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Join us for the first Door County Treasure Hunt September 30! Discover new wonders in Northern Door in a day filled with exploration and fun with friends and family! Search for treasures with your team using your clue booklet. At the end of the day, join other treasure hunters at the idyllic Sawyer Farms in Egg Harbor for an evening of food, drink, music, prizes, and a photo display of the day.

doorcountytreasurehunt.com

4177 Juddville Road, P.O. Box 457, Fish Creek, WI 54212 • 868-1457 • writeondoorcounty.org

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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

EDITOR

Jim Lundstrom ASSISTANT EDITOR

Alissa Ehmke CONTENT EDITOR

Myles Dannhausen Jr. ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Jackson Parr ART, LIT & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Alyssa Skiba ART, LIT & ENTERTAINMENT INTERN

Zach Jaeger EVENTS CALENDAR MANAGER

Abigail Thornton PRODUCTION MANAGER

David Eliot CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Ryan Miller PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

Len Villano LAYOUT ASSISTANT

Sharon Anderson ARTISTIC CONSULTANT

SECTION 1

cover The 2017 Hal Prize photography first place winner, “Surf Sisters” by Laura Joeckel.

About This Year’s Hal Prize Honoring Harold ‘Hal’ Grutzmacher 2017 Hal Prize Winners, Sponsors and Prizes The Process The Judges

The Peninsula Pulse is Door County’s resource for news, arts and entertainment. It is published weekly and claims a staff of writers, editors, designers, photographers and salespeople deeply entwined with the ethic of the peninsula and strives to be not just a reflection of its community, but a driving force of change and self-examination.

Poetry & Photography

SECTION 2

Fiction & Photography

Renee Puccini SALES MANAGERS

Jess Farley, Steve Grutzmacher CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Joe Heller

SECTION 3

Nonfiction & Photography

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Angela Sherman COURIER

The Paper Boy, LLC DISTRIBUTION EXPERTS

Jeff Andersen, Michael Brooks, Steve Glabe, Michael Hyde, Matthew Smith, Susy Vania, Drew Witteborg PUBLISHER

David Eliot OFFICE MANAGER

Ben Pothast MARKETING & OFFICE ASSISTANT

Abigail Thornton CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

Nate Bell

CHECK IT. READ IT. USE IT. IN PRINT & ONLINE DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

SECTION 4 News, Arts & Entertainment

News 2 Feature 4 Community 5 Sports 6 Arts 6 Literature 7 Indoor 8 Happenings 8 Music 8 Outdoor 10 Theater & Performance 12 Perspectives 14 Green 16 History 17 Classifieds 17

OWNER  David Eliot

Peninsula Pulse newspaper is published weekly by Peninsula Pulse, LLC. Total copies: 17,450 (18,000 peak season) Mailed Copies: 8,403 (2,433 subscribers + 5,970 post office drops) 8142 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor, WI 54202 (920) 839-2121 letters@ppulse.com doorcountypulse.com SUBMIT

letters@ppulse.com letters to the editor, story ideas, general correspondence pr@ppulse.com press releases, happenings, gallery listing updates, photo submissions classifieds@ppulse.com line classifieds

CRAFT BEER TASTING CELEBRATION Unlimited Samples • 100+ Beers • Great Views • Free Shuttle Live Music by Kaleidoscope Eyes (Acoustic Beatles Tribute Band)

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The regular deadline for letters to the editor, press releases, happenings, and gallery listing updates is noon on Friday for the following Friday issue. The regular deadline for line classifieds is noon on Tuesday. SUBSCRIBE  Peninsula Pulse is available for free

to Door County residents. Nonresidents please mail a check of $35 third class mail or $95 first class mail (recommended for prompt delivery) to: Peninsula Pulse 8142 Hwy 57 Baileys Harbor, WI 54202 ADVERTISE  doorcountymarketing.com

© 2017 Peninsula Pulse, LLC. All rights reserved. Peninsula Pulse is a Peninsula Publishing & Distribution, Inc. company. Locally owned. Locally minded. Do Good.

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THE HAL PRIZE 201 PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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About This Year’s Hal Prize It is difficult for me to believe that it has been 19 years since Tom McKenzie (who co-founded the Peninsula Pulse with Dave Eliot) walked into my bookstore to inform me that the Pulse was planning an annual literary contest named after my father. My father had died just a few months prior and, though I was surprised by Tom’s request, I knew how pleased (and embarrassed) my father would be with the honor. My dad was very fond of Tom and looked forward to the delivery of each issue of the Pulse, usually by Tom personally, where they would share thoughts on writing, literature and the current issue. Through the years, the growth of the contest moved through several changes, including a name change and the addition of photography and nonfiction as prize categories. One of the most significant steps forward was the addition of Write On, Door County as a collaborator. With this addition, many of the possibilities we had long imagined became possible. Their

generous donation of weeklong stays at the Write On retreat house in Juddville allowed us to attract nationally recognized authors to serve as judges for the contest. The same donation by Write On for contest winners in each of the writing categories allowed us to broaden our marketing efforts and attract entries from throughout the United States. This year’s contest brings two new steps in our continuing efforts to improve and grow The Hal Prize. Notably, Nicolet National Bank made a generous donation of support, which has allowed us to broaden the cash prizes we offer winning entries. In combination with other prizes provided by businesses – particularly the handcrafted pottery mugs created by Jeanne and Dave Aurelius of Clay Bay Pottery for each of the first place winners – we feel the contest is now attractive to all levels of experience. The other notable change this year was the poetry editors of the cream city review graciously agreeing to serve as final judges

for the poetry portion of the contest. Small magazines and presses are vital for writers, whether beginning or experienced. They provide the opportunity to be published, to reach an audience, and to demonstrate to publishers a track record of successful publication. We are fortunate to have a small journal of cream city’s caliber and reputation in our state. If you haven’t picked up an issue, I encourage you – whether you are a writer or a reader – to do so or even subscribe. They deserve your support. As a final note: with the publication of this year’s Hal Prize issue, next year’s contest begins! Writers and photographers, you are now formally notified: start working on your entries for the 2018 Hal Prize – the submission process remains the same and the website is ready to begin accepting your creative efforts (TheHalPrize.com).

Steve Grutzmacher

This annual issue honors a man whose passion for writing and teaching the craft of writing spanned his lifetime. While his specialty was the English Romantic period, particularly William Wordsworth, he also loved reading (and re-reading) James Bond novels. A widely published poet, he was also a regular columnist for the Door County Advocate when it was privately owned – he even convinced his editor to allow him to cover the Chicago Cubs, which afforded him several trips each season to Wrigley Field, where he became good friends with other sports writers from far larger newspapers. His greatest passion, however, was teaching writing. As an English professor at Carthage College (then in Carthage, Illinois), Knox College, and Parson College he influenced hundreds of undergraduate writers. Later, as vice president for academic affairs at the University of Tampa and dean of students at Beloit College, he continued to teach the freshman English courses, though these courses were not part of his job description. In Door County, he and his wife, Marge, opened Passtimes Books, where he enjoyed discussing literature with other avid readers. And he continued teaching writing, both at The Clearing and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College. Several of these students later brought him manuscripts which he helped edit into finished books. His encouragement and gentle, though pointed, criticism influenced innumerable students and community members. The Peninsula Pulse, along with Write On, Door County, look to continue in the same spirit by encouraging writers and photographers of all skill levels with The Hal Prize.


2017 Sponsors

POETRY

The Peninsula Pulse would like to thank the generous businesses and individuals that donated prizes to this year’s Hal Prize. Each deserves our salute for their support of the literary and photography community!

1st

“The Obligation” by Dawn Hogue

2nd “THINGS I LEARNED THIS MONTH” by Catherine Jagoe

3rd “Bernstein’s Shostakovich” by Timothy Walsh

Honorable “Daedalus Surfs Refugio Beach” by Sylvia Cavanaugh “Head Job (Brain Surgery Recovery)” by Richard Swanson “ORACLE” by Catherine Jagoe “Crow” by Meridel Kahl “White Dog” by Amy Phimister “Almost everything went wrong” by Karen Allred McKeever “Escaping the Sunday Times” by Alice D’Alessio

FICTION 1st

“Chicken” by Scott Winkler

2nd “Master Link” by Dan Powers

3rd “Lost and Found” by Roger Barr

Honorable “Calculus” by Peter Sherrill

NONFICTION 1st

“Things That Won’t Happen Again” by Joanne Nelson

2nd “France in the Family” by Ronnie Hess

3rd “The Prairie Schooner” by David Bueschel

Honorable “Let Me Tell You a Story About Benches” by Kathleen Phillips “On Coming Home from the Conference” by Joanne Nelson

PHOTOGRAPHY 1st

“Surf Sisters” by Laura Joeckel

2nd

Write On, Door County focuses on the importance of writing and reading and the ability of people to connect through stories. The nonprofit provides a beautiful and inspiring retreat for writers on 39 acres in Juddville, and conducts classes, programs and special events throughout the county for all ages and experience levels. For more information about Write On, visit writeondoorcounty.org or call 920.868.1457. Nicolet National Bank was founded in 2000 with the goal of becoming a bank that creates sustained value for our customers, shareholders and employees. Nicolet offers commercial banking, personal banking and wealth management services. Nicolet believes in real people having real conversations to create real solutions. For more information about Nicolet Bank, please visit our eight Door County offices, call 800.369.0226 or visit nicoletbank.com. Peninsula School of Art provides enriching, educational experiences to participants of all ages and abilities by offering year-round workshops, lectures, exhibits and family-friendly events for students of all ages and abilities. The first place winner of the photography contest will partake in a class at the nationally recognized school. For more information about Peninsula School of Art, visit peninsulaschoolofart. org or call 920.868.3455. David and Jeanne Aurelius, owners of Clay Bay Pottery, have generously donated both time and skill to the literary and photography contest through their production of customized pottery for contest winners. In past years, Clay Bay has donated both commemorative plates and mugs to first place winners – much prettier and more functional than your average trophy! To contact Clay Bay Pottery, located just south of Ellison Bay on Highway 42, call 920.854.5027. Sharon Grutzmacher & Roger Bergen (daughter and son-in-law of Hal Grutzmacher) are pleased to be able to assist with the cash awards for the first place winners. Sharon is the executive director of the Peninsula Music Festival and Roger is the manager of Lampert Lumber, Sister Bay.

For 65 years, the Peninsula Music Festival (PMF) has presented nine different symphonic concerts in three weeks each August. Under the baton of Victor Yampolsky, professional musicians come from America’s finest orchestras to present the concerts. The PMF performs in the Door Community Auditorium in Fish Creek from Aug. 1 – 19. Many thanks to PMF for donating tickets. Order tickets by phone at 920.854.4060 or online at musicfestival.com.

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

2017 Winners

Al Johnson’s Swedish Restaurant & Butik in Sister Bay is the home of Swedish pancakes, goats grazing on the green sod roof, and Stabbur, the new Scandinavian beer garden. The entire Johnson family was a great friend to well-known Door County writer Norbert Blei, whose “writing coop” now resides on the Write On, Door County property in Juddville. Visit aljohnsons.com for more information. Located in the heart of Fish Creek, the Peninsula Bookman features new, used and rare books. They also feature an extensive selection of books about Door County and by Door County authors and are noted for hosting book release and autographing events, and their ongoing support of local writers and Write On, Door County. For more information, visit peninsulabookman.com or call 920.868.1467. For 32 years, Seaquist Orchards Farm Market has been welcoming customers with their own cherries and apples and wonderful, locally processed fruit and cider. Located two miles north of Sister Bay on Hwy. 42, the Market is open from mid-May through October. Seaquist Orchards Farm Market – where family and farming mean everything. For more information, visit seaquistorchards.com or call 920.854.4199. Door County Living, sister publication of the Peninsula Pulse, is a free magazine published five times a year. Paper Boy is Door County’s premier delivery and distribution service, serving more than 700 locations weekly. It, too, is a sister operation of the Peninsula Pulse. Thank you to all!

“Chinta’s Love” by Shannon Thielman

3rd Honorable

2017 Prizes 1st

“A Boy and His Dog” by Michael Marit

Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry • Custom Hal Prize mug, courtesy of Clay Bay Pottery • One-week stay at Write On, Door County • $100 Photography • Custom Hal Prize mug, courtesy of Clay Bay Pottery • Peninsula School of Art class • $150

Notable

2nd

“Eastern Black Swallowtail on Parsley” by Casey Buhr “Ironworker” by Guntis Lauzums “Eye Examination” by Guntis Lauzums “Vaxholm” by Pam Maloney

“Shelf Cloud Over Murphy County Park” by Carlyle Chan “Jack” by Thomas Jordan “Giant Tortoise in the Everglades” by Thomas Jordan “Ric Furrer, the Blacksmith” by Thomas Jordan “The Tall Ship Sails Against A Grey Sky” by Thomas Jordan “Memories of Times Past” by John Koski “Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign” by Arlene Stanger “The Artist” by Arlene Stanger “Hammock Joy” by Shannon Thielman

Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry • Peninsula Bookman gift certificate • $75 Photography • Peninsula Bookman gift certificate • Al Johnson’s gift certificate • Seaquist Orchards gift certificate

3rd

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Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry • Peninsula Music Festival gift certificate • Seaquist Orchards gift certificate Photography • Door County Living one-year subscription • Door County Living In Pictures (Volumes I and II) • Seaquist Orchards gift certificate

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

“New Friend” by Ron Maloney


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

The Process Every year since 1998, The Hal Prize poetry, prose and photography contest has started the same way: with an invitation. It is an invitation we extend to people of all ages, backgrounds and artistic abilities, encouraging them to submit stories, photographs and poems for a chance to be published in our annual literary issue. As we celebrate the 20th issue of The Hal Prize, we also celebrate the fact that its necessary evolutions over the past two decades (online-only acceptance of submissions, for one) have only contributed to the contest’s growth in the Midwest literary scene. One of the ways we keep The Hal Prize fresh and exciting is through selection of new judges every year, allowing for diverse backgrounds and perspectives that influence the final publication. When compiling a list of prospective judges, we ask ourselves: who are the storytellers, photographers and poets whose work we seek out and cherish in our daily lives? Jerod Santek, the executive director of Write On, Door County, drew from his professional experiences working with novelist and English professor David Haynes. Haynes is also founder and director of Kimbilio, a community

of writers and scholars dedicated to developing, empowering and sustaining fiction writers from the African diaspora and their stories. As promoters of new and established writers, it was a mission we felt mirrored our own. Peninsula Pulse sales rep Steve Grutzmacher, whose father Hal is the namesake of this contest, recalled the early days of his own Door County literary journal, the Peninsula Review, and was reminded of the work of Mary Zane Allen, a prose lover who started the literary journal cream city review at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee in 1975. In the more than 40 years since the first issue hit newsstands, the nonprofit journal has published works by distinguished writers such as Charles Bukowski, Billy Collins, Robert Olen Butler, Ted Kooser, Audre Lorde and Adrienne Rich. Steve reached out to cream city review and formed a partnership in which the publication’s poetry team guest judged our Hal Prize poetry contest. The final piece of the prose-judging puzzle was finding an individual with a passion for documenting and sharing stories of people and places of the real world. I was immediately drawn to the idea

of one of Wisconsin Public Radio’s most engaging voices: Erika Janik, executive producer of Wisconsin Life. Janik is an author and historian who spends her days sharing the humorous, surprising and emotional stories of the people who call this state home. Her thoughtful commentary on stories both uplifting and tragic made her the perfect fit for the nonfiction job. With these judges lined up, it was time to consider the photography judge whose background and perspective would inform the final look of the 2017 Hal Prize publication. When we put out the call for photography submissions, we emphasized our desire to see photos of people and places. This mission guided us on our quest to find a photographer who did the same, and we discovered it in Milwaukee artist and photographer Kevin Miyazaki. Among his most recent work on people and institutions is Perimeter, a photography collection-turned-book on the human connection to the Great Lakes. The project, commissioned by the Haggerty Museum of Art, took Miyazaki on a tour of Lake Michigan’s perimeter where he photographed nearly 300 people with

connections to the fresh water lake, from dockworkers to surfers. Prior to the May 1 submission deadline, these judges shared with me the journeys they each took to become successful authors, poets and photographers for feature articles in the Pulse. When the contest closed and our pre-screening committee viewed and selected finalists from the 429 submissions we received this year, the judges stepped in to read (or in Miyazaki’s case, view) these finalists, make their selections and provide thoughtful commentary on why the chosen prose or photos captured their attention. What you hold in your hands is the culmination of a year’s worth of effort from the Hal Prize administrators, judges and sponsors, and the hundreds of individuals from across the country who shared their creative efforts with us. On behalf of The Hal Prize organizers and the Peninsula Pulse, thank you for reading and enjoy this, our 20th annual Hal Prize.

Alyssa Skiba, Contest Administrator

The Judges POETRY

FICTION

PHOTOGRAPHY

David Haynes is a Professor of English at Southern Methodist University and since 1996 has taught with the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. He is the author of seven novels for adults and five books for younger readers. His most recent novel is A Star in the Face of the Sky. He is the founder and director of Kimbilio.

Kevin J. Miyazaki’s artwork addresses issues of family history and ethnicity. His photographs have been shown nationally, and in Wisconsin at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, St. Norbert College and the James Watrous Gallery in Madison. Photographs from his exhibition, Perimeter, commissioned by the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University, were published as a monograph by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press in 2014. Miyazaki’s portrait, food and travel assignments have taken him to 30 states and more than 20 countries, for clients including The New York Times, AARP, Travel + Leisure, Architectural Digest and Martha Stewart Living.

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

NONFICTION The Poetry Editors of cream city review cream city review, started in 1975 by Mary Zane Allen, is Milwaukee’s leading literary journal devoted to publishing memorable and energetic pieces that push the boundaries of literature. Continually seeking to explore the relationship between form and content, cream city review features fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, reviews of contemporary literature, and author interviews. Published biannually, cream city review is a volunteer-based, nonprofit journal that has attracted readers and submissions from around the world. Approximately 4,000 submissions are received each year from both unpublished and established writers. Alessandra Simmons, whose poems have appeared in Rabbit Catastrophe, WomenArts Quarterly Journal, Post Road, Hawaii Pacific Review, The Other Journal and elsewhere. Tobias Wray’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Blackbird, Third Coast, Bellingham Review, North American Review, American Literary Review and elsewhere.

Erika Janik is a historian, author and the Executive Producer of Wisconsin Life on Wisconsin Public Radio. She is the author of six books, including Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction, A Short History of Wisconsin, and Odd Wisconsin. Her work has appeared in Salon, Slate, The Atlantic, Smithsonian, Edible Milwaukee, On Wisconsin, Midwest Living, and The Onion, among others. She holds master’s degrees in American history and journalism from the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Originally from Redmond, Washington, she now knows more about Wisconsin than she ever thought possible.


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY 1ST

“Surf Sisters” by Laura Joeckel

I was amused at the sight of these nuns hoisting their skirts to cool off in the surf of Monterosso al Mare, a Cinque Terre resort town in Italy.

This terrific travel photograph succeeds on several levels: The nuns are captured in a nonintrusive manner and we see just enough of their facial expressions to give it life. The viewer knows that we’re in Italy by the writing on the boat. Great use of composition and a telephoto lens to visually compress the elements. I would have been excited to have made this picture while on assignment!

Photography Judge Kevin J. Miyazaki

2ND

“Chinta’s Love” by Shannon Thielman

I live in rural Marathon County with my six-year-old son, where we raise chickens. We travel to Panama every other year because after having served in the Peace Corps there from 2002-2003, people in these villages seem like family. This woman cradles her granddaughter. As is frequently the case here, the child’s mother is working away from home as a teacher while the grandparents take care of her children.

This photograph is a winner because it’s both touching and informative. Good environmental portraiture is respectful and provides information about the subjects. This photograph does just that via clothing, posture, the home environment. Effective use of soft, pleasing light.

Kevin J. Miyazaki

“New Friend” by Ron Maloney While taking a swim at the Murphy Park beach, this friendly pooch decided to come over and say hi.

This is a lively, fun photograph that immediately registers with the viewer. But it also has terrific composition and lots of information and details, the closer you look. Great use of camera position within the water setting. The photographer truly put themselves into this experience.

Kevin J. Miyazaki

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

3RD

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THE HAL PRIZE 201

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Cornerstone Pub 8123 Hwy 57 Downtown Baileys Harbor 920.839.9001

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“By all means let’s be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.” RICHARD DAWKINS

PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Run (or walk) and get a T-shirt, a glass and a free fill up of beer!

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It starts and ends at the Door County Brewing Co.’s new tap room

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September 23, 2017 (root beer for the kids) PRESENTED BY: PREMIER SPONSOR:

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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

The Obligation

POETRY 1ST by Dawn Hogue

In my neighbor’s yard, currants glisten red like glass beads full of juice, heavy enough to pull down the woody branches their clusters cling to, the branches that bow down to lay their fruit on the ground. Why have the rabbits not eaten them? Are they too easy a snack? Or too sour? Instead the rabbits find their way into my garden to eat the scratchy leaves of my beanstalks. Idiots. I’ve pulled over a chair, knowing right away that bending is nothing my old back will tolerate. The dog who loves raspberries isn’t interested in the ruby globes either. I eat a few. Tart juice is little reward for this effort. No satisfying pulp like a grape. Just seeds. Small, sand-like seeds. But here I am on a serene Sunday morning pulling at the ripe bunches, aiming to fill a five-quart pail. I pick, not because I want to, but because my neighbor, in remembrance of his mother who insisted each summer I take as many as I like, must have felt, a year after her death, that he needed to make the same offer. So I pick, not needing any of them or the jars of jelly I will make. And yet, somehow, I am also not able to leave a cluster here or there on the branch. I stand now, bucket full, ready to head home, and I stop. Just a few more. I reach for one last cluster that seems to have surrendered itself to the sun, claret light radiating through each perfect orb. Seems so senseless to let them wither and dry. Someone ought to want them.

Dawn Hogue’s poetry has appeared in Stoneboat Literary Journal, Making it Speak: Poets & Artists in Cahoots, and Intersections: Art and Poetry. She taught high school English for 25 years and is currently a writing tutor for Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Talented Youth. Find more about her at dawnhogue.com.

In direct, clear language ‘The Obligation’ draws a scene of surprising depth. The speaker of the poem carries out a mundane task that reveals how we relate to others. With lines as lush and insistent as the fruit they describe, this poem serves up the simple solitude of circumstance and, in the last line in particular, transcends the poem to implicate the reader.

Poetry Judges Alessandra Simmons and Tobias Wray, cream city review

Found this fellow on parsley in a community garden plot in Algoma. Initially took him as some sort of green stained monarch. They have voracious appetites and love them some Apiaceae.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

PHOTOGRAPHY HONORABLE “Eastern Black Swallowtail on Parsley” by Casey Buhr

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THE HAL PRIZE 201

CONGRATULATIONS to the

2017 Hal Prize Winners! We look forward to your stay as a writer-in-residence!

Enhance your fiction writing skills! Study with 2016 Hal Prize Winner Scott Winkler

Fiction Writing Workshop | Sat., August 12 | 9 am–12 noon Location: 4177 Juddville Road, Fish Creek – in Norbert Blei's famous "Coop"

Register: www.writeondoorcounty.org

OPEN HOUSE Friday, August 18 | 8–10 am

Location: 4177 Juddville Road, Fish Creek

Join us for coffee, donuts, and a walk through Write On's beautiful 40 acres Get to know us, see our center, learn about our work!

REGISTER NOW! Door County Treasure Hunt: An Epic Adventure

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Saturday, September 30

Win cash awards of up to $1,000!

Info/Registration:

www.doorcountytreasurehunt.com

Look for the new Write On, Door County Fall 2017 Course Catalog in Early September! Watch for our new catalog and exciting opportunities to learn about writing from award-winning authors, poets, playwrights, and more For a copy, email us at info@writeondoorcounty.org with "Catalog Request" in the subject line

writeondoorcounty.org | 920.868.1457 4177 Juddville Road | Fish Creek


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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

THE PURPLE BUILDING

POETRY 2ND by Catherine Jagoe

THINGS I LEARNED THIS MONTH

after William Stafford

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Honey-bees point their co-workers toward food, dancing to show which way to fly, and for how long. Sometimes you can forget how to speak, if you pass your days in silence. An old man from Mexico with Alzheimer’s was shot dead by a cop in California who assumed that he was armed. In fact, the object in his pocket was a wooden crucifix. A sunflower’s face is made of hundreds of tiny flowerets inside the disk. When Tranströmer’s right hand was paralyzed by a stroke, he taught himself to play piano with the left.

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“Colors are the smiles of nature.” LEIGH HUNT

The people who built Stonehenge and other Neolithic monuments and tombs were most likely teenagers. Less than 60 years after the first manned aircraft flew for just three seconds, astronauts were orbiting the earth. The human eye relaxes when gazing at distant objects in the landscape, and finds the color green most restful. After being temporarily blinded in a factory accident, John Muir went on a thousand-mile walk. When my heart stops, I do not want to be resuscitated. I want to close the door quietly, and go. Finback whale-speech travels further than that of any other mammal: a hundred miles underwater, maybe more. Ice has an entire sonic repertoire—it can sound like explosions or gunshots, or music from another world.

‘Things I Learned This Month’ performs a careful study of the original Stafford poem in formal approach, but reaches for a more lyrical understanding of the information we receive. Similar to Stafford, the speaker here pauses amidst this factual recounting to contemplate how they would like to die. These lessons braid together to tell us something about the nature of accumulation and time itself. The facts of life are undeniable, but poems like this one help us bear them.

Poetry Judges Alessandra Simmons and Tobias Wray, cream city review

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Trusted team. Close to home.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Catherine Jagoe is a Pushcart Prize winner and the author of Bloodroot, which won the 2016 Settlement House American Poetry Prize and the Council for Wisconsin Writers Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award. She also has three poetry chapbooks: News from the North, Casting Off, and What the Sad Say.


