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WWW.DPA.COM.SG |

SINGAPORE 2019 |

1 NUMBER 10 VOLUME |

DEPTH

A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO DEVELOPING URBAN SOLUTIONS - DP URBAN

(P)

CO-GENERATIVE HUBS FOR URBANISM

INs ight

MCI

104/08/2018

IN

MAKING OF THE DESTINATION

ONEBIM, FOR ONE GLOBAL STUDIO

I N

Pers o n

THE ONE GLOBAL STUDIO ARCHITECTURAL FORECAST


London

Istanbul

Shanghai Dubai

Mumbai

Shenzhen Hanoi

Guangzhou

Yangon Bangkok

Bengaluru

Ho Chi Minh Kuala Lumpur Johor Bahru

Singapore

Jakarta

DP Global Offices Global Projects One Global Studio Network DP One Belt One Road

One Global Studio Seven years ago, we made the decision to develop our capabilities in healthcare facility design, arguably the most specialised typology in architecture. The journey has been nothing short of gruelling, and the opening of Sengkang General and Community Hospitals on March 23 is a significant and well-celebrated milestone for us. We have many other things to be thankful in the last 12 months: we were hired to design the commercial spaces of Changi Airport Terminal 5; we set-up Pen & Pixels, a dedicated team based in Bangkok that produces design visualisations and VR; we expanded the DP family of specialist services to include DP Urban; we introduced Smart FM to our suite of sustainable design solutions. Like SKGCH, these did not happen overnight; we sowed the seeds and painstakingly nurtured the saplings to maturity. In this issue, we would like to share with you the progress of our One Global Studio strategy, which we first introduced in the January 2017 edition of this magazine. One Global Studio is our approach to harness DP’s collective knowledge and experience, to optimise our design solutions and strengthen our global presence. Two years on, we have deepened the cross-border, inter-office and inter-disciplinary collaboration, to provide our clients with creative solutions from our best minds across continents for their design needs. We will discuss the advantages and challenges of designing across time zones and making the most of geographical boundaries to create possibilities for communities anywhere in the world. We also look at designing inclusive destinations and our urban design experience across cities and cultures. In the In Person pages, we ask the directors of our international offices to tell us what One Global Studio means to them and how they make it work. This sharing is our way to further explain who we are and how we work. Happy reading.

Angelene Chan Chief Executive Officer


c on ten ts 04 u p d a t e s designFUTURE Conference 2018 DPA + Eutech MOU DP Inspire Awards 2018

I N

04-07 B R I E F

01 Safra Choa Chu Kang 02 Amber Park Condominium 03 Datansha Master Plan 04 The Galleria @ Metropole 05 HometeamNS Khatib 06 Trans Studio Mall Bali 07 Huawei Songshan Lake Residences 08 Old Chang Kee 09 Supreme Powai

I N

08-23 D E P T H

01 Making of the Destination 02 A Holistic Approach to Developing Urban Solutions - DP Urban 03 Co-Generative Hubs for Urbanism

24-25 I N s i g h t OneBIM, for One Global Studio

25 I N d u s t r y 01 DP Architects ranks 10th 02 RIBA Presidential Awards 03 Singapore Design Awards 2019 04 URA Re:Bench Competition

I N

26-30 P E R S O N

The One Global Studio Architectural Forecast

d p

31-34 n e w s

Let's Talk Future

D e si g n

i n

P r i n t

Team

EDITOR IN CHIEF Angelene Chan | CONTENT Belle Chung, Toh Bee Ping, John Utanes, Josy Koh, Chia Zhao Hui GRAPHICS Rebecca Jin, Amanda Lin | PHOTOGRAPHER Bai Jiwen | CONTRIBUTOR Jackie Poh


updates |

THE L ATEST HAPPENINGS IN DP |

designFUTURE Conference 2018 Returning for a second year, designFUTURE Conference 2018 featured four distinguished speakers from architecture and its related specialist fields to share ideas about design and technology, and their relation to designing for the future. The speakers were Dr Hossein Rezai, Founder-Director of Web Structures; Prof Pascale Fung, Director of the multidisciplinary Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research (CAiRE) at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Prof Oscar Carracedo, Director at Designing Resilience in Asia International Research Programme; and Ms Angelene Chan, DP Architects’ Chief Executive Officer. From AI and design to the correlation between design and climate change, insights into each of their presentation topics from page 26.

DP AR CHITECTS PARTNERS EUTECH CYBERNETIC As part of DPA’s designINTELLIGENCE strategy to push design boundaries through innovation and to further enhance its delivery through technology, the firm has signed an exclusive partnership with Eutech Cybernetics to jointly develop Smart solutions for the building and real estate industry. The collaboration with Eutech, a leading global digital infrastructure provider, means that DPA will be able to incorporate Smart solutions in their building designs at concept stage; that will allow clients and building owners to manage data from different monitoring devices using a single digital platform. The MOU was signed during the DP designFUTURE conference at NUS University Cultural Centre, on 23rd November 2018.

D P f + D P s d | Amber Park Condominium SINGAPORE Featuring three 21-storey towers, the new luxury residential development at Amber Park is located in close proximity to East Coast Park. Offering unparalleled sea views with its extensive glazed areas covering most of the façades, all aspects of the building envelopes have been carefully considered and exquisitely crafted to obtain aesthetically pleasing and technically valid solutions. Careful attention is paid to the design of all façade elements. In particular, window sashes and balcony door frames are recessed within the curtain wall frames for a flushed appearance. Glazed panels are laminated and tinted with solar control coating in order to achieve excellent thermal and acoustic performance, enabling the project to achieve the Green Mark Gold Plus certification. At ground floor, a series of standalone buildings and pavilions offer a host of activities for residents. The envelope of these smaller buildings comprises frameless

DP INSPIRE AWARDS 2018 Returning for the second cycle in 2018 as part of DP Architects’ designFIRST thrust, more than 20 shortlisted entries competed across three categories – Building of the Year, Design of the Year and Research & Innovation. The judging panel comprised external industry experts – Dr Hossein Rezai, Professor Richard Ho, Mr Sonny Chan and Mr Lim Fong Wei. The winners were annouced during the DP designFUTURE Conference. - Yotel (Building of the Year) - Novotel & Mercure Singapore (Honorable Mention, Building of the Year) - Heartware Network (Design of the Year) - Hsinta Ecological Power Plant ( Honorable Mention, Design of the Year) - NimbleSIM: Pilot Project Testbed (Research & Innovation)

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glazing, metal trellises, louvres and screens for natural ventilation and weather protection. At roof level, the towers are joined by an expansive sky garden with a running track, a gym and other ancillary facilities. The sky deck is bordered by a stunning metal cladding feature and offers a panoramic view of the surroundings.


in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

D P A + D P g + D P s d | sa FRA Cho a Chu Kang SINGAPORE Featuring an exuberant and distinctive form that simultaneously recalls and inspires fitness, the SAFRA Choa Chu Kang clubhouse features a comprehensive suite of wellness facilities that cater to a full spectrum of users. The facilities are located on the wellness street at ground level, the fitness deck, and Skytrack on the fourth level which provides users with flexible spaces suited for a variety of activities such as futsal, yoga and martial arts. The SAFRA Choa Chu Kang clubhouse is sited within a park. The design incorporates nature through the extensive use of planters, boulevards, green walls, terracing and landscaped roofs. The green elements come together to create a seamless transition from the clubhouse to the surrounding park and vice versa. More importantly, the interlacing of fitness and nature in concert transforms Choa Chu Kang, bringing together people of all walks of life to create an active, healthy community.

DPA+DPg | datansha master plan GUANGZHOU, CHINA

With the development of the Pearl Delta, Western Guangzhou is experiencing growth at an exponential rate; and sitting at the heart of it, is Datansha Island. Its urban redevelopment into a vibrant regional hub represents an extraordinary opportunity for Guangzhou to redefine its western frontier. Positioned as the new and exciting hub of the region, the master plan sensitively optimises land use and the natural advantages provided by the site. The island is positioned as a 'Health city' providing healthcare and wellness amenities for Guangzhou city. Two towers (450m and 330m), together with an existing light rail station, signify the arrival into Datansha as well as creating a landmark for the region. An 830m 'Super Bridge' connects the communities across the length of the island. Waterfront living along the frontiers of the island is also planned, which will increase community interaction with its natural water resource. The master plan also aims to revitalise public places with distinctive green features, renewing its island hub experience.

