of active engagement, knowledge-sharing and practices with industry partners. Contribution Today, evolving lifestyle needs and multicultural dynamics combined with the climate crisis have led to the re-examination of what liveability entails and the consideration of how sustainability can be achieved in our housing estates for an even better quality of life. The new Plantation Village in Tengah is an exemplary case of how government initiatives and industry know-how in urban design and planning strategies can come together to realise a sustainable, inclusive and vibrant housing estate model. These strategies include the design and integration of urban green under HDB’s Biophilic Town Framework which seeks to 103

create a “nature-centric neighbourhood so that residents can connect with nature and enjoy its intrinsic value”. Articulated via the courtyard design concept, Plantation Village features wide open spaces such as the Precinct Heart; the Common Green with its expansive network of tree-lined, universally accessible pedestrian pathways; and elevated quadrangles with landscaped deck and provisions of benches, trellises and facilities for social activities. Strategically located and programmed, these open spaces create the sense of being in nature, and function as effective breakout spaces that invite residents outdoors, create opportunities for cross-interaction and facilitate communal bonding. Furthermore, the building design integrates building systems that will contribute to the national effort to mitigate climate change via better energy and resource management. These range from solar-ready roofs to harness this renewable energy; the Centralised Cooling System, a water-cooled system that is more energy efficient than its air-cooled counterpart; the Pneumatic Waste Conveyance System which lowers carbon footprint with its centralised garbage collection point; and the Urban Water Harvesting System, for irrigation and cleaning of common areas.


PERSPECTIVES COURTESY OF HDB

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SINO-SINGAPORE GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY MASTER PLAN COUNTRY GUANGZHOU, CHINA

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2020 SITE AREA 283HA CLIENT SINO-SINGAPORE GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP GREEN, DP URBAN

Context As China’s economy matures, the greater bay area continues to see rapid transformation in its cityscape. It has been transitioning to a knowledge-based economy characterised by balanced, sustainable and inclusive growth requires new infrastructure, urban redevelopment and collaboration. The Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City Master Plan is a bilateral cooperation project focused on redeveloping the Bay Area into a knowledgecreation demonstration and intellectual property pilot zone. The goal is to enable China to diversify its economic portfolio, encourage research and innovation, and create knowledge-intensive jobs; thereby, boosting the shift towards an era of knowledge economy. Contribution In understanding the larger economic agenda, the master plan of Guangzhou Knowledge City envisions an integrated incubator for innovation, realised 105

through an accessible and highly-efficient vertical system with a communication network that will result in a lively, multidimensional living and industrial mixed-use core for the knowledge city. It focuses on building an accessible knowledge-intensive economy with emerging sectors, including a new generation of information technology, high-end equipment and manufacturing. The design scheme, thus, introduces a knowledge-led innovation eco-system to create a vibrant innovation sector. This eco-system targets global knowledge city indicators with knowledge-intensive industrial clusters as carriers, knowledgetransformation platform facilities as support and guaranteed policies that will foster a software environment. To further boost vibrancy, the scheme integrates a Knowledge-Oriented Development (KOD), which guides the co-sharing space for researchers and research-and-development enterprises, and facilitates interaction between diverse user-groups.


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CAPSTONE PROJECT WITH SUTD COUNTRY SINGAPORE

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

YEAR OF COMPLETION 2020 COLLABORATION SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY & DESIGN (SUTD)

Context An evidence-based architecture design approach has the capacity to tackle issues of climate change. As it requires knowledge-sharing and test-bedding new practices, collaboration with research and institutional partners is necessary to realise design solutions and advance the agenda of the SDGs. Recognising this, DPA teamed up with the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) in its annual Capstone Programme, which brings together industry experts and senior year students from different academic pillars to work in design teams, and contribute their respective expertise and skills to solve real-world challenges. Contribution If a restaurant’s average monthly energy consumption can power a 3-room HDB unit for almost a year, should we not look at ways to create a circular energy loop to prevent such wastage? Partnering the institution in its 2020 Capstone Programme, Mall Hot Food was an investigation into how heat generated from F&B outlets can be sustainably repurposed and redirected for use. Through the guidance of Dr Chong Keng Hua, Associate Professor Robert Edward Simpson 107

and DPA, the team successfully conceived a prototype for an Outdoor Refreshments Area (ORA) Module which harnesses waste heat from kitchens to drive convective airflow and cool the overall space. Socially, ORAs along Orchard Road have been challenged by thermal comfort, operating costs and general stigmatisation. Adopting the former Grange Road carpark as a prospective site, the tapered double-volume modules have the flexibility to accentuate air flow and circulation depending on the event, postulating a new vision of our hawker scene. While malls are regarded as avenues of consumption, the team questioned how commercial spaces can be more sustainable as we deal with climate change. It is a modest milestone success that, beyond an applied medium, Mall Hot Food also considered the treatment of materials, building services and space norms, integrating them into the module. In concluding this research project with SUTD, DPA is further convinced of the possibility for more innovations to recycle exhaust heat energy from F&B establishments and hopes to develop this prototype to suit society’s evolving needs.