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

door go native! landscape since 1999

& nursery

natural landscapes for healthy living nursery open daily 9 - 4 185 species · organic compost · mulch topsoil · flagstone · fieldstone monarch waystation & display gardens gift certificates · delivery available call us today for your landscape estimate! 5 mi south of egg harbor 6329 hwy 42 · 920-746-9770 www.doorlandscape.com

RESALE SHOP BEGINNING AUG. 7TH WE WILL NO LONGER ACCEPT DONATIONS ON MONDAYS. DONATIONS ACCEPTED TUES. - SAT. 10-3; SUN. 11-2 Mon. - Sat. 10 - 4; Sun. 11 - 3

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On the Scandia Village Campus Off Canterbury Lane & Hwy. 57 10578 Applewood Road, Sister Bay 920-854-9669 • bargainsunlimited.org

Forever Grateful Resale Boutique & The Pier Gallery All New r Silve Sterling y Jewelr

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Bernstein’s Shostakovich the concentric grooves of the record capturing in tiny microscopic bumps and valleys the actual physical analog of their glorious sound, like a child’s hands pressed into the hardening cement of time. As this world teeters on the brink— global warming, rising seas, overpopulation, threats of pandemics, terrorist atrocities, nuclear war— it is difficult not to see that our civilization will soon go the way of all previous civilizations. In the aftermath of Armageddon, all our old technologies useless— computers mute boxes, phones, laptops, and TVs blank mysteries, I imagine survivors hoarding books, hunting for old vinyl records, perhaps a group huddled over a fire in the far north with this Shostakovich Fifth, someone turning it by hand, a pencil for a spindle, a filed nail for a stylus, a paper cone to amplify the sound. And there, somewhere in the dark future the world is rushing toward, Shostakovich echoing in the hills, the living ghosts of that long-dead orchestra playing on, Bernstein at the podium, dapper even in death.

Original Fin By Reside e Art nt Artist Brian Pie r.

BREAKFAST / LUNCH / DINNER

CASHMERE SCARVES

Made in Scotland

$15.00

POETRY 3RD by Timothy Walsh

Most of the orchestra is long dead— violinists quiet in their graves, cellists, woodwinds, and brass silent, the timpanist a clatter of bones— but here is their Shostakovich Fifth pressed into vinyl, recorded in 1959, fresh back from their tour of the Soviet bloc, a Cold War cultural exchange,

4135 Main Street / 920.868.3634

cookeryfishcreek.com

“Morning Light on the Bay”

We Have Expanded and Now Feature Antique, Mid Century & Contemporary Furniture and Home Furnishings. ALL STORE MERCHANDISE UP TO 20% OFF (excluding fine art) 4633 Market Street, Egg Harbor Across from Main Street Market Located in A Decorators Gallery

C E L E B R AT I N G 4 0 Y E A R S

LIVE MUSIC MON / WED / THURS HAPPY HOUR 3-6 PM DAILY


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “The Tall Ship Sails Against A Grey Sky” by Thomas Jordan A friend of mine invited me to watch the tall ships out on the water in full sail before they entered Sturgeon Bay. A beautiful day with plenty of sunshine and just enough breeze.

K.B. Miller Apparel

Believable Clothing, Unbelievable Service Church Street Markets 3055 Church St. Ephraim, WI 54211 920.854.9003

• Friday Fish Fry • Award Winning Chili • Homemade Soup HWY. A & E • PE

ULA NINS

CE

•9 NTER

20-839-2

048

Open Wed-Sun 10-8 Mon 10-3

Pizza Czar pizza is available at 5:00pm Wed-Sun

FAMILY TRAIN THEMED RESTAURANT Timothy Walsh’s most recent poetry collections are When the World Was Rear-Wheel Drive and The Book of Arabella. His awards include the Grand Prize in the Atlanta Review International Poetry Competition, the Kurt Vonnegut Fiction Prize from North American Review, the New Jersey Poets Prize, and the Wisconsin Academy Fiction Prize. He is the author of a book of literary criticism, The Dark Matter of Words: Absence, Unknowing, and Emptiness in Literature (Southern Illinois University Press) and two other poetry chapbooks, Wild Apples (Parallel Press) and Blue Lace Colander (Marsh River Editions). Find more at: timothyawalsh.com.

“ I t ’ s in

Try our PC Bloody Mary’s Margaritas & Daiquiris

DINE IN • CARRY OUT • 920.839.2300 p c j u n c t i o n d o o rc o u n t y . c o m

Breakfast, Lunch & Daily Breakfast,Dinner Lunch & Dinner Daily

Poetry Judges Alessandra Simmons and Tobias Wray, cream city review

at Maxwelton Braes Golf Course Hwy 57 • Baileys Harbor 920.839.2500 • ThymeCuisine.com

FRESH SEAFOOD HAND CUT STEAKS FINE SPIRITS

Open Mon-Fri 9-5 Sat 9-2 DONATE VOLUNTEER SHOP

410 North 14th Ave. Sturgeon Bay, WI • 920-743-2869

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CALL FOR RESERVATIONS | 920.868.3532 3667 HWY. 42, 1 MILE N. of FISH CREEK | LICENSED CATERER | ALEXANDERSOFDOORCOUNTY.COM OPEN NIGHTLY | BAR AT 4PM | DINING AT 5PM | CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH AT 9:30AM

New and used building materials. Furniture and Appliances.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

It would seem that ‘Bernstein’s Shostakovich’ dares to suggest that beauty is eternal. Through grim calculations that result in a dystopic future, the speaker hopes that we may yet survive this delicate dance by having learned to dance at all. Though it predicts a world that feels empty, the desolate landscape slowly fills across the poem until it ends where it began, in a resonating music hall. It is a song that, like the poem’s idea of civilization, has been recycled and copied over and over. It survives because it refuses to be silenced.

Closed Monday, August 7

the Oven!”


THE HAL PRIZE 201

POETRY HONORABLE by Amy Phimister

White Dog

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Her companion is a white dog with black dots older than she in dog years, although she is old and wears her white hat and matching gloves well. They both walk stiffly teetering listing like flooding ships. Each day at the dock they saunter together, the bedraggled leash rubbing the concrete boat ramp, it’s extra-long so he can wander in her wake, the rope ties them together, mother ship and lifeboat. She, slightly bent forward, risks each step, picking up colored lake stones. He meanders, sniffing scents of stink fish and sometimes his haunches shake, while he eats bones and grass. A pair, like the earth and sky, sand and water. They are peaceful as daylight. Fishermen on the horizon don’t see them, the queer twosome at the shoreline black specks in the sand. Could be a pair of gulls bobbing bending scavenging the silica.

Amy Phimister has retired to Door County after several years of working in Chicago for various corporations. Writing poetry has become her next career and she is helped by the great discussion of her poetry group.

PHOTOGRAPHY HONORABLE “A Boy and His Dog” by Michael Marit This is a photograph of my son and dog taking a rest during an afternoon hike. They’re both displaying similar emotions - fatigue - in their own ways.


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

27th ANNUAL

FREE

Festival Admission

August 12 & 13

• Sikaflex Challenge Saturday, August 12 • Boathouse Sale Sunday, August 13 • Children’s Activities • Music & Demonstrations Raffles & Concessions More than just •• Tours of the Tugboat John Purves a boat show! 920.743.5958 • www.DCMM.org

| 9 am – 6 pm | 9 am – 4 pm

120 N. Madison Avenue, Sturgeon Bay

Björklunden, Lawrence University’s northern campus in Baileys Harbor, welcomes lifelong learners every summer and fall for seminars that run the full gamut of the liberal arts— from history to literature to the natural sciences. Come learn from expert instructors while enjoying the natural beauty of one of Door County’s treasures.

Learn more about Björklunden at go.lawrence.edu/bjork

NEW COMFORT FURNITURE & MATTRESS Mattresses  Furniture  Home Accents

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Fish Creek 4164 Main Street, Lower Level Fish Creek Market Building 920-868-9091, Ext 7

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Sturgeon Bay 60 South Madison Avenue Corner of Oak & Madison 920-818-1081

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

TAKE AN EXTRA


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

5th Annual

5th Annual Washington Island Washington Island 5th Annual Literary Festival Literary Festival

Washington Island Literary Festival EXPLORING

EXPLORING FRONTIERS FRONTIERS EXPLORING Real Imagined Real andand Imagined FRONTIERS September 22-24, September 22-24, 20172017

Amy Amy Hassinger

Hassinger Amy Hassinger

Real and Imagined

September 22-24, 2017

David Stuart David Stuart MacLean MacLean David Stuart MacLean Rachel

Rachel Dewoskin Dewoskin Rachel Dewoskin Dan Egan

Dan Egan

Dan Egan

Kao Kailia Yang

Kao Kailia Yang Kao Kailia

Also Featuring Yang

Karla Huston Also Featuring Also Featuring Wisconsin Poet Laureate

Karla Huston Karla Huston Wisconsin Poet Laureate Wisconsin Poet Laureate

Writer workshops Friday • September 22

Writer Writer workshops workshops Friday 22 Friday •• September September 22

“Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog” painted in 1818 by Caspar David Friedrich.

“Wanderer Above thetheSea in1818 1818bybyCaspar Caspar David Friedrich. “Wanderer Above SeaofofFog” Fog”painted painted in David Friedrich. washingtonislandliteraryfestival.com • To register: www.truebloodpac.com

washingtonislandliteraryfestival.com• •To Toregister: register: www.truebloodpac.com washingtonislandliteraryfestival.com www.truebloodpac.com

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Not just handmade bags!

Did you know... … FLS is your local resource for custom advertising specialty items ________________________ Call us today for your custom imprinted pens, mugs, can coozies and other specialty items!

Local leader of professional custom printing for exhibits, garments and advertising premiums

254 Louisiana St. • Downtown Sturgeon Bay 920-743-3353 • flsbanners.com

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Jack” by Thomas Jordan

The owner of the small shop on Kangaroo Lake that sells cuckoo clocks and German beer steins. His face reminds me of a cross between John Huston and Ernest Hemingway. His eyes tell a million stories.


ORACLE

Heritage Program 8:30AM - 11AM Museum Open 10AM - 4PM

Door County’s Only Beach-front Coffee Shop

6:30am – 2:30pm

“No,” he replied. “But I have the record of its passing.”

JAcksONPOrt

It was a gray day, on a grimy street in a small provincial town.

1 BLOCK bLOck NORTH NOrth OF Of CTY ctY VA

Serving Door County Coffee, fresh bakery, quiche or strata & a great view of the Lake Michigan. Find us at the Square Rigger Lodge in Jacksonport.

I was on my way to the dentist, fretting I might be late. He was an older man, in a suit of some kind,

I never did learn the time. I have never forgotten.

Sponsored by: Sister Bay Historical Society www.sisterbayhistory.org

OPEN DAILY

frEE WI-fI

Once, at nineteen, I stopped a man on the street to ask if he had the time.

a little formal, but not memorable— tweed, or perhaps a trench coat.

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

POETRY HONORABLE by Catherine Jagoe

SATURDAYS Locally grown produce, 8AM - NOON meats, flowers, & Corner of the Past Museum homemade products from HWY 57 & Country Lane certified kitchens. 1 mi. S. of downtown Sister Bay

Catherine Jagoe is a Pushcart Prize winner and the author of Bloodroot, which won the 2016 Settlement House American Poetry Prize and the Council for Wisconsin Writers Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award. She also has three poetry chapbooks: News from the North, Casting Off, and What the Sad Say.

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/ALittleBitOf Coffee

I mention this in the same way certain things loom out at you when you’re on a bike and pedaling hard, focused, and afterwards all you remember are instants, imprinted: a killdeer on the shoulder, feigning a broken wing, or a hillside covered in clover, or the small, round hole in the road that could have thrown you.

Crow

I asked him, Are you afraid of me? Asked him, Are you laughing at me? Asked, Are you okay? At this, his rasping stopped and rolled into soft ruffled keening. I listened to him until he flew away, black wings brushing empty air.

Serving Food 11am - 8pm TUE - SUN

4849 Glidden Drive • Whitefish Bay, WI 920.818.1177

Serving

Meridel Kahl retired in 2013 after 45 years of teaching, with the last 27 years spent at The College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, Minnesota. She loves every minute of her new life, especially the time she has to write and to study Spanish.

BREAKFAST and LUNCH * Italian Cappuccino Bar * Cocktails, Beers and Wines Open Full Service at 8:00am Tuesday - Sunday Producing the finest quality baked goods, Home of the CORSICA LOAF™.

Open Tuesday - Sunday at 8:00am (closed Mondays)

doorcountybakery.com

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

One day during the autumn drought that followed my mother’s summer passing, a large crow sat on the metal fence marking the borders of my yard. He flexed his wings darted his head from left to right balanced first on one clawed foot then the other and in a voice like a string of curses cut through the silent darkening afternoon.

POETRY HONORABLE by Meridel Kahl

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10048 Hwy. 57, Sister Bay • 920.854.1137


THE HAL PRIZE 201

POETRY HONORABLE by Sylvia Cavanaugh

Daedalus Surfs Refugio Beach I saw him there gray hair and spine soldiered stiff but with nimble ankles to work the board this is how he flies now skimming the rising breast of the sea he glides the high tide rides the moon goddess in the full sun of morning the sea permitting the light to penetrate only the high vaulting arc of the wave blue giving way to beryl but mostly the sea casts off the sun in a scattering of sharp sparkle like a shriek of triumphant laughter and when the wave he rides is almost spent and the board careens one way and he the other sideways or backwards he washes up in the sizzle of white foam not quite water not quite air

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

he thinks he once knew free love given and taken in patchouli moonglo rooms thinks he knew his way around the maze now he kisses the sand and salt refugio, O, refugio Originally from Pennsylvania, Sylvia Cavanaugh has an M.S. in Urban Planning and currently teaches high school African and Asian cultural studies. She and her students have been actively involved in the Sheboygan chapter of 100,000 Poets for Change. A Pushcart Prize nominee, her poems have appeared in numerous publications. She is a contributing editor for VerseVirtual: An Online Community Journal of Poetry. Her chapbook, Staring Through My Eyes, was published in 2016.

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Shelf Cloud Over Murphy County Park” by Carlyle Chan I captured this image from Murphy County Park as a storm front was passing through.


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

POETRY HONORABLE by Alice D’Alessio

Held breath of the day -drawn in and waiting, after the headlines – how they stack up accumulate like compost: insults to the brain lacerations of the psyche. Colorless skim milk sky dappled pattern of raindrops on the path, where hikers like us seek escape from blundering and blustering. An Indian family - black eyes, black hair have found the boardwalk through the marsh. It’s a muskrat the small girl tells us, pointing at rippled water with excitement. And we saw a heron! In her smile the day breathes again.

Alice D’Alessio is the author of one biography and four books of poetry. Her fourth book, Walking the Tracks, was published in fall of 2016 by Fireweed Press of Madison. A former editor for the University of Wisconsin, she has taught poetry at Elderhostel, Write On, Door County, and other venues.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Escaping the Sunday Times

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THE HAL PRIZE 201

Bring Light to any Room Stop into Lampert Lumber today and check out our Marvin® Windows displays. We will help you every step of the way on all your project needs.

2603 S. Bay Shore Dr. Sister Bay, WI 920.854.2341 621 S. Duluth Ave. Sturgeon Bay, WI 920.743.3377 www.LampertLumber.com

Jacksonport Cottage GALLERY & GIFTS

Door County’s Premier Collection of Fine Art, Amish Quilts, Gifts and Home Décor. Enjoy the work of over 125 Artists and Craftsmen. Open Daily 9am - 5pm 

Save the Date for our 19th Annual Art, Craft and Amish Quilt Sale   October 12-15 6275 Hwy. 57, Sturgeon Bay (downtown Jacksonport) jacksonportcottage.com • 920.823.2288

Celebrating RESTAURANT

60 Years!

Now Open Daily 7am - 2pm • Outdoor Seating 2 4 4 5 S . B ay S h ore D r i v e • S i s t e r B ay

Family Owned & Operated for 3 Generations The

Mill

Food & Spirits

Located 5 minutes nor th of Sturgeon Bay at the intersection of Highways 42 & 57

Family-style

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Roasted Chicken

Every, Wed, Thur, Sat & Sun - $14.95

All You Can Eat

POETRY HONORABLE by Richard Swanson

Head Job (Brain Surgery Recovery) Kindergarten at age 77. I’m in it. Exasperated, I re-learn only one of my tussling clown feet can occupy a pant leg at a time. How do I get Limb One and Limb Two where they belong, and should I try seeing this situation as yuk-yuk funny? My fingers scrawl bramble bush letters when writing. Walking, I’m spooked by a baseball-bat object, limp then suddenly swiveling from my right shoulder. Turns out it has a comforting voice confiding it’s my arm in disguise. As your old sidekick I like this new you, it tells me. With your loosey-goosey moves you’re more detached. Chic, I’d even say, but can you keep everything together? Three days ago, I had something called a procedure. During it spongy masses were peeled from my brain, and vials of (pretty?) red liquid got sluiced away. My pate opened to new experience, its bald flap professionally re-sutured, I sense something found a rabbit hole way into my skull, uprooting and carrying off parts of my word lode in its scrounging. When I speak, my sentences are big-city trains gone rogue, careening toward pile-ups. My words stammer, veer off or explode— syllables shards on the fly. How is your day going, so far? asks the nurse, entering. N . . . not! Sh! Su, SHORE! I reply. All n-night lone—drum s! Drreams!

Prime Rib

Every Wed & Sat - $25.95

Soups & Desserts • Steaks • Seafood • Prime Rib • Pastas • Martini Menu

Complete Bar Service Dining Room Opens at 5:00

920.743.5044

www.MillSupperClub.com

Closed Monday and Tuesday November - Memorial Day

Chief Oshkosh Native American Arts Open Daily

Celebrating our 20th year in business! 20% off Sterling Silver Jewelry in August

7631 Hwy. 42, Egg Harbor (920) 868-3240

A regular contributor to magazines and sites, Richard Swanson won the Posner prize from the Council for Wisconsin Writers (CWW). For five years he was the secretary for the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets, and served on the Poet Laureate Commission as well as the CWW’s Board. He lives in Madison.


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY HONORABLE “Eye Examination” by Guntis Lauzums

Photograph of my 90-year-old mother Valija in the examining chair. Our regular visit to the eye doctor.

Waterfront restaurant on the shores of Egg Harbor Serving Breakfast Daily 7:30-11:00am Serving Dinner Tuesday  through Sunday  nights at 5:45pm Live Music

w w w. a lpi ne re s or t . c om

For Home-Made Goodness…. Start at the Top & Shop the Rock! Monday - Saturday 8:00 - 5:00 Sunday 8:00 - 4:00 www.beashomadeproducts.com

Dinner Nightly Mon. - Thurs. 5-9 Fri. & Sat. 4-10 Sunday 4-9 136 N. 3rd Ave. | Sturgeon Bay Craft Beer, Wine, & Sake Cocktails

(920) 818-1333

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7715 Horseshoe Bay Road/Hwy. G in Egg Harbor 920.868.3000

Over 100 different varieties available

A Blend of American Cuisine & Signature Sushi

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

763 STATE RD. 42 • GILLS ROCK ELLISON BAY, WI 54210 920-854-2268 • FAX 920-854-7299


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

The Clearing FOLK SCHOOL

CLASS

OPENINGS! August 24 & 25

August 11

August 21 & 22

LANDSCAPE WRITER’S CRAFT ‘PAINTING’ WITH Susan O’Leary FABRIC Susan Hoffmann September 5 & 6

PLAYING WITH SANDBLASTING POLYMER CLAY ON GLASS Lynne Bergschultz

Gary Chaudoir

ed Docent TLhis Tours Sun. Sat. & PM @1

12171 GARRETT BAY ROAD|ELLISON BAY 920-854-4088|WWW.THECLEARING.ORG VISITOR CENTER: WEEKDAYS: 8 - 4 | WEEKENDS: 12 - 4 OFFICE: WEEKDAYS: 8 - 4

DOOR COUNTY CHARM BANGLES $19.99

Gold

& Silver

Top of the Hill Shops • Fish Creek • 920.246.0839

Crystal Mining CO. at

Stake Your Claim! PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Almost everything went wrong. An unnamed senior American military official, commenting on the first military raid of Donald Trump’s presidency, Jan. 29, 2017

60% OFF

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POETRY HONORABLE by Karen Allred McKeever

Junior Prospectors Strike it Rich! Hands on sluice box mining for the entire family. 10421 HWY 42 North Ephraim (next to the Summer Kitchen) www.DoorCountyRockandGem.com

Door County Land Trust

Protecting Door County’s Exceptional Lands and Waters...Forever

Hike Three Springs Nature Preserve! Thursday, August 10, 3-5 pm Saturday, August 12, 9-11 am Free and open to the public. Find out more online at:

www.DoorCountyLandTrust.org/events

In the photograph, Nawar sits on a step, chin in her hands, brown eyes wide, wearing lipstick and a crimson hair bow that matches her flouncy tulle skirt. She looks like any eight-year-old playing dress up, posing for the camera, looking slightly away. Perhaps it is the last picture ever taken of Nawar, snapped on a whim by her mother who now clutches it to her heart, a grief she can hold. What she remembers— the neck’s gaping wound, her little girl suffering for hours in her bloodsoaked bed, those brown eyes bewildered by pain. If you are Nawar’s mother you will take exception to the American’s use of the word almost to describe the results of the hastily planned, deadly attack. You will scream that everything went wrong the same way it went wrong five years earlier when Nawar’s curly-haired brother, Abdulrahman, died in a similar raid ordered from inside the most protected house in the world by a different American president who sent a drone to dismantle a family barbecue in Yemen where Abdulrahman was eating and laughing with his cousin. In this matter of children’s blood, there is no difference— almost is a desecration, and everything is wrong.

A native of California, Karen Allred McKeever currently resides in the Chicago suburbs, where her days consist of teaching English, writing poetry, gardening, feeding friends and family, and walking her dog.


BAY MARINE Your Great Lakes Premier Yacht Dealership

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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Relax...and Save!

AL WE S L S TO IZE RE BO AT S

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Stop by our showroom with 10 spas on display. Ready to be delivered to your home. Quality installation and service after the sale.

Home Comfort Systems At your door when you need us! * For a limited time only. See store for details

www.wulfbrothers.com Sturgeon Bay Sister Bay 920-743-5587 920-854-5587

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR SPECIAL WINTER STORAGE PACKAGE RATE! 920.743.6526 DOOR COUNTY YACHTING CENTER | 155 E. REDWOOD ST. STURGEON BAY, WI 54235 WWW.BAYMARINE.NET

Luxemburg 920-845-2525

“Never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.” CORNEL WEST

Being a Caregiver is rewarding but hard...

Join us at the award-winning Carrington Pub & Grill on Saturday, August 5th for our corn roast. Enjoy fresh and delicious roasted corn - free of charge. And there’s no cover for our awesome musical line-up. Corn Roast Date and Hours: Saturday, August 5th, 4pm - midnight. Live Music at Corn Roast: The bands include: Kathy Grier from 4 - 5pm. Chocolateers takes center stage from 5 - 7pm. Absolute Bratwurst plays 7 - 9pm. And Jason Fladager performs from 9pm - midnight.

Regular Carrington Hours: Open daily, serving 11am - 9pm. Lounge open later. Fiesta Buffet: Every Tuesday night from 5 - 9pm. All-You-Can-Eat for $14. Friday Fish Fry: Check out our Friday Fish Fry. You’ll be hooked. Live Music: Aug 11: Armchair Boogie. Aug 18: Ifdakar Karaoke: Every Saturday night from 9pm - midnight. Cheryl Simon hosts. Indoor and Outdoor Seating: Seasonal outdoor seating. With one of the best views in all of Door County.

For those individuals who are challenged by progressive illness the natural inclination is to wait until things get “bad enough” to seek help. Often times, waiting too long creates even more challenges. Those being cared for have enough change--creating a stable team early will help. We are here for you whether it is a couple of hours a month or five days a week. We can help provide you the support you need to STAY IN YOUR HOME for as long as possible. For more information on building your care team or touring our facilities, give us a call: 920.743.7943 ext. 212

7643 Hillside Road | Egg Harbor

www.CarringtonPub.com

SUNFLOWER COTTAGE

a service provided by the Sunshine House Inc.

55 West Yew Street, Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235

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920.868.5162 or 920.868.3205

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Corn Corn Roast Roast

y l r a e m a e t e r a c r u o ! e Build y n o l a s i h t o d o t e v a h You don’t


panoramic lake views. bright, contemporary ranch. gorgeous neighborhood.

PICADILLY FRANK LYMAN ROYCE ETHYL CONRAD C YEST DAMEE TRIBAL LIBRA ADORE BALI

patty chaudoir broker · associate

over 200 feet of shorefront 4394 glidden dr. sturgeon bay GliddenDriveRanchHome.com

MICHAEL TYLER ALEX EVENING DRESSES

920.868.2828 · 9402 hill st · fish creek, wi · TrueDoorCounty.com visit online or call for a complete listing collection

4153 hwy 42 • downtown fish creek • 920.868.2665 Open Daily 10am • Open Year Round

Imagine an instant 3% improvement. Earn more than $100 annually with Real Cash Back Checking.

The Hobie Mirage Eclipse™ will take you places you’ve never been before. Discover new waters with Hobie.

hobiecat.com

DOOR COUNTY’S NEAREST HOBIE® DEALER

800.369.0226 Member FDIC | Equal Housing Lender

www.manitowoc-marina.com | (920) 682-5117

Real Cash Back Checking is available for Consumer Deposits Only. To qualify for up to 3% cash back on debit card purchases, account holder must enroll in online banking and e-statements. In addition, the following transactions are required each qualification cycle: At least ten posted and cleared debit card transactions (ATM-processed transactions do not count as qualifying debit card transactions), and at least one posted and cleared direct deposit of payroll or social security. Maximum cash back reward is $9.00 per qualification cycle. All Nicolet National Bank checking accounts are subject to credit approval. Member FDIC.