D P A | the galleria @metropole HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM

Strategically located across the Saigon River from the iconic Opera House and flanked by a bridge to the south, The Galleria comprises three towers and provides unobstructed views of the river and central business district. Its design is a response to its natural surrounds and features a series of staggered and stratified balconies and apartment volumes, reminiscent of river rock formations. The middle tower is set further away from the river, creating a 60m elevated common facilities deck that runs parallel to the river and connects the towers. Reflective surfaces on the textured faรงade create a dialogue with land, river and sky, defining the unique relationship between the urbanscape and nature. Interior spaces are planned to enhance panoramic views of the Saigon River. The design of the units are geometrically simple, framing nature when the balcony doors are fully opened, providing a seamless sense of transition between the interior and exterior. Each unit has a generous 1.8m wide central corridor spine with pockets of daylight for natural

Implementation of the master plan will begin in 2019, bringing a new, sustainable and integrated economic development to Western Guangzhou.

light and ventilation.

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in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

D P A + D P g | H om e T e a m N S K h atib SINGAPORE HomeTeamNS Khatib Clubhouse’s design rethinks the basic function of circulation pathways, elevating it from a purely utilitarian space to an experience layered with narratives, emotions and purpose. The development’s two main thoroughfares showcase HomeTeamNS’ history and heritage, evoking a sense of distinct pride in Home Team NSmen, their families and visitors. More than just a transient space, the thoroughfares immerse visitors on a journey through time – by reliving HomeTeamNS’s history, narrating the present and showcasing their future aspirations. HomeTeamNS’s qualities of ‘Strength’, ‘Diversity’ and ‘Unity’ are also interpreted in its flooring design. The flooring is divided into grids, representing its collective strength. Diversity is interpreted in the varying width of the grid while unity is expressed through its shuffling. With these design elements, the architectural and aesthetic scheme of the building serve to create an enriching experience for the users.

DPA | old chang kee LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Old Chang Kee, one of Singapore’s longest established and wellloved street food brands, has opened its first flagship outlet in central London. The project is a fusion of Singapore’s multicultural heritage and Covent Garden’s urban vibe. This unique food experience was neatly packaged to fit within a tight space behind a typical English Victorian frontage. The original shop façade was reconfigured to give greater visibility and bring visitors directly from the street into the heart of the restaurant, while still meeting central London’s strict planning laws. The two-level interior was organised to house food preparation below and maximise seating and sales above. Upon entering, customers are taken on a brief visual and aromatic journey into the world of Singapore coffee shops. Here, elements of Southeast Asia’s blended heritage come to life with turn-of-the-century green and white geometric floor tiles, highly decorative Peranakan wall tiles, and 1960’s and 70’s memorabilia – a truly multi-sensory experience of sight, sound and smell.


in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

D P A + D P d | Trans Studio Mall Bali DENPASAR, INDONESIA Located on a 2.6ha site near the popular tourist enclaves

from inside the theme park to traverse to the outside

of the Kuta, Legian and Seminyak beaches in Bali,

as a visible attraction. On the façade, extensive green

Indonesia, Trans Studio Mall Bali is a premier lifestyle

plants overflow from linear planter boxes and outdoor

and leisure destination with over 60,000sqm distributed

balconies, reminiscent of the uniquely terraced Balinese

over two levels of the Trans Studio theme park above

paddy fields.

three levels of retail space. To further emphasise local relevance, unique Balinese The key challenge in the design was to break down

landscape and architectural principles are incorporated

the massive scale of the upper floor dedicated for the

into the vernacular design. A grand porte-cochere, in

biggest indoor theme park in Bali. To do so, the roof is

the form of a pavilion with eight columns; each carved

articulated into a series of ‘Bales’, or truncated square

with intricate flora-inspired motifs, celebrates the sense

pyramids commonly found in local paddy fields. Parts of

of arrival providing a transitional experience prior to

the roof form are opened up to allow a roller coaster ride

entering the exciting interior mall atrium.

DPA+DPg | Huawei SongShan Lake Residences GUANGZHOU, CHINA The Songshan Lake Business Park is the largest industrial

green spaces of the Business Park and the central garden

development and headquarters for Huawei in southern

without comprising privacy of each unit. Convenience

China. Set within a natural environment, a portion of land

is realised through the availability and accessibility of

has been allocated as staff housing to provide employees

amenities. The residential towers come with subterranean

proximity to the workplace. The project is one of three

parking, street retail and a semi-public clubhouse around

pilot residences to be created for the business park.

the central garden, which serves as the main community space for the development. Flanked by F&B and retail

Its urban planning and schematics are guided by two

spaces, it provides an enjoyable “going home experience”

things: comfort and conduciveness. Comfort is articulated

through the creation of a variety of spatial qualities such

through the careful arrangement of its 10 high-rise

as fitness areas, trails, courts and lawns integrated into

residential towers for pleasant solar exposure and cross-

the lush landscape. Within walking distance too, are the

ventilation; while maximising views towards the lush

kindergarten and a school on the adjacent plot.

DPA | Supreme Powai MUMBAI, INDIA Supreme Powai is a mixed-use development located in the affluent suburb of Powai in Mumbai, India. It comprises two rows of residential towers with 450 luxury and midscale units, a 12,000sqm retail podium with a 54,000sqm office tower and serviced apartments. Sited on extremely hilly land with a height limit measured from its lowest point, Supreme Powai is strategically placed at the highest point to maximise its usable height. Its residential towers are oriented north-south, so north-facing units front a forest reserve while south-facing units front a garden reserve. A linear lap pool is placed between the two rows of towers. Other sports facilities, including tennis courts, are situated in the rear garden with more exclusive facilities, such as Skybridges, located at the premium residential towers. As Supreme Powai’s retail and office components are oriented east-west, screen details help to minimise heat gain and glare in Mumbai’s hot and humid climate.

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IN DEPTH â… | MAKING DESTINATION |

making of the destination Th e eth o s th a t g r o u nd s o u r p h i l o s o p h y, gu ides our O n e G lo b a l S tu d i o a nd d e f i ne s t h e D P e x p e r i e nc e . By John Utanes


IN DEPTH Ⅰ | MAKING DESTINATION |

Over the course of five decades, DP Architects has honed its sensitivity towards the socio-economic sentiments and cultural norms of a place and its people. This forms part of the firm’s design DNA and is translated into all of its works. But, it does not stop here. The practice has accumulated design expertise across various building types, and continues to sharpen its skills through the development of 10 specialist arms. Simultaneously, the firm has expanded its reach into overseas markets, setting up 16 offices worldwide. In its journey to create excellent destinations, DP Architects and its group of companies (DP) go the extra mile. Today, playing to its strengths, DP has grown into a multidisciplinary architectural practice and cultivated a uniquely collaborative working environment to offer clients integrated design solutions from concept stage of a project. The firm is essentially a one-stop design shop, in which its full suite of services can be exported and made accessible to clients all around the world via its international network of strategically located offices. Such a global network also enables immersion programmes between the various offices to give DP staff exposure to cross-cultural communication, location-based business practices and international experience. Design solutions are not restricted to a singular architectural approach; through One Global Studio (OGS), DP taps into the expertise of different offices for fresh perspectives on developments.

ONE GLOBAL STUDIO : SCOPE

SINGAPORE

UAE

Architecture & Urban Planning

Interior Design FASHION AVENUE EXPANSION DESIGN ARCHITECT: DP ARCHITECTS (CONCEPT DESIGN TO CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION) INITIAL ID CONCEPT & DESIGN: DP DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN: KKD

Despite its exponential growth, DP remains firmly rooted in the vision and values that have enabled it to become the 10th largest architecture firm in the world (WA100 2019 survey). Armed with the capability to deliver integrated design, and backed by broad and deep knowledge across OGS, DP not only continues to create destinations all over the world, but to shape and uplift lives.

The Dubai Mall | Dubai, UAE DP designed the mall to be the world’s best shopping destination. Applying a keen understanding to the local site and cultural context, the architecture design team, supported by interior planning specialists, DP Design, solved complex issues of wayfinding and circulation in the mega-scale project. The Dubai Mall remains a crowning achievement not only for the client, Emaar Properties PJSC, but also for DP as it showcases the strength of its design practice on the world stage.

