Design In Print Vol 10 No 4: Urban Workspace

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WWW.DPA.COM.SG |

SINGAPORE 2019 |

4 NUMBER 10 VOLUME | 041/08/2019 (P) MCI

IN

DEPTH

HE ART WARE NET WORK FRASERS TOWER

WOODS SQUARE

DP ARCHITECTS HQ

IN

fo c u s

ONE BUILDING.

ONE INTEGRATED PL ATFORM.

I N

Pers o n

BEHIND DP'S LIVING L AB


With a rising urgency to confront the climate crisis, we thought it

would be timely to dedicate this issue of Design in Print to how DP is evolving its design strategies for sustainability and wellness.

In 2015, the United Nations released the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with the intention that they be achieved by the year 2030. Whether sustainability can be achieved, depends on two

things: consensus and effort. Climate change, after all, does not

discriminate in terms of who it will impact. Should we understand this, we will then also acknowledge that each and all of us bear

responsibilities towards Earth and ensuring its sustainability. This year, DP has pledged to the Singapore Climate Action Goals

under the Ministry of Environment and Water Resources. In a

public commitment to sustainability, we have also pledged to

the Construction Declares Climate and Biodiversity Emergency –

Singapore | Architectural Firms as one of the founding signatories to acknowledge the seriousness of our environmental situation. Effort must follow consensus. With sustainability as a necessary

outcome of design, DP is forging new partnerships, and harnessing the power of technology and data as essential tools in design

innovation. This issue of Design in Print takes an in depth look at

how we are transforming our new headquarters in Marina Square

(Singapore) into a living lab. By incorporating savvy smart features in our office design, it will be a testbed for the synergies between technology and design in an actual built environment. This

includes the integration of IoT data on an Open Building System

Integration (OBSI), iviva, a collaboration with Eutech Cybernetics; and prototype IAQ sensors to monitor indoor environment variables, a collaboration with the NUS-spinoff company, SenSing.

We also look at how we are adopting these design strategies

in some of our latest urban workspace projects, Frasers Tower,

Woods Square and Heartware Network, so as to deliver a work environment that optimises climatic comfort for end-user

productivity and energy efficiency for the larger wellbeing of our planet.

We hope you will enjoy reading this issue and be inspired to join the effort against climate change.

Angelene Chan

Chief Executive Officer


c on ten ts 03 u p d a t e s

Designing Change: DP Design releases second volume

I N

04-07 B R I E F

01 Agile Mont Kiara 02 Embassy Garden 03 Menara Syariah 04 Agile Bukit Bintang 05 Puteri Habour Marina Walk 06 Matrix Damansara Perdana 07 Arumaya Residences 08 Jurong Spring Community Club

08 I N d u s t r y

01 NS Hub Ground-breaking 02 IIDA Best of Asia Pacific Design Awards 2019 03 London Design Awards 2019 04 DP Director Chan Hui Min speaks at Zak World of Faรงades Singapore

I N

09-22 D E P T H

I N

23-24 f o c u s

01 Heartware Network 02 Frasers Tower 03 Woods Square 04 DP Architects HQ

One Building. One Integrated Platform.

25-26 I N s i g h t S Open Office

I N

27-33 P E R S O N

Behind DP's Living Lab

D e si g n

i n

P r i n t

Team

EDITOR IN CHIEF Angelene Chan | CONTENT Belle Chung, John Utanes, Josy Koh, Chia Zhao Hui

GRAPHICS Amanda Lin, Rebecca Jin | PHOTOGRAPHER Bai Jiwen | CONTRIBUTOR Jackie Poh, Toh Bee Ping


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T H E L AT E S T H A P P E N I N G S I N D P

UPDATES

DESIGNING CHANGE DP DESIGN RELEASES SECOND VOLUME

Following its first volume ‘Designing Spaces’, DP Design is releasing its second volume ‘Designing Change’ this March. While the first volume was an illustration of DP Design’s expertise in dealing with various types of spaces and uses, ‘Designing Change’ provides an insight into the design thought that guides and inspires the creative approach behind DP Design’s latest body of works across a variety of building types and scale. ‘Designing Change’ is a visual discourse into the creative psyche of the interior-architects at DP Design. It explores and illustrates how designing an interior space goes beyond a direct, strategic response to a building’s intrinsic architectural form to examine and embody the evolving relationship between man and built environment. Recognising that change is the only constant in an ever-progressing world, the book aims to simultaneously

rethink design and inspire new paradigm in design approach and perspective on space. Its narrative draws on more than three decades of DP Design's experience in the interior design, space planning and project management industry. The book combines design concepts and short stories with beautiful imagery to provide an in-depth look at the fundamentals and perceptions of interior spaces so as to relook the practice of interior design today. ‘Designing Change’ may be purchased in-store at major book retailers. DP Design is an integral part of the Singapore-based international architecture practice, DP Architects and its group of companies. Adept at handling multi-disciplinary large scale projects, DP Design works hand in hand with DP Architects to achieve holistic design practices.


IN BRIEF

S H O R T T A K E S O N N E W & NO T A B L E P R O J E C T S

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DPA

Agile Mont Kiara KUAL A LUMPUR, MAL AYSIA

Agile Mont Kiara is an exclusive urban-chic residential project comprising 11 high- and low-rise towers, strategically placed to offer vantage views of the extensive surrounding green pastures. These towers house over 800 units and rise above an environment deck, which includes facilities such as a swimming pool, children’s water play area, indoor golf range and badminton courts that cater to residents of all ages. A stunning 100-metre long Sky Club on the 29th storey features a sky lounge at the central bridge that connects two of the tallest residential towers. This lounge offers commanding views of the surrounding Istana grounds and beyond. Sky Suites are also located at both ends of the Sky Club, providing residents additional facilities with a touch of exclusivity.

DPA

E m bassy Ga r d e n KUAL A LUMPUR, MAL AYSIA

Nested in the prestigious embassy district of Kuala Lumpur, Embassy Garden is a mixed-use development with three towers atop an elegant podium and ground floor retail. It provides a luxurious resort lifestyle experience with panoramic views of the surrounding urban oasis. Living spaces, ranging from studio to family units, are designed with quality finishing and fittings to cater to a myriad of lavish choices. Additionally, a distinctive portal on the 65th storey frames the sky club overlooking the Petronas and Kuala Lumpur Towers. At more than 200-metre above ground, the club and infinity pool are breath-taking venues for gathering and recreation. Embassy Garden daringly redefines prestige city living with striking identity, stunning views, beautiful landscaping and efficient living.


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IN BRIEF

DPA + DPf + DPl + DPSD

M e n a r a S ya r i a h JAKARTA , INDONESIA

Envisioned as the anchoring landmark of the future Islamic Financial Center in Sedayu Watertown, Menara Syariah is the first Syariah financial hub in South-East Asia featuring offices with lifestyle retail on the ground floor. The twin towers are oriented to embrace Fortune Plaza, forming a continuity of green across both sides. The landscape across the park gently transitions up the towers, resulting in a cascading green podium and deck that offers tenants clear sweeping views of Fortune Plaza. Upon arrival, guests are greeted by grand geometric columns and an elaborate Mashrabiya façade. This iconic traditional pattern is outlined in sleek stainless-steel and spread across the towers above. At night, the façade lights up across the network and glitters like stars. Menara Syariah is designed to be a world-class business hub that offers a modern, sustainable and future ready workplace. It is the first ever, unique Syariah office tower in Indonesia.