THE HAL PRIZE 201

FICTION 1ST by Scott Winkler

Chicken Clay and I milked the cows for the last time. Our mother insisted on being in the barn with her camera, switching out flash cubes between pictures of us washing the cows’ udders, slipping on the black rubber inflations to draw out the milk, dipping the cows’ teats in an iodine solution, and pouring milk through a filtered funnel into the large metal cans we toted to cool in the stone tub filled with cold water in the milk house. When she prompted me to smile, I had no difficulty in doing so. I wouldn’t miss them. The herd had been good to our family, but with my father gone, Clay leaving for Basic in two days, and my going to Madison in August, selling the cows to a trusted neighbor was the right thing to do. Clay didn’t smile so easily, but then he’d never been the type to smile for photos. Pictures of him in our mother’s album showed the sternest face in America’s Dairyland — not angry or sour, just stern. She did capture a hint of a smile in one shot that day when she oohed and ahhed at his muscles while toting surge bucket of one of the milking machines. After milking, we completed the morning chores but didn’t herd the cows to pasture; loading them in trailers was easier if we guided them from stanchions to the walled ramp at the barn doors. Melvin Zwijacz and his son Robert, eight years my senior and certain to one day take over his father’s operation, arrived soon after the chores. Though we’d sought to make our job easier by loading from the barn, cows are cows — stubborn, prone to urinating or defecating without warning, massive, and

cover The 2017 Hal Prize photography second place winner, “Chinta’s Love” by Shannon Thielman.

dumbly strong. Not every cow presented a problem; Old Plug lumbered easily, her rear hips swaying slowly, without any prodding. Some, like the young cow we called SheDevil, proved difficult. She-Devil couldn’t be milked without positioning a large clamp, resembling an inverted horseshoe with a crank at its axis, in front of her rear hips. Cranked tight, the two halves squeezed to prevent her from kicking. We didn’t have the luxury of using the clamp for transport, and she did her best to do everything but what we wanted. Eventually, though, with the aid of shouts and raised arms, of waving broom handles and pitchforks, we loaded and transported all the cows. The job took hours. The adult cows were easier to load than the heifers, who hadn’t entered the barn since we pastured them in the spring. We collectively worked to close in on each heifer individually, herding it toward the barnyard door. Smaller than the cows, the heifers had spring in their steps. 800 pounds of Holstein trotting toward collision prompted each of us to step out of a heifer’s path more than once, requiring us to begin again our efforts to herd the animal into the barn and trailer. We didn’t stop for lunch. By three o’clock, we’d all sweat through our clothes and were covered to varying degrees with chaff, dust, and manure, but we’d successfully transported 42 adult cows, 24 heifers, and a dozen calves to their new home. Clay and I stood beneath the light pole near the asphalt shingled well cover. Clay, perched on the edge of the lid, didn’t

look as tired as I felt. As Melvin spoke with my mother and tucked his checkbook into his shirt pocket, Robert approached us. “Thank you, guys. Dad and I couldn’t have done this alone.” Clay shrugged. “It’s what neighbors do,” he said. “Not a problem,” I said. “We’re happy to help.” I wasn’t going to miss waking up for 5am milking. “We’ll take good care of them,” Robert said. “Your dad had a good herd.” “He did,” I said. “He wouldn’t have wanted anyone else to have them.” “It’s appreciated,” Robert said. “I’ve been hoping to grow our operation for a while now.” I saw an excitement in his eyes I’d never felt and was happy for him. “If there’s anything we can do,” Robert said, “to help you out. I know it can’t be easy with your mom being—” Clay interrupted him — not rudely, but coolly, in that way Clay had. “She’ll be fine,” he said. “We all will. Right, Walt?” I looked at my brother. “Right,” I said. Several of our mother’s siblings still lived in Shawano, much closer than either of us would soon be. Peace of mind. “We will.” After the funeral, I’d asked my mother if she wanted me to stay home that fall. She looked at me as if the sun had risen in the west that morning and made it very clear that I wasn’t about to abandon my hopes or her prayers for me. She said she hadn’t really thought about what she’d now do, but that her gardens always needed tending, that our church would never turn away a

Hoka One One

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

NEW WORKS and PORTAL triptychs

Margaret Lockwood Gallery

Brooks Saucony Maloja

7 South 2nd Ave., Sturgeon Bay www.margaretlockwood gallery.com info@margaretlockwoodgallery.com and on Facebook 920-493-3635

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Terry Bicycles

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Simms 2017 Artists Steven Haas Mobiles

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Angela Lensch Jewelry

Reneé Schwaller Ceramics

Topo Designs

Dan Bresnahan

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Margaret Lockwood

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Prisca Benson-Fittshur Ceramics

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65th Season

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

An Orchestra Like No Other! Victor Yampolsky Music Director and Conductor

Thru August 19

■ Saturday, August 5 Arthur Fiedler & The Boston Pops Terry Everson, trumpet

“Don’t criticize what you can’t understand.” BOB DYLAN

Music from a traditional Boston Pops concert will be performed. Terry Everson, principal trumpet and featured soloist is a current member of the Boston Pops and Maestro Yampolsky was a violinist with the Boston Pops, having played under the baton of Arthur Fiedler. Full concert program is on the website.

Sponsored by Joan & Robert Schaupp

■ Tuesday, August 8 PMF Showcase

Alexandria Hoffman, piccolo Amy Sims, violin Paul Ledwon, cello Christi Zuniga, piano Joan DerHovsepian, viola Piccolo Concerto, RV 443, C major Beethoven Triple Concerto, Op. 56, C major Hugo Wolf Italian Serenade Richard Strauss Der Bürger als Edelmann, Op. 60

■ Tuesday, August 15 Summers in Spain

Guy Victor Bordo, conductor Desiree Ruhstrat & Dmitri Pogorelov, violins Falla Xavier Zoghbi

Concerto for two violins

RimskyKorsakov Massenet

Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34 Ballet Music from Le Cid

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■ Thursday, August 17 Dvořák and his time III Vassily Primakov, piano Taichi Fukumura, Emerging Conductor* Josef Suk

Meditation on the Old Bohemian Chorale* “Saint Wenceslas”, Op. 35

Dvořák

Piano Concerto, Op. 33, G minor

Dvořák

Symphony No. 9, Op. 95, E minor

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■ Thursday, August 10 Dvořák and his time II

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Poet and Peasant Overture* Violin Concerto, Op. 53, A minor Symphony No. 7, Op. 70, D minor

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■ Saturday, August 12 Mozart’s Greatest Hits Eric Olson, oboe Conner Ray, clarinet Richard Britsch, horn Philip Pandolfi, bassoon Mozart

Fresh made pastry and hot breakfast treats

Coffee Nook

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ONE FREE FRESH ROASTED COFFEE AT THE NOOK

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■ Saturday, August 19 Festival Finale James Ehnes, violin Augusta Read Thomas

Aureole

Prokofiev

Symphony No. 7, Op. 131, C-sharp minor

Shostakovich

Violin Concerto, Op. 77, A minor

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Reservations: (920) 868-1333

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DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Anna Lee, violin Jiannan Cheng, Emerging Conductor*

Three Cornered Hat: Suite No. 2


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Clay Bay Pottery 11650 Hwy 42  Ellison Bay

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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Ephraim Men’s Club Scholarship Pancake Breakfast SAT., August 5 $10.00 Adults $6.00 Child

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volunteer, that the new library might need someone to re-stack the shelves and read for preschoolers at story time, or that she’d discover an adventure waiting for her. Melvin walked to us. Behind him, dark clouds gathered in the west. “Thank you,” he said. “Your father would be proud. You’ve taken good care of the farm, and we’ll take good care of the animals.” He shook hands with Clay and me. “Good luck at school, Walt, and Clay, do us all proud. Your father will be smiling down.” “Thanks,” I said. “I will,” said Clay. Melvin and Robert walked to their truck. In their movements, I sensed the same weariness that had settled in my bones. Mine surpassed the exhaustion of having worked since sunrise, though. If the last three years had beaten me down, the last month had drained me — but not drained enough to dismiss the thought that crossed my mind when walked toward the house and looked to the side yard, where the fruit of the cherry trees was just beginning to streak red. “Hey, Clay,” I said, “hungry for some chicken?” “It’s been a while,” he said, “but you know me.” “I do,” I said and went up the front stairs and into the mudroom for our gloves and a baseball. Chicken ball was a silly and, to be honest, dangerous game Clay and I had played since we were boys. Standing at opposite ends of the side yard — Clay near the outhouse that went unused since my parents installed indoor plumbing and I near the sprawling lilac bush whose lavender flowers perfumed the air each May — we lobbed high, soft tosses to loosen our arms. Once loose, we each took a step closer. Easy lobs became faster pegs, and as the distance decreased, velocity increased. We repeated the process: another step closer when we agreed it was right, sometimes with a word, but more often than not with a gesture or a nod. Ultimately, we stood no more than thirty feet apart, throwing the ball as hard as we could, aiming for a shoulder or shin, a knee or even a crotch, daring one another either to trust hair-trigger reflexes or to flinch and bail — to chicken out. As we took our places on either end of the yard, the clouds drew closer. Lightning briefly flashed, followed several seconds later by thunder rolling. Clay’s first toss was high and lazy, and I could easily see the slow rotation of the red laces as it dropped from the darkening sky. Though exhausted from the day’s work, I limbered up quickly. Muscle memory took over. Clay and I had played chicken ball more times than we could count, and for as ludicrous as the game was, we loved it. Clay and I were so different in so many ways, but this — this we shared: a link, however tenuous, to my kid brother. As we played, I wondered about my brother’s reaction to our father’s letters to us. I wasn’t surprised that we hadn’t spoken of them; it wasn’t the only subject floating between us that we couldn’t bring ourselves to voice, and I wasn’t going to force the issue. My openness with Meg and Tom and even my mother was counterbalanced by the silence between the men in my family. With each other, we’d always been detached. When frustration, desperation, or anger forced a moment to its crisis, we resorted to shouts, resentment, and uneasiness writhing like something electrical. Another step closer. Clay couldn’t have felt what I did when I read my letter. It was impossible. We may have spoken little, but history told me that much. He had his own dreams, and I could only imagine the measure of pride that filled him when he read our father’s thoughts about raising us to serve and be better men than him. Another step. Higher velocity. He had to be proud, embracing our father’s ideals, that he’d become the man our father envisioned when squinting through the mists of time for a glimpse of his sons in the future…

F i s h C r e e k B o o k s h o p & G a l l e r y | To p o f t h e H i l l S h o p s | F i s h C r e e k

Another. Faster. … that he — not me — was on the cusp of fulfilling the dream closest to our father’s heart, repaying the debt I’d never see as anything but a liability. Thirty feet. Terminal velocity. And all that — was okay. We chose targets with impunity. More lightning, more thunder. Clay’s next throw was low and hard, a beeline for my right ankle. I speared the ball just above the grass. I loved Clay. I returned his throw, left shoulder, snapping my wrist for maximum backspin. And it wasn’t simply blood. His throw streaked toward my left knee, my mitt swallowing it before it struck me. He was a hell of a ballplayer. Right shin. I wished the scouts had swayed him. I saw Clay as misguided, but his beliefs were his; I wouldn’t change them. The knee again. Rain began to fall. I was afraid for him. I knew he’d live through Vietnam, knew that as a soldier he’d carry his body with the same preternatural grace he exhibited on the diamond, treading lightly, gliding through razor grass, over paddy and trail without triggering a mine or allowing an unseen soldier to draw a bead. I threw sidearm, changing the trajectory of the ball, making it rise toward his throat. He snared it with nonchalance. I wasn’t afraid for his body. I feared for his soul. The rain fell in sheets, but we didn’t stop. Our mother called from the porch, but I couldn’t hear her voice over the thunder. The knee a third time. I couldn’t remember my last win in chicken ball. I might have been nine, maybe ten. A long time ago. I whipped the ball toward his chest, hoping in the act of catching it he’d hear. Not a word now. It’s okay. He’d even won when one of my throws had skipped just before reaching him, catching him in the mouth and snapping a front tooth cleanly in half. But someday. Angled away from me, I threw at Clay’s heel. You’ll talk. His left hand reached downward, snaring the ball and transferring it to his meat hand as he pirouetted to return the throw. You’ll need it. I caught the ball a hair’s breadth above the bridge of my nose. I’ll listen. As I gripped the ball, the hair on my arms stood on end. A concussion sucked the air from the world for a heartbeat. The butternut tree whose limbs hung over the cows’ path to pasture exploded in a flash of smoke and splinters. A thick limb groaned and dropped to the ground, pulling away the bark, exposing a white gash. Our mother screamed, but her voice came from somewhere far away, too far away to reach us. Clay, his smirk situated between amusement and wonder, crouched as he would in the field, motioning for my throw. I did, trusting I’d neither flinch nor bail.

Scott Winkler is currently a high school English teacher whose unflagging belief in the power of words and ideas guides both his pedagogy and his writing. Scott’s publication background is varied and diverse. His academic work has previously appeared in The Journal of Popular Culture and Aethlon, and his short fiction has appeared in a variety of publications. His book The Wide Turn Toward Home, a collection of seven short stories and the title novella, was published by Pocol Press in 2008.

How amazing to evoke a whole world in a small space, which ‘Chicken’ does so masterfully. The dignity and the strong bond of this grieving family are rendered with compassion and warmth. It’s also a quite admirable ‘brother story,’ which I am always a sucker for, and contains an earned moment of (actual!) electrical magic.

Fiction Judge David Haynes

• 2018 CALENDARS • GREETING CARDS

920-559-9091

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FishCreekBooks.com


STUDIO/GALLERY

• PORTRAITS • STILL LIFE • LANDSCAPES

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

INGWERSEN PHOTOGRAPHY HONORABLE “Vaxholm” by Pam Maloney On the island of Vaxholm in the Stockholm Archipelago, a day trip from Sweden’s capital; until 1912 all houses were required to be made of wood.

Willard

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129 W. Juniper St., Sturgeon Bay 11-1 on Saturday, August 12 Beautifully restored and ready to move into. Double lot – perfect waterfront location. Enjoy all of the convenience to restaurants, shops and marinas. Have fun at your own private beach.

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Cathy Wiese, Welcome Home Realty (920) 493-8004

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

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THE HAL PRIZE 201

Settlement Farm Market Each Wednesday from 9:30 - 1:30 (or sell-out) New this season fresh LUNCH Highway 42, 1 mile south of downtown Fish Creek

FINE CRAFTS AND GIFTS YARNS • BOOKS FIBER ARTS SUPPLIES 986 Jackson Harbor Road • Washington Island, WI • (920) 847-2264 Open Daily May thru October • www.sieversschool.com

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Stoneware, Wisconsin furniture, folk art, decoys, and signage BUY A ND S E L L Melissa and Dennis Koepsel 9669 Hwy. 57, Baileys Harbor, WI • 920-854-9069 • meadowlaneantiques@gmail.com

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Grocery • Supplements • Organic • Local Open Daily M-F 8-7 • S-S 8-5 142 S. 3rd Ave.• Sturgeon Bay

920. 746.4103

Cream City Review One of Wisconsin’s Premier Literary Magazines

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

ccr www.creamcityreview.org Submission periods: Fall/Winter Issue: August 1-November 1 Spring/Summer Issue: January 1-April 1 Submissions are only accepted through Submittable.

Master

FICTION 2ND by Dan Powers

It looked like a picked-over carcass flipped on its back. Tires and pedals pointed at the blue summer sky, seat and handlebars cradled in the grass. Kevin thought, no, more like a patient – flat out on the operating table. But the thought quickly gave way to feelings of frustration and helplessness. Frustrated, because his dad had already showed him twice how to get the chain back on the sprocket. Helpless, because he lacked confidence and feared making it worse. This time the chain was solidly wedged between the rear wheel gear and the hub. It wouldn’t budge. If he yanked too hard on it, he might break the chain.


So he’d been out of commission all afternoon, like a cowboy whose horse had come up lame, or had been shot out from beneath him. He let out his breath slowly thinking how lucky he’d been not to go over the handlebars and land on his head when the chain suddenly jammed. He slowly turned the pedals by hand. They produced only a scraping sound, but no resistance. They moved easily but uselessly since they were disconnected from any functionality. That’s how I feel, Kevin thought. He didn’t really understand ‘functionality,’ but viscerally felt the emotional repercussion. To soothe himself and the patient – for by now

he was thoroughly invested in the idea of his bike as his faithful but injured steed – he said, “That’s OK boy, Dad’s home now and will be out in a minute to help us.” When he heard the back door, he jumped up and began talking even before he completely turned around. “Dad, I’m sorry. I know you showed me how to do this before, but the stupid chain is jammed and I didn’t want to accidently break it.” “That’s OK, we’ll get it fixed.” Mr. Cullerton’s assuring words seemed almost visible and a bit magical as they came wrapped in the exhaled smoke of his cigarette. He had changed into his household chore

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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Link

Contemporary, Mixed-media Fine Art Gallery

www.jjeffreytaylor.com 4175 Main Street • Fish Creek, WI 920-868-3033 Open Daily 10 am

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The Sturgeon Bay Cinema creating magical Movie Memories

MOVIE TIMES August 4 – August 9 Monday’s $7 Matinees will RETURN in September!! $5 Movies all Day Tuesdays - NO 3D TUESDAY

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THE BIG SICK R / 2hr 1min

Fri-Wed 8/4-9: 1:00, 3:45, 6:15 & 8:45

VALERIAN & THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS:3D/2D PG-13 / 2hr 17min Fri-Wed 8/4-9: (2D)3:45 & 8:30

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PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Ric Furrer, the Blacksmith” by Thomas Jordan

C L A S S I C S

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Ric Furrer has a shop at the outskirts of Sturgeon Bay. He is famous for being featured in the NOVA special, “Secrets of the Viking Sword.” People come from all over the country to attend his classes and his work is featured all over the world.

C O A S T A L

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Friday, Aug. 4 thru Thurs., Aug. 10


THE HAL PRIZE 201

NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS ♦

MONDAY – BBQ Brisket Platter TUESDAY – Prime Rib WEDNESDAY – Blue Gill Dinner THURSDAY – Baked Chicken Dinner FRIDAY – Fish Fry SATURDAY – BBQ Ribs SUNDAY – Specialty Burger

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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trousers held up by a black belt with a buckle bearing the silver plated initial ‘C’ for Cullerton. It had been a gift from Mrs. Cullerton so long ago that as far as Kevin knew it was the only belt his dad had ever owned. His buttoned shirt and tie were gone and his v-neck white T-shirt, tucked into his waistband, hung loose against his narrow chest and the afternoon air. He gave the back of Kevin’s neck a light squeeze as he knelt next to the injured red Schwinn. “I see you started off on the right foot. You have the back wheel nuts loosened up.” Kevin felt a tiny flash of pride. He took a knee in imitation of his dad’s position. “They were tight, but I got them. I even remember you told me they were 9/16 inch and to use the box wrench instead of the open-ended so it wouldn’t slip off and smush my knuckles.” “That’s always a good thing to remember. I think we’re going to need a flat head screwdriver here.” Kevin was off towards the tiny garage before his dad finished. “There’s one on your bench in here. I’ll get it.” He was back in seconds. “Here, Dad.” He handed it to him and took a knee again, this time on the other side so he could better see and also to be out of the haze from the cigarette now dangling from his dad’s lips. Mr. Cullerton squinted through the smoke as he worked the driver blade beneath the chain and braced it against the hub. “I tried pulling it out, but it was too tight. See?” Kevin held up his hands to show his father the grease marks from where he’d grasped the chain. He wanted his dad to know he’d tried and not just waited for him to come home. “You can usually pry it out as long as you’re careful not to bend the links.” His dad wiggled the blade and dislodged the stuck chain with a flick of his wrist. “There we go,” he said as he handed the screwdriver back to Kevin. “Well since you already have your hands oily, why don’t you put the chain back on while I slacken the back wheel?” Again a sense of pride ran up Kevin’s neck. “OK.” He stood and re-fit the loosened chain unto the teeth of the pedal gear. As he did so he noticed for the first time one of the links looked strange and different than the others. “Dad, what’s this? This link looks wrong.” His father leaned forward to see as Kevin held the chain towards him knowing the gesture would again show off his oil-stained fingers. “That’s the master-link,” his dad said. He coughed twice and crushed out his cigarette on the lawn. “Master-link?” Kevin repeated. “What the heck is that?” “Here let me show.” His dad slipped his hand between Kevin’s without the slightest hesitation about getting oil on it. His left palm supported the chain, so the link was facing up and Kevin could see what he was pointing at with his little finger. “You see these two pins? This side has a double slot. It slides onto the pins and then the tension holds the link tight. This small clip then makes sure they don’t come apart. It’s called a master-link because you can pop the clip off and take the link apart and open up the chain.” “Why would you ever want to do that?” Kevin asked.


“Well, if there was a problem with the chain like you needed to thread it around or through a tight spot, or if you ever had to add or take a link out because it was too small or large.” He looked up from his hands to make sure Kevin was following his explanation. Kevin found himself eyeball to eyeball. His dad’s eyes were blue, the same shade as his own. Surely, he must have stared into his dad’s eyes sometime before, back when he was little and didn’t know it was rude to stare. But this felt strange, like he was looking inside his dad and seeing back to when he was just a kid his own age. “Dad?” he asked. “Who taught you all of this stuff?” Kevin would always remember the moment. Tiny and quick as it was, it etched itself deep into him. In later

years, sometimes it would float to the surface as one of those rare moments of deep connection between father and son. At other times it seemed, in retrospect, a moment of sadness. The visual memory though, when it drifted into his mind’s eye, was always the same. His father’s eyes seemed in that moment to slide from blue to a grey drizzly color, washed out like faded jeans. He’d also remember the words, even long after the sound of his father’s voice had faded from memory: “I guess…” his dad said and slipped his palm out from beneath the chain leaving it in Kevin’s hands. “I guess, unfortunately, I had to learn on my own.” It would be a long, long time before Kevin realized what his dad was telling him; about his own youth, about his own father, and about the potential of a master link.

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

THE CHIVES RESTAURANT GROUP

OPEN

7 DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH & DINNER 11AM-10PM (FRIDAY’S AND SATURDAY’S 11AM-MIDNIGHT)

Dan Powers grew up in Chicago and moved to Door County in 1985. He lived in Ellison Bay for ten years before moving to Sturgeon Bay. He is a retired K-12 educator of 35 years. He taught general music, worked in curriculum and as a literacy specialist. His hobbies are writing, genealogy, and golf.

1 NORTH SPRUCE STREET FISH CREEK BARRINGERSDOORCOUNTY.COM

I love the quiet, simple beauty of this story. So much is packed into a small space, with each gesture and image offering something important and useful to the fiction. A small, beautiful gem.

Fiction Judge David Haynes

NEW LOCATION!

SMALL PLATES/ STARTERS

Spaghetti and Meatballs - 16.95

chopped romaine, caesar dressing, house croutons

beef and pork meatballs, marinara, herbed ricotta, pecorino crust

Piccata

Pasta Vino Salad - 8.95

Chicken - 17.95 • Veal - 21.95

romaine, roasted tomatoes, onion, bacon, gorgonzola, balsamic vinaigrette

Panzanella Salad - 9.95

roast tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, arugula, cucumber, onion, croutons, balsamic vinaigrette

Wedding

Soup

Cup - 4.95 Bowl -7.95

chicken broth, herbs, meatballs, ditalini, parmesan

Hard-shell Clams - 11.95

panko/parmesan crust, lemon, capers, white wine, garlic, linguini

OPEN NIGHTLY 5 PM

Sausage and Peppers - 16.95

HOUSE SPECIALTIES

Red or White Sauce - 18.95

Closed Tuesdays

all entrees include classic caesar salad or wedding soup and fresh baked bread (substitute Pasta Vino Salad - 1.95 Panzanella Salad - 2.95)

Whitefish Piccata - 22.95

(1 lb) scampi style, crostini

door county whitefish, lemon, capers, white wine, garlic, linguini

Garlic Mussels - 12.95

Short Rib Brasato - 22.95

(1 lb) garlic, white wine, crostini

Bruschetta - 8.95

grilled baguette, tomatoes, pesto, parmesan, capers, onions

Burrata - 12.95

fresh mozzarella, roasted tomatoes, arugula, balsamic reduction

Meatballs - 2.95 each

pork and beef, marinara, herbed ricotta, pecorino crust

Veal Gorgonzola - 24.95

veal cutlets, portabella mushrooms, tomatoes, spring peas, gorgonzola cream, cheese ravioli

Scallops Limoncello - 25.95 sea scallops, arugula, caramelized onion, limoncello cream, spaghetti (substitute gluten-free pasta - 2)

Linguini with Clams

hard-shell clams, white wine, garlic, herbs or marinara

Beef and Veal Tortellacci - 19.95 beef and veal filled pasta, roasted tomatoes, portabellas, ricotta cream, romano crust

Pappardelle Caprese - 18.95 burrata, roasted tomatoes, arugula, pappardelle, basil, olive oil, balsamic reduction

Shrimp Fra Diavolo - 22.95 jumbo shrimp, spicy marinara, grappa, herbed ricotta, fettucine

Captain Charlie’s Pasta - 22.95 smoked whitefish, caramelized onion, capers, pepper vodka, cream, pappardelle

EARLY DINING SPECIAL • $15.95

Parmigiana

Chicken - 17.95 • Veal - 21.95 panko crusted, marinara, mozzarella, spaghetti

Ravioli Bolognese - 16.95 beef and pork ragu, marinara, herbed ricotta, pecorino crust, four cheese ravioli

Marsala

Chicken - 17.95 • Veal - 21.95

panko parmesan crust, brown sauce, portabellas, marsala, fettuccine

Scampi

Shrimp - 21.95 • Lobster - 26.95 garlic, butter, white wine, linguini

3 Course Dinner From 5:00 – 5:30

Lower Level • Country Walk Shops • Sister Bay

920.854.8100

OPEN

7 DAYS A WEEK FOR DINNER BRUNCH IS SERVED ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY FROM 9AM TO 2PM

8041 HWY 57 | BAILEYS HARBOR 920-839-2000 CHIVESDOORCOUNTY.COM

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PastaVinoDC.com

braised short rib, roasted root vegetables, red wine demi, fettuccine

house made italian sausage, bell peppers, onions, marinara, spaghetti

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Classic Caesar Salad - 7.95

PASTA VINO CLASSICS


THE HAL PRIZE 2017 PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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Lost and Found FICTION 3RD by Roger Barr

“This ain’t how Grandma told us to go,” Connor says. Jake ignores him and trudges along Michigan Street, the waters of Sturgeon Bay glassy in the distance. Connor follows because he has no choice. “You going where I think you’re going?” Connor demands. “Jake? Are you?” “Maybe.” “You said you’d go by yourself.” “I lied.” “I don’t want to go there,” Connor says. “Cemeteries are creepy.” “Then go back to Grandma’s.” “No!” “Then shut up and keep walking.” They keep walking, making a right turn onto Bay Shore Drive. As they hike along, the breeze off Sturgeon Bay feels cool on their faces. “Why you like cemeteries so much?” Connor asks. “Because I do.” Jake regrets he ever mentioned his intentions to Connor. He doesn’t understand himself why, at thirteen, he’s developed such a fascination with cemeteries. There’s just something interesting about them. Back in Minneapolis, he sometimes drags Connor to the Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery on East Lake Street, a few blocks from their house. They wander among tilting old headstones and newer stones of polished granite, reading the names, until Connor begs to go home. Jake has been itching to walk around in Bay Side Cemetery since spotting it when the two of them arrived in Sturgeon Bay three days ago to stay with Grandpa and Grandma Billings while their parents toured Europe. Grandma thinks they’re headed downtown to get ice cream cones. When he asked if they could walk downtown, she reluctantly agreed, giving him ten dollars and detailed instructions so they wouldn’t get lost. As if they could get lost in a town this size after growing up in Minneapolis. Grandpa and Grandma are nice, Jake thinks as he and Connor walk along, but it never feels right. It’s like they are out of practice in dealing with kids. Two or three times a year, they drive from Wisconsin to Minneapolis to spend the weekend. Jake is glad when they arrive and glad when they leave. Grandma is an older, fussier version of his mother. Grandpa is okay but sometimes he tries too hard. Or not hard enough. When their parents traveled once before, Jake and Connor had stayed with the Vandersteens next door. Despite their protests, this time they had been dumped here in Sturgeon Bay. “We gonna get ice cream or not?” Connor asks. “Later, if you’re good.” “Half of that ten bucks is mine,” Connor says. “Grandma said.” “Try an’ collect it, half a brother,” Jake says. It is a private endearment that Jake uses lovingly, as much to describe Connor’s still small stature as to acknowledge that they have different fathers. Having different fathers is something Jake is painfully aware of lately. It barely registers on Connor’s radar screen — despite the fact that at age nine, Connor is a clone of Ed Gilbertson and he, Jake, looks like someone else. When the three Gilbertson men, as his mother calls them, stand together, he feels like the odd man out.