ON LEFT & ABOVE: THE NEW EXPANSION TO FASHION AVENUE AT THE DUBAI MALL PROMISES TO BE THE PREMIER HIGH FASHION RETAIL EXPERIENCE OF THE MIDDLE EAST. THE ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIORS OF THE PROJECT BLEND THE LATEST TRENDS WITH AN UNDERSTATED ELEGANCE BORN FROM DPA’S EXPERTISE IN HOSPITALITY AND RETAIL DESIGN.

THE WATERFALL ATRIUM IS ONE OF THE MANY ATTRACTION NODES WHICH OFFERS SPACES OF RESPITE AND RELAXATION.

THE FASHION ATRIUM IS ONE OF THE NINE UNIQUE ATRIUM SPACES THAT FUNCTION AS BOTH WAYFINDING LANDMARKS, AND PLACES OF REST AND SOCIAL MIXING.

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IN DEPTH Ⅰ | MAKING DESTINATION |

FROM TOP: SKETCH TO PERSPECTIVE, DP’S DESIGN CAPTURES THE ESSENCE OF THE STREETS OF ISTANBUL AND CHOREOGRAPHS A FRESH RETAIL EXPERIENCE. THE DESIGN INTENT OF EMAAR SQUARE MALL WAS TO DRAW THE LIVELINESS OF THE STREETS OF ISTANBUL INTO AN EVERYDAY ENVIRONMENT WITH MAJOR SOCIAL AREAS AND DOMINANT FUNCTIONS SO AS TO DELIVER A SHOPPING MALL EXPERIENCE THAT IS MEANINGFUL AND DELIGHTFUL.

Emaar Square | Istanbul, Turkey Drawing inspiration from the spirit of Istanbul street life, DP’s architectural design of Emaar Square Mall, the retail component of Emaar Square, seeks to choreograph a new way of organising a large-scale retail environment that inspires exploration and delight. To do so, the design team tapped on its deep expertise acquired from extensive experience in different types of retail mall concepts including the facelift of Orchard Road, Singapore’s premier shopping belt. With Emaar Square Mall, DP took the conventional introverted mall design layout and turned it inside out; effectively introducing

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a system of paths as ‘streets’ that connect its ‘plazas’ and ‘public spaces’. Spatially and aesthetically, the sequence of activity nodes and details such as skylights, terraces and fountains along the route are carefully arranged for the aesthetic pleasure of the moving observer.

FACING PAGE, BOTTOM: THE CENTRAL SUNKEN PLAZA OF THE MALL OPERATES AS A CONSTANTLY ACTIVE THEATRE FOR PEOPLE-WATCHING AND A MULTI-PURPOSE SPACE FEATURING OUTDOOR DINING AROUND AN INTERACTIVE FEATURE THAT CAN BE TRANSFORMED INTO AN ICESKATING RINK IN THE WINTER.


IN DEPTH Ⅰ | MAKING DESTINATION |

ONE GLOBAL STUDIO : SCOPE

SINGAPORE

TURKEY

Architecture & Urban Planning

Interior Design

A KEY FEATURE OF THE SPRING ZONE IN THE NORTH OF THE MALL IS ITS ‘TREE-TOP CAFES’ WITH ITS OPEN AIR COURTYARD FOR THE FOOD COURT, PUNCTUATED BY A DRAMATIC 12-METRE ‘WATER VEIL’.

"IN DP, THE EASE AT WHICH WE CAN SHAPE TALENT AND KNOWLEDGE ACROSS BORDERS SETS US APART." - CHAN HUI MIN, DIRECTOR OF DPA (TURKEY BRANCH) THE WAVE-LIKE CANOPY, APPLIED TO THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE MALL, MAKE FOR A GRAND SENSE OF ARRIVAL.


IN DEPTH â… | MAKING DESTINATION |

Fuying Tower | Nanjing, China Located in the South-west corner of Nanjing Jiangbei New Area Industrial Technology Research and Innovation Park (NJITRIP) Phase 1, Fuying Tower comprises an IT incubator and accelerator, and business supporting facilities on the ground level. Designed by the teams in DPA China and DPA Singapore, connectivity was the overarching theme behind its architectural scheme and spatial programming; effectively positioning Fuying Tower as a public landscape connector, a rich urban visual corridor. In short, it is the IT space in which communication is provoked, networking takes place and knowledge is shared.

DP'S ONE GLOBAL STUDIO IS A ONE-STOP DESIGN SHOP, IN WHICH ITS FULL SUITE OF SERVICES CAN BE EXPORTED AND MADE ACCESSIBLE TO CLIENTS ALL AROUND THE WORLD VIA ITS INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF STRATEGICALLY LOCATED OFFICES.

CONNECTIVITY IS ARCHITECTURALLY ARTICULATED THROUGH THE WAY THE ATTACHED TOWERS INTERACT AND MIRROR ONE ANOTHER AROUND AN INTERNAL LANDSCAPED COURTYARD, LINKING THE INTERIOR WITH THE EXTERIOR.

URBAN PLANNING: CONNECTIVITY AND CIRCULATION OF USERS BETWEEN OFFICE TOWERS WERE KEY TO CREATING A DEVELOPMENT THAT ENCOURAGES EMPLOYEES TO INTERMINGLE, WHICH FOSTER A GREATER SENSE OF COMMUNITY.

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ARCHITECTURE: ITS ARCHITECTURAL SCHEME RESPONDS TO ITS SURROUNDING SITE CONTEXT BY COLLAPSING PUBLIC-PRIVATE SPACES AS WELL AS WORK-PLAY SPACES TO FOSTER A HIGHLY DYNAMIC AND COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT.


IN DEPTH Ⅰ | MAKING DESTINATION |

ONE GLOBAL STUDIO : SCOPE

SINGAPORE

CHINA

Architecture & Urban Planning

Landscape

THE USE OF VARIOUS FAÇADE TREATMENTS ENHANCES THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PARK, CREATING A MORE INTIMATE SENSORY INTERACTION BETWEEN THE USERS AND THE ENVIRONMENT.

LANDSCAPE: BY ALLOWING THE LANDSCAPING TO FLOW FROM THE PUBLIC CONNECTOR INTO THE INTERNAL LANDSCAPED COURTYARD, THE SCHEME BLURRED PUBLIC-PRIVATE AND WORK-PLAY BOUNDARIES, CREATED A RICH URBAN VISUAL CORRIDOR AND EFFECTED A MORE INTIMATE SENSORY INTERACTION BETWEEN USERS AND THE ENVIRONMENT.

MATERIALS, LINES AND GEOMETRY APPLIED IN THE ARRIVAL HALL OF THE TOWERS ECHO THE ARCHITECTURAL ARTICULATION, THEREBY CREATING A SEAMLESS IDENTITY AND EXPERIENCE OF FUYING TOWER.

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IN DEPTH â…¡ | URBAN PL ANNING |

A holistic approach to developing Urban Solutions - DP Urban By Chan Hui Min and Esther Chai

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IN DEPTH Ⅱ | URBAN PL ANNING |

More than 50% of the world’s population

as well as the technical and financial

and civic quality. The approach and

live in cities, and the number is rapidly

feasibility components. In the spirit of

planning principles in urban projects

growing. The problems brought on by

delivering integrated urban solutions to

of this specialist arm, revolves around

climate change, and the issues of liveability

our clients, DP Urban partners with both

the following:

and sustainability of urban cities become

internal and external experts and

even more critical in this context.

technical specialists.

DP Urban is a new specialist unit with

As part of One Global Studio, DP Urban

expertise in large-scale urban planning,

works closely with other specialist units

and the associated fields of urban design,

related to urban development, design

landscape and infrastructure planning, with

teams working on larger scale projects and,

the mission to widen and strengthen DPA’s

most importantly, with the international

capabilities in urban projects.

offices in offering and collaborating on

Creation of memorable places

People-centredness

Liveability

urban planning and urban design services. Beyond urban design and physical planning, DP Urban also looks at

In line with DPA’s philosophy, DP Urban is

urban projects in its entirety, from the

devoted to creating liveable, sustainable

economic and real estate perspectives;

and nurturing spaces for human activities

environmental, social and political aspects

and thus, shaping a city’s public domain

Sustainability

Future Readiness

TAPPING INTO THE WATERFRONT ADVANTAGE OF THE SITE, THE MASTER PLAN ENVISIONS AND CREATES A VIBRANT ENVIONMENT AND WORKS TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE.