DPA

A g i l e B u k i t B i n ta n g KUAL A LUMPUR, MAL AYSIA

Situated along the periphery of Jalan Bukit Bintang – Kuala Lumpur’s most prominent retail belt – the 158,000sqm Agile Bukit Bintang stands tall among its low-lying surroundings. Its three towers, housing 1,501 residential and 66 Small Office Versatile Office (SOVO) units, rest on a podium consisting of an eight-storey carpark masked by green terraces and screens. To take advantage of its panoramic views, DPA delivered a design concept that is akin to mountain living. At ground level, a valleylike volume is carved away to form a distinct green oasis that integrates retail and F&B; enhancing the public landscape and activities around the site. The architectural form of its asymmetrical towers resemble mountainous ridges and presents an impressive vertical elevation. This optimises the views via visual corridors towards Petronas Twin Towers and Kuala Lumpur Tower, fetching picturesque views of the city skyline for the residents. Its facilities include a 25m-pool, children’s water play area, barbecue facilities and an exclusive Sky Club on the 60th storey; offering private gathering spaces and recreational experience with spectacular views in a garden setting.


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S H O R T T A K E S O N N E W & NO T A B L E P R O J E C T S

DPA

P ute r i H a r b o u r M a r i n a Wa l k JOHOR BAHRU, MAL AYSIA

Puteri Harbour Marina Walk is an existing mixed-use development along Puteri Harbor. It constitutes a mid-rise hotel and serviced apartments on top of an open-concept retail podium with scenic waterfront views. Its location along the Puteri Harbour Marina puts the development in close proximity to multiple existing and upcoming developments, which in turn presents potential for high visitor footfall. DP was approached by the client, with this in mind, for a design proposal that would revamp the area and to transform Puteri Harbour Marina Walk into a revitalised destination. Thus, a great emphasis on placemaking featured strongly in DP’s design proposal, as a strategy to inject life and vibrancy into the development. The key nodes and axes were first established, and subsequently given their own identities and characteristics. Capitalising on the prominence of the main entrances located along the axes of the roads coming into Marina Walk, an extensive entrance canopy and sheltered plaza provide a grand welcome. Here, informal events can be held, creating a sense of vibrancy and curiosity for visitors. On the side facing the promenade, stepped plazas give space for visitors to rest and for performances and activities to be held with the marina as a backdrop.

DPA

M at r i x Da m a n s a r a P e r da n a KUAL A LUMPUR, MAL AYSIA

Twenty minutes away from the heart of Kuala Lumpur lies an exclusive residential development that harmonises the urban and natural environments. The Matrix Damansara Perdana sensitively integrates two 40-storey residential towers with lush green surroundings. It offers panoramic views of the neighbouring nature reser ves and four sets of premium link houses with direct views of the inner pool, providing a sense of tranquillity. To articulate people-centric spaces, the design blends clean lines with rustic and organic textures, curating a vibrant yet timeless user-experience with a contiguous green corridor at its core. This corridor seamlessly connects residents to various amenities, and is complemented with sky gardens for gathering and socialising in more private and intimate spaces.


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S H O R T T A K E S O N N E W & NO T A B L E P R O J E C T S

IN BRIEF

DPA + DPl + DPSD

A r u m a ya R e s i d e n c e s JAKARTA , INDONESIA

Arumaya Residences is located at Jalan T.B Simatupang, one of South Jakarta’s most prominent business districts and alongside major transport networks. It is designed as an integrated development comprising three residential types – namely duplex townhouses, walk-up apartments and apartments – in a 24-storey apartment tower and 16 units of two-storey townhouses, with a unique user experience. This is articulated in the dedicated dropoffs, parking lots, passenger lifts, facilities and communal areas created for each residential type. The development is also set on a north-south axis so as to maximise city views in the north and mountain views in the south, while minimising solar heat gain from the east and west. The passenger lifts and cores are positioned at both ends of the floor plate to maximise the number of units in the middle allowing relatively equal accessibility for all units in terms of distance to lifts. The façade design of Arumaya is a modern and exquisite interpretation of the vernacular Indonesian spirit. It interweaves traditional batik patterns into its horizontal ledges, while vertical fins provide the tower with a distinct look that doubles as sunshades for passive thermal comfort.

DPA + DPG + DPSD

Jurong Spring Community Club SINGAPORE

Reflecting on the history of Jurong West, Jurong Spring Community Club (JSCC) interprets its industrial past and expresses the spirit of the locale through an articulation of spaces that employ a palette of tactile brick walls, expanded aluminium meshes, and timber panels. The community club serves as an extension of the neighbourhood, using soft edges to create porous boundaries that increase accessibility and connectivity. The club offers facilities that synergise with one another to promote community engagement. On the first storey, a basketball court can double as a space for mass festivities. On the third storey, the gym, culinary studio and classrooms are placed within a landscaped communal deck that offers a gathering space with unprecedented views across the neighbourhood. The aluminium expanded mesh acts as a skin, with a varying panel orientation accompanied by a subtle panel division to create an alluring contrast when viewed from different angles. The façade acts as a veil that unifies the entire building from all angles and at night, light illuminates from within, creating an architectural spectacle for the neighbourhood.


INDUSTRY

8

AWA R DS & E V EN T S

NS HUB GROUND-BREAKING DP Architects' NS Hub starts construction Designed by DP Architects, the new NS Hub is intended to be a onestop centre for National Ser vice (NS) personnel to engage in all related ser vices from pre-enlistment medical to the Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT ). The size of nine football fields, the hub includes facilities such as a foodcour t, e-Mar t, childcare centre and exercise facilities. Its ground-breaking ceremony was held on 25th November, of ficiated by Singapore Defence Minister Dr Ng Eng Hen; and is scheduled for completion in 2023.

IIDA BEST OF ASIA PACIFIC DESIGN AWARDS 2019 Heartware Network named winner of Corporate Spaces Small Category Conceptualised by DP Architects as a space of possibilities for youth to gather, interact and participate, Heartware Network has been recognised and named winner of Corporate Spaces Small Category in IIDA Best of Asia Pacific Design Awards 2019. The awards ceremony will be held at Le Brand Store BMW George V in Paris on 18th January.

LONDON DESIGN AWARDS 2019 DP Architects Projects receive accolades Three of DP Architects’ projects, Bonnevaux Meditation Retreat, Frasers Tower and Why Green? received accolades in London Design Awards 2019. Both Bonnevaux Meditation Retreat, a proposed meditation retreat in France, and Frasers Tower, an office building in Singapore, won gold in the categories of “Architecture – Proposed” and “Architecture – Commercial (International)”, respectively. Following suit, Why Green?, a light installation designed for iLights Marina Bay Bicentennial, won silver in the category of “Pop-Ups, Display, Exhibit & Set Design”. The Awards ceremony was held in London at Bethnal Green on 5th November.

Bonnevaux Meditation Retreat | France

Frasers Tower | Singapore

Why Green? | Singapore

DP DIRECTOR CHAN HUI MIN SPEAKS AT ZAK WORLD OF FAÇADES SINGAPORE UN Sustainable Development Goals as Building Blocks for a Better Architectural Future DP Director Ms Chan Hui Min was invited as a panellist to the third edition of Zak World of Façades Singapore to share her insights from an architect’s perspective on the role of UN Sustainable Development Goals in the built environment industry today. Her fellow panellists included Farizan d’Avezac de Moran, Senior Partner, GreenA Consultants; Micheal Leong, Director, SAA Architects; David Robinson, Senior ESD Consultant, Cundall and BP Loh, Senior Associate, Hassell. The event took place on 14th November at Marina Bay Sands.