In recent months things haven’t gone smoothly between Jake and Ed, whom he calls Dad, even though the step in their relationship sometimes feels more like a cliff. For reasons Jake can’t explain, he challenges Ed Gilbertson’s authority at every turn. Ed shrugs it off and says it’s hormones. His mother asks him what’s wrong, but Jake evades the real issue. Because she does. The Bay Side Cemetery grass has recently been mowed. The smell of the cut grass is faint in the air. Small American flags rise above a few gravestones, rippling in the breeze. For several minutes, they wander silently among the stones. Jake suddenly sees a large headstone, reddish in color. There is a familiar, forbidden name chiseled in the polished granite: GRANGER. On each side of the red headstone is a row of three flat gravestones. On one of them, Jake sees the name Adam Granger, and under it the dates February 7, 1974 - April 13, 2004. Instantly Jake understands that this is the reason for his fascination with cemeteries. Without admitting it to anyone, even himself, he’s been searching for this particular grave. To make it real. Suddenly it feels too real and he turns his head so Connor won’t see him cry. “What?” Connor asks. “Nothing.” He makes a show of looking at other headstones standing guard over family plots, but he can’t help glancing back at the red granite stone. Connor sees through the ruse. “What’s wrong, Jake?” Jake hesitates for a moment. If he can’t share this with his half a brother, then who is there? He puts a hand on Connor’s shoulder and walks him back to the red headstone. “Granger,” he says, “was my last name before our Mom married your Dad and they had you.” He points to the smaller stone. “That’s my dad.” “Holy smoke!” Connor exclaims. For a long moment, the only sound is the flutter of the flags. “Did you know him?” “No.” “What happened?” “He died in a car accident,” Jake answers. “Before I was born. There’s more to it.” He knows this not by what he’s been told, but by what he hasn’t been told. “Like what?” Connor asks. “I think it has to do with how the accident happened.” “Why don’t you just ask?” Jake almost smiles. Connor is too young to understand the gulf between the kid and the adult worlds. There are some things you never ask an adult, not if you want an answer with any truth in it. In the last year, when he really started asking questions about his real dad, his mother answered each question with a minimum of words, sending the message it was a forbidden topic. Everything he wants to know remains locked in the past. By not knowing, he feels like part of him is somehow lost, like losing a pair of gloves. “Come on,” Jake says. “Let’s go get ice cream.” Despite being from the big city, they manage to get lost on the way back to their grandparents’ house. As they wander around, a car suddenly swerves over to the curb.

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“Where have you two been?” Grandma demands. They climb into the car. Jake shoots Connor a look that says keep your mouth shut. “I’ve been looking all over for you,” Grandma says. “I knew you’d get lost.” He could never explain to Grandma that suddenly he doesn’t feel lost at all. In fact, he feels like at last he’s found a part of himself, like one missing glove had turned up in Lost and Found. “It’s no big deal,” Jake says. “You found us.” The next day is Saturday. Grandpa is off work. About midmorning, Grandma decides to bake chocolate chip cookies and drafts Connor to help. “Jake,” Grandpa says, “What say we take a walk? Stretch our legs.” By the tone of Grandpa’s voice, Jake knows there’s no escape. Grandpa follows a route through town that brings them to Bay Shore Drive. He turns north and suddenly Jake knows where they’re headed. Grandpa cuts through the cemetery lots like he knows exactly where he’s going. When they reach the GRANGER headstone, Grandpa stops. Jake waits. Grandpa’s hands slide into his pockets. “So I understand you’ve been asking some questions around home, giving your folks a hard time. Your mother asked me what to do, and I said you’re old enough to know. She agreed.” Now Jake understands why he and Connor are staying here instead of with the Vandersteens. It makes him angry. “If she wants me to know something, then why don’t she tell me?” “It’s not something she likes to talk about,” Grandpa says. “So she asked me if I’d talk to you. What do you want to know?” Grandpa’s question bears the directness Jake has craved, but suddenly finds a little terrifying. “She told me he died in a car accident.” “That’s right.” “Is there more to it?” “There is.” Grandpa jingles the change in his pockets and looks toward the bay. “Your Grandma and I weren’t very happy when your mother married Adam Granger,” he says. “We knew the family. Let’s just say they were kinda rough and Adam was a wild one.” Grandpa shakes his head. “To make a long story short, around the time your mother married Adam, he got into drugs. It was hard on your mother. He used them more and more, and after a couple years, he started manufacturing them. He set up a factory out in the country where he made a drug called methamphetamine. The sheriff’s department arrested a bunch of drug users. They said they bought their drugs from Adam. The sheriff put Adam under surveillance and found his factory. They went out there one night to arrest him.” Grandpa taps the July date on Adam Granger’s gravestone with his toe. “That’s the date they went out. Adam found out the sheriff’s posse was coming. Somebody tipped him off, though the sheriff never determined who called. Officially. Adam made a run for it in his car just as they arrived. During the chase, he crashed his car. That was it.”

Grandpa falls silent. Jake thinks his way through what Grandpa has said and not said, decoding his meaning. “Was she the one who called him?” Grandpa hesitates and then nods. “It was real hard on your mother. She didn’t know where Adam was when she called him. She told him the sheriff had been to the house looking for him. She begged him to turn himself in. The sheriff determined she wasn’t involved in any of what Adam was doing and left her out of his report. But she blamed herself for Adam’s death.” Jake studies the gravestone. It is overwhelming, hearing it all laid out so matter-of-fact. This is a different side of Grandpa, one that Jake wishes he had known before. “Right after Adam died, she found out she was carrying you,” Grandpa says. “You’re the one good thing that came out of a pretty awful time for her. She needed to get away from here, start over. That’s why she moved to Minneapolis. Eventually, she met your step-dad. You know the rest.” It is Jake’s turn to nod. Everyone knows the story of how his mother met Ed Gilbertson in the business ethics class they were taking in night school, Jake thinks. God knows he’s heard it enough times, as if her life began on that day and everything Grandpa just told him never happened. He thinks of Ed Gilbertson and Connor, two thirds of the Gilbertson men. A question nags at him. “Do I look like him?” “Yes,” Grandpa says. “Adam was tall and rangy — like you.” That answers that question, Jake thinks, but generates another, scarier one. “You need to understand,” Grandpa says, as though reading Jake’s mind. “A man’s made up of more than flesh and bone. He’s also the sum of the choices he makes. Your father made a lot of bad choices.” Grandpa rests his hands on Jake’s shoulders. “There’s years of choices ahead of you, Jake. They’re yours to make, not your father’s. Ed Gilbertson is a good man. He can be the father Adam Granger never could be — if you choose to let him.” Grandpa claps him on the shoulders. “Let’s head back. I’ll bet those cookies are done.” They make their way between the gravestones. Jake looks back at the red headstone a final time. He senses that Grandpa’s account is an abbreviated version of what happened, sanitized to protect everyone involved — his dead father, his mother. Grandpa and Grandma. Maybe even himself. Connor, too. It is, he is coming to understand, what adults do. They leave the cemetery. Grandpa’s step has a lightness that wasn’t there when they first set out. So, Jake thinks, the rest of the story, the other glove, is laying out there somewhere, waiting to be found. He’ll keep looking. Someday. For today, one glove found is enough.

Roger Barr’s collection of short stories Getting Ready for Christmas & Other Stories was published in 2011. He’s also the author of a novel, seven nonfiction books and the award-winning play Decoration Day. In 2013 he won The Loft writing contest, a juried competition. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

A fine coming-of-age story about the ways that our wisest elders often seem to know the moment when we are ready to know the next thing. I want to follow this young man and find how this truth will shape his world.

Mike’s Port Pub & Grill Open Daily • Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner

Bob McCurdy’s EDEN NORTH GALLERY has moved to his home at 8510 State Hwy. 57

First Sunday Pota to Pancakes August 6

Mon.- Grilled Ham & Gouda Tue.- Nacho Supreme Wed.- All you can eat Pollock Thu.- Fajitas

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Fri.- Fish Fry Sat.- Broasted Pork Chops & Chicken Sun.- Broasted Chicken w/the fixens

6269 Hwy 57 • Jacksonport (920) 823-2081

Fiction Judge David Haynes

Open by appointment or good fortune. (920) 839-2754

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Thursday, August 10 th 4–8

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Celebrating 30 Years • 1987 - 2017

Callsen’s

MAIN STREET MARKET

Door County’s Super Market

PHOTOGRAPHY HONORABLE “Ironworker” by Guntis Lauzums “Ironworker” is a portrait of the large building boom happening in Wisconsin.

History – Get Into It!

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Heritage Program Saturday Stillwoods Art Studio-Don & Carolyn Payne Photography, Pastels. 8:30 am to 11am

Open 10am - 4pm, Tues. - Sat. • One Mile So. of Downtown Sister Bay, Hwy. 57 & Country Lane • sisterbayhistory.org

Open Daily 7am

Saturday Nights with The Jamaican Door

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SPECIAL EXHIBIT: QUILT SHOW TRILLIUM QUILT GUILD AUGUST 11 & 12

Immerse yourself in the unique history of Sister Bay. 15 galleries filled with artifacts, photos, videos, in 15 historically restored buildings – hands-on Family Fun!

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

The Corner of the Past Historical Museum


THE HAL PRIZE 201

FICTION HONORABLE by Peter Sherrill

Calculus Chandler

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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James Johnson’s eyes were on me. Not hard, not cold, not angry. Expressionless. I stopped knocking the dust and grit off me and realized I had a decision to make. His eyes waited. “Mr. Johnson, I’m sorry about your arbor here. I’d like to make it right.” “Do you know how to use a hammer?” “Yessir.” “And I suppose you have used a shovel before.” “Yessir.” He gestured me around the side of his garage into a small building. I suppose you could call it a shed, except that it was so – pristine. White, freshly painted. Window boxes with geraniums. I stood at the door. He handed me a shovel and placed a hammer, level, and several small tools into a wooden tote. “Pull the lattice off the pole. Pole’s in two feet, so you’ll need to dig it up and re-set it. Level and plumb line,” he gestured to the tool tote. “Save as many of the marigolds as you can. Don’t go near the roses.” His eyes waited for my nod. He turned and went in his back door. I had ridden the alley between Pine and Maple on the way home from my paper route, as always. This time, though, James Johnson, Jr. – Three-J to his buddies – had backed out of that garage in an old Ford F-150. He cut it too sharp and caught the edge of his Dad’s arbor, damn near running me over to boot. Knocked me off my bicycle. Yee-hawed loud and shot off in a spray of gravel and blue oil smoke. He was a block and a half away by the time James, Sr. came to see what had happened. I pulled the lattice gently off the tilted pole with the claw of the hammer. I spread a few of the newspapers from the tote next to the pole and shoveled up marigolds, putting them aside. I set to digging. It’s hard to tell if it was the heat of an Indiana summer that had me flushed and sweaty, or the humiliation of what’d just happened. I comforted myself by admiring the Johnson’s tiny back yard. I’d never seen it before, hidden by their garage and arbor. This neighborhood was The Heights. Most of the folks who lived here worked at the foundry. The houses are snugged tight against one another, only a thin sidewalk between each. Postage-stamp-sized front yards, cinderblock front porches. Some had screens. Otherwise the house number was all that told the difference. But this back yard was lush, manicured – made me think of the Garden of Eden. It had a patch of brilliant grass, tomatoes growing in neat cages, marigolds and flowers I couldn’t name, all precisely arranged and closely tended. I could see I had a tough standard to meet. I was about halfway through digging up the pole when Three-J and a couple of buddies buzzed down the alley to see what there was to see. He fishtailed some gravel my way and roared off laughing. James, Sr. was seated inside the house with his back to me. He had a guitar. He leaned forward and put the needle down on a record. “… shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die. When I hear that whistle blowin,’ I hang my head and cry…” he played along with the guitar solo. Poorly. Then he lifted the needle and repeated. Then again. I lost count at about eighteen, when the heat and

humidity dissolved it in a cloud of sweat. It’s odd how your mind drifts to other places when there’s only drudge and discomfort in front of you. I remembered my math teacher, Mr. Walker. He’d nudged me on the shoulder just before summer vacation, smiling. “Next fall. Calculus.” “Calculus?” “You bet. You’re good with math. You can handle it.” “Okay – but what is calculus about?” Even in the swelter of the alley between Pine and Maple, I chuckled to remember how he’d lit into an animated description of the wonders of calculus, and the dizzying problems it could work out. Okay, I thought. So a rocket takes off and is creating thrust at a fixed rate. Every instant its speed increases; but its weight decreases, because it’s burned that much fuel. That means that it accelerates that much more, even though the thrust remains constant, but in the next instant it’s faster, but lighter. There’s really a way to work out where it’s going to land, even though everything is changing all at once? By the time I’d gotten the pole squared up and plumb, Mr. Johnson had played the whole guitar solo passably. He went through it a few more times as I shoveled back the dirt and re-positioned the marigolds. He was playing it confidently. If you press the point of those small finish nails with the side of the hammer head, you can back them almost-out of the lattice without dropping them into the dirt. Steering clear of the rose thorns and moving them as gently as I could, I pulled the lattice back into place on the pole. Even as sweaty and gritty as I was, I got a lot of satisfaction seeing that the finish nails lined up exactly with the holes they’d come out of. I tapped them back into place. I had the arbor back as it had been. I shook the last of the dirt off the newspaper onto the marigolds and straightened up the work site. I stood up from brushing the last of the dirt off the driveway. I heard a few steps. James Johnson’s eyes were back on me. Still expressionless, except that he surveyed the work I’d done with a faint nod. “Sir, I believe I’m done.” He nodded toward the tool building. “You see where the tools came from? “Yessir.” “Put ‘em up. Then you’re done.” I hung the hammer and level on the pegboard, put the shovel in its stand in the corner, and the small tools in the half-open drawer. By the time I’d shut the drawer and the building’s door, James, Sr. had gone back into the house. Instead, Mrs. Johnson was standing there, with a glass of lemonade in her hand. “Here,” she said. Her voice was almost too quiet. “I thought you might need this.” I had seen Mrs. Johnson before. She was always the one at the door when I came by on Thursday evenings to collect the 40 cents for the newspaper. Always a faint smile, always has the quarter, dime and nickel in a saucer on the front-hall table. I’d thank her, hand her the tab from the collection book, another faint smile. I’d never heard her speak before. No surprise: different churches, and in this town that’s everything. I imagined she was Baptist. Most of The Heights is. They have no truck with Presbyterians. “Thank you.” The lemonade was delicious. You can tell when it’s

come from a can, and this had been squeezed, strained, sweetened and iced. “It’s just the right thing.” Unlike her husband, her eyes were searching me intensely. “May I ask you something?” “Yes’m.” “What you did – I was watching. James, Jr. knocked that arbor over with his truck. Why did you take the blame for that?” I was trying to form an answer, but her eyes searched me until she said, “Wasn’t that a lie? Why would you lie to my husband?” I sipped her wonderful lemonade. “It wasn’t a lie. Not exactly. I said I was sorry the arbor was damaged, and I was. I said I wanted to make it right, and I did. Both were true.” “But why did you do that? Be straight with me.” Her eyes had shifted to a mother’s critical stillness. The lemonade was half gone. “I thought that only Three – uh, James, Jr. – and I were the only ones who saw that happen. When Mr. Johnson was right there, I decided that saying what I saw might amount to squealing on someone who’s bigger and stronger than me. It could get to ‘no, I didn’t’ and who’s-callin’-who-a-liar, and friends and cousins start gettin’ involved. Everything changes all at once. You can’t tell how it will end. Or when. It was quicker and easier to tell what I felt, rather than what I saw.” I thought of Mr. Walker, and had to choke back a smile. “Sometimes the shortest distance between two points is not a straight line.” Her eyes searched me busily again. I was already several hours late, and needed to get home for supper. “Mrs. Johnson, this truly is the best lemonade I’ve ever tasted. This makes the whole effort worthwhile. Thank you.” Again, the truth. She smiled her small smile, and took the glass from me. Mom chewed on me a little for coming home late, and dirty. I let her go on imagining I’d gotten caught up in a good baseball game. It wasn’t till the beginning of school in September that I began to see how my calculation had worked out. Several of the Johnsons’ neighbor girls talked to me in the hallway. Nothing great, but a hi-how-ya-doin’ can make your morning. Three-J’s brother Jared said his Dad told Three-J he couldn’t even work as hard as a skinny Presbyterian schoolboy. But come December 21 – well, that Thursday evening, at Johnson’s, my 40-cent weekly newspaper collection came with a Christmas card. Had a dollar bill in it. Also an excellent chocolate-chip cookie. Best I ever tasted.

Peter Sherrill grew up in an eastern Indiana factory town, which provides plenty of material for his writing projects. He’s published a few short stories and quite a few poems.

Here’s a compelling story about that universal struggle to choose the right path and, as is often the case, how to even know what that is. How rare it is to see a well-rendered story about a fundamentally decent kid.

Fiction Judge David Haynes


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

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Flavorful, fresh and fun. The awardwinning Carrington Pub & Grill offers tasty salads, appetizers, sandwiches, steaks, fish, pasta, pizza, American classics and yummy desserts. Great view. Tasty food. And a friendly crew. Located on a bluff overlooking the sparkling waters of the Bay of Green Bay.

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920.868.5162 or 920.868.3205

www.CarringtonPub.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 7/1/17—9/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. For certain rebate-eligible products, the purchase of multiple units of such product is required to receive a rebate. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. **The PowerView App is available on Apple® iOS and Android™ mobile devices, and requires the PowerView Hub for operation. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q3NPVIGC1

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Karaoke: Every Saturday night from 9pm - midnight. Cheryl Simon hosts.

At the Landmark Resort 7643 Hillside Road | Egg Harbor

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Catch the Flavor

Vignette® Modern Roman Shades with PowerView® Motorization


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

CASEY’S BBQ & SMOKEHOUSE brisket • ribs • wings • salads • soups • sandwiches burgers • whitefish • friday fish fry • saturday prime rib Open• Daily open daily 11am •11am year round

Live Musiyc Saturda 2 - 5pm

7855 hwy 42 downtown egg harbor

920.868.3038

caseysbbqandsmokehouse.com

2428 S Bay Shore Drive • Sister Bay • www.SilverBirchDoorCounty.com OPEN MAY THROUGH DECEMBER

Pelletier’s

2428 S Bay Shore Drive • Sister Bay • www.SilverBirchDoorCounty.com OPEN MAY THROUGH DECEMBER

Breakfast, Lunch & Nightly Fish Boil

Founder’s Square • Fish Creek •

920-868-3313

www.doorcountyfishboil.com

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

OPEN DAILY 6AM - 7PM WEDS. 6AM - 2PM

Fish Boils Tues., Fri., & Sat. 5 & 6pm

DAILY HOMEMADE BREAKFAST & LUNCH SPECIALS! Stop by, we’ll leave the grill on for you! Downtown Ellison Bay • Hwy. 42

NEH O T S

EDGE GOL

F

Door County’s affordable, family-friendly course 9 holes, par 34

Twilight Rates start at 3pm Unlimited Golf $12 Walking Night Golf Footgolf y a d Every $20 Riding July 29 & pm after 2

Sept. 2

(920) 868-1861 4320 Cty. E • Egg Harbor 1 mile east of Hwy. 42 on Cty. E

TUNE UP YOUR GAME! Private / Group Lessons Matt Stottern / PGA & Sylvia Ferdon / LPGA Register Today 920-854-5791 / PeninsulaGolf.org

Book Your Tee Time Today! PeninsulaGolf.org/920.854.5791 9890 Shore Rd., Ephraim

$1 OFF Short Course Green Fees $2 OFF Range LG Bucket Present Coupon at Check In

Bay Ridge PUBLIC GOLF COURSE SISTER BAY

Life’s A Pitch, Then You PUTT! Door County’s Only Regulation 9-Hole Golf Course

920-854-4085 www.bayridgegolf.com


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Serving Friday Fish Fry Starting May 22nd

RESTAURANT

I N A C O U, N T R Y C L U B A T M O S P H E R E Full Bar • Open to the Public • Patio Seating • Smoke-Free Dining Room

CASUAL DINING

Lunch 11 am - 3 pm Daily Salads • Appetizers • Burgers • Sandwiches • Pizza

Friday Night Fish Fry

5 PM - 9 PM

Perch • Walleye • Whitefish • Alaskan Pollock • Limited Menu

SERVING HOMEMADE PIZZAS WI-FI Available N. of Egg Harbor on Hwy. 42, Take EE to 8125 Heritage Lake Rd. 920-868-2483 • 888- 463- 4653 • orchardsateggharbor.com

GOLF COURSE

7670 Hwy. 57 Baileys Harbor (920) 421-GOLF (4653) GOLFMAXWELTONBRAES.COM

18 Hole Championship Course

CALL (920) 421-GOLF (4653)

Play Peninsula State Park Golf Course Spectacular Water Views & Majestic Woodlands

CELEBRATE SUMMER! 18 holes $61 9 holes $34 Unlimited Golf …After 2pm…only $33 All above rates include Power Cart Get Out & Play Pen Park Today!

Book Your Tee Time Today! PeninsulaGolf.org 920.854.5791 9890 Shore Rd., Ephraim

LAST CALL TO SIGN UP BY AUG. 5th, 12pm! 92nd Annual Resorters “Match Play” Tournament When: Aug 7-10th Open to all amateur Adult & Junior golfers! Gift certificates, prizes or trophies will be awarded in all classes & flights. Pairings will be posted Aug. 5th after 5pm at the Clubhouse.

----------------------------

Entry Fee: Adults $95 / Juniors Ages (10-14) $32 PGC Season Members $25

----------------------------

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “The Artist” by Arlene Stanger

For More Info & Registration • Go to PeninsulaGolf.org Calendar of Events  • Call Clubhouse (920)-854-5791  • Come to Clubhouse  Please complete & return all Entry Forms no later than August 5th, 12pm! 

This artist, working out of his van on a Berlin street, drew an appreciative audience.

Door County’s #1 Public Course According to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

36 Hole Golf Course Egg Harbor 9 holes with cart $35 18 holes with cart $55 Daily fee with cart $85 Twilight with cart $32

Where the View is as Great as the Golf!

7670 Horseshoe Bay Road www.GolfAtAlpine.com

4146 GOLF VALLEY DR. STURGEON BAY, WI 54235 920.743.3334

18 HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE Beautifully Manicured & Maintained Exceptional Greens & Bunkers idlewildgolfclub.com AMERICAN PUB FARE Full Bar • Big Screen TV’s Stunning Views OPEN DAILY 11AM

Summer Rates Mon-Thu (Non-Holidays) Jun 26 - Aug 17 9 Holes 18 Holes

Before 12:30 PM $28 After 12:30 PM $24 Junior After 1PM (Su-Thu) $12

Fri-Sun & Holidays Jun 23 - Aug 20 9 Holes

Before 12:30 PM After 12:30 PM Junior After 1PM (Fr-Sat)

$33 $26 $15

Carts per person

$12

$46 $32 $20

18 Holes

N. of Egg Harbor on Hwy. 42, Take EE to 8125 Heritage Lake Rd.

$56 $36 $25 $18

920-868-2483 • 888-463-4653 • orchardsateggharbor.com

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920.868.3232

IDLEWILD GOLF CLUB

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

PUBLIC 18 HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSE


NAN HElSCHER, DONNA BROWN, tODD vOSS, DAvE tURNER EXHIBIT III August 10 – September 15 ARTIST RECEPTION August 10, 4pm–7pm ARTIST DEMONSTRATION August 11, 11am–2pm

Nan Helscher

Donna Brown

Dave Turner

Todd Voss

STANDING ROCK Oil/Cold Wax | 16” x 16”

UNDRESSED Monotype | 20” x 28”

HERON Wood | 8” x 4”

RIPE FIELDS Oil | 24” x 32”

Open daily May – October; Weekends Year-Round 10376 Hwy 42, Sister Bay, WI 920-854-4343

finelinedesignsgallery.com

The essence of Door County in an historic setting Current Exhibits Quilting Savvy through Aug 6 Kaleidoscope through Aug 13

CAPTIVATING DIMENSIONAL MAGICAL

EXTRAORDINARY MUSIC

WEDDINGS SPECIAL EVENTS

featuring over 70 local & regional artists 6746 County Road G • Egg Harbor (3 miles south of Egg Harbor just off Hwy 42) Open Daily 10-5 thru October • Friday-Sunday 10-4, November-December (920) 629-4877 • www.WoodwalkGallery.com MIDSUMMERS MUSIC • SOCIAL EVENTS

Check out our popular Willow Plant Supports


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Introducing the Nautical Collection in Sterling Silver and Diamonds designed by Draeb Jewelers

A neighbor you can count on.

■ ■ ■ ■

Over 600 New & Used Vehicles 9 Brands • 1 Location Servicing all Brands, Domestic & Imports Complete Collision Centers

SHOP OUR FULL INVENTORY at

jimolsonauto.com Additional pieces available. Stop in to see the entire collection.

Family Owned & Operated Since 1910

• Chevrolet • Buick • Cadillac 632 Green Bay Rd.

743-4461

• Chrysler • Dodge • Jeep • Ram 812 Green Bay Rd.

743-6271

• Ford • Lincoln 440 S. Duluth Ave.

• Express 1201 Egg Harbor Rd.

746-1050

746-3190

www.draebjewelersinc.com

50 N 3rd Ave. • Sturgeon Bay • 920-743-4233

“Slow down and enjoy life. It’s not only the scenery you miss by going too fast – you also miss the sense of where you are going and why.” EDDIE CANTOR

Door County Garden Destination!

• Excavating • Grading Dirt

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

• Tree Line Removal • Trenching/Underground work • Product Removal & Or/ Brought to Jobsite • Truck Hauling • Snow Removal • Foundation & Home Addition Digging • Demolition CALL us TODAY (920)559-6885 www.imovedirt.com | Egg Harbor, WI

Anniversary ONE WEEK ONLY!

SALE

Celebrating our 44th Season!