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IN DEPTH Ⅱ | URBAN PL ANNING |

Shaping the Future Development of Haliç Tersanesi Istanbul, Turkey Haliç Tersanesi (meaning shipyard) is located at the coast of Golden Horn, Istanbul. It dates from the Byzantine era and was the main shipyard – one of the largest in the Mediterranean Sea – of the Ottoman Empire, used actively for both military and civil purposes. The redevelopment master plan aimed to reinvigorate and revitalise the old shipyard through mindful programming, integration of local heritage and design that sensitively pays homage to the history of the site. Spanning 18 hectares, Haliç Tersanesi will house approximately 269,000 square metres of retail, hospitality, residential, office and cultural spaces. An embodiment of the rich cultural and historical legacy of Istanbul, it is also expected to bring economic opportunities to the area.

SITE: URBAN REVITALIZATION

UNIQUENESS: AUTHENTIC HERITAGE

LIFESTYLE: WATERFRONT LIVING

WATERFRONT RESIDENCES WATERVIEW RESIDENCES WATERFRONT RETAIL & RESIDENCES RESIDENCES RETAIL & ENTERTAINMENT CLUSTER CULTURAL CENTRE CULTURAL DISTRICT

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THE URBAN ZONING OF THE HALIÇ TERSANESI MASTER PLAN.


IN DEPTH Ⅱ | URBAN PL ANNING |

A New Place to Cherish Old Traditions - Okmeydani Istanbul, Turkey Located at the heart of Istanbul, Okmeydani was an archery field during Ottoman times that grew into an informal settlement over the past 40 years. The urban redevelopment plan focused on creating new economic opportunities and replacement housing without losing the sense of place and history. The historical archery obelisks scattered across the site were preserved and integrated with the public open spaces to form a network of parks connecting to the neighbourhoods. The master plan optimised its topography, reintroduced a walkable urban fabric and weaved in the local heritage to create a liveable and memorable community.

FROM TOP: INFORMED BY SKYLINE STUDIES, THE ICONIC STRUCTURE IS CAPPED AT 15 STOREYS, THE HEIGHT MOST SENSITIVE TO ISTANBUL’S URBAN FABRIC. THE MASTER PLAN CAPITALISES ON THE SLOPING TERRAIN TO CREATE A VISTA TOWARDS THE GOLDEN HORN, THE PROMINENT BODY OF WATER THAT JOINS BOSPHORUS STRAIT.

EXISITING 1/1000 MASTER PLAN.

PROPOSED REVISIONS: BUILDINGS ARE ORIENTATED TO MAXIMISE THE VIEWS OVER THE SITE AND TOWARDS THE GOLDEN HORN.

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IN DEPTH Ⅱ | URBAN PL ANNING |

CULTURAL INNOVATION INDUSTRIAL ZONE BUSINESS DISTRICT

BIOLOGICAL AND HEALTH INDUSTRIAL ZONE

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION ZONE

MULTIPLE COMPLEX DISTRICT

R&D AND RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

CENTRAL COMMERCIAL AND CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL SCIENTIFIC EDUCATION SERVICE HOTEL HOSPITAL CULTURAL SCHOOL

OVERALL PLANNING.

A Green, Innovative, Dynamic and People-centric Urban Core – Guangzhou Knowledge City Guangzhou, China The urban design of the core area of Guangzhou Knowledge City was conceived through thoughtful spatial design and was inspired by the need to satisfy the increasing demands of modern society; which are: better communication and urban infrastructure, new innovation, balance lifestyle and environmental sustainability.

THE KNOWLEDGE ISLE.

Musical Fountain Plaza

Entertainment Plaza

Floating Stadium

Waterfront Plaza

Cultural Plaza

Flora Plaza

Four Season Garden

LAKESIDE DESIGN.

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AERIAL VIEW OF GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY.


IN DEPTH Ⅱ | URBAN PL ANNING |

Low-Carbon Ecological Technology Park – Nanjing Tech Park East Nanjing, China The 540-ha project is planned as a low-density ecological technology park with a plot ratio of 2.5. Sustainable design strategies were considered in the master plan and these include solar power, rainwater harvesting and extensive greening. Dynamic mixed use, seamless connectivity, unique identity, green network and low-carbon ecological design form the main planning ideas that guide the development of the master plan.

Ensuring relevance of the Lusail City master plan for sustainable development Doha, Qatar Lusail City is the largest real estate development in Qatar with a total area of 3800ha. Located north of the West Bay in Doha, it is envisioned to be a self-sustained city for 270,000 inhabitants. To date, around 40% of the land parcels are already developed or under construction. To ensure that the master plan, which was prepared 10 years ago, remains relevant for the next stage of development, the review addresses the changing market trends, stakeholder feedback and preferences, infrastructure implementation and land-use management system, and ensure relevance of its master plan to guide the next stage of the Lusail City development.

AERIAL VIEW OF NANJING TECH PARK EAST.

FROM AESTHETIC EXPRESSION TO SPATIAL PROGRAMMING, DESIGN MUST SERVE THE PEOPLE AND MEET THE PURPOSE IT IS CREATING FOR; THUS, THE ARCHITECTURE SCHEME ARTICULATES THE SURROUNDING SOCIO-CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT AND SPACES ADDRESS THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEMANDS.


IN DEPTH â…˘ | HUB ECOLOGY |

Co-generative hubs for urbanism Exporting our Hub Ecology

In the recent decade, Singapore has been fervently pursuing building projects of a more civic nature, conjuring new plans to develop various areas around the island. This pursuit for communal architecture is, in part, due to the widening economic gaps and increased social stratification which calls for an enlarged common ground and space for interaction between social groupings. In other words, such civic infrastructure, unlike its conventional counterparts, breaks away from silos created by community grouping.

10 Typology Research Groups

Multidisciplinary Design Solution

DP has a deep wealth of knowledge in a variety of typologies and shares that knowledge easily throughout all its offices.

DP delivers a one-stop solution integrating all its expertise and experience for a holistic design approach.

10 Specialist Arms

16 Global Offices

Round the Clock Capability

DP's range of service includes specialists in interior design, landscaping, engineering, sustainable design for multidiscplinary design solutions.

DP's wide reach across strategic locations worldwide provide broad design points of view and ample opportunities in various world markets.

With a robust communications and IT infrastructure, DP is able to work cohesively across timezones and across boundaries to ensure timely delivery.

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IN DEPTH Ⅲ | HUB ECOLOGY |

OUR TAMPINES HUB, SINGAPORE

Designing for inclusivity Evolving its methodology with the times and needs of the country, DP Architects has developed a unique Hub Ecology design concept. Instead of separating them into functional entities, the Hub Ecology concept is about communal architecture that are truly integrated mixed-developments, capitalising on the mixing of public and commercial realms to develop dynamic spatial networks, and allowing for greater programmatic flexibility and possibilities. Communal architecture then, as a shared commodity, focuses on the co-location of facilities that encourage the co-sharing of common resources. This collaborative space not only serves to provide end-users with added convenience, but also facilitates the connecting of community groups. A testament of such a successful development is Our Tampines Hub (OTH), Singapore’s pioneering model of integrated community and lifestyle hub. The development, designed by DPA, departs from the conventional notion where communal spaces are clearly defined and designed as a single entity to create a network of spaces. From the user’s point of view, the clustering of programmes allows for new types of communal spaces, which can leverage on the possible interfacing and interaction of activities and user groups. A case in point is the kitchen located within the library’s culinary section which is used for cooking lessons organised by the People’s Association (PA), who is the manager of community centres nationwide. By carving niche spaces, there would be a higher chance for users to associate with other spaces and facilities related to their primary purpose. Since its opening in 2017, the OTH management has reported that amalgamating the supposed sites has made the operational cost

of soft services 30% more efficient compared to other community centres. In fact, PA, the interlocutor for integrated community hubs such as OTH that connect users with various government agencies, highlighted that the convenience in co-locating government services and state facilities within one building has seen a good record of patronage at the one-stop service centre. To realise the purpose of OTH, the design went through an intense participatory process that involved both the stakeholders and the residents of Tampines. While this process was imperative, it was also noted that the architects needed to provide sound planning principles that are best suited for the client’s programme. The purpose of the public engagement process was to further develop those principles through the public’s understanding of how the spaces can be utilised and maximised in the future. And the end result of the design could not be better. PA has reported an average monthly visitorship of 1.5 million since its opening in 2017. As a comparison, the monthly average number of international visitors by air in 2017 was 1,128,984 persons as reported by the Singapore Tourism Board. In June 2018, OTH celebrated the milestone of having 20 million visitors since 2017, and recent reports from PA show that more than 18 million have visited the premises from January to November 2018. PA also reported that the average time spent by visitors of OTH to be at 2 hours and 44 minutes. In addition, the percentage ratio of male to female is 52‐48, which is relatively higher than other community centres where the trend has traditionally shown higher female participation. The architecture has been touted