MODULARITY

Standalone module

Ground floor circulation by canopy extension

Second floor circulation by elevated connections

HEAT WASTE RECOVERY

PERSPECTIVES IN COLL ABOR ATION WITH SUTD

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CONSTRUCTION DECLARES COUNTRY SINGAPORE YEAR 2020 DP SPECIALISTS INVOLVED DP ENGINEERS, DP GREEN, DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Context Construction Declares is a global petition uniting all strands of the construction and built environment sectors. It is both a public declaration of our planet’s environmental crises and a commitment to take positive action in response to climate breakdown and biodiversity collapse. Singapore is the first Asian country to join Construction Declares with both architects and structural engineers coming together as founding signatories in January 2020. The architecture firms are CSYA, DP Architects, Forum Architects, Guz Architects, HASSELL, SCDA and WOHA while the structural engineering firms are Arup, DP Engineers, RSP Planners & Engineers, Web Structures and WSP. Contribution The movement has since gained momentum with other construction-related specialists joining as founding signatories for their respective petitions. Within the DPA group, its environmentally sustainable design arm, DP Sustainable Design along with 10 Degree Solar, Atelier Ten, Surbana Jurong and Web Earth signed the Environmental Consultants Declare in June 2020; and 109

the firm’s landscape and arboriculture consultancy arm, DP Green joined other landscape specialists – D’Land, Grant Associates, ICN Design International, Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl and Stephen Caffyn Landscape Design – to sign Landscape Architects Declare in November 2020. Sustainable design is not new to DP Architects and its group of companies. DP has, across its projects, advocated design practices that consider the whole life cycle of buildings and its regeneration while adding value to its urban fabric and the community. Joining the petition as founding signatories further solidifies the firm’s commitment and enhances its efforts towards climate change through advocacy and action. Key to this is changing the mind-sets and perspectives of clients and end-users to better appreciate the impact of their requirements and expectations in reducing carbon emissions. DP is also refocusing its sustainability strategies, elevating its expertise and deepening its interdisciplinary approach to offer a total solution for a liveable and sustainable built environment.


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Afterword

DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE + PLANET By Ng San Son People and environment have always been at the heart of DP's architecture endeavours. Design excellence for us is not solely defined by aesthetics. It places emphasis on the careful study and purposeful application of design strategies that create human-centric and sustainable built environments. This has and continues to be driven by our deep belief in the capacity of design to influence social behaviour, build environmental ownership and effect sustainable national development. In the face of mounting humanitarian crises and climate degradation, it is imperative that we deepen our environmental consciousness and lend our voice. Curated for advocacy, Design in Print Vol. 12.2 communicates our desire for and commitment to a liveable and sustainable future through the common language of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The matrix we employed in benchmarking our projects against the SDGs references the method of analysis and architectural discourse outlined by the International Union of Architects in their 2019 SDG Dhaka Declaration and publication, An Architecture Guide to the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The editorial journey was an interesting one. The post-evaluation of our projects through the lens of the SDGs involved careful examination of the main purposes, conditions, social effects of our buildings and urban designs. It raised hard questions, and led us into deeper reflection and discussions on the true impact and extent of contribution of our design works in mitigating the wider humanitarian and 111

climate crises. Weighted against each goal, we recognise that buildings contribute both intrinsically and extrinsincally to more than one goal, albeit unevenly across the SDGs. More importantly, we have gained a deeper understanding of how we can do our part as an industry and identified areas in which we must do better if we are to effect real change for sustainable development. This includes greater accountability through evidence-based design and data-based outcomes as well as boldness in design through embracing new practices and pushing design innovation. Post publication, we have emerged with a greater affirmation of our design ethos and commitment. Standing at six months away from COP 26 and nine years before the 2030 deadline for achieving the agenda for sustainable development, time is of essence. Locally, we need to acknowledge how the SG Green Plan 2030 is well poised to herald the next bold age for Singapore, driven by green innovations and technological systems implemented at scale for cities and countries. It is a blueprint that paves the way for the private sector to be more involved and be a custodian for our built environment. DP Architects is onboard with the nation’s next phase of development towards becoming not just a City in Nature but also a Global City of Sustainability. Budding from this quarterly, our Design in Print will continue to investigate alternative ideas to green our world. Through our dialogues, we hope to forge an avenue across all sectors and professions, in support of and to contribute to the targets of the UN SDGs.