IN DEPTH

F E A TU R E D P R O J E C T

WORK SMART. WORK WELL. By Belle Chung, Josy Koh and John Utanes

THE WAY TO WORK IS EVOLVING AND AT THE CORE OF THIS CHANGE, IS THE ADVENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE ALTERING PERCEPTIONS ON WHAT CONSTITUTES THE IDEAL WORK-LIFE BALANCE. WHILE THIS IS NOT NEW NEWS, THE SPEED AND MANNER IN WHICH IT IS HAPPENING AS WELL AS THE IMPACT ON WHAT AND HOW THE MODERN URBAN WORKPLACE SHOULD BE IS NONETHELESS, EXCITING. The early waves of change has perhaps been more cosmetic. Concepts of ‘workplace

wellness’ and ‘remote working’ led to a rise in trends related to corporate flexibility and identity. This has in turn led to a new age of playful yet savvy and sophisticated openplan workspaces characterised by a culture of co-working and hot-desking.

Today, the evolution of the new age office continues. This is because, if true workplace wellness is dependent on flexibility then a good looking office only makes up a part

of the happiness quotient. Likewise, if the climate change crisis is far from letting up,

then sustainably sourcing one’s design materials is but the beginning of a larger eco-

conscious movement. In lieu of this, the contemporary office cannot just be a pretty fit out; and DP Architects (DPA) recognises this.

The offices of tomorrow are built with wellness in mind. They are also smart, integrating quality technology infrastructure. Here, connectivity and accessibility are key to

workplace flexibility and by this extension, staff happiness. Simultaneously, data and

analytics are crucial in understanding energy consumption patterns and things such as

circadian cycles. With these data analysis, a more informed and conscious effort can be made towards sustainability and work wellness, respectively.

Understanding this, DPA continues to innovate on the urban workspace typology. In the following articles, In Depth explores how the architecture practice is staying ahead of the curve through its collaborative, inter-disciplinary approach, to deliver integrated design solutions that are calibrated to the unique context of each project.

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IN DEPTH

HEARTWARE NETWORK WORK, MEET, DREAM — INNOVATING WORKPLACES FOR YOUTHS.

A FLEXIBLE CANVAS | THE SPATIAL PROGRAMMING OF HEARTWARE NETWORK IS BASED ON A DISTINCTIVE AND ITERATIVE MODULAR GRID FURNITURE SYSTEM THAT PROVIDES OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH TO GATHER, INTERACT AND PARTICIPATE.

Conceptualising Heartware Network’s new premises, DP’s

Heartwork Network was to envision and design the office

are able to gather, interact and participate – cultivating a

wheels, loose seating and individual pedestals which can

design goal was to create a space of possibilities where youths deep sense of community and place. The project explores

how design can be used as a powerful tool to reach out to the youths of today by creating a space that captures not only the corporate identity of Heartware Network, but also the values it stands for and aims to inculcate within its youths. The new

office is also designed as a space that its youths would be able to identify with and as an environment in which the nurturing

as a canvas for customisable spaces via tiered bleachers on be packed back into the cabinetry. This enables flexibility in the space and allows for a spontaneous work environment.

Ideation panels and spots are also freely available throughout the space, encouraging participation of the youth, while allowing them to create their own identity.

In creating a space that resonates with the youths, the

of values within the youths may take place.

design applies a neutral palette of plywood, white laminate,

Thus, the design breaks away from conventional institutional

colours of Heartware Network are incorporated to this

outfits; introducing instead, a distinctive modular and

interactive grid furniture system that iterates with various plug-in elements. The first design strategy applied to

realise such an open, inviting and interactive work space at

and shades of grey. Accent colours that reflect the corporate base palette of neutrals. An additional overlay of acoustic

hanging mobiles and signage also adds distinctive character and youthful energy within the spaces. Each showcases and advocates the various ideologies that Heartware Network


YEAR 2018

GFA 350SQM | SINGAPORE

12

Heartware Network, located at Ganges Avenue, is a registered charity youth organisation that reaches out to an average of 1,500 youths annually. The design of its new 350 square metres (sqm) office was a Community Social Responsibility (CSR) initiative by DPA. It is also DPA's latest foray into the design of flexible and creative workplace environment.

and their youths stand for – dove for authenticity,

planes for enterprise, boats for dedication and crane for integrity.

Throughout the design process, one of the key

considerations for the project was to inculcate a sense of social responsibility and eco-consciousness in the

youths today. As such, green and smart elements were incorporated to promote awareness and encourage greater ownership in playing their part to protect

the environment. When one enters the space, they

are greeted with a green feature wall that harvests the condensate from the air conditioning – setting the tone for the organisation’s attitude towards

sustainability. In addition, sensors allow for the smart

control of electrical components such as the automatic

switching off of lighting not in use. All components are wired for satellite control while monitoring their daily

energy footprint. The tracking of energy consumption via smart devices also helps spur greater sense of responsibility in usage.

This results in an environment where one is able to reshape and repurpose the space for their

own activities, therefore empowering the user’s individualism while purposefully strengthening

ownership as well as notion of community and place. The design of Heartware Network’s new office is a

reflection of the energy of the youth today; and aims

to give the youths who volunteer with the organisation an empowered voice.

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: SEAH CHEE HUANG, AILEEN KOH, JEHAN NAIR DP DESIGN: CHENEY CHING DP LIGHTING: KEVIN STURROCK, FRANCIS LAT


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IN DEPTH

FRASERS TOWER WELLNESS, WHERE WORK HAPPENS.

THE SKY, THE ROOFTOP GARDEN WITH A VANTAGE VIEW OF THE CITYSCAPE


YEAR 2018

GFA 77,160SQM | SINGAPORE

14

With a sustainable urbanism design approach, Frasers Tower not only created a smart and well workplace within the constraints of the site but also contributes to the broader urban context, working towards building a more liveable city. By Josy Koh

In a research done by the Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED) in 2011, employees in the United States and Canada clock an

approximate 1,705 work hours a year. This is slightly more than the United Kingdom

where workers clock in around 1,650 hours. Here in Singapore, workers log an average

of 2,287 hours on their timesheets. Putting

this into perspective, an average knowledge

worker in Singapore spends one quarter of the year in the office. When one considers these long working hours in a high density urban

setting, it can make corporate life feel more pressurising than it already is and perhaps, more stifling than it needs to be. For this

reason, Frasers Tower is designed not just as

a prominent landmark in the Central Business District (CBD) and a symbolic tower for the

company. More important to its design goal, is to create a unique work environment that delights its end-users. To achieve this, the

architectural scheme closely studied its site and sensitively responded to the context.

Bounded by Cecil Street and Telok Ayer Street, fronting the Telok Ayer Garden which is one

of the limited green spaces in the CBD, Frasers Tower stands on prime land. Thus prominently located at the beginning of Cecil Street, it inspired a tower of poetic simplicity that

is also a strong urban statement along the

street. The primary approach to the tower, as one travels from Anson Road to Cecil Street, focuses on the south-east faรงade of the

tower. From this remarkable vantage point,

the tower soars from a rectangular base that

accommodates larger floor plates, and flares outwards as it rises. It then tapers inwards towards the top as the core reduced. The

tapering tower form also helps to distance itself from the neighbouring buildings, VIEW FROM CECIL STREET

establishing a remarkable presence in the crowded context of the CBD.


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IN DEPTH

ENVISIONED AS AN ‘OFFICE IN A PARK; PARK IN AN OFFICE’, THE BIOPHILIA-BASED DESIGN FEATURES IN FRASERS TOWER TRANSFORM THE CONVENTIONAL WORK ENVIRONMENT INTO A UNIQUE ONE THAT PRIORITISES THE WELLBEING OF ITS TENANTS.