Friday, August 4 thru Sunday, August 13

44% OFF

Sun Perennials • Shade Perennials Trees • Shrubs • Evergreens Roses • Hydrangeas • Perennial Vines Pottery • Concrete Statuary • Birdbaths Metal Garden Art • Trellises & Topiaries Plant Stands • Fairy Gardening Accessories Garden Arbors • Garden Benches

Shop Early for Best Selection! OUR BEST SALE & PRICES of the SEASON!! Cash & Carry only. Discount applied to item’s original price. Sale prices not valid on previous purchases. Anniversary Sale prices end at 4pm Sunday, August 13, 2017

6939 State Hwy. 42 • 3 miles south of Egg Harbor Open Daily • (920)-868-3646 • www.SunnypointDoorCounty.com


Door County Plein Air

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

Presented by Peninsula School of Art

...it’s a shore thing! EXHIBITION & SALE through August 12 Take home your favorite Door County scene painted by nationally recognized artists Proceeds benefit the programs at the non-profit Peninsula School of Art

3900 County Road F • 920.868.3455

PeninsulaSchoolofArt.org

“I’m spending a year dead for tax reasons.” DOUGLAS ADAMS

er Ba ist

WOOD ORCHARD MARKET

y

S

DISCOVER DOOR COUNTY LIGHTHOUSES!

YO LI T T L UR E CAP TAI N R I DE S FREE!

EN JOY LI VE M U SI C T ON SU N SE CR UI SE S!

Located in beautiful Door County, just north of Egg Harbor on Hwy 42 Truly Unique

Art and decor fill the walls with style and design. The children’s area is complete with gifts for all ages.

Totally Delicious

Come cruise aboard our 149 passenger, double decker tour boat docked in downtown Sister Bay. We offer daily narrated tours to Eagle Bluff Lighthouse, Death’s Door and the many islands, bluffs and beaches surrounding Door County. Enjoy the sun on our upper level sun deck or find shade and refreshment on our lower bar deck. Don’t miss our nightly Sunset Live Music cruises and Sun and Fun Swimming Excursion trips scheduled throughout the season. On board we offer a full bar of refreshments. Departs daily from Sister Bay Marina • USCG Certified Boats

Reservations: www.DoorCountyBoats.com Tours Starting at $24

KIDS UNDER 12 FREE! PULSE

Very Door County

Lighthouse Gifts - Cherries Galore Apples like no other.

Where visitors become friends and family. CRISTA & MARK KOCHANSKI & FAMILY

JANICE & STEVE WOOD

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For additional information, call us at 920.421.4444 (Sister Bay)

Seasonal Fruits & Vegetables, Cherry Salsa, Jams & Jellies, Fresh Bakery and So Much More - Samples Galore!

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

JUMP ABOARD … GRAB A DRIN K … ENJOY A ROMANTIC SUNSET

Fresh Door County Cherries!


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• e THE HAL PRIZE 201 at

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NONFICTION 1ST

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Things Won’t H Again

The Shoreline The Shoreline Restaurant IN GILLS ROCK Restaurant

IN GILLS ROCK

Open Daily For Lunch & Dinner Bar OpenFull Tues. - Sun.

920.854.2950 11 AM -Sorry 3 PM & 5 PM - 9 PM No Reservations Open Daily For & Dinner FullLunch Bar Full Bar

920.854.2950 Sorry No Reservations

Now Open

Deli &

Full Service, Carry-Out, Boar’s Head

Catering Including

Meals to G o

il Store Retafeaturing Many Local Products 2602 So. Bay Shore Drive • Sister Bay (920) 854-8029

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Sun. - Thurs. 10-6; Fri. & Sat. 9:30-6:30

I’m washing my brother’s dishes. Actually, I’m boiling his flatware before I can begin the washing. It’s all that dirty: the knives and spoons coated with something filmy, the fork tines clogged with what might be old eggs. Other than the jarring sounds of pans sliding against pans as I search cupboards or move dishes from counter to sink, the cabin is utterly quiet, the heavy air undisturbed. My brother Steven — bearded, thin, and haggard enough to appear Christlike — says he might have barfed in the sink, but he’s not sure. He mentions this from the one comfortable chair in his cabin, where he sits naked from the waist down, cigarettes and vodka within easy reach, his long hands flat on the black leather armrests, his body motionless as he stares out the glass sliding doors to the woods beyond his deck. Steven’s golden retriever, her fur dull and matted, lies on the rug next to his chair. The dog doesn’t bark, or move her tail, but tracks my movements with her eyes. The nakedness is fair. Steven’s stomach is so distended from his failing liver that his pants are probably useless. Besides, he didn’t expect my visit. I’ve arrived without invitation, after driving on winter roads for several hundred miles, to see if he’s still alive. In our last telephone conversation, Steven ’s voice was low and full of pauses. He described shooting pains in his chest, how little he ate, how much he slept. While driving, I prayed he hadn’t answered his phone for the last several days because it wasn’t charged or because he was sleeping a lot, lost in the wild colored dreams he’d been telling me about. Both assumptions were correct. I discover this when I walk into his cabin, as casual as some neighbor with a coffee cake, although it’s

chicken and rice I’ve brought to cook for him. When I call his name he doesn’t move from the chair, greet me, or rush to cover himself. He just says, “I’m not going to some damn hospital.” Shutting the door behind me, I childishly reply, “No one asked you to.” I’ve messed up before, arguing or trying to reason; or worst of all, using my social worker skills — something he always detected and mocked me for — to get him to stop drinking, to change who he’d become. Even now, way into my forties, I’m only the younger sister, and anything I suggest is unlikely to happen. So I’ll boil the flatware and wash all the dishes instead, because nothing is clean and I want to make him a meal. It’s unlikely the dishes will get dirty again once I leave, not with how used-up Steven looks, not after his admission that nothing stays down anymore except for vodka. This is what I’m here for. With my grandmother and mother dead, it’s become my job to make a last attempt to save, or at least feed, my brother. I remember us eating meals together, the pancakes our grandmother made: the smell of bacon, the eggs fried in butter in a cast iron skillet. Our own mother always at the stove, making meat and potatoes and a vegetable each night. After supper the two of us would do the dishes together. Steven washing and me up on a stool drying each plate and putting it away in the cupboard where it belonged. I want to give this to him one more time, to change the air in the horrible cabin, cover the cigarette smoke, the unbathed body and dirty dog smell, change it to something like home — like our grandmother’s home. Like the people we were. Steven knows this, I’m sure of it. There’s the way he mentions the

sound of the chicken frying, and the way he sniffs the air as I turn the meat over in the skillet. I serve him such a small portion, resisting the urge to cut the meat for him. He eats everything on the plate, being precise about each bite, looking almost happy by the time he finishes. He tells me how good it tastes, but soon after he pushes heavily on the arms of his recliner to stand and make his way to the bathroom. I doubt he’ll reheat the leftovers I’ve wrapped and put in the refrigerator. Steven returns out of breath and with a towel wrapped around himself and tells me, “Don’t go in there.” I pull up a hard kitchen chair and sit next to the table piled with weeks of mail. I’d much rather scrub at spots on the counter, or vacuum around the dog, but I’m remembering that Bible story, the one about Martha and Mary hanging out with Jesus, how Martha cleans while Mary listens. I realize I’m imitating the wrong sister, so I stop and sit down. It’s clear to me I won’t visit Steven here again. Not with how large his belly has become on his emaciated body or with the way he’s missing his ankles, his lower legs just swollen, jaundiced blobs ending in feet. One foot, I notice, has dried poop stuck to it. I point this out and he expresses minimal interest, just moves his head unhurriedly to look, and says he doesn’t know if it’s his or the dog’s. He does not attempt to clean himself. Still, I press where his ankle should be, and comment on how long the skin takes to bounce back. There are lines on both legs, streaks of ochre against his skin’s oddly yellowtan color, like the straight roads on a map. They represent past bouts of diarrhea, I realize, but this time I stay quiet. Despite the gravity, the finality of this visit, my heart isn’t pounding and my thoughts aren’t all jumbled

cover The 2017 Hal Prize photography third place winner, “New Friend” by Ron Maloney.

Put Our Bobcat to Work for You!

Now – september 2 wed – sat 7:3O pm & sunday matinee 2 pm

Our Brushcat Mower Can Clear Juniper, Sumac, & More

Special Tuesday evening performance Aug 29 at 7:3O

239 NORTH THIRD AVENUE IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN STURGEON BAY Get tickets online at www.ThirdAvenuePlayhouse.com or by calling the box office at (920) 743-1760

Call Jonathan at 920-421-1335 |

Re-grade/Re-gravel Your Driveway Put an End to Bumps & Potholes

www.countryacresbobcatservices.com


That Happen

GGrereaatt FoFoodod! !

GGrereatat DDrinrinksks! !

On Kangaroo Kangaroo Lake On Lake

BAILEYS HARBOR, WISCONSIN

Great View!

BAILEYS HARBOR, WISCONSIN

DD ININ E IN OR E IN CARORYR OCUATRRY

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

by Joanne Nelson

OUT Nightly Specials All You Can Eat MON.-Meatloaf TUES.-Turkey Pot Pie Walleye Wednesday WED.-Walleye Grouper THURS.-Mexican Friday FRI.-Grouper

SPECIALS

SERVING OUR FULL MENU LUNCH & DINNER OPEN DAILY 11 AM • YEAR ROUND

County E on Kangaroo Lake • Baileys Harbor • 920.839.9192

www.coyote-roadhouse.com

CZARNUSZKA SOUP BAR TAKE YOUR CLOTHES OFF! DONNY’S

Gift Certificates Available

Glidden Lodge RESTAURANT

Extraordinary Cuisine Breathtaking Waterfront Dining

Reservations Accepted Closer than you think...

Open Nightly 4pm - 9pm 920.746.9460•donnysgliddenlodge.com 4670 Glidden Drive • Sturgeon Bay 54235 A Glimpse of Ireland in County Door

O’Meara’s Irish House

THE BEST OF IRELAND AND BEYOND

Served Nightly

On a road trip following old Route 66, I came across this after-hours establishment that covered most of the signage found along the way.

credit cards accepted

Genuine supper club, full bar and vintage bowling lanes!

Nightly Specials

SUMMER HOURS

To m S e a g a r d

46th Season • Open Daily at 10am 2328 Mill Road Sister Bay, WI -

920.854.4416 - www.millroadgallery.com

Hwy. 42 Sister Bay • 920-854-2841

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“On Q.” oil on linen by Brigitte Kozma

Brigitte Kozma

Voted

Lunch Served Best Fish Fry 11:30am-2pm: & Best Old Tuesday-Sunday in the bar Fashioned Dinner at 5pm Nightly Fridays at 4:30pm

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign” by Arlene Stanger

At the north end of Fish Creek, Hwy 42 920-868-3528 • www.omearasirish.com


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

and rubbery as often happens to me in a crisis. It’s more like the lingering cigarette smoke is a fog I wade through to face Steven. I fight the desire to pull back, to dissociate and watch the events play out from the ceiling somewhere or out in the woods — the woods my brother loved. I’m surprised by the memory of a phone call from months, maybe even a year, ago. He was sitting on his deck, tossing a ball to the dog he said — and drinking, from the sound of his voice. I was busy running errands and told him so. He mocked me and called me foolish for living my suburban life driving my van, doing everything from a list, and eating eggs only at breakfast. “That’s what you’re doing. I know that’s what you’re doing,” he accused from his sunny patio. My stunned silence as I drove the curved roads of my neighborhood encouraged him to ramble on. He said I could eat anything, anytime — there were no rules. His words were sarcastic, his laughter cruel.

“Let’s have some new cliches.” SAMUEL GOLDWYN

OPEN NOW In Downtown Sister Bay

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

DIPPY’S TWO

Open 11am to 8pm

(Behind our Door County Confectionery Store)

Featuring: Ice Cream bars and Beach Toys

If I keep working, if I vacuum, as my mother surely would, perhaps I’ll make up for the chicken, do something right. There is a risk to just sitting with each other, not even a sink of dirty dishes between us. What if I say something wrong, open some old wound between us, and there is never another time to fix it? I talk about my kids, ask questions about his dog, the best things he’s ever done, and about his worst memory ever. Without a pause, he tells about when he was a kid, maybe seven, and I was a baby. He was in the garage with our dad and Todd Markowski from down the block, who smoked smelly cigars. Steven sat in the driver’s seat of one of the old cars Dad loved to restore. I imagine the way his brown hair stood up in the back, his freckled face with its slanted smile. As Steven talks he looks out the screen window, at the spot between the pines where the deer come in the early evening. Steven was supposed to press the brake pedal so Dad could show Mr. Markowski something. He messed up — what little boy wouldn’t — pushed the gas pedal instead and caused some problem. Maybe the men jumped back, startled at the sound of the motor racing, or maybe the car lurched forward, Steven doesn’t say. But he tells about the swearing and name calling that came next, all in front of Mr. Markowski who kept smoking his cigar. Steven refused to go into the garage after that. In my mind, as Steven talks, I add bottles of Pabst to the workbench underneath the windows facing the backyard, and a smack as he’s hauled out by his elbow, the harsh words ringing from him, as he runs to his

room and slams his door. Or, it’s possible he sat frozen in the lousy cab of the broken car intent, despite the shouting, on the view of crab apple trees, wash lines, and our redshuttered house outside the double glass of windshield and windows. Maybe our mother’s shadow moved past a window, carrying the new sister he wasn’t allowed to touch without cleaning up first. Steven finishes his story and turns to me, “What you gonna do, write about it?” I remain silent, make no promises, already wondering how to memorize each portion of this day, how it might look on the page. I fear I’ll forget his sunken cheeks and ragged beard, or the way he lifts his unlit cigarette to his mouth inhaling and exhaling nothing. The drawn-out pace of his words, the raspy sound of his laugh, his light touch on my arm, and even the long imprint of my finger on his ankle make me wish for paper, some way to get it all outside myself. His dog cries at the door and I take her outside. Tail wagging, she checks the air and tests the length of her leash while I pour corn for the deer from a bucket in the shed. I’m on Steven’s property, his land ends where the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest begins, but it’s the crab apple trees in the backyard of our parents’ home I’m picturing. Steven could lean against a rake, motionless for long stretches of time. Mom and I would watch him from the kitchen window, her hand holding back the ruffled curtain so we could both see. I remember her exasperation at his lack of progress. How she’d say, “That kid … What’ll become of that kid?” I knew I could rake better, get rid of all the crab apples and make her happy if only I were big enough. Later, as I drive away from his cabin, another memory returns. I’m still little, and Steven wants me to toss a football with him. Crab apples and yellow leaves litter the autumn ground. Our laundry line posts denote end zones. There are the rich sounds of crackling leaves and pigskin hitting palms as he teaches me to catch and pass. He plays defense and I make my slow way towards those laundry pole goal posts. Success is in the air, as he allows me to get close, oh so close, to a touchdown. And then he uses all his power to push me back to the fiftyyard line and tackle me until time is finally called and the game is over. Driving south towards home I suppose Steven is in his chair, the dog stretched out beside him. They’ll both watch for deer that make their way out of the woods at dusk looking for corn. Later Steven will rouse himself enough to pour another drink or light a cigarette. I’ll futz with the car’s radio or talk on my cell phone. Both of us are moving on.

Joanne Nelson’s writing appears in literary journals such as Midwestern Gothic, Brevity, Consequence, and Redivider. In addition, she presents on topics related to mindfulness and writing, creativity, and the personal essay. Nelson lives in Hartland, Wisconsin where she leads community programs, maintains a psychotherapy practice, and adjuncts. More information is available at wakeupthewriterwithin.com.

This is a gut punch of a story filled with indelible images – the clogged fork tines, the ‘jaundiced blobs ending in feet,’ the imprint of a finger on an ankle. I can picture it all even as I don’t want to, and haven’t been able to stop thinking about it since my first reading. The starkness of the now is beautifully mixed with the past and what is, unfortunately, likely to happen next.

Nonfiction Judge Erika Janik


THE HAL PRIZE 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Giant Tortoise in the Everglades” by Thomas Jordan After a cruise we had plenty of time before our flight home so we took a tour of the Florida Everglades. Lot of gators and birds but had a chance to capture a close-up of this giant tortoise. Fortunately they are slow moving, which gave me time for this ‘portrait.’

Home of the scrumptious pecan & cinnamon rolls. Swedish limpa bread. Cardamom coffee cake. Only scratch bagels in D.C.

Reservations recommended

1/2-lb

Prime Rib Sunday Brunch Buffet $16.99 Tuesday International Buffet $18.50 Thursday Prime Rib Buffet $21.50 Breakfast Buffet 7:30 -11:30

Daily 7:00

ROW L EYS BAY R ES O R T

rowleysbayresort.com

Dinner Buffet 5:00-8:00

$1 off adult buffet one per person

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920-854-2385 n 1041 Cty. Rd. ZZ, Ellison Bay

n

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

All-you-can eat Fish Boil buffets Mon., Wed., Fri. and Sat. Storyteller at 4:30 with a second story at 6:00 every Sat. $21.50


France in the Family

PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

My parents would always have Paris. They met on Sunday, April 18, 1937, my father’s birthday, on a blind date on the western edge of the city. It was cloudy, and my mother wasn’t keen about the meeting, dragging her feet. She usually spent Sundays in the suburbs having lunch with colleagues and changed buses at the Porte de Saint-Cloud. To please a best friend, she was squeezing him in. She was 26, single, independent, cosmopolitan, working in the Paris office of my grandfather’s import-export business, a moderately successful pharmaceutical firm. Her flair for languages was an asset, coming in handy as she took dictation in her own multilingual brand of Pitman shorthand, handled correspondence and answered the phone. She tweezed her eyebrows, smoked, and had dared to pose nude for art students in a life drawing class. If she was handsome -- some would say even beautiful from the photographs -- she could never acknowledge it, being instead utterly convinced that she was ugly or at best plain, while her younger sister, with blonde curls and blue eyes, was the conventionally pretty one. She was smart and bookish; played the piano; and was not easily won or impressed. My father was a sound- and cameraman who had started out as a sales representative at Fox Movietone. Starryeyed about America, its cultural icons like Shirley Temple and Tom Mix, he was lured by drama and thrills, of travel across Europe and journalistic scoops. In Berlin, he photographed Hitler when he rose to Chancellor in January 1933, standing in the Reich Chancellery just a few feet away from him, and Mussolini’s family when my father, no longer able to work in Germany, was moved by Fox to Rome. During all this time, he didn’t seem to make the connection that as a Jew getting so close might put him in harm’s way. Perhaps it didn’t matter, because he was committed to covering the news. Or perhaps he was hoping this proximity might eventually pay off. It was something that, like so much else, I never thought to ask. Indeed, it was my father’s connection to Spain’s Generalissimo Franco that probably saved his life. My father had been sent to Spain in 1934 where, as a soundman, he had recorded bullfights, flamenco dancers and Seville’s Holy Week. In 1936, he had been assigned to cover the Spanish Civil War from Franco’s side, coming under fire near Málaga from

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by Ronnie Hess

Loyalist troops as his team took their first combat pictures. One day in May 1937, scarcely a month after meeting my mother, he was stopped at Irún along the French-Spanish border and interrogated by a Gestapo officer in charge of German nationals in Spain. “Mensch, Sie sind doch Jude,” the German officer hissed at my father. “So, you’re a Jew.” My father was detained and sent to an internment camp in Fuenterrabía. As he was filling out papers there, he listed Franco as a reference, having interviewed him two days before in Burgos, then demanded to speak by phone to his press headquarters in Salamanca. He got through to a press officer who phoned the military commander in Irún who had him released. A slightly more dramatic version that I recall hearing from my father as a child had him behind bars yelling in Spanish, “I want to speak to Generalissimo Franco,” until a Spanish guard opened the jail door and told my father to get going, saying he’d look the other way. My sister always believed that was the better part of the truth. As a youth, my father had been raised in a close-knit, middle class, not particularly religious Jewish family that could trace its ancestors back to the early 18th century in southeastern Germany. Relatives had established themselves in and around Bavaria as innkeepers and optometrists, solid citizens respected by members of both Jewish and Gentile communities, according to an account my grandfather had written about his relatives. The Urkunde, the official document that had conferred German citizenship on one of my ancestors in the 19th century, was a treasured family heirloom, handed down along with the embroidered sheets and tablecloths that were either spirited out of Germany just before World War II by my aunt or put away for safekeeping by friends until family could reclaim the possessions after the war. I never found out which. After Hitler’s rise to power in 1933, after my father left home not to return again, he threw himself into gallivanting across Europe, fancying himself not a refugee but a foreign correspondent and ladies’ man, especially since he was on the rebound, not yet divorced but putting behind him a failed marriage to a woman he had wed years before in an extravagant, formal ceremony in a Kraków synagogue. That he was dapper was without question, a man who dressed impeccably in tailored suits

and hand-made, monogrammed shirts. He was over six feet tall, energetic, athletic, an ex-amateur boxer with a broken nose, a man who liked to pose, even mug, for the camera, a man without hesitation or reserve. He had been sent to good schools, like my mother, and was pleased he could still recite the opening sentences of The Odyssey in Greek, which he had learned along with Latin at the gymnasium, or high school. But when he and my mother met, he spoke in a peppery “Broadway English,” a patois of swear words, bloody this and bloody that, and street talk learned from an Italian cameraman. It never occurred to my father that no self-respecting Englishman would ever utter these kinds of phrases in polite company and it probably never crossed his mind that his brazenness and showy self-confidence might be off-putting to a well-brought up, reserved English woman. Or, did he just know his own charm? He was bent on seizing the moment, a man who didn’t so much embrace life as powerfully tackle it. For her, he must have been the brass section of an orchestra, a one-man band, a blaring, unapologetic, one-of-a-kind composition, pulsing his beats straight to the heart. When he first saw her – was she walking toward him, did he fix his gaze upon her, eye her up and down, or was she the one sitting down as he approached, did she extend a gloved hand, did he kiss it? – he knew he was not indifferent. A coup de foudre. A lightning bolt. Love at first sight. My father pressed my mother to meet him again that evening and she agreed. They ordered lobster -- because it was his birthday -- in a restaurant around the corner from the Gare Saint-Lazare. He walked her back to her hotel behind the Place de la Madeleine. The next day they lunched near the Rue Des Poules, and then, in the evening, without remembering being asked and without reconsidering, she went to his hotel, asked the night clerk for his room number, climbed the stairs, knocked on the door and walked in. During the next two years, from 1937 to 1939, my father’s situation became increasingly precarious. Since Germany’s racial laws had cost him his job in Germany, Fox shifted him to Spain; but the Nazis also made it impossible for him to continue working there and Fox transferred him to Italy. There were rushed introductions to family – my mother to my father’s mother and brother during a visit

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to Rome; my father to my mother’s family in England on a 24-hour pass. Just before war broke out, my mother agreed to follow my father to Spain, ironically the only country now that would issue him a work permit. The border agents told her she was abandoning Britain in its hour of need. She swore she said, “I’m going to be with the man I love.” In Madrid, my father worked for Fox until the Spanish government acceded to Germany’s demand to bar German Jews from Spanish or German companies. My father resorted to making a living as a freelance photographer, his Jewish identity known only to close friends, while my mother taught English to the daughter of a Spanish duchess. In December 1940, visas finally in hand, my parents set sail on the Magallanes, a Spanish steamer bound first for Cuba and then New York City. They were leaving loved ones they would never see again – my father’s parents, who later would be deported to Theresienstadt, then executed in Treblinka, along with my father’s aunts; my mother’s beloved brother, a violinist turned artillery man in the British army who would be killed in 1942 in Crete, his body never recovered; and my mother’s father, who would die of heart failure in 1950. But in the early months of 1942, recently married and expecting the birth of my sister, my parents tried to be hopeful. Bad news would come later, shadows of the heart, phantoms of loss. Yes, they were alone in America, but full of New World optimism. They had their life together, beacons of light shone for them. In an early snapshot of them together, on an outing to Washington Square, they looked confident, their heads held high, my mother’s belly full with my sister, rounding the outlines of her cloth coat. As my parents made their way in America, putting down roots, the French private school they sent me to came to represent neutral ground in their own culture wars. As a small child going to school during the Great War, my mother had knitted bandages for wounded British soldiers and surely had been exposed to large doses of British propaganda against the Boches, the German enemy, although she never used that word. She never shared my father’s affection for German food and popular music, and their conflicting tastes sometimes would trigger an explosive exchange. He would go on the defensive while she would misguidedly try to settle

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NONFICTION 2ND

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PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Hammock Joy” by Shannon Thielman I live in rural Marathon County with my six-year-old son, where we raise chickens. We travel to Panama every other year because after having served in the Peace Corps there from 2002-2003, people in these villages seem like family. These children (three Panamanian and one, my son, American) were enjoying popsicles together after a long afternoon playing. Their joy is nearly constant, and is in stark contrast to the economic poverty their families face.

things by saying he wasn’t really German, or “Jews go one above every race.” At those moments he would cry out in exasperation and disgust, bang his fist on the table, and storm out of the house. The tension, as I now see it in broader terms, was between decades of attempted Jewish integration into the larger German society by my father’s family, and my mother’s ideas about Jewish exceptionalism. My sister and I were witnesses, hostages. My mother never considered that I would have any difficulty thrust into an utterly foreign linguistic environment where, at first, I couldn’t communicate. She assumed that I would simply catch on, much as she thought she had as a child when her father decided that at the dinner table his family would speak French. My mother had become a convert of this over-zealousness. When my grandfather sent her to work in his Paris office he may not have seen the posting as a reward for her follow-through or belief in him, but for her it was all that, and an idealized, almost innate faith in France.

And there was no escaping my mother’s preposterous name. My grandmother, in what must have been a romantic haze as she expected her first born, invested in my mother much of her own youthful imagination and yearning for French ground and culture, for the people she had come across in life and in books. Like so many Europeans of her generation, she had been won over by France’s idealized “civilizing mission,” its centuries of international influence. When my mother was born, just a few, short months after my grandparents had married, my grandmother named her child Clementine Marie-Antoinette Martine. Through her school years, my mother insisted it took teachers an eternity to read her name out, that she could walk to the front of the classroom to pick up an exam paper before they had even finished calling on her. When my parents married, she didn’t object when my father insisted she become simply Tina. It was the only time she let anyone kill her connection to France.

Ronnie Hess is a writer and poet, the author of three poetry chapbooks – Whole Cloth, Ribbon of Sand, and A Woman in Vegetable; as well as two culinary travel guides, Eat Smart in France and Eat Smart in Portugal. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

This story is cinematic in scope filled with vivid descriptions as the author tries to make sense of her own life in the story of her parents’ early life and courtship. The opening makes you think you’ve read this story before – they’d always have Paris – but it quickly charts a different course. The details of their lives and characters are exact and yet spare, painting a rich portrait of two very different people coming together in just a few pages.