Sustainability is no longer a choice for the built environment sector. The role that architects and designers play in reversing the impacts of climate change becomes more critical by the day. Aligning with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals, we must plan and implement sustainable developments that reduce negative impact on the environment. Where possible, we should adapt and retrofit existing buildings, pursue passive designs, select low carbon materials and adopt renewable energy generation to minimise the carbon footprint. Yong Siew Onn | Director, DP Sustainable Design

The time has come to address sustainability challenges in the BE industry head-on. These challenges are no longer “someone else’s problems” but have tangible consequences to the life cycle cost of built environment assets. As a result, a tectonic mindset shift is underway where “Sustainability” is a fundamental need in the built environment, no longer a “nice-to-have". Chan Hui Min | Director, DP Architects

The UN SDG offers a holistic framework that will improve the way communities intertwine with the environment sustainably to improve our quality of life. The built sector has an integral role to play in upkeeping this ecosystem. There isn't a planet B, so keep up or be left behind. Taib Shabbir | Associate Director, DP Sustainable Design

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Acknowledgements In our push for greater adoption of human-centric design and sustainable practices in the built environment, we recognise that achieving sustainable development is not the work of one but of many. It requires industry-wide collaboration across diverse disciplines and stakeholders. It is this spirit of collaboration with our partners and clients, and shared commitment to climate action for a better and more sustainable future that has enabled us to prioritise people and planet across our body of works. Some of these, we have compiled into this special issue of Design in Print Vol. 12.2 in support of the United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and for the purpose of advocating positive and practical measures that can mitigate the impact of the built environment on climate change. To be able to match advocacy to action and realise this publication, we sincerely thank the United Nations Association of Singapore (UNAS) as well as our partners and clients for collaborating with us on this special issue. Building & Construction Authority CapitaLand Defence Science and Technology Agency Gabon Sez Gammon Pte Ltd HAAD Heartware Network Hillview Rise Development Pte Ltd (Parent Company: Hong Leong Holdings Ltd) HomeTeamNS Housing & Development Board, Singapore Kienta Engineering Construction Pte Ltd Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine Lusail Real Estate Development Company Ministry of Defence, Singapore Ministry of Education, Singapore Ministry of Health, Singapore Montfort Care National University of Singapore

People’s Association SAFRA National Service Association Singapore Cooperation Enterprise Singapore Institute of Technology Singapore Press Holdings Ltd Singapore University of Technology & Design Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP, USA SMEC SP Group Sport Singapore Sunray Woodcraft Construction Pte Ltd The Woodleigh Mall Pte Ltd & The Woodleigh Residences Pte Ltd c/o Kajima Development Pte Ltd Temasek Club T&T Group Joint Stock Company Wildlife Reserves Singapore World Community for Christian Meditation

We would also like to acknowledge the International Union of Architects (UIA). While this issue of Design in Print is not intended as a guide, the parameters of how architecture and design can contribute to the agenda and targets of the 17 SDGs drew reference from the work and research done by the UIA in their publication, An Architecture Guide to the UN 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Through this, we have been further inspired to truly place people and planet at the heart of what we do; and hope to similarly galvanise you towards action and advocacy against the crises the world is facing today. THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF DESIGN IN PRINT REFLECTS DPA’S COLL ABOR ATION WITH THE UN ASSOCIATION OF SINGAPORE (UNAS), A NATIONAL VOLUNTARY ORGANIZ ATION WHOSE MISSION IS TO PROMOTE THE AIMS AND IDE ALS OF THE UNITED NATIONS AS WELL AS SUPPORT ITS WORK.

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OUR SPECIALISTS All Rights Reserved. No material may be reproduced without prior permission. DP Architects accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences including any loss or damage arising from reliance on information in Design in Print. Any opinions in Design in Print are solely those of the named authors of the article in which they appear. Unless named as author, DP Architects, Editorial Panel and other Contributors do not endorse any such views and disclaim all liability from their publication.

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Design in Print Vol 12.2 - The Sustainability Issue  

DP has always placed human-centricity and sustainability at the heart of its practice and believes that architecture and design can help to...

Design in Print Vol 12.2 - The Sustainability Issue  

DP has always placed human-centricity and sustainability at the heart of its practice and believes that architecture and design can help to...

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