The design team was also mindful of the development’s

and connectivity to the outdoors. Specifically, elements

took intricate and careful measures for its protection

natural spaces such as the sky, water features, gardens

close proximity to a conserved heritage building, and during construction. Hence, Frasers Tower was

intentionally designed to setback from the conserved

church, using The Park on level one to not only create a tranquil buffer zone for the church to nestle in

of nature refer to natural daylight and views of outdoor

and interior plantings. These natural stimulants support productivity by encouraging better focus and a healthy creative drive.

comfortably. It also serves as a good design strategy to

In the design of Frasers Tower, this is achieved through

of its end-users.

main office tower. It effectively blurs the line between

Envisioned as an ‘office in a park; park in an office’,

flowing seamlessly from the public park into the office

bring nature into the development, much to the delight

the biophilia-based design features in Frasers Tower

transform the conventional work environment into a

unique one that prioritises the wellbeing of its tenants.

Workplaces that elicit human alertness and engagement incorporates cues of nature via the use of light, air,

spatial definition, footfall patterns, entrances and exits,

the bold use of lush greenery in the retail podium and indoor and outdoor; creating an illusion of greens

lobby space, terracing up the retail outdoor decks and up to the office sky deck. The rooftop garden, aptly

named The Sky, is one of the many pockets of green

spaces in the development where the community can enjoy tranquility and a vantage view of the cityscape. Because biophilic experiences may improve stress


YEAR 2018

GFA 77,160SQM | SINGAPORE

16

THE PARK ON LEVEL ONE CREATES A TRANQUIL BUFFER ZONE FOR THE CHURCH

THE TERRACE, A BREAKOUT AREA IDEAL FOR SOCIAL EVENTS AND TOWN HALL SESSIONS

THE OASIS, A RETAIL PODIUM SPACE WITH A ROOF GARDEN.

GREEN POCKETS OF GARDENS

recovery rates, better cognitive functions and enhanced

create spaces for recreation and its respective amenities.

key consideration in the design of Frasers Tower. To

four. It functions as a breakout area ideal for social

mental stamina, accessibility to the greenery was a

encourage end-users to immerse themselves in this

urbane-nature surround where they may be inspired to meaningful interaction and collaboration, the

community zones — one of the first in the CBD — are lushly landscaped and cleverly integrated. In fact, the

overall architectural treatment of the building promotes usability and replaces more than 100% of the land

space that Frasers Tower sits on; effectively, creating an

This is best articulated in The Terrace, located on level events, town hall sessions and creative thinking in an

uplifting green environment. The community can also look forward to a game of foosball at the recreational area or relax at the resting pods. The Oasis, a retail

podium space with a roof garden, offers a wide range of

food and beverage options for the community when they are in need of some respite.

office-in-a-park.

By maintaining a balanced work life, knowledge

workers can maximise their energy and reduce burn

out rates. The secret behind this, lies in part in energy management and employee engagement. Hence, the architectural scheme of Frasers Tower was careful to

DESIGN TEAM D P A R C H I T E C T S: T I L I A N S EN G , T EO H H A I PI N, TA N CH EE K I A N G , CLY D E U R I A RT E, S O N G CH A I PU K S A K U L


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IN DEPTH

WOODS SQUARE MODERNITY IN THE WOODS

THE PROJECT DOVETAILS THE GOVERNMENT’S HOLISTIC PLAN TO DEVELOP A CORRIDOR OF EXTENSIVE GREENERY FOR THE NORTH OF SINGAPORE.

THE LANDSCAPE DESIGN FORMS THE FOCUS OF THE ARCHITECTURAL SCHEME AND RECALLS THE SITE’S FORMER HISTORY THROUGH THE INCLUSION OF RUBBER TREE CLUSTERS

RETAIL FLOORS ADD VIBRANCE TO THE DEVELOPMENT, INCLUDING A UNIT DEVOTED TO CHILDCARE FOR THE BENEFIT OF OFFICE USERS.


YEAR 2020

GFA 67,000SQM | SINGAPORE

18

With a growing awareness of how deeply the human and urban environments are interconnected, offices are now focused on creating an environment that reflects our human needs, such as improving urban mobility, supporting a sustainable and healthy environment, and planning zones that encourage interactions and collaborations By John Utanes

With the Woods Square project, DP had the

of its architectural scheme. Recalling the site’s

within a development of compelling architecture

a cluster of rubber trees. It dovetails with the

opportunity to create such an environment and design.

Designed for the modern workplace, Woods

Square offers Small Office Loft Office (SOLO)

units with floor-to-floor height of five meters and platform furniture. The loft offices afford owners and tenants the creativity to design their own

work space, as well as the opportunity to carve

out areas according to how their team interacts

with each other – be it zones to encourage open face-to-face interactions or private corners for

confidential discussions etched out on the upper

former history, the landscape design includes

government’s holistic plan to develop a corridor

of extensive greenery for the north of Singapore, where lush boulevards run through offices and business parks. Its extensive landscaped areas serve as a green lung for the building, cooling down the development naturally. Adding to the naturally cooling effect are sun-shading fins and fritted glass on the façade offering

shade, reducing heat and glare from the sun, and allowing the building to reduce energy consumption.

platform level. Moreover, with a floor-to-ceiling

One of the plans for the north region is to

easily flows into the office throughout the day,

with a comprehensive network of pedestrian

glass curtain wall on the building, natural light

encouraging creativity and livelier moods from

everyone within. In addition to SOLO units, there

are also Strata units for sale, and office spaces for lease at Towers 1 and 2 respectively.

Woods Square is designed with an emphasis on socialisation. Its design intention is to create a

work environment that improves collaboration and cultivates inspiring ideas. To tap into the

social buzz of the community where ideas can

complement the public transport infrastructure walkways and cycling paths that link Woods

Square straight to key buildings in the vicinity. Bicycle parking with attached shower facilities has been provided. With interconnected

office towers and comfortable linkways to

the Causeway Point, Woodlands Civic Centre and Woodlands and the upcoming TEL MRT

stations, Woods Square’s central location and connectivity allows for greater mobility.

be shared and expanded on, meeting places and

Considering the impact of the built

throughout the development. Alternatively, cafés

create healthy people-first offices and buildings

business pods at the green sky terraces are dotted for casual discussions are available on the retail

floors of Woods Square. Also, recreational facilities

like the gym and swimming pool also help users to de-stress and relax their mind so that better and more diverse solutions or creative ideas can be

environment on people, it is important to

- one that engages and energises people at work, all within a comfortable and inspiring

environment. Woods Square in Woodlands is exactly that.

cultivated. In addition, a unit devoted to childcare is provided for the benefits of office users. MEETING PLACES AND BUSINESS PODS `AT SKY TERRACES ARE DOTTED THROUGHOUT THE DEVELOPMENT.

The landscape design of Woods Square is

conceptualised by DP Green and forms the focus

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: DADI SURYA, SUNEETH CHANGAROTH, PAUL APPASAMY, MICHELLE LIM, ONG HOAY SAN DP GREEN: YEONG WENG FAI, ROBERT SUNGA, LEHANA GUO


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IN DEPTH

DP ARCHITECTS HQ A SMART AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING LAB THAT EMBRACES THE DP CULTURE.

FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE NEW HQ


YEAR 2019

GFA 4,180SQM | SINGAPORE

20

In 2019, DP Architects consolidated its Studio 1 and Studio 2 offices in Marina Square, Singapore. The decision to merge the two studios into a singular office location serves to address two things close to DP's heart — collaboration and sustainability. By Belle Chung

The decision also comes at a time of evolving perceptions and demands of workspaces all

over, as digital disruption change the way people work and communicate. Recognising this need

to evolve the office space along with the times, DP’s design team set to work; re-envisioning a future-ready office that integrates savvy

technology infrastructure in phases and delights

with aesthetics that are sustainably sourced while holding true to DP’s identity and work culture. MAINTAINING A PEOPLE-CENTRED

designFIRST CULTURE

DP Architects, built on its People+Partners ethos,

has since expanded to include eight specialist arms from interior design and building envelope design to landscape and arboricultural consultancy, and environmentally sustainable design. Housing all 800 Singapore-based DPians under one roof,

one of the main design goals for the new office space is that it must further enhance the inter-

disciplinary design collaboration and workflow

between departments, and among the DPA group of companies.

To achieve this, the office design first applies

an open plan concept that offers flexibility for

easy reconfiguration of office layout to maximise space usage. This deliberate absence of walls

and cubicles throughout the office is a simple

but straightforward approach with a definitive

impact. By physically reinforcing DP’s open and collaborative work culture, it psychologically breaks down silo mentality, encouraging

dialogue between design teams and specialists. Conversations and discussions, in turn, further

foster an environment of knowledge exchange and

shared learning; all of which, have been DP’s key to generating creative design solutions.


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PUSHING FORWARD WITH AN INTELLIGENT, ECO-CONSCIOUS designFIRST ETHOS

To support the operational complexities of DP's highly collaborative work environment, DP’s Tech team set

about laying the foundations for a sound technology infrastructure in phases. This includes the upgrading

of the office’s data centre as well as the installation of

pragmatic and perceptive technologies that are able to take care of end-users’ operational tasks. At the end of

Phase 1, both old and new meeting rooms, for example, have been equipped with smart and robust AV systems;

reducing the dependency on IT personnel to assist in the set up for video-conferencing or to double up as smart

boards. The booking of meeting rooms and scheduling of meetings have also been transformed into a more seamless experience with the integration of the two E-Systems.

The implementation of smart technologies within the

office goes beyond improving operational efficiencies. DP recognises that in this age of digital disruption, technology and data when properly planned and

incorporated at early concept stages, may be harnessed

as one of the most useful allies in the fight against climate change. Thus, setting up the new office as a living lab

to testbed technologies that can help clients to achieve

smart sustainability in the built environment sector, the

firm has partnered Eutech Cybernetics and is investing in IoT (Internet of Things) smart sensors and software that provides an open integration platform, iviva. Together,

these technologies function as a holistic smart building infrastructure platform that not only offers seamless

connectivity with future digital services application. It

can also track and collate data on the rate of energy and

resource expenditure; ultimately providing crucial insights into consumer behaviour. The knowledge acquired

through data analysis in turn allows us to meaningfully

alter consumption patterns for a more sustainable future. Among the smart features installed in Phase 1, is a set of prototype smart sensors that conducts real-time

indoor environment monitoring of things such as air

quality (i.e. temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide and Particulate Matter), light and noise quality, and smart

electricity metering to track energy consumption level. Data collected by these sensors are analysed and

displayed in a visualisation dashboard including dynamic heat map powered by SenSING’s analytic algorithms, and are connected to iviva integration platform. This

live monitoring system allows DP to comprehensively

interpret its indoor environmental quality and energy

consumption patterns so as to translate it into wellbeing indices and electricity cost savings.

IN DEPTH


YEAR 2019

GFA 4,180SQM | SINGAPORE

22

In addition, to further optimise energy consumption and reduce carbon footprint, circadian lighting for example, has automated dimming that adjusts illuminance levels based on occupancy and daylight availability to create a work environment that improves mood, energy and productivity among DPians.

Having a deep eco-conscious mindset and approach to

design, DP ensured that each design decision made in the

conceptualisation of the new West Wing expansion – from minimising wastage to material choice – was sustainably grounded. Leveraging on the flexibility afforded by the

open plan concept, the design team was presented with a canvas on which they were able to retain and reuse 50%

of its existing furniture stock. Throughout the West Wing, low VOC paints, certified green labelled partitions and energy-efficient light fixtures are used.

DP was founded on a deep concern for the built

environment. More than five decades on, the practice continues to be dedicated to creating architecture of

excellence that contributes to the wellbeing of its end-

users as well as its urban fabric. This design philosophy

forms the core principle that guides its designFIRST ethos. And, in the face of climate crisis, placing design-FIRST is

not only about aesthetics. This, the new DP headquarters is a clear testament of as it sets the firm’s larger plan for sustainability in motion.

Poised as a living lab, it is here that the practice aims to

continue nurturing an eco-conscious design thinking and evolving its design methodology. As a testbed where innovative design and new technologies synergise, it is also a creative space where designFIRST for DP is

about exercising a green civic-mindedness such that sustainability is a necessary outcome of design.

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: TI LIAN SENG, CHIN THOE CHONG, LEE SHEE KOENG, TOH LI CHUIN DP DESIGN: MIKE LIM, ALLAN WANG, WIDARI BAHRIN, CALLIOPE LEE, SADIQIN DARIS, RAYMOND CHEONG, JASON CHEN, RIDHWAN AZIZ, KELLY WONG DP GREEN: YEONG WENG FAI, HE YE DP LIGHTING: KEVIN STURROCK, CHRISTINE CHAN DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN: YONG SIEW ONN DPA (TECH): DEREK HERBERT, JACKSON KEUNG, MICHAEL WONG, STEPHEN CHEOK


23

IN FOCUS

ONE BUILDING. ONE INTEGRATED PLATFORM. HOW DP IS GOING ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY THE INTELLIGENT WAY. By Derek Herbert and Yong Siew Onn The idea of a “smart office” varies depending on design

philosophies. For DP, a smart office entails a well-planned,

connected and sustainable office that delivers wellness, increases efficiency and productivity, and promotes user friendliness. It is said that sustainability comes at a cost with short, medium and long-term gains as facilitating a comprehensive suite of

intelligent technologies can both be costly and time-consuming with low rates of returns in the short-term.

iviva. Solution Ecosystem

Campus, Airports, Hospitals, Retail

Corporate/Commercial Marketplace STAFFVISITORS

Lucy

Application Suite

PASSENGERSPATIENTSSHOPPERS

iviva.

Space as a Service

Technology Framework

TENANTS/ RETAILERS

Next Gen Operating Model

DIGITAL WORKPLACE OPERATIONS

Lifecycle Management BIM

SMART BUILDING DIGITAL TWIN


24

INTRODUCING IVIVA

LUC Y IS THE FIR ST NE X T GENER ATION IPA A S (2.0) DE VELOPED SPECIFIC ALLY FOR THE DIGITAL WOR K PL ACE/ SMART BUILDING

DP’s recent office renovation focused on several aspects of

sustainable design including the incorporation of intelligent

fittings and controls underpinned by connected technologies.

through the continuous commissioning of equipment, systems, operational processes and spaces.