Nonfiction Judge Erika Janik

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It was late of April and the sea ice had all but disappeared from the edges of the channels and bays. The sun felt warm on our backs. Though it yet harbored some coolness, the air was warming, and had a heady aroma that smelled at the same time of fresh linen and earth. The doldrums of winter were reliably over, and we were ready for another season of adventure in the limitless possibilities of our world. My crew and I strode through the ripening field of grasses and wildflowers, and when atop the last hillock before the harbor, we saw her there below our feet, riding high at tie-up. Her bare yards beckoned us as if with welcoming arms. With one mind, we all stood there agape, taking in the sights, sounds, smells, and potential of the day that welled inside our breasts. The march down the hill and conversation with crewmates escaped my remembrance as I suddenly found myself dockside, ready to board. Now close to her, we stood transfixed for the second time, drinking in the width, breadth, and awe of the vessel that would bear us up on her planks to destinations only imagined. We had not noticed her for what she was before. It was just a tree that had fallen in a gale some years before, left to succumb to the ways of nature. The bark was gone, and certainly no leaves. But, to me, my sister, Kathy, and our neighbors, John and his brother, Joel, it became that day a schooner set in the sea of warming prairie, floated by our spirits, and propelled by our youthful imagination. One by one, we clambered aboard. It was a very large tree, with the trunk held high up off the ground by its branches. Our efforts of throwing a leg over the trunk and hauling ourselves up hand over hand by pulling on still supple branches added to our image of manning a real ship of the line that was not made for human comfort, but for speed and transport over the brine. Once standing on the deck and viewing our surroundings from a higher perspective, everything looked different, making it easy to ascribe new characteristics to our neighborhood, as we imagined the grassy yards a blue ocean, the homes distant islands far offshore. Gazing upwards into the branches reaching skyward over our heads, the masts and yardarms that had been purposefully set for us in the firmament by the very wind itself, were poised to capture the force of that ether as it blew across us, toward wherever we willed it to. Our preparations for voyage continued, as we disembarked momentarily to fetch household items necessary to complete fitment. Lengths of rope and an old bedsheet were commandeered for rigging, and piping from an old plumbing project for cannon. We finished the fitting out with, what was standard childhood equipment in our youth, our ever-present cap pistols and rifles to handle any adverse consequence of unfortunate encounter. After tying the sail to the upper branches and stringing the ropes from yardarm to yardarm, we were by all accounts ready to embark upon the open waters. And, so we


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3831 Clarks thin Lakeshafts Roadof wheat seared did. It was a magnificent ship, and would of seemingly 1½ milesthe east Hwy 57 onitCounty serve us well as we began making way. airof toward us as becameWD apparent Surgeon near Jacksonport While upon the waters, we each uponBay, nearing that this was a volley of 920-743-1560 performed our duties as we saw fit. The arrows. Some thudded as they burrowed lookouts, John and Joel, climbed the into our masts and gunwales. The rest www.whitefi shbayfarm.com masts, leaning out from the yards to better whistled overhead and all around our search for whatever might come our way sides like a hoard of unearthly wraiths. by manner of fortune or imagining. I was These mercifully only found the ocean to happiest walking the deck from fore to their end, and not muscle, bone, or flesh. aft and back again, checking on all the The advantage was now with us, as their many facets of marine engineering that a store of arrows was half depleted and we good master ought to keep stock of. Kathy had not yet begun to fire at what now had was at the helm, finding a pliable branch become even closer range. Kathy yelled with which to swing the rudder port or “Fire!” as she turned the rudder into the starboard, depending on contrary wind savage flotilla. Our cap pistols barked, direction, current change, or other whim of sending up our own cloud, this time of the sea or spirit. smoke from the black powder contained As most spring weather goes, it was a in the narrow strips of paper ammunition usual blustery day, and provided us with with which they were loaded. The heathens excitement as the deck rocked beneath were terrified at the sound. They had our feet from it, making footing precarious neither seen such a sight as our courage, for the sailor of little or no experience in nor the superiority of our weapons and the ways of the wind upon the water. Our resolve. Their chief made some sort of youngest shipmate, Joel, was walking guttural utterance, intelligible only to aft to explore another mast, one he had those of his fellows, at which they all broke not yet climbed, when a sudden gust of heading and made a half circle with their wind rolled the deck hard and sent him canoes, paddles flailing at the water in over the gunwales. “Man overboard!” was attempt to get away from us. Our merciful shouted, followed by cries of “Shark!” and spirits took pity on them as we ceased fire all seamen on watch came running to lend and watched them land their boats and hand to retrieve him from the threatening take foot upon the beach and run, only to deep. It spat him back out at us as we become lost in the thick jungle overgrowth grappled at his arms and legs, pulling him that was their island. Kathy spun the wheel aboard. He was none the worse for wear, seaward, and we once again continued our albeit embarrassed for the likes of it. No journey, this time with greater caution. other mishaps of ill-advised foot placement Eight bells. High noon. Dead calm. were recorded in the ship’s log that day, Our enthusiasm flagged. Hot, and adrift as all took heed of what had happened, without the ether’s push behind us. We felt and what acting without regard for the depleted and unsure of what to do next. unexpected meant while at sea. Restlessness invaded our disposition, Tired from the averted disaster and but yet each was filled with a fatigue that selfless acts of heroism, we now all lay prevented us from carrying on. Then, prone upon the deck with eyes closed, suddenly, a harkening from one of the deeply drinking of the warm sun upon distant islands off our starboard quarter our faces, and were made drowsy by was heard. “Lunch!” With this rousing the rhythmic rocking of the deck as the call, Kathy and I headed off back home wind lulled us as if back in our cradles of for provisions. John and Joel went off to perhaps ten years previous. To an observer, their respective island for the same, and I’m sure we appeared as turtles lined along we agreed to muster back at the ship a half submerged log, soaking in the sun afterward when we would be refreshed and rays to warm their blood. So it was with fit again. us, taking advantage of what nature had to We all had a fine mess, returned to our offer for our growth and well being. vessel, finding our vigor restored, and After a time, my reverie was shaken continued on our journey of discovery. with a shout of “Cannibals! All hands on There were a few more challenging Deck! Man the guns!” And sure enough, encounters that afternoon with a the ever aware and sharp-eyed John had hurricane, as the wind had come up again, spotted three canoes heading our way, and pirates. The pirates went much the as while at rest, we had approached an same way as the cannibals, having no uncharted island unawares. I could hear stomach for the staunch resistance as the thrumming cadence of the lead canoe’s what we gave. Our cannon came into play chief metering out a beat the paddlers as we loosed our shot at them, wrecking followed, making them appear at a distance their vessel for strategic maneuvering, as some sort of mechanical toy with leaving it seaworthy enough to employ their simultaneous stroke. But, mark my their retreat. We found these actions to not word, they were no toy. Never was seen be as extensive as those experienced in the such a band of savage and bloodthirsty morning, and were over much sooner once renegades. Wild hair and painted faces they had begun. Perhaps it was due to our marked their visage, a sight one might have increased maturity in dealing with such easily thought up in a nightmare. They threats, that they were disposed of more approached. expediently than were our earlier dealings We took up arms. Being the individuals with untried ventures. of proper deportment that we were, we The rest of the voyage was peaceful, and held our breath and waited, keeping our we had time for reflecting conversation, fire until the foe committed to battle by free from further imagined challenge. making the first offense. Then, a cloud We spoke more of what were our actual

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Whitefish Bay Farm Gallery


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experiences as children in the moment and not as sailors on the bounding main. John told us of a teacher who was pressing him for greater academic results that was echoed by his parents. Joel was hurt by a seemingly innocent nickname, Jojo, that made him feel small, unimportant, and ineffective. Kathy spoke of the unrealistic expectations our mother had been placing upon her outward appearance. Although their words did not use those terms, as their meaning would not be known to any child, the theme of their experiences would make an internal connection and bring understanding as we developed into adulthood. My experiences and feelings would remain silent and unshared for many more years. With time, I too would be able to feel these things as my shipmates had at an earlier age, and make sense of the world to a somewhat greater degree than before. I would go on to resign my self-appointed role as captain, as I became aware that I was merely a passenger upon my ship. All of us grew to become contributors to the society in which we were placed. We made decisions on behalf of, and issued encouragement and warning to, others as well as ourselves. We based this upon what we understood of our world, and what we had learned in our travels. We would be far from the perfect and exquisitely successful souls we had imagined ourselves to be upon the open waters, but we were experienced. We were experienced with near death, experienced with foes that would tear us asunder, experienced with storms of the soul and mind, and pirates!

& IC E CR EA M PA RL OR

This story captures the imaginative spirit of childhood with the language of a great nautical adventure story and a sentence cadence that matches the action of the story. It brought me back to my own childhood in and around the trees and the sudden ways that kids can veer from makebelieve to serious discussion and back again.

Nonfiction Judge Erika Janik

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PHOTOGRAPHY NOTABLE “Memories of Times Past” by John Koski Midway between Seattle and Tacoma, off to the side of the road, sits a long-abandoned schoolhouse. On the day this photo was taken the sky was filled with clouds that seemed to whisper of the many memories created here.

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NEW


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Music Performance Center

August 4 & 5, 9-12 August 4: Ellington, Basie & Miller Vol. II August 5: Swinging Through the Ages Featuring Mardra and Reggie Thomas

August 9: A Century of Swing August 10-11: The Great American Big Band August 12: A Century of Swing World Class Faculty/Student Performances begin at 7:30PM in 100 year-old concert barn. Pre-show music at 7:00PM in outdoor gazebo.

Adult, student, child, premium, and group ticket prices available. For the price of 3 concerts, attend 4 with “3/4 time” promo. Call to learn more. Order tickets by phone 920-868-3763 or online at BirchCreek.org/tickets Thanks to this week’s Concert Sponsors:

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“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” JONI MITCHELL

 

 







2017 Jacksonport

2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport 2017 Jacksonport

CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST CHERRY FEST Lakeside Park * Hwy. 57, Jacksonport Lakeside Park Hwy. 57,Jacksonport Jacksonport Lakeside Park * *Hwy. 57, Lakeside Park * Hwy. 57, Jacksonport Lakeside Park Jacksonport Lakeside Park *Hwy. Hwy. 57, Jacksonport Lakeside Park * *Hwy. 57,57, Jacksonport Lakeside Park * Hwy. 57, Jacksonport Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin Door County, Wisconsin

8am -- 4pm 4pm Saturday, August 5,5,5,2017 8am 4pm Saturday, August 2017 8am -4pm 4pm Saturday, August 2017 - 4pm Saturday, August 5, 2017 8am Saturday, August 2017 8am -4pm Saturday, August 5, 2017 8am -8am Saturday, August 5,5, 2017 8am --4pm Saturday, August 5, 2017 Schedule of Events of Events Schedule Schedule of Events Schedule ofEvents Events Schedule ofof Events Schedule of Events Schedule of Events

PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Booth featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry pie and cream and 8AM -- 4PM: Bakery featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry piecherry andice cream and 8AM - 4PM: Bakery Booth featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry pie and icepie cream and 4PM: Bakery Booth featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, and ice and cream and 8AM - 4PM: Bakery Booth featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry pie and ice cream 8AM - 8AM 4PM: Bakery Booth featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry piepie and ice cream and 8AM -cherry 4PM: Bakery Booth fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry pie and ice andto benefit 8AM - sundaes. 4PM: featuring fresh baked cherry kolaches, cherry and ice cream and ofcherry cherry jams, cherry pie filling and other cherry products for sale to benefit sundaes. Avariety jams, cherry pie filling and other cherry products for sale to benefit cherry sundaes. ABakery variety ofBooth cherry jams, cherry pie filling and other products tocream benefit cherry sundaes. Avariety variety offeaturing cherry jams, cherry pie filling and other cherry products for cherry A of jams, cherry pie filling and other cherry products for sale to sale benefit

cherry sundaes. A aA variety of of cherry jams, cherry piepie filling andand other cherry products forfor sale to to benefit cherry sundaes. variety cherry jams, cherry other cherry products forsale sale tobenefit benefit cherry sundaes. Anearby. variety of cherry jams, cherry piefilling filling and other cherry products the JHS nearby. the JHS at at a at booth the JHS abooth booth nearby. the JHS aatbooth nearby. thethe JHS at a booth nearby. JHS at aatbooth nearby. the JHS a booth nearby. Juried Arts && Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from theMidwest. Midwest. Many Juried Arts &&Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from the Midwest. Many of your your Juried Arts Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from the Many Midwest. Many Juried Arts Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from the Midwest. Many of your of your featuring talented artists craftsmen the ofof Juried Arts & Crafts Fair featuring talented artists andand craftsmen from the Midwest. Many ofyour your Juried Arts & Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from the Midwest. Many ofyour your Juried Arts & Crafts Fair featuring talented artists and craftsmen from the Midwest. Many of favorite artists from for this renowned show asshow well as many amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years will return for this renowned show as well as many amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years will return for this renowned show as well many amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years will return for this renowned as well as many amazing first-timers. past years will return for this renowned show as well as many amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years willwill return forfor this renowned show as well as many amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years will return forthis this renowned show as well as amazing first-timers. favorite artists from past years return renowned show well as many many amazing first-timers. Historical Review Booth --Sponsored Sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will feature Historical Review Booth Sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth feature Historical Review Booth Sponsored the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth willfeature feature Historical Review - Sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will feature Historical Review Booth Sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will Historical Review Booth -Booth Sponsored by by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will feature Historical Review Booth by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will feature Historical Review Booth ---Sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society. Booth will feature Jacksonport Family memorabilia display and the Society’s books for sale– Jacksonport through the Jacksonport Family memorabilia on display and the Society’s 1010 books for sale– Jacksonport through the Jacksonport Family memorabilia onon display and the Society’s 10 books for sale– Jacksonport through thethrough Jacksonport Family memorabilia onand display and the Society’s 10 books for sale– Jacksonport the Jacksonport Family memorabilia on display and the Society’s 10 books for sale– Jacksonport through the Jacksonport Family memorabilia on display the Society’s 10 books for sale– Jacksonport through the Jacksonport Family memorabilia on display and the Society’s for sale– Jacksonport through Jacksonport Family memorabilia on display and the Society’s 10 books for sale– Jacksonport through the in time Generations. The Root Cellar the Erskine Rest Area will open to the public. Take aTake step back inthe time Generations. The Root Cellar in the Erskine Rest Area will bebe open tothe the public. Take back time Generations. The Root Cellar ininin the Erskine Rest Area will be open to public. Take astep step back in time Generations. The Root Cellar inErskine theRest Erskine Rest Area will be open to the public. ain step back Generations. The Root Cellar in the Erskine Rest Area will be open to the public. Take a back in time Generations. The Root Cellar in the Erskine Area will be open to the public. Take a step back in time Generations. The Root Cellar the Rest Area will be open to the public. Take a step back in time Generations. The Root Cellar in the Erskine Rest willHistorical beBooth. open to the public. Take a step back in time and visit the restored Root Cellar located next toArea the Historical Booth. and visit the restored Root Cellar located next to the Historical Booth. and visit the restored Root Cellar located next toto the Historical and visit the restored Root Cellar located next to the and visit the restored Root Cellar located next to the Historical Booth. and visit the restored Root Cellar located next Historical Booth. and visit the restored Root Cellar located next the Historical Booth.Booth. and visit the restored Root Cellar located next totothe Historical Booth. th4ththAnnual th Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic cars and trucks dating Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic and trucks dating th Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic cars and trucks dating 4Annual Annual Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic cars and trucks th 4th4Annual Annual Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic cars and trucks dating 4th 4Annual Cherry Fest Car Show Antique and classic cars and trucks dating

- dating - -----Antique 4 Annual CherryFest FestCar Car Show andand classic carsback andback trucks dating 4 Annual Cherry Show Antique classic cars and totrucks the 1930’s. to the 1930’s. to the 1930’s. back todating the 1930’s. back to the back the 1930’s. back totothe 1930’s. back to the1930’s. 1930’s.

JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased atthe the Erskine Root Cellar and the JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased Root Cellar the JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased Erskine Root Cellar and the JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can beDrawing purchased atErskine the Erskine Root Cellar JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased atthe Erskine Root Cellar and theand the JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased atatat the Erskine Root Cellar and the Loritz Cabin until 2PM. held at3PM 3PM at Root Cellar JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased the Erskine Root Cellar and the JHS RAFFLE: Tickets can be purchased the Erskine Root Cellar and the Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing at at Root Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held at 3PM at Root Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held at 3PM at Root Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held at 3PM at Root Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held atat 3PM atatRoot Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held at3PM 3PM at Root Cellar Loritz Cabin until 2PM. Drawing held Root Cellar Need not be present to win. Need notbe be present towin. win. Need not be present win. Need not present Need not be present to win. Need not be present totowin. Need towin. win. Neednot notbe bepresent present to 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins open to the public - just south of Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz && Cote Cabins open the public -just just south of Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz Cote Cabins open tothe the public -just south Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins open public south Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins to the- -public -ofof just south of Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins open totoopen the public just south Jacksonport. 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins open toand the public - just south of aJacksonport. 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers Cherry Brats along variety of 10:00AM –2:00PM: Loritz & Cote Cabins open to the public - just south ofwith Jacksonport. 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along with a variety 10:00AM: Lunch Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along variety of 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along with variety 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along variety of 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along with aa variety ofaof cold beverages will beBooth provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Jaciwith Birnschein. 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along with aand variety of cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Jaci Birnschein. cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Birnschein. cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Jaci Birnschein. cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith Jaci 10:00AM: Lunch Booth Opens: Cherry Hamburgers and Cherry Brats along with a variety of cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Jaci Birnschein.Birnschein. cold beverages will be provided by Door County Customs Meats owned by Keith and Jaci Birnschein. cold beverages will beMusic providedby byHighland Door CountyRoad Customslocal Meatsbluegrass owned byband. Keith and Jaci Birnschein. 10:00AM - NOON: 10:00AM NOON: Music byby Highland Road local bluegrass band. band. 10:00AM - -NOON: Music Highland Road local bluegrass band. 10:00AM --NOON: Music by Highland Road local bluegrass band. 10:00AM NOON: Music by Highland Road local bluegrass 10:00AM - NOON: Music by Highland Road local bluegrass band. 10:00AM - NOON: Music by Highland Road local bluegrass band. 11:00AM - 3:00PM: Mayberry’s HorseRoad Drawn 10:00AM - NOON: Mayberry’s Music by Highland localWagon bluegrassRides band. ongoing from Lakeside Park. 11:00AM 3:00PM: Horse Drawn WagonRides Ridesongoing ongoing from Lakeside Park. 11:00AM - -3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon Rides ongoing Lakeside 11:00AM --3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon from Lakeside 11:00AM - 3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon Rides ongoing from Lakeside Park. 11:00AM 3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon Rides ongoing fromPark. Lakeside Park. 11:00AM --3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon Rides ongoing from Lakeside Park. NOON 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring country music. 11:00AM 3:00PM: Mayberry’s Horse Drawn Wagon Rides ongoing from Lakeside Park. NOON - 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring country music. NOON --4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring countrymusic. music. NOON - 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring NOON - 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring country music. NOON 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group country featuring country music. NOON - 4:00PM: Modernfor Day local group music. 12:30PM: Registration theDrifters Penny Hunt on the featuring beach for country youngsters. 12:30PM: Registration for the Penny Hunt on the beach for youngsters. NOON - 4:00PM: Modern Day Drifters local group featuring country music. 12:30PM: Registration forfor the Penny Hunt onon the beach for youngsters. 12:30PM: Registration for the Penny Hunt onthe the beach for youngsters. 12:30PM: Registration the Penny Hunt beach for youngsters. 12:30PM: Registration for the Penny Hunt on the beach for youngsters. 12:30PM: Pennyfor Hunt on the 1:00PM:Registration Penny Huntfor on the beach ages 3-5 andbeach 6-8. for youngsters. 1:00PM: Penny Hunt on for the the beach for ages 3-5 and 6-8. for youngsters. 12:30PM: Registration Penny Hunt on the beach 1:00PM: Penny Hunt onHunt the beach for ages 3-5 and 6-8. 1:00PM: Penny Hunt on the beach for ages 3-5 and 6-8. 1:00PM: Penny Hunt on the beach for ages 3-5 and 6-8. 1:00PM: Penny on the beach for ages 3-5 and 6-8. All musical performances will take place the Big Tent. Picnic table seating around the tent will be available. Bring Penny Hunt theinin beach ages 3-5 table and 6-8. All1:00PM: musical performances will takeon place the Big for Tent. Picnic seating around the tent will be available. Bring

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your folding chairs or blankets for additional seating. Performance times may vary slightly. 1:00PM: Penny Hunt onthe beach for ages 3-5table and 6-8. All musical will take place in Big Tent. Picnic table seating around the tent be available. Bring your folding chairs or blankets for additional seating. Performance times may vary slightly. Allperformances musical performances will take place in the Big Tent. Picnic table seating around the tentwill will available. All musical performances will take place inthe the Big Tent. Picnic seating around the tent will be available. Bring All musical performances will take place in the Big Tent. Picnic table seating around the tent will beBring available. Bring All musicalyour performances will take in the Bigadditional Tent. Picnic table seating around the tentslightly. will vary be available. folding chairs or blankets for additional seating. Performance times may vary your folding chairs or or blankets for seating. Performance times may vary your folding chairs orplace blankets for additional seating. Performance times may vary slightly. your folding chairs blankets for additional seating. Performance times may slightly. Bring your folding chairs or blankets for additional seating. Performance times may vary slightly. All musical performances will take place in the Big Tent. Picnic table seating around the tent will be available. Bring

This 23rd annual Cherry Fest is sponsored by the This 23rdseating. annual Performance CherryHistorical Festtimes is sponsored the your folding chairs or blankets for additional may vary by slightly. Jacksonport Society This 23rd annual Cherry Fest isissponsored by Jacksonport Historical Society This 23rd annual Cherry Fest issponsored sponsored bythe This 23rd annual Cherry Fest by the by the This 23rd annual Cherry Fest is sponsored www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org This 23rd annual Cherry FestHistorical isSociety sponsored by the Jacksonport Historical Society www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org Jacksonport Historical Society Jacksonport Historical Jacksonport Society Jacksonport Historical Societyby the www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org This 23rd annual Cherry Fest is sponsored

www.jacksonporthistoricalsociety.org

Jacksonport Historical Society

Live Music The Mixtape Sat., 8/5, 5-9pm

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On Coming Home from the Conference the time spent shopping for drapery, who would remark on how nicely the pleats hung or how the color complemented the tile flooring instead of criticizing him. A woman who would have been home helping instead of off adventuring. Bruce and Elizabeth, our 17-year-old daughter, were watching television when I came downstairs. Regretting my negative comments about the new bathroom curtain, I casually asked, “So, what’s with the body wash — the pheromone infused one?” Elizabeth looked up from the TV. “I wondered about that too.” Bruce, from his usual spot on the couch, replied “The Dial? It was on sale. $2.79.” After describing the cost of the other brands he added, “I don’t even know what pheromones are.” I thought this answer came a tad fast. I countered, “Well, you know what ‘attraction enhancing’ means.” “I don’t think it says that.” At this point Elizabeth, clearly enjoying our exchange, happily ran upstairs for the offending cleanser and rushed back downstairs to read aloud the aforementioned descriptions. Bruce, wearing a long sleeved white t-shirt pallid against his winter skin and black shorts with multi-colored socks, refused to understand the implications and suggested there was no need for enhancement as he had always been a “stud muffin.” Then he turned his gaze back to the antics on Storage Wars. I couldn’t let it go. For the next several mornings I faced the accusatory block letters throbbing against the blue ribbon. I wondered if this was how it happens, small omens laughed off or dismissed in the busyness of work, raising kids, and the sweet complacency of marriage. I couldn’t resist Googling “pheromones” and found scant evidence to support liquid soap as a sexual attractant. And the body wash’s list of ingredients actually read nearly the same as my shampoo’s. Of course this wasn’t the important thing. It’s not the reality of the ingredient, but the belief system created. Tell yourself you’re more enhancing and the odds are you will be. That’s what I would tell one of my psychotherapy clients anyway — right after gently confronting the insecurity lurking around the edges of the story. At the same time I might wonder aloud to him or her, “Why all the concentration on this?” To switch chairs for a minute and answer my own question — I can feel the blush crawling up my face — aren’t I the one with the opportunities? Night after night of post conference schmoozing and, at the very least, all that elbow rubbing?

It’s not only opportunity. It’s history. My family includes generations of adventurers and gallivanters. Heck, both my greatgrandfather and father became mid-life runaways, and my maternal grandfather was infamous for a septuagenarian fling with his cousin Bernice. It seems my over-concentration on body wash may have been scented with projection. But it’s the adventuring I’m attracted to, not some need to stray — a desire, stronger with age, to be off exploring more than at home decorating. It’s an itchy feeling of not fitting in when everyone gathers around the TV for the night. With this analysis I understand that my fears of becoming like my overanxious mother may have kept me from recognizing the more captivating danger — that of my father’s wanderlust. I mull these ideas while I pin back the curtain a week later, the color nice against the woodwork, the window no longer muffled. “Did you see how I changed the curtain?” I asked Bruce when he hadn’t praised my domestic exertion within an hour. “Yea, I thought I already said that. You can see the backyard a lot better.” He was right — the view was much improved. The hammock swaying between our two apple trees, the new outdoor furniture on the patio, and the baskets of flowers hanging from the fence were all more inviting without the gauzy material in the way. However, too often it was my thoughts that I saw when I looked out the window, my focus coming to rest on whatever confirmed the images tumbling around my head. Or maybe all those sneaky pheromones caterwauling through the air and just looking for trouble continued to blur my vision. Most days though, the cars that journeyed on the highway visible beyond our backyard caught my eye at least as much as the hammock, the planters, and the deck chairs.

Joanne Nelson’s writing appears in literary journals such as Midwestern Gothic, Brevity, Consequence, and Redivider. In addition, she presents on topics related to mindfulness and writing, creativity, and the personal essay. Nelson lives in Hartland, Wisconsin where she leads community programs, maintains a psychotherapy practice, and adjuncts. More information is available at wakeupthewriterwithin.com.

This story captures what I think (and maybe hope for my own sake!) is a common experience of seeing something and making assumptions about the people in our lives. There’s an uncertainty many of us have that can send us spiraling, even when we, like the author, should know better. It’s always nice to know you aren’t alone and that those feelings come from somewhere, even from your own family history.