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IN DEPTH â…˘ | HUB ECOLOGY |

by other governments as a successful case study for communal architecture. (OTH has been visited by delegations from China and Russia.) Exporting our Hub Ecology After OTH, DPA has succeeded in designing integrated community hubs in China, namely Shunde Jurong Hub in Foshan, Tianjin Eco�city Community Hub, Great Bay Area Sports & Cultural Centre as well as the Guangdong Province Hub. The export of its hub expertise and design methodology to overseas markets such as China is made possible through One Global Studio. Locally entrenched with a network of offices in Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, DPA is able to translate its hub expertise into the region, thereby bringing culturally and contextually appropriate design solutions to the respective contexts. This is evident in the spatial planning and developmental configuration of Tianjin Eco-city Community Hub, for example. The 20.35ha community hub is being developed in two phases. The community sports hub, like OTH, is aimed at encouraging active community participation and promoting healthy lifestyles within the Tianjin Eco-city community. Other than providing for daily sporting needs, it is also capable of holding regional

TIANJIN ECO-CITY COMMUNITY HUB, CHINA

sporting events. Community development programmes had also been planned for Phase One to create a symbiotic programmatic relationship between sports and community functions within a complete, multi-use mixed development. The planning of Phase Two takes the broader site opportunities into consideration. Programmes including hotel, meeting and convention facilities, and offices line the city edges up until the front roads while the retail and food & beverages street engages with the waterfront zone along Huifeng Creek. Truly, the design strategy of this communal development capitalises on opportunities and

AS A SUM OF ITS PARTS, ONE GLOBAL STUDIO IS AN EFFECTIVE MEANS OF EXPORT AND IMPORT OF DESIGN IDEOLOGIES AND METHODOLOGY ACROSS ITS INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF OFFICES.


IN DEPTH â…˘ | HUB ECOLOGY |

efficiency in proximity as well as adjacencies of large public facilities, sensitively calibrating its spatial programming to meet its socio-economic purpose as a major community magnet for Tianjin Eco-city.

BUKIT CANBERRA, SINGAPORE

The success of Tianjin Eco-city Community Hub, among many of its other contemporaries designed by DPA, lies in the strength of One Global Studio. As a sum of its parts, One Global Studio is an effective means of export and import of design ideologies and methodology across its international network of offices. Though large, the firm’s collaborative environment, where it shares an open resource pool of collective experience and research, enables it to be highly flexible and uniquely dynamic. This in turn facilitates the best appropriation of resources and expertise to the place and project; thereby, delivering holistic, wellcalibrated and localised design solutions. * This article is based on a presentation on Co-generative Hubs given by DPA director, Mr Seah Chee Huang and architectural associate, Shawn Teo at the Great Asian Streets Symposium 2018, held in conjunction with the Pacific Rim Community Design Network & Structures for Inclusion.

SHUNDE JURONG HUB, CHINA

PUNGGOL TOWN HUB, SINGAPORE

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INsight | ONE BIM |

One BIM, for One Global Studio By Chan Hui Min and Namrita Chowdhry

If One Global Studio could be described as a borderless design village, One BIM would be the common language of the villagers. OneBIM is the shared framework for the organisation of design information across disciplines and territories within One Global Studio. It is the goal of OneBIM to avoid duplication or loss of information when designs are dynamically revised by multiple parties concurrently. As an integral part of DP’s One Global Studio operation, it follows a four-pronged strategy that extends beyond technology adoption to include Culture, Capability, Standards and Infrastructure.

URBAN PLANNING

INFRASTRUCTURE

ENGINEERING

ARCHITECTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN

Why OneBIM For multidisciplinary design teams collaborating on projects, the lack of smooth data transfer is one of the leading causes of abortive work and delays. Take for instance a typical scenario where the architects and engineers work in silos; every time the architect re-plans a wet room, the engineer has to rework the plumbing connections almost from scratch. However, the amount of rework could be greatly reduced and partially automated if the design information of the architects and engineers were integrated from the get go. By using common intelligent object libraries that embed multidisciplinary design data, enforcing standard modelling protocol and educating designers on the impact of their actions on another discipline, productivity gains can be reaped from the entire system. In other words, people work better when their designs can talk to one another using a common language. OneBIM promotes the use of common libraries for all disciplines, with components capable of providing an integrated design workflow between everyone involved.

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ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS

PRODUCT

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

LANDSCAPE

WELL BEING & PLACE MARKING

BIM Community Engagement The success of OneBIM hinges on buy-in from the members of One Global Studio. Here the problem extends beyond a technical solution to a cultural one. It is important to have standards that are defined through a collaborative process especially since there are many BIM experts within the firm. Each studio is represented by a BIM expert who contributes to the creation and update of standards through structured engagement sessions. The democratic process not only ensures greater buy-in and adoption by the BIM leaders but also furthers interdisciplinary design understanding. Thought Leadership Global BIM trends emphasise the need for robust BIM standards supported by enhanced training, innovation, and continuous research and development. As a platform that enhances productivity through innovative collaboration workflows, OneBIM is in sync with Singapore’s vision for integrated digital delivery (IDD) for the construction industry.


INDUSTRY | AWARDS & EVENTS |

Rhizome House, an award-winning installation, by DPA and its lighting specialist, DP Lighting, was designed and digitally manufactured via BIM. Working through BIM from conceptualisation to fabrication not only enabled the design team to push its design vision, it also made the collaborative process between DPA and DPL more cohesive, effective and efficient.

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D P A R C H I T E CT S R A N K S 1 0 T H WA 1 0 0 2 0 1 9 DP Architects is the world’s tenth largest architecture practice, according to an annual ranking of the top 100 architecture firms by size. The survey is compiled by Building Design, a leading UK-based online resource for the profession. DP Architects is the only Southeast Asian firm in the top ten list dominated by firms from the world’s largest countries like USA, Canada and China. The firm employs 1,100 staff, including 727 architectural employees.

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RIB A PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS MR SEAH CHEE HUANG CONFERRED MEDAL The RIBA Presidential Medal is internationally regarded as a mark of excellence in architecture. Mr Seah Chee Huang, director of DP Architects and president of the Singapore Institute of Architects (SIA), was recognised for his passion for architecture and commitment

DESIGN MODEL + INFORMATION

to delivering excellent design. He holds that architecture can create more coherent environments and cohesive communities. This is expressed in his architectural designs ranging from community and sports developments such as Singapore Sports Hub and Our Tampines Hub to corporate social responsibility initiatives like Heartware Network and GoodLife! Makan.

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SINGAPORE DESIGN AWARDS 2019 DP ARCHITECTS AND DP DESIGN RECOGNISED AS PLACE-MAKERS In the Singapore Design Awards (SDA) 2019, DPA was awarded Gold in the category of Place-Making (Architecture) while DPD was recognised as a finalist under Place-Making (Interior) category. Receiving special mention at the award ceremony were DPA’s innovative architectural schematics for Yotel Singapore and DPD’s fresh design approach of Chengdu Perennial International Medical Centre, a development that was initially intended for retail, also received special mention.

MANUFACTURING

The SDA is led by Design Business Chamber Singapore and IESingapore to honour outstanding design and raise awareness of designers’ strategic role in Singapore and Southeast Asia. PRECAST MODEL

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SITE ASSEMBLY

URA RE:BENCH COMPETITION ‘ZIP’ MERITED FOR ITS GOOD CAUSE The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) launched a public design competition, Re:Bench – Adopt-a-Bench for Charity, last year. It called on young designers to design benches made from salvaged wooden planks from the former Singapore National Stadium. Among the participants was DPian Edison Gunawan. His design ‘Zip’ commemorates the unity of Singaporeans and the memories of sharing the same goals and dreams. This is interpreted by two linear benches merged into one, interconnected – supporting each other – united. Edison for his design ‘Zip’, awarded the Merit Prize Winner. It is one of 14 selected bench designs fabricated and on display at the Marina Bay Civic Distric for adoption. All proceeds will go to supporting charities under the Community Chest.


IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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THE ONE GLOBAL STUDIO ARCHITECTURAL FORECAST Interview by Belle Chung & John Utanes

Every country has its own set of construction codes, standards and laws. In addition, it has its own set of cultures and traditions. With a plethora of differences, specialist knowledge is key. Here, the strength of DP’s One Global Studio (OGS) shines. With a pulse on the ground and expertise of their respective country’s local contexts and exposure to varied typologies, IN PERSON surveyed its key country specialists. We find out what goes into designing for different contexts under One Global Studio and get a forecast of the trends in architecture today.

Question 1

What is trending in the architecture landscape in the coming year? A plethora of global issues are going to affect architecture in the years to come. With populations becoming denser and urbanisation at its peak, related socio-economic and infrastructural stresses are felt around the world. "A case in point is Jakarta," says Mr Bernard Tay, an associate director of DPA (Indonesia). “The increase in population relates to issues of housing and traffic congestion. Throughout major city points, continued efforts to push for developments in suburban areas for relief and infrastructure works will be at the forefront of architectural design and construction industry.” Infrastructure problems aside, countries are also experiencing burgeoning property prices which are causing housing to become increasingly unaffordable. “I can see the issue of providing good affordable housing to continue as the pillar issue that needs a lot of work," says Mr Frven Lim, Director for DP UK. "We are involved in this sector with a couple of partners in projects that take a long term strategic view to contribute towards some solutions. This trend requires us to understand the unique needs and demands of the Millennials and Gen-Z, who will become the majority of the population very soon.”

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Mixed-used developments are on the rise and we are seeing more opportunities for architecture, science and arts to merge. Sports and leisure activities are becoming integrated. We are going to see more AI integration and smart buildings becoming a norm. Digital payments are already a very big part of Chinese society. The physical shopping mall needs to be reevaluated to entice users out of their homes. – Ian Liew | Director (China)


IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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Back in Southeast Asia, similar market forces have, according to Mr Steven Liew, director at DPA (Malaysia), resulted in "an oversupply of retail and office developments, and a rising demand for affordable housing. With developers starting to look into less conventional typologies, the architectural landscape in Malaysia is experiencing a noticeable shift from high-end residential, retail and offices to hospitality, healthcare and industrial developments. Architects must, therefore, provide innovative design solutions to reduce cost while maintaining efficiency and quality." Despite economic and political swings, the Middle East is one of the most dynamic property development locations in the world. The appetite for property development and scale of growth that the UAE and surrounding Gulf States have shown is far beyond any other region in the Western hemisphere. And with the 2017 United Nations' World Population Prospects reporting this region as having the world's fastest-growing populations from 2010-2015, it translates to continued property development opportunities. – May Chan | Director (Middle East and North Africa - MENA)

Infrastructure aside, tourism and healthcare developments will also take precedence in Indonesia. We will see new railways, toll roads, highways and airports in conjunction with new hospitality developments all over the archipelago (10 New Bali initiative). Simultaneously, the government's push for free basic healthcare coverage for all citizens have come to full effect, which calls for more hospitals, medical schools and nurses' colleges. – Rida Sobana | Director (Indonesia)

Question 2

What is important to consider when designing for different locales? Across the board, there is a unanimous agreement of how architecture in each country is dictated by its respective climate, culture and codes. Therefore, a thorough understanding of local context is vital and that includes an understanding of the needs of end users. As described by Mr Charles Putera, a director at DP (India), “Every country is different. Every citizen is different. Every climate is different. And architecture needs to respond to these appropriately; not only to optimise energy use but also to make comfortable spaces for the final end users. We do not design and build for ourselves to serve our ego but to serve the eventual end users.” He goes on to share that because end users in each country differ culturally, DP must also sensitively consider these things while designing. This is iterated in DP's Middle-Eastern projects. "When working on MENA projects, our team must consider two main aspects - local culture and climate,' says director at DPA (MENA), Mr Toh Sze Chong. "While most clients are looking for a new futuristic vision, they often still wish to incorporate Islamic motifs on the building design (e.g. the mashrabiya pattern). Culturally, our design team understands and respects the local lifestyles and challenges of a harsher climate, and incorporate such sensitivities into our design."

It is always important to be mindful that all architectural design serves an underlying purpose - whether this is personal, political, financial or a combination of each - which, at most times, seems to work against purely architectural concerns. The crux is to align with the client’s real concerns and idiosyncrasies. – Niew Pey Ran | Director (China)

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This standard of design sensitivity is consistent throughout. "In Myanmar, the architecture is prominently influenced by either religion or history," says director of DPA (Myanmar), Mr Foo Chai Yee. "Considerations such as views towards a pagoda or the placement of a shrine inside a home inform residential design. In the CBD district of Yangon, British Colonial buildings from the 1880s such as the Secretariat Building, Bogyoke Market and Strand Hotel still play prominent roles in the urban architecture." Hence, the vast resources of One Global Studio must be applied contextually. Mr Tan Jiann Woei, director of DP Thailand and Indochina adds, “Knowledge transfer and know-how is as good as just ideas in our heads if we choose to disregard local needs, values and the cultural contexts. If they are not aptly considered, the design aims will not be realised.”

Understanding of the climatic condition is key but more importantly, understanding the cultural differences especially when a country has diversity of race, such as in Malaysia. – William Chua | Associate Director (Malaysia)

Question 3

How does DP’s One Global Studio set itself apart from its contemporaries? At a glance, the obvious strength of OGS is its geographical advantage. "With OGS, we have the ability to deliver projects across different time zones to turn around assignments with a more speedy and efficient response time," says director at DPA (Singapore), Mr Suneeth Changaroth. “Where our offices are located, we possess a keen understanding of their respective local contexts, which is key to delivering designs that are sensitive to their locales.” But what is deeply and truly unique about OGS and its vast network of 16 global offices and rich resource pool of 10 specialist arms and 10 typology research groups? Director at DPA (MENA), Ms May Chan holds that it is DP's work culture, "DP's One Global Studio way of working goes beyond servicing the client; and very often, we would find ourselves living and breathing the project to achieve the best design within the given brief, time and cost. This all starts from our head office in Singapore, where our rich and long history lies; which is very different from other large architectural firms. For us, the people and our partners take precedence; and design comes first - this is the DP culture and the DP way." What then gives OGS its unique efficacy is its integrated model involving close inter-disciplinary collaboration between the various disciplines under one common umbrella. "And this holistic approach to design at early stage translates to the delivery of relevant, well-calibrated designs," says Mr Tong Bin Sin, a director at DPA (Singapore). "It also translates to efficiency, thereby bringing better value to the projects for the clients."

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The sheer expanse of office locations spanning across the globe from Shanghai to London and the integration of various verticals and specialised research groups across different typologies give DP its richness in knowledge, diverse expertise and the best collaborative ideas to achieve design excellence. – Smruti Pednekar | Director (India)

The thrust to pool and source knowledge, information and manpower from our offices around the world recognises that expertise is location agnostic. At the same time, it ensures that local sensitivities and nuances can be accurately addressed. – Niew Pey Ran | Director (China)


IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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Question 4

What is the value to having local offices in various countries? The value of having a local presence comes in three interlinked forms. It, first and foremost, provides proximity to client and project. This in turn enables effective monitoring of project progress and more importantly, better client-partner relations – something which is highly valued among clients in countries such as China and Turkey. Apart from having a presence in hotspots to many new ventures, some cultures place a great emphasis on face-to-face contact. According to director of DPA (China), Mr Ian Liw, "In the Chinese culture, for example, this is highly important and are usually done over a meal or a drink. Having staff and a physical presence, in China especially, shows DP's understanding of such cultural nuances." Being locally entrenched also allows the firm to have a more accurate pulse on the architectural scene of a country. While deployment of appropriate resources make up part of the OGS formula, employment of local staff in each country completes it. This the director for DP Turkey, Ms Chan Hui Min, firmly attests, “You cannot understand the local practices, culture and way of life unless you are guided by the local people. That’s why we have local offices with local talent.” From Southeast Asia and South Asia to Middle East and Europe, this has enabled DP to deliver well-calibrated designs that are relevant to its locale and its end users time and again.