At the heart of this connectivity is a single technology system

Operators have a first-hand view into the many layers of a

based on Eutech’s iviva software. A solution ecosystem that is

the-spot, further conserving energy or providing optimum

seamlessly connect various sub-systems and digital services via

further by integrating all aspects of the building through its

“Lucy”, it supports a technology framework that allows the

services industry would otherwise be complicated and costly

provide an enhanced end-user experience.

of these challenges making it a strong integration platform

called the Open Building System Integration (OBSI) platform

building’s performance and can make adjustments on-

designed to suit the built environment, iviva has the ability to

environments to suit the end-user. iviva takes it one step

open communication protocols. Utilising its proprietary engine

multi-protocol integration layer, a process that in the building

seamless inter-connectivity of various “smart” elements which

due to the many protocol standards. iviva overcomes many

These systems can integrate with 3D BIM models to create a

well-suited to meet Singapore’s quest to be a Smart Nation.

digital replica or “Digital Twin” of physical spaces, equipment

With DP’s renovation, it implemented the iviva platform

intelligent interface to the actual space (Physical Twin) for smart

performance. By linking electrical metering into iviva, there is

owners who decide to implement such an OBSI platform in their

to end-users of the need to conserve. It also indicates where

able to simulate operational behaviour before any practical

periods of low occupancy and where controls can be applied

systems and infrastructure processes; and serves as an

in its new office. DP now has a real-time view of its space

operations and maintenance. What this means for building

a clear view of energy consumption and a constant reminder

development from early design concept stage, is that they are

optimisation can be made over a 24-hour time cycle noting

implementation, thereby determining outcomes and potentially

to lighting or reducing fan speeds on fan coil units.

work. Conversely, iviva also replicates what has been installed

In addition, DP has also installed a set of prototype smart

and report.

monitoring of things such as air quality (i.e. temperature,

A unique feature of iviva is the Commissioning To Operate

noise quality to analyse data collected and displayed in a

reducing abortive costs, if prospective technologies do not

into the built environment and is able to then monitor, control

(C2O) process that simplifies the delivery of Physical and

Digital Twins by automating the connection, integration and

commissioning of the building equipment, systems and spaces ensuring that they are operationally-ready for handover.

Post-handover, C2O provides continued operational efficiency

sensors that conducts real-time indoor environment

humidity, carbon dioxide and Particulate Matter), light and visualisation dashboard including dynamic heat map powered by SenSING’s analytic algorithms. The live

monitoring system allows DP to comprehensively interpret its indoor environmental quality so as to translate it into wellbeing indices.


25

INSIGHTS

OPEN OFFICE AN EXAMINATION OF THE OFFICE TYPOLOGY AND THE ARCHITECTS’ ROLE IN THE AGE OF DIGITAL DISRUPTION. By Terence Chua

BOTH ARC 380 AND FRASERS TOWER PROVIDE A BENCHMARK FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS TO NOT ONLY CONTRIBUTE WITHIN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT OF THE SITE BUT ALSO TO A BROADER URBAN CONTEXT, WORKING TOWARDS A MORE BALANCED WORKLIFE AND CREATING A MORE LIVEABLE CITY.

Open office design is a generic term for floor plans that maximise

given rise to the nomadic worker – a new generation of employees

boundaries and lesser enclosed rooms. The concept of open

traditional office setup. This has contributed to the growing demand

the use of large open spaces for workstations, with fewer spatial office design was popular even as early as the turn of the 20th century and evolved in the 1950s due to the emergence of

tele-communication technologies. While it remains to be seen if the benefits of efficiency and more face-to-face interaction

who can ‘plug in and work’ remotely from anywhere, away from the for co-sharing spaces, which have been sprouting up in central

business districts (CBD), providing start-ups and freelancers access to prime locations and regional networks.

are negated by higher levels of noise and distractions in the

These co-working spaces are typically characterised by an open

to stay. According to a 2010 study by the International Facility

individuals and business partners who are not typically employed

work environment, the open office design is undoubtedly here Management Association, 68% of people worked in an office with either no walls or low walls; and this number is certainly

growing. With this in mind, we seek to understand more recent developments in open and shared office spaces in the age of digital disruption.

Digital disruption is the change brought about by new digital technologies and business models. With the proliferation of

internet exploding over the past decade and its rapidly declining

costs, the availability of private networks and mobile devices have

office plan featuring contemporary shared work stations. Here,

by a single organisation but share certain values can come together. It is a concept that is growing in popularity among Millennials

entering the workforce with an expectation that they will have access to similar environments as their campus, where collaboration and exploration are the ‘incubators’ for creating new and innovative ideas. Yet, there remains an overriding peer accountability and

competitiveness within a fast-paced but flexible environment which contributes to productivity. What is then interesting is how unique

synergies can develop from working with like-minded people in such an open, shared office environment.


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OP E N O F F I C E

Simultaneously, with productivity increasingly tagged to the

When well-conceived, the open-concept office can be a

the availability of co-sharing offices. Workspaces are evolving to

innovation while catering to a new generation of workers. In

wellness quotient, the ideal workplace environment is not just about embrace diversity and develop curated environments to attract

like-minded individuals that form a closely-knit community which

can grow as members increase. One manner in which new-age office spaces are doing so is by redefining what makes the ideal workplace environment for the employees to foster community and a sense of belonging.

An example of such an office development is Arc 380. Designed by

DP Architects (DPA), the 16-storey development offers an expanded

range of amenities with a renewed focus on creating breakout spaces

transformative space, acting as a catalyst for productivity and creating such dynamic office developments with new adjacencies,

DPA tapped into its wide knowledge and expertise across building

types to provide a cross-typology design solution while refreshing the standard architectural scheme for office developments. The final design output is an office space that captures the

collaborative spirit of co-sharing workspaces for a co-generative work culture. Flexibility features strongly in the development,

allowing the organisation to adapt quickly, and accommodate to changing needs and requirements.

for social interaction and wellness; and office spaces set amidst sky terraces with lush planting, water features and BBQ facilities. The

concept of designing spaces for work-life balance continues to the

communal rooftop area, which comprises a swimming pool, indoor gym and function room with uninterrupted elevated views of the

surrounds. The incorporation of these social spaces within an office development cultivates synergy in the workplace by providing

alternative spaces for interaction and team building. The internal layout of ARC 380 is designed to be relatively column-free with

partition walls that may be easily removed and features floor plates

that are 24-metre (m) at its widest point. Each office unit is designed with individual toilets and 4.9m high floor-to-ceiling glass windows; maximising daylighting to the office space while leveraging on its panoramic views of the cityscape.

Frasers Tower is another such office development designed by DPA. Envisioned as an ‘office in a park; park in an office’, the 38-storey

Grade A office development within the CBD is designed to promote sustainable urbanism; with a focus on the built environment and well-being of users. The development interacts seamlessly with

the park and adjacent buildings near the site, through four major principles:

1. Compactness of built up area enables larger public space

across the site;

urban-scape by creating public spaces and reducing the urban

2. Landscaped Replacement Areas contributes back to the

heat island effect within densely built up areas;

3. High Performance Building works to reduce the carbon

footprint through lower energy consumption and use of sustainable products; and,

4. Connectivity which is activated through the seamless weaving

FROM TOP: ALTERNATING CANTILEVERED SKY TERRACES WITH SOFT LANDSCAPING NOT ONLY ACCENTUATE THE TOWER FAÇADE BUT ALSO ACT AS BREAK OUT RELAXATION SPACES FOR END-USERS. COMMUNAL FACILITIES AT THE TOWER ROOF LEVEL INCLUDE A 1M DEEP SWIMMING POOL WITH AN UNINTERRUPTED VIEW OF THE KALLANG BASIN, A SHALLOW POOL FOR SUNBATHING, FUNCTION ROOM AND GYM FACILITIES.

of multi-layers of pedestrian walkway between Frasers Tower and its surrounds.