Nonfiction Judge Erika Janik

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

I came home from the conference buoyed by the breakout sessions, refreshed by time with friends, and packing plenty of convention hall swag. My flight came in early, my luggage arrived safely, and my husband, Bruce, picked me up outside the airport as planned. The house sparkled and smelled of PineSol when I walked in. I was glad to be home in my familiar, predictable place of spouse, kids, and dogs — and grateful for my better half, a guy who actually enjoys cleaning and takes good care of the family. After I unpacked, I headed into the upstairs bathroom and discovered a new ruby colored curtain adorning the window that overlooks our backyard. I called to Bruce, “It’s okay, but it sure cuts off the view.” “We can take it down.” “No, no, it’s fine.” In the shower, washing the travel away and returning to myself as wife and mom, I noticed a new body wash. Dial for Men. It sported an attractive red and gold label featuring the word “Magnetic” and, in block uppercase letters, the tag, ATTRACTION ENHANCING. Underneath this, also in block uppercase, but penetrated by a strip of manly blue, the phrase: PHEROMONE INFUSED. What, you might ask yourself — as I did, while working my own mildmannered shampoo into my hair — is a contented husband doing with body wash labeled “pheromone infused?” And, you might wonder — again, as I did by the time I moved onto conditioner — exactly what pheromone infused means. I thought pheromones were naturally occurring chemicals that made the person across the room hot for you as long as you were single and unattached, but then withered away once you became happily married. I recognized, with the sixth sense borne of my many years as a social worker, that I was avoiding any cognitive or emotional examination of the phrase “attraction enhancing.” It crossed my mind that product placement in such a highly trafficked area — used by daughters, guests, and me — implied a certain innocence or obliviousness. However, it might also suggest an initial, subconscious inkling of dissatisfaction in what had seemed, only moments earlier, a solid marriage. In fact, toweling off, I pictured myself typing these very words on some future tearful morning, alone but for a lukewarm cup of coffee, relating how I missed the first signs of trouble, let my attention waver, and paid the price — the children only visiting, the dogs forlorn, and the house for sale. Bruce now with a woman more appreciative of his fresh look, one who would recognize

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

NONFICTION HONORABLE by Joanne Nelson

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THE HAL PRIZE 2017

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

Washington Island Ferry Line

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Crossing Death’s Door

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8:00 am 9:30 am 11:00 am

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1:00 pm 3:00 pm 5:00 pm

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April 29 thru June 22 8:00 am 9:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 noon 1:00 pm

2:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm

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Friday Night Trips 7:45 pm 9:15 pm

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It is April, warmer sun bringing a gentle day. Leafless branches, no touch of green yet to be seen, frame my view of Lake Michigan. Yesterday, at this same place along the bluff, I saw whitecaps breaking in steady rows upon the beach below. Today, with no wind, all is still. I live in Milwaukee and today I am in my place on a wooden bench in Lake Park, a short walk from the senior residence I call home. My husband and I named it our bench, the first of many resting places along a winding path we also called ours. From the first day, we used that possessive plural...and developed a comfortable pattern when in the park: We walked a bit together, then Jim stopped at a bench with a good view while I continued further down the path. He always encouraged me to keep walking and I knew he was content, waiting for my return to tell stories of what he had observed in my absence. Black and white photos of the late 1800s show women in long dresses and men in top hats sitting or strolling sedately along the same pathways we use now. They would be surprised to see skateboarders and joggers, but the lawn-bowlers of today still wear the whites of an earlier time. Beyond their court is a playground with swings and ball fields where families gather to watch their offspring kick, throw or hit balls of any shape and size. The same families return in the evening with picnic suppers, ready for music under the tree and stars. The combination of relaxing and doing would please Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who in the late 1890s designed Lake Park. Known for his planning of Central Park in New York City, he envisioned the same natural landscaping with meandering paths offering surprising vistas at every turn. There are no formal gardens, just 138 acres of open meadow-like spaces, wild areas of shrubbery, growths of trees, and a waterfall. Two iron bridges guarded by eight concrete lions span ravines filled with wildlife and, if you look over the railings, you’ll see cedar paths cutting through woodlands to the lake beyond. Fallen trees and shrubbery provide safe hiding places for wildlife. Straight lines stretching out to other straight lines did not interest Frederick Olmsted. Here on our bench, I recall the day we found another couple sitting here and moved to the next bench. That is when I noticed a bronze plaque attached to the slats forming the back. Etched into the plate was a quote attributed to Albert Einstein, Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature’s beauty. The words were chosen by a family with a canine friend, Skipper Bud. We were curious about those who honored a dog and a scientific genius in the same sentence. Our discussion was interrupted by voices rising from the beach below and unfamiliar bird song coming from the trees along the bluff in front of us. Our world was no longer anchored to one small bench: with no effort on our part, we had widened our circle. Einstein’s words made us curious about the trilling and tweeting in the trees in front of us, the lives of the those playing in the sand below. A brief return to our bench showed no such inspiration and dedication. But what about the next one down the path? I got up and walked over to investigate and read, Nature speaks in symbols and signs. The words etched into the plaque were attributed to James Greenleaf Whittier. Jim had vague memories of a distant classroom…an old woman and a soldier on horseback. At our age, names and dates slip and slide, in and out so easily! What can you do but smile? That first day, we wandered from bench to bench, reading the words of Frederick Law Olmsted, Virgil, John Muir, Mary Oliver, and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. In less than half a block, we met a scientist, philosopher, adventurer...and poets. Because I carry a notebook in my pocket like all writers do, I wrote down the names and the quotes attributed to them. My plan was to find all the benches with such tributes, write them in my book, research the authors, then write a poem in response, maybe to the person sitting on the bench, the writer of the words, or myself. Jim nodded in careful agreement, but vowed to stay out of the ravines. We found benches everywhere...along the familiar bluff path, around the mini golf course, and in the open meadow. At the top of the waterfall, A.R. Ammons and John Muir mused about the power of wind. William Stafford wished us to sit and converse with a Civil War hero captured in bronze across the way. And the two benches honoring Joyce Kilmer were in a grove of trees, of course! I explored the ravines on my own, venturing beyond crumbling passageways to the baseball diamonds and summer stage where I discover Robbie Burns facing the lawn bowling court, Hamlin Garland hidden at the edge of the woods and Aldo Leopold across from the playground. Since we knew little about the illustrious men and women whose words we found, I delved deeper into their lives. For example, that man on the second bench...James Greenleaf Whittier? Jim was right. All school children from a certain time knew about Barbara Frietchie’s old grey head and that barefoot boy with cheek of tan. Of course, that Whittier! But we did not know about him as fervent abolitionist, friend of Emerson and Longfellow, radical reformer and Quaker. The poem I wrote pictured Whittier in the silence of a Quaker meeting room, but seemed directed at Jim. When I closed with these lines, Share this bench with him and listen for the still, small voice he knows speaks into the quiet

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he understood, for my husband was a quiet man who relished his moments of solitude in the midst of days filling with changes he found hard to accept. It was strange: While in the park, whether walking or resting, we relished the thought that nothing stayed the same: one day the lake holding three shades of blue and white waves, a red boat with a yellow sail; the next day, offering oil tankers floating in the air, suspended between grey sky and water of the same color. These surprises from one day to the next seemed right, natural. Changes in our own lives were different. They were happening to us...without our permission, setting both of us on edge. Yet, we were also learning how to find peace. John Muir spoke into the quiet we came to appreciate. The Father of the National Parks read Emerson while camping among the Redwoods of Yosemite, and from this place shared, Nature’s peace will flow into you As sunshine flows into trees.


Benches

And full-leafed trees shaded us that summer, while providing nesting places for robins and anchors for hammocks. Among them we could rest easy. Anton Chekhov, wrote of what we were learning, but could not say aloud, his gentle lesson, Let us learn to appreciate There will be times when The trees will be bare.

 Windmill Farm 

Nestled in a Dutch farmstead, the gallery features Ed Fenendael’s award-winning watercolors, pastels and oils. Inspired by the pastoral scenes of Door County and Europe, Fenendael’s paintings evoke a sense of peace, comfort and tranquility.

THE HAL PRIZE 2017

NONFICTION HONORABLE by Kathleen Phillips

1

whispered soft, while we relished every walk, every rest, every glorious moment of summer. Jim often walked to the park and did not get further than our bench. And I walked alone, exploring hidden corners, finding benches deep in ravines full of shade. Together or separately, we watched summer leave and autumn arrive, unaware our bare time was coming, was closer than we thought. The trees that autumn never seemed more beautiful...golden maples and red sumac bright against blue sky and lake. Jim sat more and walked less. One day, after watching a flock of geese move across the horizon, we went to Mary Oliver’s bench and read together,

The gallery is located 3 /2 miles North of 1 Jacksonport on Cty A, then 1 /2 miles west (left) on Fairview Road to 3829. Open Friday, Saturday, Sunday; May 19 - October 15 (or by appointment) 920-868-9282 www.watercolorexcitement.com

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“Cheers” to Friends and Family.

The world offers itself to your imagination, Calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting We did not leave the spot until the last geese were out of sight, the sky quiet. Did we talk about the last three words? I don’t remember. In late fall, Jim stayed at home as winds from the north blew the last leaves from the trees. The park I visited was one of bare trees and brown grass. But the lake was still blue, the benches still inviting. Returning to my desk at home, I wrote, Only when the leaves fall, can we see the stretch of sand below the bluff, the lake stretching to the sky. Only then, can we see the shape of each tree, how their branches reach for the sky.

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I finally understood the words of Chekhov, words we read together in the full bloom of summer. In winter, with sidewalks and paths too slippery for walking, I stayed inside, writing poems, responding to the quotes we both knew. Jim sat in his big chair, content to watch the snow fall outside his window. In that quiet, I remembered a poem written in the 8th century, attributed to Anonymous, who I decided was an Irish monk living in a beehive hut. He wrote,

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In the peace of that time, with the days so short and the nights so long, I responded, I too sit in quiet, light holding me in place moving across the pages, the margins of my life. Jim died in March, a week before the returning of light, the Vernal Equinox. Suddenly my whole world changed. My companion of 56 years no longer walked beside me. I was alone. I did not return to Lake Park until the snow melted. Then, though trying to become at ease with the first person singular, I headed for our bench. I sat still, looking around me, taking in a different silence. When a Red-winged Blackbird called from a thicket of trees below the bluff, I got up, eager to get a glimpse of this harbinger of spring, early arrival to a still-cold world. He was elusive, drawing me further down our path. After a nod to Einstein and Whittier, I came to Frederick Law Olmsted. I stopped there, reading and rereading, Gradually and silently the charm comes over us, The beauty has entered our soul.

Kathleen Phillips lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home is Eastcastle Place, a senior residence three blocks from Lake Michigan. On the bluff overlooking the water is Lake Park. That is where she and her husband walked as often as they could before his death. That is the place where they both found wonder...and she found poetry. This piece tells of that journey, the journey two people in their 80s who have walked together for 56 years and finding peace at the end. She is a member of WFOP and has been published in many journals and anthologies.

We all have routines and things we think of as ours, like the bench and the routine described in this story. And yet, just by stepping even a bit outside that routine – to another bench – we can often discover something entirely new about a familiar place. This is a big story about a small thing – a park bench.

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Nonfiction Judge Erika Janik

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He spoke of beauty...and I recalled what Jim and I found here in this park along the bluff. He spoke of the soul, of what we often felt, but could not see...the song of the blackbird, the sound the wind makes in bare branches, water in waves moving to the shore. And, in this time and place, gradually and silently, I added to that list: the voice of a loved one who never leaves, Jim’s voice whispering words only I could hear, that in the midst of life that would continue to change, he would always be near, waiting in the silence we both learned to loved.

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Concerts are free and begin at 5pm on Thurdays in Harbor View Park, 7809 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor Bring a lawn chair or blanket, carry-ins welcome.

August 10 BIRCH CREEK JAZZ AMBASSADORS August 17 MIGHTY MOUTH Rock & Blues

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4225 Main Street • Fish Creek • 888.364.9542 innkeeper@whitegullinn.com • www.w hitegullinn.com

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breakfast • lunch • dinner traditional Door County fish boils


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An Eastern black swallowtail caterpillar at Oak Road Nature Preserve, Egg Harbor. Photo by Len Villano.


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Main: great room (adjoins kitchen, dining, sunroom), master suite (spa bath & sitting room), & 2 more bedrooms. Lower: office, game & bunk rooms, & bathroom. Two 2+car heated garages. one on each level. Near boat launch. $1,239,000. www.PPDC.info/4sale/Glidden3842/

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SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

NEWS BULLETIN WHAT HAPPENED

• This winter, visitors to Winter Park in Kewaunee County will head to the top of its six-lane snow tubing hill via a Magic Carpet. The standing conveyor belt lift, which was ordered in spring, has arrived and the Kewaunee County Promotion & Recreation Department, as well as the Winter Park Association, will soon begin installation. In preparation for the moving walkway, the snow tubing hill has been reshaped. Framing will be done before the mat is rolled up the 220-foot slope of the hill that has a 70-foot vertical drop. The Magic Carpet is replacing the tow rope, which is being repurposed at the beginner’s ski hill after it’s retrofitted with handles. “This is a huge improvement to Winter Park,” said Dave Myers, Kewaunee County Promotions & Recreation Director. “We’re going to be the one and only snow tubing hill in our area to have this feature for visitors, which will be more efficient and fun to ride.” Last season at Winter Park, approximately 6,700 of the 7,200 visitors purchased passes for the snow tubing hill during the six weeks it was open. • The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources announced this week that it reissued a Wisconsin Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (WPDES) Permit to El-Na Farms LLC in the Town of Lincoln in Kewaunee County. The farm has approximately 1,350 milking and dry cows, 850 heifers and 500 calves, equaling 2,675 animal units, which produce approximately 16.5 million gallons of manure and process wastewater as well as 5,000 tons of solid manure annually, on approximately 4,982 acres. The permit took effect Aug. 1 and is good through July 31, 2022. The farm plans to expand to 5,970 animal units. In responding to public comments about the growth of this CAFO at a permit hearing held in Luxemburg on June 27, the DNR wrote: “The Department does not claim that CAFO WPDES permits are ‘zero risk’ permits and the Department acknowledges that there have been impacts associated with CAFOs, some of those impacts have been significant. However, the Department believes that the WPDES permit program has been an effective means to address these impacts and avoid impacts from occurring in the future. As with any license or permit that is issued, there is always the potential for environmental impacts associated with permit noncompliance or situations not easily or explicitly addressed by prescriptive permit requirements.”

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COMING UP • The Southern Door County School District will hold its Back-to-School Registration Days Aug. 9-10, from 12:30-7 pm in the Eagle Gym. Registration is for all returning and new students. Individual enrollment packets have already been mailed to the homes of returning students. Parents of new students should contact the district office to request enrollment information. During registration, families will have the opportunity to complete various school forms, pay student fees, and deposit money to meal accounts. Grades Pre-K-5 students will learn their classroom teacher’s name and grades 6-12 students will receive their schedules. If parents are unable to register their children during the registration days, they should make other arrangements with their child’s respective school office as soon as possible. • Lake Michigan Stakeholders will host the annual Lake Michigan Day to explore water quality and water quantity challenges and opportunities facing the region Aug. 11 from 9 am – 4 pm. Cameron Davis, the Obama Administration’s liaison to Congress on Great Lakes issues and a lead author of the Great Lakes Legacy Act, will be the keynote speaker. A panel discussion led by former Racine Mayor John Dickert includes the mayors of Port Washington, Sheboygan and Manitowoc and will highlight the importance of funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Businesses and individuals will also be honored as Champions of Conservation for their efforts to protect Lake Michigan. The meeting will be held at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, 70 Maritime Drive, Manitowoc, WI 53220. Registration is required to attend. For more information and a schedule of events, visit lakemichiganstakeholders.org.

Kitchens Sees Foxconn Deal as State’s Rust Belt Exit by JIM LUNDSTROM jim@ppulse.com

S

ome see it as a jumpstart for Wisconsin to shake off its Rust Belt trappings and enter the 21st century, while others see the deal with Taiwanese contract manufacturer Foxconn Technology Group as the sort of corporate welfare that House Speaker Paul Ryan and President Donald Trump have railed against in the past. “This is a once-in-a-century opportunity for our state and our country, and Wisconsin is ready,” Gov. Scott Walker said in a statement announcing the Foxconn plan, which includes $3 billion in state tax breaks to the tech giant to build a $10 billion plant in southeastern Wisconsin to make flat-screen TVs. Initially the plant would hire 3,000 workers and could grow, according to Gov. Walker, to 13,000 workers. Under the deal, Foxconn would receive up to $200 million annually in refundable tax credits for 15 years, up to $2.85 billion. It also waives $150 million in sales taxes on building materials, equipment and supplies. The draft legislation also calls for issuing up to $252.4 million in state debt to update beleaguered Interstate 94, which is in the area being considered for the plant. Troubling to environmental groups, the draft legislation also waives the required state environmental impact statement and does away with wetland and waterway permitting. “A rollback of such an extreme nature is unnecessary,” the nonpartisan Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters said in a statement. Others have pointed out that Foxconn has a history of making big promises without delivering, and point to a plant in Pennsylvania that never materialized and several others around the world. And at least one economist, Michael J. Hicks at Ball State University, wrote in a column at Marketwatch.com that, “Foxconn bears no meaningful risk in this deal.” But after a meeting with Gov. Walker and other officials on Tuesday, Rep. Joel Kitchens said he and his colleagues learned more about the deal. Kitchens said going into the meeting, he had a pretty good understanding of the economic side of the deal, but he did have some concerns about environmental questions. “It’s being portrayed that we’re giving them a pass on all this stuff,” Kitchens said. “I really feel pretty comfortable about it at this point. We’re just trying to streamline it. When the chairman [Terry Gou] was looking at Wisconsin, one of the most important things to him is that it could be done quickly. He wanted this place up and

running as soon as possible. We’re trying to streamline the process. Wastewater treatment, air pollution standards, exactly the same, all federal requirements the same. It’s just the permitting process that’s being changed.” For example, he mentions the state waiving the environmental impact study. “That takes a year to do that and in the end all it is, is an advisory. They still have to do a federal environmental impact study,” Kitchens said, adding the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will oversee the project. “In the case of wetlands remediation, normally you’re required to replace 1.2 acres for every acre that you degrade,” Kitchens said. “We bumped it up to two acres. They don’t have to go through the permitting process ahead of time, but the DNR will be watching and they will certainly be held to the standard that is required. It is incumbent upon us that the DNR provides necessary oversight. There’s not a single standard being loosened for them. It’s just the permitting process.” As far as the economics, Kitchens said unlike other states that made corporate deals without promises of jobs, the Foxconn deal is tied to performance. “They don’t get a penny until they’ve hired people and until we see paystubs,” he said. “If they don’t produce the jobs, they don’t get the money.” Kitchens agrees that it is a good deal for Foxconn, but adds, “honestly for me it goes beyond just what this plant will produce. I think it can transform the economy. We’re sort of stuck in the Rust Belt economy and we need to move into the 21st century. We can’t do that by sitting back. These companies have a lot of places they can go, and we can argue philosophically that we shouldn’t give away money to businesses, well, every other place is doing it, so you’re either in the game or you’re not. I think compared to other deals other states have done, it’s a pretty good deal.” Kitchens mentions there has already been talk that American glass manufacturer Corning could invest another $1 billion to set up shop close to Foxconn as a supplier of glass for the LCD screens. “Supposedly they will have 150 suppliers, and they want people that are close,” Kitchens said. “I think a lot of Wisconsin businesses are going to see benefits from it or even be created from it. That’s where there’s an impact. And 10,000 people to do the construction.” Kitchens added that Foxconn would like to break ground next May. Gov. Walker is expected to call a special session of the legislature to consider the Foxconn deal.

DOT Seeks Comments on Remote Bridge Operations

T

he Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) held a public meeting Aug. 1 to present data about the test period of remote operations of the three Sturgeon Bay bridges. All three bridges have been operated from the Oregon Street Bridge since 2014. The Michigan Street Bridge has operated remotely since 2011. The United States Coast Guard (USCG) will evaluate the data and public comments and determine whether to extend the test period, modify the arrangement, or make the remote operation arrangement permanent. Operating the bridges remotely has brought bridge operations costs down from $1.03 million per year to $340,000, almost entirely through manpower savings, according to Jason Lahm from the WisDOT. If the operation is made permanent and added to the national register, it would make the canal the first waterway operated entirely remotely in the United States, Lahm said. The WisDOT is still accepting questions and comments from the public by email at jason.lahm@dot.wi.gov.

MUNICIPAL NEWS DOOR COUNTY City of Sturgeon Bay: The Finance/ Purchasing & Building Committee meets Aug. 8 at 4 pm. The Community Protection & Service Committee meets Aug. 10 at 4:30 pm. County of Door: The Library Board meets at 5 pm Aug. 7. The Human Services Board meets at 8:30 am Aug. 8. The Comprehensive Community Services Coordinated Services Team Children’s Community Options Program Committee meets at noon Aug. 8. The Board of Adjustment meets at 6:30 pm Aug. 8. The Ag & Extension Committee meets at 8:30 am Aug. 9. The Property Committee meets at 9 am Aug. 9. The Airport & Parks Committee meets at 1:30 pm Aug. 9. The IS Committee meets at 2 pm Aug. 10. Town of Brussels: The town board meets at 7 pm Aug. 9. Town of Clay Banks: The town board meets at 6 pm Aug. 10. Town and Village of Egg Harbor: Joint meeting at the Egg Harbor Town Hall at 6 pm Aug. 9. Town of Jacksonport: The Parks Committee meets at 7 pm Aug. 7.

KEWAUNEE COUNTY City of Algoma: The common council meets at 6 pm Aug. 7. The Tourism & Promotion Committee meets at 1:30 pm Aug. 8. The Zoning Board of Appeals meets at 6 pm Aug. 8. The Parks & Recreation Committee meets at 7 pm Aug. 8. County of Kewaunee: The Land & Water Committee meets at 9 am Aug. 8. The Finance Committee meets at 8 am Aug. 10. The Law/EM Committee meets at 9 am Aug. 10. Town of Carlton: The town board meets at 7 pm Aug. 8. Town of Lincoln: The town board meets at 7 pm Aug. 7. Town of Red River: The town board meets at 7:30 pm Aug. 9. Village of Casco: The village board meets at 7 pm Aug. 8.


PAUL ELDRIDGE

YOUR REPS IN THE NEWS

Engineers estimate it will cost up to $148,739 to stabilize the old granary building in Sturgeon Bay. Photo by Jacob Dannhausen-Brun.

Council Votes to Tear Down Granary by MYLES DANNHAUSEN JR. myles@ppulse.com

T

he old granary building on Sturgeon Bay’s west waterfront will be razed in January if a private group or individual does not come forward with funds and a plan to save it by Jan. 1, 2018. The granary, which may be added to the National Register of Historic Places this month, has fallen into disrepair since the city purchased it in 2012. After Fire Chief Timothy Dietman issued an emergency order barring access to the building for safety reasons May 26, the city solicited bids to stabilize or raze the structure. Estimates to raze the building ranged from $65,000 – $85,000, while estimates to stabilize the structure ranged from $138,739 – $148,739. Those estimates made Alderman Stewart Fett lean toward razing the structure. “Obviously, if you read through it the foundation is in bad, bad shape and needs significant money to be repaired,” Fett said. Fett motioned to demolish the building no sooner than Jan. 1, 2018, to allow time for a group or person to come forward to save or restore the elevator. In the public comment period, city resident Hans Christian presented a rough outline for a Center for the Arts that could incorporate the granary. Christian said the center would possibly serve as a new home for existing arts organizations and an educational center. Alderman Ron Vandertie blamed the lawsuit brought by Friends of Sturgeon Bay Public Waterfront for the predicament. “The reason the granary is still standing is because there was a pricetag of $65,000 to tear it down, and we were led to believe there was interest in using the building in new development,” he said. “Since the lawsuit, we’ve not only lost the brewpub restaurant, but we’ve lost a developer who possibly would restructure and use it. It’s the lawsuit that has put us all behind the eight ball.” The motion carried with Alderwomen Barbara Allmann, Kelly Catarozoli and Laurel Hauser dissenting.

by MYLES DANNHAUSEN JR. myles@ppulse.com

T

Senator Tammy Baldwin Sen. Baldwin has successfully worked to restore the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. She led the fight against President Trump’s budget proposal to eliminate the federal CDBG program, which funds local community development initiatives that support jobs, housing, infrastructure, and public services for millions of Americans. “From touring neighborhood revitalization projects to delivering a Meals-on-Wheels care package, I’ve seen how Community Development Block Grants help people and drive economic development all across Wisconsin,” Baldwin said. “I led the fight in the Senate against President Trump’s proposed elimination of the CDBG program, and I’m proud that we will reverse these cuts in bipartisan legislation that passed committee and is moving forward. Together, we can continue to make differences in the lives of so many families in Wisconsin.” Trump’s budget proposal would have reduced funding for the CDBG program from $3 billion to zero. In response, Senator Baldwin led a group of 42 Senators in calling to maintain full federal funding the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Community Development Block Grant program in the Fiscal Year 2018. As a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Baldwin successfully restored full federal funding of CDBG in the FY2018 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Bill. This bipartisan legislation passed the Appropriations Committee and is now moving to the full Senate for a vote. Source: Baldwin press release

President Donald Trump President Trump predicted the U.S. would curb North Korea’s nuclear program, days after the nation conducted its latest test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). “We’ll handle North Korea. We’ll be able to handle North Korea. It will be handled. We handle everything,” Trump told reporters during a Cabinet meeting at the White House. On July 28, North Korea launched its second ballistic missile in less than a month, raising concerns about Pyongyang’s capabilities to strike the U.S. mainland. Experts believe the ICBM could potentially hit the United States’ West Coast. American presidents have long vowed to prevent North Korea from gaining such a weapon. “I am very disappointed in China,” Trump tweeted on July 29. “Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk. We will no longer allow this to continue. China could easily solve this problem!” Source: thehill.com

REPS CONTACT INFORMATION State Assembly Representative Joel Kitchens 608.266.5350 Room 10 West State Capitol PO Box 8952 Madison, WI 53708 Rep.Kitchens@legis.wisconsin.gov State Senator Frank Lasee 608.266.3512 Room 316 South State Capitol PO Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707-7882 Sen.Lasee@legis.wisconsin.gov Governor Scott Walker 608.266.1212 Office of Governor Scott Walker 115 East Capitol Madison, WI 53702 govgeneral@wisconsin.gov U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin baldwin.senate.gov 202.224.5653 717 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 U.S. Senator Ron Johnson ronjohnson.senate.gov 202.224.5323 386 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 U.S. Representative Mike Gallagher gallagher.house.gov 202.225.5665 1513 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 President Donald Trump whitehouse.gov/administration/ president-trump Comments: 202.456.1111 Switchboard: 202.456.1414 The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500

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he battle over Sturgeon Bay’s west waterfront took a new turn Aug. 1. The common council voted to approve the settlement agreement reached between the city’s negotiating committee and the Friends of Sturgeon Bay Public Waterfront (FSBPW) concerning the location of the Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM) on the west waterfront. The decision comes after the Waterfront Redevelopment Authority (WRA), which was also named in the lawsuit brought by the FSBPW, voted against the settlement July 26. In June, the city’s ad hoc negotiating committee and FSBPW met for two days to resolve the lawsuit. That resulted in an agreement to jointly recommend to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) that it approve an ordinary high water mark parallel to and 60 feet waterward of the original meander line in the U.S. government land survey of 1835 for parcel 92 next to the Door County Maritime Museum.