Having a local presence allows us to service clients better and have a more localised feel of our developments. This is especially important in Myanmar where local laws and codes are updated frequently as local authorities actively try to improve and meet international standards. – Foo Chai Yee | Director (Myanmar)

Rooted locally, OGS has also facilitated greater opportunities for new markets for both DP and clients looking to establish their own presence in different markets. It is an ethos that benefits all partners involved, whether it is in terms of national development or foreign economic plans like that of China’s One Belt One Road initiative. DP is strategic in positioning itself for future growth. For example, Turkey plays a political and economic leadership role as one of the most developed countries in the region and has worked for this target for the last 15 years. Due to its geographical and historical location between Europe and Asia, Turkey, especially Istanbul, has been a bridge and gate to different regions, trades and cultures for centuries. Also, Turkey is at the very heart of the future China belt project, which will show the country in a more central role in world trade. Therefore, we are going to see many developments in all areas of economy and life in the country and through the country. DP cannot miss this opportunity. – Elif Tuba Oz | Associate Director (Turkey)

Our offices are strategically positioned for establishing greater market opportunities. We see that Indochina will be a key area of growth for the next 10 years, especially with China’s One Belt One Road initiative bringing significant investments to these countries. It is important that we are present in Cambodia and other key locations so that we can tap on their potential. – Chua Zi Jun | Director (Thailand & Indochina )

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IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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Question 5

Are there disadvantages to OGS? What has been done to overcome them? As with all work that involves people and great physical distances, communication styles and differences in deadlines pose the biggest challenges. Mr Rida Sobana, a director of DPA (Indonesia), points this out, “Conceptually, OGS is the ideal avenue in optimising our global expertise, exposure and local knowledge. However, in many occasions, due to existing project commitments of individual offices and teams, ensuring OGS works well and flawlessly is challenging.” The solution, he highlights, is to nip it right in the bud, “Thus, clear and structured rules of engagement among stakeholders is key. This ensures that there is clear priority of tasks which help teams form quickly and commence work immediately. This was done with clear structural adjustments to how the office continues its operations.” This, Mr Steven Liew, director at DPA (Malaysia) agrees as he places emphasis on the necessity for “communication channels, both through the infrastructure and through social relations, to be kept strong.” To do so, DP does two things. The first is to always ensure that every office is aligned to the common objective of achieving design excellence. Tools such as the Attributes of Purposeful Design chart, annual Blueprint sessions, shared communication platforms and many others help to achieve consistency and quality in design. The second is to fully exploit technological advancements so much so that it is a common consensus and a corporate culture that with the availability of technology and the firm’s access to it, there is no excuse for non-communication.

There are challenges when it comes to coordinating and communicating with different parties on a global level but that is alleviated by our improved communication capabilities that make it easier and smoother to reach each other. It is also important to keep an open mind when discussing issues with colleagues from other offices as there will be different ways of dealing with the same problem. Greater understanding towards each other is necessary to jointly come up with impactful solutions. – Toh Sze Chong | Director (Middle East and North Africa)

Any organisation’s strength is based on the relationships between its people. If these connections or links are weak, the whole will eventually fall apart. When these relationships evolve from being floors apart to countries apart, it is doubly important to ensure that these connections are strong. To ensure the fostering of this family, DP leaders meet twice a year in one location, face to face, to refresh their common vision. With all the filetransfers, emails and WhatsApps, we should remember, ultimately: “It’s good to talk.” (A line from a famous UK TV advert from my childhood.) – Kailas Moorthy | Associate Director (UK/Europe)

Gina Sincero I am Gina Ann Sincero from Cebu, Philippines. I’ve worked in Singapore for the past nine years and have recently joined DPA (Singapore) as a Senior Architectural Executive in September 2018. I love a bit of creative expression and exploration, so sketching on the weekends whenever time permits is something I enjoy. Portraitures are most interesting for me. I enjoy capturing the different expressions and personalities of my subjects, and the challenge of getting the details correct. It is what validates a successful portrait. For this series of drawings, I first handsketched and then digitally painted each portrait.

Through low-cost online communication tools, DP is able to capitalise on the ease of information sharing across international offices. This brings diversity in thought and advantages in design and office operations as there is a common platform that connects DPians all over the world through exchanging of creative ideas, sharing of wide-ranging expertise and even pooling resources across different time zones. – Bernard Tay | Associate Director (Indonesia)


dp news | designFUTURE CONFERENCE 2018 |

Let’s talk Future A dialogue on the forces of change, the uncertainties it poses and the challenges facing design and the built e n v i r o n m e n t a t t h e 2 0 1 8 D P d e s i g n F U TU R E C o n f e r e n c e . By Josy Koh and Toh Bee Ping

Technology, climate change and artificial intelligence took centre stage at the DP designFUTURE Conference, held on 23rd November 2018 at the University Cultural Centre of National University of Singapore. Thought leaders and experts of the field leading the dialogue were Founder-Director of Web Structures, Dr Hossein Rezai; Director of Center for Artificial Intelligence Research (CAiRE) at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Prof Pascale Fung; Director of Designing Resilience in Asia International Research Programme, Prof Oscar Carracedo; and Chief Executive Officer of DP Architects, Ms Angelene Chan. Here is a summary on the insights each brought on the imminent issues facing the craft of architecture and the urban environment today.

"THE FUTURE IS NOT A RANDOM THING THAT HAPPENS TOMORROW, NEXT WEEK OR NEXT YEAR. FUTURE IS WHAT IS IN OUR HEADS, TODAY" - ho ssein r ezai

Designing for the Future Commencing the conference, Dr Hossein Rezai, addressed the various issues that the world, in particular the built and natural environments, face today. Reliance on others who live miles away has become a norm, creating a worldwide culture of collaboration across expertise, industries and livelihoods. It is a culture that is likely to stay for a long while more. In fact, with the advancement of technology and the onset of the digital age and economy, the future calls for a deeper collaboration between man and machine now. This call comes with the identification that the future of design is in purposeful design. To understand what ‘purposeful design’ entails, Dr Rezai draws from history. He highlighted that evolution has alienated Man from the natural environment – a separation from the food chain that occurred when Man acquired tools. Across history, this great divorce has led to the consistent neglect and exploitation of our natural surrounds. In short, massive pollution and shocking climate change. A recent annual report by the United Nations revealed that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is at its highest point as of October in 2017; and practices contributing to this include waste management – yet another challenge. Unbeknown to many, the waste that are produced by humans leave a large carbon footprint.

do not simply entail developers and government authorities. It also comprises the neighbourhood, including the communities, grid of the city and the streets.

Dr Rezai puts forth that while Man has separated from the natural

To respond to these higher aspirations, a deep collaboration between man and machine is required. In the field of design, such machines are computational design, visual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

environment, this has not removed the duty of care humanity owes to earth. Thus, the tools we have acquired whether physical or digital, must help to integrate Man and Nature. It must help to address the damage that has been done. Thus, developers, government bodies, designers, architects and communities alike must recognize that today, this duty of care begins with our built environment. Architects and designers especially, must understand that their client

These tools with their high processing power and zero recovery time, are invented for the purpose of alleviating Man of repetitive tasks and for a more efficient and effective design process. Man, then, must bring our innate strength of emotions, curiosity, creativity, and the power of reasoning and judgment to the table. After all, as Dr Rezai pointed out, “The Future is not a random thing that happens tomorrow, next week or next year. Future is what is in our heads, today.”

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dp news | designFUTURE CONFERENCE 2018 |

Robots with Heart: Artificial Intelligence Benefitting Our Society Taking to stage with a specific focus on Artificial Intelligence (AI), Prof Pascale Fung shed insights on the science and technological advancements within the field. AI, while exciting and curious, has been seen as a risk to the existence of human civilisation since its conception. The rampant perception does not, however, come as a surprise. The array of tasks AI is able to perform has been increasing; more frighteningly, growing to encompass tasks previously believed to be uniquely human. To date, AI is able to process reasoning, plan, machine learn, process natural language, move autonomously and manipulate objects, as well as recognise speech, image and emotion. These increased abilities are met with rapid adoption in the market, thus posing challenges of data transparency and security, laws and regulations for AI governance, job replacements and autonomous weaponry.

and can do so within a multimedia, multi-environment. Thus, AI researchers are still faced with the challenge of graduating AI from big data to small data, unsupervised learning.