This approach aims to enrich the lives of the both the public

community and the work community in land-scarce Singapore

where aspects such as the physical, ecological, economic and social

factors are considered throughout the design process from inception phase to post-completion. In fact, since completion, the building management participated in activities such as the ‘October Car

Free Weekend’ and ‘MIJ Vertical Marathon 2019’ to form a holistic

approach to sustainability and well-being of end users. (For more on Frasers Tower, read page 13)

TERRENCE CHUA has worked on numerous condominium

projects including Paterson Suites Condominium, Paterson

Collection, Elliot @ the East Coast and the award-winning 8 Saint Thomas. He was also the Project Architect for commercial projects such as the conversion of an existing condominium at Paterson Road to Serviced Apartments, F&B projects at Dempsey Road and Tanjong Beach (Sentosa). Today, Terrence taps on his collective know-how in high-end residential and commercial typologies in his work on corporate developments like Arc 380 and the mixed-development project, Guoco Midtown & Midtown Bay


27

IN PERSON


28

B E HI N D D P ' S L I V I N G L A B

BEHIND DP’S LIVING LAB Interview by Belle Chung

SMART, SAVVY AND SUSTAINABLE, DP’S NEW OFFICE WILL FUNCTION AS A LIVING LAB WHERE ARCHITECTURE AND THE LATEST IN INTERNET OF THINGS (IoT) CAN DYNAMICALLY COME TOGETHER TO ADVANCE DESIGN INNOVATION AND UNCOVER NEW BUT SUSTAINABLE FRONTIERS IN ARCHITECTURAL EXCELLENCE. THIS ISSUE, IN PERSON CAUGHT UP WITH THE MINDS BEHIND DP’S NEW OFFICE – CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER LEE SHEE KOENG, CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER DEREK HERBERT, DIRECTOR OF DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN YONG SIEW ONN AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR (DP DESIGN) ALLAN WANG – TO TALK SUSTAINABILITY, WORK CULTURE, THE DP VISION, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY.

FROM LEFT: CHIEF OPERATING OFFICIER LEE SHEE KOENG, DIRECTOR OF DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN YONG SIEW ONN, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR (DP DESIGN) ALLAN WANG AND CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER DEREK HERBERT


29

THESE DAYS, THERE IS A LOT OF EMPHASIS ON CREATING THE RIGHT WORKPLACE CULTURE SO AS TO HIT THE SWEET SPOT IN THE EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY AND HAPPINESS QUOTIENT. HOW DOES DP DEFINE ‘POSITIVE’ WORKPLACE? LEE SHEE KOENG: Happy people! Happy over what they work

on; about who they work with (bosses included) and where

they work in (i.e. the physical environment). Happy, also, with

the organisation they work for; knowing and sensing that the

firm and its management value their people enough to invest in them. Happy to know that their work counts and their opinions matter enough for consideration.

HOW DOES THIS AFFECT AND/OR CONTRIBUTE TO DP’S WORK CULTURE AND ETHICS? ALLAN WANG: Ours is a culture of, what I like to call, Creation

through Collaboration. The success of our works depends on our multi-disciplinary design approach, which in turn depends on

constant communication and open creative knowledge sharing between our eight architecture-related specialists.

LSK: Yes, the core pillars of DP’s work ethics lie in our

People+Partner and designFIRST ethos. If I may break it down

IN PERSON

simply, it is firstly, about being design-centric through

stringent design crit sessions so as to nurture a generation

of self-critical and more importantly, self-renewing architects and designers. This in essence, allows DP to always place

design-FIRST and to create well-calibrated design solutions. For our designFIRST approach to be truly dynamic, we

depend on our People+Partner. After all, successful internal partnerships rely on quality communication and teamwork. Thus, DP is all for investing in its people and nurturing a

collaborative work environment where we leverage and tap

into one another’s expertise and design knowledge. For this to bloom, we need as I mentioned before, happy people.

Successful external partnerships (with clients) depends on

three things: a service-oriented mind-set that ensures timely delivery, and a client-centric attitude that is pro-business

and sympathetic to the vision and mission of others; all while conducting ourselves with integrity and honesty. This is how DP has always remained true to its People+Partner.

HOW DID THE DESIGN TEAM ARTICULATE THIS WORK CULTURE IN THE DESIGN OF THE NEW OFFICE? AW: To achieve the balance of productivity and real estate

space within the Studio spaces, we organised flexible spaces

within an organic layout that features informal group spaces and minimal to low levels of enclosures. Each director was


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B E HI N D D P ' S L I V I N G L A B

IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN DP ' S PHILOSOPHY TO DESIGN AND DELIVER PROJECTS THAT RESPOND TO THE ENVIRONMENT AND INSPIRE HUMAN ASPIRATION. AT AN AGE OF GROSS CONCERNS OVER CLIMATE CHANGE, DP WITH THIS SAME PHILOSOPHY, HAS A HUGE OBLIGATION TO RESPOND IN A SUSTAINABLE MANNER. – LEE SHEE KOENG ON DP’S LARGER VISION ON DESIGNING FOR SUSTAINABILITY

given the freedom of configuration so as to create a space that is conducive to their team dynamic within their allocated precinct.

The design scheme also took into consideration the linear

configuration of the office and supported the collaborative culture with a meeting zone at each end. One is located in

the “back-of-house” in close proximity to the model-making

department, and plotting and equipment room. It is ultimately a makerspace that allows for the office to gather to work on projects and share ideas. The other meeting zone is in the

front-of-house. It features both enclosed and open meeting

spaces, effectively facilitating meetings with external parties.

CAN YOU TELL US MORE ABOUT THE DESIGN VISION OF THE FRONT-OFHOUSE AND HOW IT WAS CONCEIVED? AW: First impressions count. We have a unique situation of having

an office frontage within the mall and we thought: why not play to this advantage? So the team envisioned a blurring of line between two vastly different typologies – office and retail, through the

introduction of an atypical open concept lounge reception front

while retaining essences identifiable to an architectural company. Its sweeping walls and organic features symbiotically connects

with the mall. Simultaneously, the array of timber strip softens the surfaces but provides an intuitive flow into the meeting room and library beyond. Use of draping landscape and light fixture further enhances our holistic approach as an architectural practice.

The design outcome has created a shopfront unique to DP and indefinitely showcases the DP spirit.

SO, A GOOD LOOKING OFFICE DEFINITELY HELPS SET THE RIGHT MOOD AND CREATES AN IDEAL ATMOSPHERE. BUT IT HAS ALSO BEEN SAID THAT IT IS TECHNOLOGY THAT ACTUALLY BOOSTS STAFF PRODUCTIVITY AND THE WELLNESS QUOTIENT. IN LIEU OF THIS, WHAT DEFINES A ‘SMART OFFICE’? DEREK HERBERT: A ‘smart office’ environment is geared towards

aspects of sustainability by leveraging off pragmatic technologies to deliver a set of outcomes best suited toward the end-user. It

takes the operational tasks of the end-user and replaces it with

perceptive technologies thereby allowing users to focus on their core priorities.

YONG SIEW ONN: In this age of digitalisation, it is about

leveraging on IoT sensors and AI technology to improve various aspects of productivity. Simultaneously, the future workplace couples this with emerging office trends such as hot-desking and co-working.

LSK: That said, the ‘smart office’ is not achieved through

the installation of the best or the most expensive technology alone. There is no point in having a Smart device that can


31

IN PERSON

SUSTAINABILITY HAS TO START WITH INTELLIGENT DESIGN... AND WHEN PLANNED PROPERLY, THE OUTCOMES ARE TANGIBLE AND BENEFICIAL . ADOPTING IT AS AN AFTERTHOUGHT CAN BE COSTLY. – DEREK HERBERT ON SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

measure savings in utilities but at the expense of our people

the room, the lights are turned on via control of the presence

people working in it. So it is really about how every inch of the

Meeting rooms also have a smart whiteboard that allows users

under-performing. Truly, the office is only as smart as the

office environment can bring about joy and comfort when one

works in it. Any technology implemented should be harnessed

to lift up the spirit and wellness of all who work in it. I am back to my Happy People culture!

DH: I second that. In essence, the ‘smart office’ is an

environment that connects people to the building to the IT infrastructure via a suite of underlying technologies. The

end-goal of a smart office is to provide wellness and increase efficiencies whilst minimising carbon emissions.

DP HAS IMPLEMENTED SOME SMART FUNCTIONS FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND WELLNESS. ANY FAVOURITE SMART/ SUSTAINABLE FUNCTION? DH: My personal favourite is the upgrade we’ve done to the

meeting rooms. All are now equipped with online meeting

room booking system via O365, in-room presence sensors,

digital LED lighting and intelligent all-in-one PCs. Users are

now able to book rooms via their O365 calendar at the same

time that they are organising a meeting, which is then visually displayed on the 7” tablets located outside the room. This

display turns red when a meeting is in progress. Upon entry to

sensors. Users can also wirelessly connect to the in-room PCs. to perform drawing mark-ups and notations, which can all be emailed, easing information exchange.

LSK: With DPians now located in three distinct zones – West,

Central and East, my favourite has to be the people locator and way-finding map. It is a bit of a fun way to ease discovery of

resources in the new office and ensure speed of access. This is

especially so when we have incorporated collaboration spaces within the working spaces.

YSO: Prior to the implementation of the larger smart office

initiative, we collaborated with SenSING, a NUS-spinoff

company on the use of their prototype IAQ sensors to monitor eight different indoor environment variables – namely,

temperature, light, humidity, noise, TVoC, PM2.5, PM10 and

carbon dioxide. We also collaborated with Eutech Cybernetics on their building services monitoring, control and reporting open platform, iviva.

With the sensors installed in our front-of-house and iviva set up, our living lab office is in effect. So I’m personally excited

about how the integration of IoT data on the iviva platform will provide us with meaningful real-time analytics that can not

only help DP achieve its sustainability and wellness goals. It

will also help us provide clients with a total design solution so


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B E HI N D D P ' S L I V I N G L A B

that they too are able to achieve smart sustainability in the built environment sector.

AW: Intuitively, people tend to gravitate towards outdoor,

CAN TECHNOLOGY TRULY HELP US GET AHEAD OF THE CURVE ON SUSTAINABILITY ISSUES?

nature and daylight that improves psychological and physical well-being. So one of my favourite parts of designing the

office was creating an indoor experience that mirrors aspects of nature/outdoors through the incorporation of biophilia

into the office space and introduction of dynamic tune-able white lighting.

Together with DP Green, we designed customised system pots and integrated indoor landscaping with the reception and

studio that are supported with automated irrigation. The species selected are varied to mimic the outdoors. We then worked with

DP Lighting on selecting the right dynamic white lighting for the office. And the cool part is that these lights are then connected to the smart control system and set to follow as closely to

natural daylight as possible. This means we get warmer light

temperatures in the day and cooler ones in the afternoons. This helps create a consistent circadian rhythm, which promotes better productivity.

DH: I think it can, if it is planned correctly. Technology is only

part of the answer; it is not the silver bullet everyone believes it is. The people factor forms the rest of the equation. When coupled correctly, the outcomes are tangible and beneficial.

But, to achieve these, there must be sufficient planning, funding

and measurable goals – short, medium and long term. For some technologies like solar, for example; its returns are long-term

simply because the investment values are high for what it can

support. Being able to match the right supporting technologies

are key to how we can get ahead on sustainability. It is not a one size fits all approach.

One of the most significant improvements we made toward

energy optimisation was the design and construction of our

new in-house data centre. Data centres are notoriously known as large heat sinks. By adopting the latest ASHRAE standards on heating and cooling, internal temperature of the space is

WORK CULTURES ARE EVERCHANGING WITH GREATER EMPHASIS ON SOCIALISATION TODAY. WORKSPACES HAVE TO ACCOMMODATE TO THESE DEMANDS OF NETWORKING AND BEING INCLUSIVE. THE DESIGN VISION OF OUR OFFICE THEN HAS AN AMPLITUDE OF CONSIDERATION FROM ECONOMICS, TENANCY AREA AND SCALABILITY TO PERSONAL STAFF WELLBEING. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF MULTI-USAGE WAS KEY TO THE FOOTPRINT OF SUCH OPEN CRISP FLOOR PLAN WITH A BALANCE OF COLLABORATIVE AND PRIVATE SPACES TO PROMOTE TEAM BUILDING. – ALLAN WANG ON EVOLVING DESIGN AND SPACEPLANNING OF URBAN WORKSPACES TODAY


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B E HI N D D P ' S L I V I N G L A B

IN PERSON

optimised at 26-degree Celsius. It means less energy is required to cool the space, resulting in lower energy consumption and costs.

BESIDES SHAPING INNOVATION, WE HOPE THE USAGE OF OUR OFFICE SPACE AS A LIVING LAB FOR TRYING OUT I o T PROTOTYPES CAN EVENTUALLY BE APPLIED TO OUR PROJECTS WITH WILLING CLIENTS SO AS TO ACHIEVE SMART SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT SECTOR. – YONG SIEW ONN ON DP'S GREATER SUSTAINABILITY JOURNEY

IT asset technology today is well advanced and can safely

operate at higher ambient temperatures without affecting

performance. As we move into the future and with our longterm strategy of adopting hard storage rather than the

traditional file-and-print servers, we expect to drive energy

consumption at the rack level, even lower. The point: sustainability has to start with intelligent design. Adopting it as an afterthought can be costly.

YSO: The same applies to designing and building an entire

development. Early planning and integration of Smart Building

Infrastructure via open digital platforms such as iviva at design

concept stage can save developers a world of pain in terms of cost at a later stage. For example, iviva’s feature ‘Commissioning To

Operate’ (C2O) process can automate the connection, integration

and commissioning of the building equipment, systems and spaces to ensure that all are operating as per intended design during preand post-project handover.

With this in place, the efficiency of AI gaining traction, predictive maintenance will soon be the norm. Hence, with continued

operational efficiency maintained throughout the building life-

cycle, reduction in energy and other resources can be achieved. This will result in lower carbon footprint, which is a main environmental sustainability focus in this climate crisis.


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Published by DP Architects Pte Ltd 6 Raffles Boulevard #02-249 Marina Square Singapore 039594 T: +65 6338 3988 F: +65 6337 9989 E: designinprint@dpa.com.sg www.dpa.com.sg

DP Engineers | dpengineers@dpe.com.sg

All photos are credited to the respective photographers unless otherwise stated.

DP Sustainable Design | dpsd@dpsd.com.sg

DP Façade | dpf@dpfacade.com.sg DP Green | dpgreen@dpg.com.sg DP Lighting | dplighting@dplighting.com.sg

DP Urban | dpurban@dpurban.com.sg

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IN HISTORY

SUNTEC CITY OFFICE

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RETAIL

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MIXED-USE

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490,000SQM

The formal organisation for the development of Suntec City resembles an open palm: five office towers – four 45-storey and

one 18-storey – establish the fingers and an international convention centre, the

wrist. These six structures are connected

programmatically at their bases by a four-

storey retail podium and are set centripetally about a 16,000sqm circular fountain that operates as the site’s focal point and

unifies the complex’s many parts, including underground eateries and a ground-level roadway. Here, the waters flow inward to

the centre of the site’s open palm, a symbol of good luck and prosperity. As a hub of

activity, this accumulation of layers forms a unique instance of the urban city room.

This project was designed in collaboration with Tsao & McKown Architects.

1997

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SINGAPORE


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