So is AI truly ready to replace its creators? Prof Fung thinks otherwise. Today, machine learning is still primitive as every AI system can only do one task and all systems must learn from vast amounts of data under the scheme of supervised learning. Humans, on the other hand, have an innate ability for learning

science and technological advancement alone. Deep collaboration between technical science and social science, such as psychology and behavioral science, and between AI and design must take place. In this manner, human and machine may establish a mutually beneficial relationship for the betterment of society.

That said, AI has nevertheless, come a long way. In the field of lifestyle, it is playing a pertinent role in smart living from wireless speaker systems to thermostats, home security and monitoring systems as well as door locks and domestic robots. Within the healthcare industry, AI is currently used in assisting tumor detection via medical images, diagnosis supports, genome sequencing and even mental health care and virtual therapy. Where security is concerned, it can be used to predict crime, aid with the coping of cybercrime, identify wanted criminals and collect evidence via technologies like GPS projectiles and body cameras. There is no question that it is becoming increasingly intuitive. However, regardless of industry, AI’s role is not realised on

"DEEP COLLABORATION BETWEEN TECHNICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE, BETWEEN AI AND DESIGN MUST TAKE PLACE ESTABLISH A MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL RELATIONSHIP FOR THE BETTERMENT OF SOCIETY." - p asc al e f ung


dp news | designFUTURE CONFERENCE 2018 |

"WE NEED ARCHITECTS, URBAN DESIGNERS AND PLANNERS TO ACTIVELY CONTRIBUTE WITH DESIGNS THAT RESTORE THE ENVIRONMENT AND RECOVER THE URBAN ECO SYSTEMS" - osca r carrac e do

Designing the Unpredictable, Planning with Uncertainty Singapore prides itself for being green, but is it really? This was the question that Prof Oscar Carracedo posed. Singapore is found to have the largest ecological footprint in Asia and eighth largest in the world; and the country is consuming resources four times faster than what our planet can produce. For a small country of 5.6 million living on 700sqkm of land, these figures are sobering. As the environmental crisis and rapid urbanisation become more acute, it becomes increasingly critical for cities to build resilience – cities that can withstand and respond to the stress brought on by these adversities. Global warming has led to rising sea levels and resulted in disasters including floods, tsunamis, earthquakes and wildfires. Facing a dire future and grave uncertainties, it is no longer enough to adapt and mitigate climate change, cautioned Prof Carracedo; instead pro-active steps have to be taken to restore our planet. He outlined four key strategies for urban resilience, developed by DRIA, a research body under the School of Design and Environment in National University of Singapore that promotes research, innovative ideas and design solutions to build resilience in Asian cities.

Hybridised Living has been proposed as a more effective and cheaper way to live with the consequences of climate change. Instead of building barriers to keep out flood waters, why not learn to coexist with water? For this to work, it will require a holistic approach in the design and planning of housing, urban typologies and built infrastructure that can adapt to extreme living conditions. Building off-grid infrastructure for the provision of energy, water, food and waste will help cities maintain continuity when crisis hits. Decentralising these solutions enables faster recovery and swifter support from non-affected areas. Off-the-grid living has the added advantage of promoting self-sufficiency and reducing the environmental impacts derived from the wholesale system of transmission and distribution. The most important strategy, and also the most challenging, is the intelligent integration between different urban systems that make up the city. Productive, ecological, energy, living and preventive systems do not operate in silos; stress on one system will affect the other. These interdependent systems cannot be designed in isolation, and will require policy makers, public agencies and private stakeholders to work together even closer than before.

The first strategy is to reinstate green and eco spaces in the city. Results of a study done in Bangkok showed that re-introducing green cover along the Chao Phraya River will prevent flooding, absorb carbon emissions, reduce the urban heat island effect, increase oxygen levels and help to purify the river.

These strategies must be considered in city building in coming years. Addressing the audience, Prof Carracedo remarked, “We need architects, urban designers and planners to actively contribute with designs that restore the environment and recover the urban eco systems.”

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dp news | designFUTURE CONFERENCE 2018 |

Building a Design Pathway The practice of architecture is evolving, not least due to rapid market and technological changes. Work activities are increasingly being automated, and along with advances in building technology and growing industry preference for construction models that favour efficient execution, the architecture profession is facing an uncertain future. Along with the changing times, design companies have to transform and innovate if they want to remain relevant. How does an organisation implement transformative change? Ms Angelene Chan shared that DP Architects is investing in research as the principal way to develop its craft and create a business edge.

no room for design creativity. Challenging this perception, the residential study group, is studying plug-in joinery designs that allow design customisation and variation in modular design. NimbleSIM: Sustainability is now the norm in every link of the construction value chain, and environmental simulations are the cornerstone of every project. To gain a competitive advantage in its provision of sustainable design solutions, DP Sustainable Design, one of 10 specialist firms within the DPA group has written a computer program that allows its architects to test the performance of building designs as they design. The programme, named NimbleSIM, is coded to read different virtual models, run simulation, provide performance analysis, and produce multiple design options in minimal time. The programme has been adopted within the practice’s design process for the past six months. HoTHoB: This research was undertaken by DP’s London team in reaction to the shortage of reasonably priced housing for young working adults in the city. Noticing the bridges that cross over rail-lines on their commute to work, the team began to study the possibility of these small sites as a solution to a big problem. Together with industry partners, the team produced a design prototype that can be efficiently and safely adopted for these sites. The research has since been presented to the Mayor’s office in London. In closing, Ms Chan acknowledged that the focus on research will not generate quick returns; but the firm is convinced that the pursuit of research as a thinking pathway for design will lead to a shift in conventional thinking and behaviour. More significantly, it will help to advance the practice of architecture as a necessary discipline to build a better society.

Since the research initiative was mooted in 2016, ten typology study groups have been established, and the firm’s design studios have been organised to facilitate the practice and study of architecture by typology. The practice is currently undertaking a dozen typologybased studies, largely in prototype investigation and computational design, and through applied projects. Ms Chan highlighted six of these projects, including investigations into design flexibility in Prefabricated Prefinished Volumetric Construction (PPVC), computational sustainable solutions, and solutions to ease the housing shortage in London. Plug-and-Play White Plans: The concept of Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DfMA) has been commended by the Building and Construction Authority to increase construction efficiency and productivity, with the mandatory use of PPVC for certain types of buildings. A stumbling block to its wide adoption is the prevalent mindset that PPVC is all about repetition and uniformity, leaving

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THE FOCUS ON RESEARCH WILL NOT GENERATE QUICK RETURNS BUT ITS PURSUIT AS A THINKING PATHWAY FOR DESIGN WILL LEAD TO SHIFTS IN CONVENTIONAL THINKING AND BEHAVIOUR, ADVANCING THE PRACTISE OF ARCHITECTURE. - ang el ene c han


52 years of architectural excellence

All Rights Reserved. No material may be reproduced without prior permission. DP Architects accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences including any loss or damage arising from reliance on information in Design in Print. Any opinions in Design in Print are solely those of the named authors of the article in which they appear. Unless named as author, DP Architects, Editorial Panel and other Contributors do not endorse any such views and disclaim all liability from their publication. Copyright Š DP Architects Pte Ltd MCI (P) 104/08/2018

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IN History

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SINGAPORE RIVER M A ST E R P L A N The development of the schematic design of the Singapore River was based on a process of evaluating the existing uses, character and urban improvements. With a vision to establish Singapore River as “The People’s River�, the master plan formulated a clear vision of specific river-related concepts. The thrust was in enhancing the main precincts of Robertson Quay, Havelock, Clarke Quay, Boat Quay and the civic quarter through a series of events and activities that encourage repeat visitations and in turn generate more business. A comprehensive plan for overall enhancements was proposed. It included architecture, infrastructure improvements, branding, event suggestions, heritage and the provision of open space opportunities, creating a clear framework of physical improvements and management options for the future. Completed in 2002, the master plan rejuvenated the Singapore River; creating a livelier river for the people, and allowing its heritage and potential for new developments to be recognised.

2002

Profile for DPArchitects

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