Both the WRA and common council need to agree to the settlement for it to be submitted for official approval by the DNR, so it’s unclear if the council’s decision will inch the city closer to resolving the impasse. The DNR will meet with city representatives Aug. 3 to set a date for a declaratory hearing that may determine the OHWM. The settlement passed in a 4 – 3 vote after the council deliberated in closed session for about 40 minutes. Alderpersons Kelly Catarozoli, Laurel Hauser, Barbara Allmann and David Ward voted in favor. Aldermen Richard Wiesner, Stewart Fett, and Ron Vandertie voted against the settlement. Before convening in closed session, Catarozoli pleaded with the counsel to stay in open session to discuss the settlement. “Nothing we’ve discussed is information that the city’s attorneys and the plaintiff’s attorneys are not privy to,” Catarozoli said. “The only people we’re keeping information from is the public.” Her motion to remain in open session fell in a 4-3 vote, with Allmann and Hauser supporting the motion.

Congressman Mike Gallagher The House of Representatives passed an amendment offered by Congressman Gallagher to reduce vulnerabilities to our nation’s electricity supply, foster renewable energy innovation, and improve U.S. national security. The amendment prioritizes the Department of Energy’s research programs that are essential to improving our nation’s low-cost electricity supply and advancing grid security. “As our nation looks to modernize our grid, improve our domestic energy supply, and reduce national security risks, energy storage technologies must become more affordable and reliable. This fiscally responsible amendment ensures that our limited resources are spent on important research initiatives rather than Washington, D.C. bureaucrats,” Rep. Gallagher said. “Through bolstering public-private partnerships that advance innovative energy storage solutions, this amendment will help improve our grid security and make renewable energy more feasible, cost effective and deployable.” Source: Gallagher press release

Senator Ron Johnson Sen. Johnson issued the following statement regarding the July 28 health care vote in the Senate: “I am disappointed not only in the failure to pass legislation to begin to repair the damage done by Obamacare, but also in the dysfunctional process that directly led to this result. Too many people have been harmed to allow tonight’s vote to be the end. In the coming weeks my committee will hold hearings to lay out the realities of our health care system, and I am committed to working with anyone who is serious about addressing these issues. Americans deserve far better than their elected officials have delivered to this point.” Source: Johnson press release

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City Approves West Waterfront Settlement

Governor Scott Walker The campaigns of Gov. Walker and House Speaker Paul Ryan launched digital ads this week touting the decision by Foxconn Technology Group to build a plant in Wisconsin. The two are gearing up for the 2018 election, although Walker has yet to formally announce that he’s running for a third term. Walker was the point man in negotiations with Foxconn, while Ryan also helped court the Taiwan-based firm. “Foxconn’s investment is a oncein-a-century opportunity to transform Wisconsin’s economy, and an example of Gov. Walker delivering results for hard-working Wisconsin families,” Walker campaign manager Joe Fadness said in a statement. Responding to the Walker ad push, State Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling (D-La Crosse) tweeted: “Is this a good deal for taxpayers or a campaign re-election gimmick? Gov. Walker seems to be blurring the lines.” Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

In the spider-web of facts, many a truth is strangled.”


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

On the Hunt for by ALYSSA SKIBA alyssa.skiba@ppulse.com

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

f you’ve ever seen David LaLuzerne meandering through Door County’s nature preserves and county parks, chances are he hasn’t taken much notice of you. “I have a tendency to do that,” he explained. “Wherever I walk out I start to look around, what kind of herbs are growing now around here?” On a gray, misty July day, we were barely

out of the parking lot at the Oak Road Nature Preserve before LaLuzerne started identifying herbs peeking through the gravel drive while reciting their medicinal values. The Ellison Bay resident and longtime pharmacist was preparing for his summer field herbs hike, the second in his five-part 2017 Herb Walk series. Through these outdoor excursions, LaLuzerne introduces fellow hikers to the abundance of local herbs in woodlands, fields and wetlands, and educates them on their historical, culinary and medicinal values. It is a passion he has nurtured since his introduction to herbs during pharmacy school in the ’70s. His class was the last to have pharmacognosy – the study of medicinal drugs derived from natural sources like plants and sea life – as required coursework, and it set LaLuzerne on a path of incorporating homeopathic remedies into his life and career. He eventually opened an herb and vitamin shop called Green Earth, at one point operating three locations in the Madison area.

(Top) Herbalist David LaLuzerne during a July Herb Walk at Oak Road Nature Preserve in Egg Harbor. (Center, from left) Red clover. St. John’s wort. Bittersweet nightshade. Echinacea. Yarrow leaf. Queen Anne’s lace. According to legend, Queen Anne was making lace when she pricked her finger with a needle and a drop of blood fell onto the fabric. The deep red center floret of the plant pays homage to this tale. (Right) Pulse Arts, Lit and Entertainment Editor Alyssa Skiba admires an Echinacea plant in bloom at Oak Road Nature Preserve. Photos by Len Villano.

Herbs

“I started to get into the whole idea of natural healing and what is healing all about,” LaLuzerne said. “To me, it’s about nourishing the body to heal itself, to restore a balance, and that’s really what herbs do… The issue that I have with healthcare is that it’s really about treating symptoms and you have to go to a doctor for that, to get a prescription, but there’s so much we should be able to do for ourselves. I feel like I try to help people learn about those things and one of the best ways to do that is through

your food and stuff that you can do for yourself.” His interest in educating people led to the launch of Herb TV Online (herbtvonline. com), an online resource for those interested in learning about oriental medicine, wildcrafting, herbalism and more. Five years ago he closed up shop in the Madison area and in 2015, he and his wife Lynn moved to Door County, where LaLuzerne has spent time finding and studying local herbs. He has taught classes

at The Clearing, where interest in the topic inspired creation of his own Herb Walks. The hike at the Oak Road Nature Preserve, a Door County Land Trust preserve located northeast of Carlsville, introduced us to the herbs growing in and alongside the trail on the vernal wetland portion of the land, east of Oak Road. Land trust guidelines prohibit visitors from collecting vegetation, wildlife and other material from preserves, so the hikes are purely visual, though LaLuzerne is quick to point out that herbs found on land trust preserves are likely to be found in your own backyard. While the hikes are not long in distance, you can expect to make a stop every few feet as LaLuzerne points out nearby herbs and explains how to incorporate them into your everyday wellness routine. Today, he is excited to see echinacea in full bloom and as we walk the damp trails, he expounds on the value of the bergamot, Queen Anne’s lace, St. John’s wort and red clover we pass by. LaLuzerne recommends three ways to use herbs for healing: as a tea/infusion, a tincture, or an additional ingredient in your regular meals (think salads). “In many ways, the best way to use any herb is in your food, to incorporate the whole herb into your food somehow but the extract is better than the tea in terms of the medicinal value,” he said. “Of course teas can taste really good, too, and that’s beneficial.” To make a tincture – an alcoholic extract of a plant – LaLuzerne chops up the plant material, places it in a glass jar, and covers the material with either brandy or vodka. He gives the mixture a daily shake over the course of two to six weeks, depending on the material.

“If it’s flowers and leaves, usually two weeks is enough to extract but if you have a root or bark, which can be used in a lot of cases, you would chop it up and then let it extract for at least six weeks because it’s denser material, it’s harder to make a good extraction,” he said. Tinctures are taken in very small doses and can be diluted in water or juice before drinking them (do your research to determine best dosage). As for making tea, the amount of plant material used depends on whether the plant is fresh or dried. “If you’re using a fresh plant, you probably want a good couple tablespoons per cup,” LaLuzerne said. “If you dry it, you can use less, maybe one or two teaspoons.” As for incorporating herbs into meals, LaLuzerne recommends a variety of preparations: boiled, roasted or raw in a salad. When it comes down to it, the most important part is consumption. “Ultimately I think the body is what heals itself and you just gotta give it the nutrients it needs to do that,” he said. “That’s why I like herbs.” For those interested in getting started, LaLuzerne recommends two guides: Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide by Lawrence Newcomb, and A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs: Eastern and Central North America by Steven Foster and James A. Duke. Three hikes remain in David LaLuzerne’s schedule. They are: Aug. 12, wetland herbs, Reiboldt’s Creek at Moonlight Bay; Sept. 16, mushrooms, Mink River Trail; Oct. 14, herbs in the neighborhood, LaLuzerne residence (12030 Garrett Bay Road, Ellison Bay). All herb walks are held on Saturdays from 1 – 3pm. Hikes are $5. For more information, email LaLuzerne at David@HerbTVOnline.com.


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

COMMUNITY LIFE NOTES As a free public service to our readers, Peninsula Pulse presents Life Notes, devoted to the notable milestones in life, from birth to significant birthdays to engagements, weddings and passings. The deadline for submissions is noon on Friday. Send submissions to lifenotes@ ppulse.com. The Pulse reserves the right to edit submissions to conform to space. Call 920.839.2121 for details.

BIRTHS Jenny Londo and Adam Nicholson, Sturgeon Bay, are parents of a son born on July 17, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Elizabeth and Thomas Pratt, Sturgeon Bay, are the parents of a daughter born on July 19, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Maternal grandparents are Laura and Marc Enger, Farmer City, Ill. Paternal Grandparents are Aleta and Thomas Pratt, Coconut Grove, Ill. Elizabeth R. Gibson and Louis W. Laboy, Sturgeon Bay, are the parents of a son born on July 26, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Maternal grandparents are Barbara and Earl Gibson, Sturgeon Bay. Paternal grandparents are Anna Ligia Laboy Munoz, Puerto Rico, and Santos A. Laboy Pagan, Puerto Rico. Jennifer Lasee and Bobby Deggendorf, Sturgeon Bay, are the parents of a daughter born on July 26, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Maternal grandparents are John and Dennie Lasee, Sturgeon Bay. Paternal grandparents are Patti and Bob Chamberlin, Lemont, Ill. Kori and Tyler Powell, Sturgeon Bay, are the parents of a daughter born July 28, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Maternal grandparents are Tami and Jim Feuerstein, Whitelaw, Wis. Paternal grandparents are Mari Anderson, Janesville, Wis., and Heather and Dan Powell, Bellingham, Wash.

tinker and repair all kinds of items, going out for breakfast at the Morning Glory, and getting a burger and a beer for lunch. Sonny was an extremely generous person who had a wonderful sense of humor. Memorial services were held July 31. Burial was at Bayside Cemetery. In-lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to St. Peter’s Lutheran Church.

MEMORIAL SERVICE Don Makuen

Donald R. Makuen, 86, of Ellison Bay, died May 15, 2017 in Ellison Bay. Don’s family invites the community to a memorial celebration Sunday, Aug. 6, 1 – 3 pm at Rowleys Bay Resort in Ellison Bay.

OBITUARIES Edward Ebel Aug. 11, 1958 – July 30, 2017

Edward “Ed” Ebel, 58, of Elms Road, Sturgeon Bay, died after a yearlong battle with esophageal cancer. He was the youngest in the family born to Melvin and Geraldine Ebel, in Rice Lake. He moved with the family to Sturgeon Bay in 1965, when Ed was seven. He married Patt A. Magle in 1984. Ed was self-employed in the tanning business for many years. He enjoyed entertaining family and friends with his home-cooking, canning and sausagemaking. He was also a skilled carpenter and enjoyed gardening, boating with the kids, country music and following the Packers. Family and friends are invited to attend a celebration of Ed’s life from 1 – 4 pm, Aug. 13 at Sherwood Point Grill (formerly the Fishing Hole). Sherwin G. Weckler April 28, 1927 – July 26, 2017

Lindsey Donohue and Brandon Fabry, Ephraim, are the parents of a son born July 29, 2017, at Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay. Maternal grandparents are Karla and Mike Donohue, Gills Rock. Paternal grandparents are Shirley and Cliff Christl, Green Bay. Sherwin Gustave “Sonny” Weckler, 90, of Sturgeon Bay, died at Cardinal Ridge CBRF with family at his side. He was born in Door County to Clarence and Cebell (Krause) Weckler. Sonny owned and operated Weckler’s Hillside Court for many years. He also worked at Griffin Toohey Food Services, Wisconsin Foods, and Bayship Building. Sonny loved to

Walter I. Nehlsen Aug. 23, 1930 – July 24, 2017 Walter I. Nehlsen, 86, of Washington Island, died after a brief illness. Walt and his wife Evelyn retired to Washington Island in 1998. He had many hobbies including working in the woods, working on tractors (John Deere only) and flying. He managed the airport on Washington Island for many years. Before retirement, he farmed and ran his own electrical wiring business in Whitewater. Walt had a special sensitivity for serviceman, especially those who served and died in WWII. He was able to visit the Normandy American Cemetery and Pearl Harbor over the past few years. A memorial service will be held Aug. 12, 11 am at Bethel Church on Washington Island. Memorials may be given in Walter’s name and will be used for several causes including WIChip (Service/Support on Washington Island) and Leader Dogs for the Blind. Georgine “Gee” Kretzmann Feb. 22, 1928 – June 22, 2017

Georgine (Gee) Kretzmann, 89, of Ellison Bay, died at Hearthside Home in Sister Bay, with her husband Conrad (Connie) and son Mark at her bedside. She was born to Orlando and Charlotte E. Carner (Arndt), Cleveland, Ohio. She met Connie while earning an English degree at Valparaiso University. Connie and Gee were married Aug. 27, 1950. They lived in Chicago where their children Katherine, Peter, and Mark were born. In 1956 they moved to Libertyville before retiring to Ellison Bay in 1989. In 1995 they built a home on 10 acres of hay field thus the name Hayfield House. Although small in stature, Gee was large in heart. Her years were filled with generosity, love and compassion. On her 67th marriage anniversary weekend, Aug. 26, 11 am, a joyful service will be held at Shepherd of the Bay Lutheran Church in Ellison Bay. In lieu of flowers memorials may be given to Compassion International, 12290 Voyager Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80921-3668 or Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin, 3003 N Richmond Street #A, Appleton, WI 54911. caspersonfuneralhome.com

Members of the Billy Weiss American Legion Post 527 present a check for $1,000 to Fire Chief Chris Hecht for the Sister Bay Liberty Grove Fire Department at their Aug. 1 meeting at the Sister Bay Village Hall. Post members also properly disposed of American flags by burning them in a beachfront ceremony. We’ll have more on that ceremony in next week’s Pulse. Photo by Jim Lundstrom.

DOOR NOTES • The Sturgeon Bay Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3088 will conduct their annual “Buddy Poppy” drive Aug. 4 & 5. They will be at the following locations: Sturgeon Bay – Econofoods, Pick ‘N Save, Walgreens from 8 am – 6 pm; and Egg Harbor – Main Street Market from 7:30 am – 7:30 pm. • The Ridges Sanctuary celebrates their 80th Anniversary and the Cook-Albert Fuller Nature Center Building Dedication Aug. 5. The Nature Center will be open from 9 am to 5 pm, with the usual 10 am Guided Sanctuary hikes. The Dedication Ceremony begins at 11:30 am and will be followed by a grill-out from 12 – 2 pm. Guided Sanctuary hikes will again be available at 2 pm. No reservations necessary. The Cook-Albert Fuller Nature Center is located at 8166 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. • Saints Peter and Paul Parish in Institute will hold their annual fish boil and polka mass Aug. 6. Polka mass begins at 9:30 am and the all-you-can-eat fish boil goes from 11 am – 2 pm. All plates include onion, potatoes, rye bread, coleslaw and dessert bars. Also scheduled during the day is a Belgian pie sale before and after mass Aug. 5 and 6; music all day from Jerry Voelker and the Jolly Gents; flea market in the church basement from 9 am – 3 pm; and a silent auction with bag auction items. The cost for fish is $13 adults, $6 kids (5-10), and free for kids ages 4 and younger; and $6 adults and $3 kids (5-10) for a hot dog or sloppy Joe plate. The event is held rain or shine and is the annual major fundraiser for the parish. The Saints Peter and Paul Parish is located at the intersection of Highway 57 and Dunn Road in Institute. • Doulagivers of Door County hopes the community will join their monthly community discussion about end-of-life topics. The next meeting is Aug. 8, 6 – 7:30 pm at the Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S. 4th Ave. Each month there will be a short educational presentation, followed by open discussion between all present. At this meeting, the group will discuss the need for closure for all facing the end of their lives, and ways that loved ones can help with this process. Pre-registration is appreciated. This is always a free community event. The meetings are led by Marggie Hatala, RN, BSN, Reiki Master. To register or for more information, visit marggiehatala.com. • The 47th Men’s Sturgeon Bay High School HalfCentury Reunion is scheduled for Aug. 16 at the Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club. Social hour begins at 11:30 am with a family style lunch at 12:30 pm. The cost is $28 and can be sent to Half Century Club, C/O Dave Hunt, 7521 Eliason Rd, Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235.

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Tiger, a sevenyear-old domestic shorthair cat, is this week’s featured pet from the Door County Humane Society (DCHS). He came to DCHS as a stray. As you can see in the picture, Tiger has only one eye. When he came to DCHS, his damaged right eye was removed, and he’s been feeling much better ever since. Tiger is an incredibly friendly, playful, and chatty boy. He loves having people around and gets lonely without them. So if you are looking for a sweet boy who just wants to love and be loved, visit Tiger today. The Door County Humane Society, located at 3475 County PD in Sturgeon Bay, is open 12 – 6 pm Monday, Wednesday and Friday; and 12 – 4 pm Saturday. For more information, call 920.746.1111 or visit doorcountyhumanesociety.org.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

• Malibu Moo’s, located at 4151 Maple St., Fish Creek, is holding a special MS fundraiser during August. For every Guernsey Turtle sold in August, Malibu Moo’s will donate 10 percent of the proceeds to go toward MS research and programs for families living with MS. Two friends from high school have teamed up to make this event possible. Mary Graf, owner of Malibu Moo’s, and Pat Heller, MS fundraiser, met in high school and have been friends for 50 years. This is the third year they have teamed up to raise funds.


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

Boxing is a celebration of the lost religion of masculinity all the more trenchant for its being lost.”

SPORTS

JOYCE CAROL OATES

RED PUTTER PRO TOURNEY RETURNS AUG. 5 It’s tournament time again at The Red Putter Miniature Golf Course. The 16th annual tournament and will be the first without course owner and tournament director Bob Yttri. He started the tournament in 2002 when several regular players were bragging about their low scores and he said they had to prove it. He added the stipulation that players first had to qualify to enter and the Pro Tournament was born. The top prize for the Red Putter Pro Tournament is $2,000. Pros will come from near and far to compete for the prize money, trophy and the coveted Red Jacket. This is the only professional miniature golf tournament in the area and draws between 80 and 100 players from around the country. Golfers may enter The Red Putter Pro Tournament for $30, and must pre-qualify with a score under par on the course. Registered players practice for free the week of the tournament. Sign-in begins at 8 am on Aug. 5, with tournament play beginning at 9 am. Three rounds of golf are played, followed by lunch served by the Mink River Basin. Visit doorcountypulse.com/ entertainment/door-county-video to view a tournament review video.

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Caleb Cornell of Sturgeon Bay won the 35th Annual Kewaunee/Door Salmon Tournament with a 30.51-pound fish he caught off Washington Island July 30, the final day of the nine-day tournament. Cornell won the $10,000 first prize, taxidermy mounting of the fish by Northland Taxidermy and a salmon ring. The next largest salmon hooked was a 30.35-pounder caught by Mike Bathke. He earned a $5,000 prize. Submitted.

TOUGH LOSS FOR DESTROYERS

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

In the seventh week of Mid-States Football League (MSFL) play, the Door County Destroyers lost 49-10 to the Racine Raiders July 29. The Destroyers play at home Aug. 5 against the Lincoln-Way Patriots. Kick-off is at 4 pm at the Baileys Harbor Rec Park. The first round of MSFL playoffs begins Aug. 19. For more information visit dcdestroyers. com.

Bays Move Into First Sister Bay’s Sam Forkert and Bubba Laughlin outdueled West Jacksonport’s Riley Cordier as Sister Bay stepped into first place in Door County League Baseball play Sunday. Sister Bay took the matchup of top teams 1 – 0. In other play, Maplewood routed Kolberg 19 – 3, Egg Harbor did the same to Baileys Harbor 16 – 4 in the first game of a double-header, then 8 – 2 in the nightcap. On Friday, Washington Island topped Institute 9 – 6. RESULTS Washington Island 9, Institute 6 West Jacksonport 0, Sister Bay 1 Baileys Harbor 4, Egg Harbor 16 (Game 1) Baileys Harbor 2, Egg

Harbor 8 (Game 2) Maplewood 19, Kolberg 3 SCHEDULE Aug. 4, 7:30 pm Egg Harbor at Institute Aug. 5, 1:30 pm West Jacksonport at Kolberg Aug. 6, 1:30 pm Kolberg at West Jacksonport Sister Bay at Maplewood Baileys Harbor at Washington Island STANDINGS Sister Bay, 10-1 West Jacksonport, 9-2 Egg Harbor, 8-4 Washington Island, 6-5 Kolberg, 4-5 Maplewood, 4-8 Baileys Harbor, 2-9 Institute, 1-11

NORTHERN DOOR VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE STANDINGS As of July 26

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2016 Champion Nate Nichols takes a victory ride on the Badger with his trophy and Red Jacket. Submitted.

CALEB CORNELL WINS K/D SALMON TOURNAMENT

COUNTY LEAGUE BASEBALL

ARTS

PC Junction, 27-3 Blue Horse, 25-5 Husby’s, 25-5 Roots, 19-11 Main Street Market, 14-18 Camp David, 11-18 Nicolet Beach, 9-18 Wilson’s, 5-31 TypeSetters, 2-28 RESULTS July 26 Blue Horse 2, Main Street Market 1 Husby’s 3, Wilson’s 0 Roots Inn 2, TypeSetters 1 Blue Horse 2, Nicolet Beach 1 Camp David 0, PC Junction 3 Main Street Market 3, TypeSetters 0 SCHEDULE Aug. 9 7 pm PC Junction vs. Blue Horse Wilson’s vs. Camp David Husby’s vs. Nicolet Beach 8 pm Camp David vs. Main Street Market Husby’s vs. TypeSetters Roots Inn vs. Nicolet Beach

(1) James May Gallery presents their

(3) The reception for Plum Bottom Pottery

newest exhibit, Ceramics Sculpture Culture, with an opening reception Aug. 4, 5:30 – 8 pm. The show was curated by Taylor Robenalt and features the Ceramics Sculpture Culture, a collective of emerging ceramic sculptors. The exhibit runs through Aug. 28. Ceramics Sculpture Culture is a collective of artists whose intent is to support and promote the growth and understanding of contemporary ceramic sculpture. Ceramics Sculpture Culture intends to show as a group in galleries nationwide, creating and hosting informative workshops in studios and art centers, writing and publishing articles in contemporary art publications, and participating in panel discussions and symposiums throughout the year. To stay up-to-date with the group, follow Ceramics Sculpture Culture on Instagram. This show coincides with the monthly Art Walk on historic Steele Street and the second annual Mobiles in Algoma. In addition to the opening reception at James May, there will be an opening reception for Kit Leffler from 5 – 9 pm at The Jabberwock, paint your own raku from 5 – 9 pm at Clay on Steele, and an opening reception for Kimberly Lyon at Steele Street Trading Co. & Gallery. James May Gallery is located at 213 Steele St. in Algoma. Summer hours are 1 – 5 pm Sunday, 10 am – 1 pm Monday, 10 am – 5 pm Thursday through Saturday, and by appointment.

& Gallery’s Art Show 8: Glass is Aug. 5, 1 – 4 pm. The show features glass artists Josephine Geiger, Rose Klemen, Sarka Evans and Kellie Hanson. Geiger will hold a leaded glass demonstration from 1 to 2 pm and will detail her design and cutting process. A reception with the artists will follow from 2-4 pm with a chance to meet Geiger and Evans. Geiger’s delightful leaded glass panels bring clouds, skies, trees and water to life with brilliant and dynamic colors. Her contemporary, geometric compositions are influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright. Evans’s beautifully framed mosaics are inspired by the scenes outside her window and the stunning Lake Michigan landscape. Klemen’s functional and decorative fused glass works are inspired by the natural forces. She uses rich blues, greens and warm golden browns to create depth and mystery. Hanson, a self-taught Michigan artist, describes creating mosaics as a delightful glass puzzle. Her work includes playful colors and textures in a combination of glass, tiles, mirror, beads, old and new china, and found objects. Plum Bottom Pottery & Gallery is open 10 am – 5 pm daily. To visit go 15 minutes north of Sturgeon Bay or five minutes south of Egg Harbor on Highway 42 then east to 4999 Plum Bottom Rd.

(2) 2forU Design & Gallery will offer a

meet-and-greet with featured watercolor artist Fran Vail Aug. 5, 2 – 4:30 pm. Vail will demonstrate her watercolor techniques while painting a landscape and discuss her uniquely beautiful studies of bird wings. Door County is Vail’s home away from home. She has lived part of almost every summer in Ephraim and has studied painting with many Door County artists, including Phil Austin, Craig Blietz and Bonnie Paruch. She is a working artist and watercolor instructor with more than 40 years experience. Her work is inspired by the beauty and constantly changing moods of Door County landscapes, flowers and wildlife. She will be in Ephraim throughout August and available for private or group lessons. 2forU Design & Gallery is located in downtown Fish Creek at 4140 Bluff Lane. For more information, call 920.854.7770 or visit 2forUDesign.com.

(4) Patricia Shoppe of Egg Harbor wraps up their summer trunk show series with the newest addition to their jewelry collection, Anna Beck. This Saturday, Aug. 5 the entire fall collection will be at the store for pre-orders. This latest collection is not available in stores until September but Patricia Shoppe is offering an early ordering offer of 10 percent off all purchases of Anna Beck jewelry during the trunk show. Anna Beck offers a high quality collection of handcrafted sterling silver and 18-karat gold jewelry made by skilled artisans in Bali. Erin Bosman, owner of Patricia Shoppe, said, “Reading Anna Beck’s story behind her collection reminded me of how it feels when we sell jewelry to our customer. It is part of their memories, their vacation, their Door County experience. I handpick each piece in my store trying to offer customers a diverse collection to choose from that will speak to them in some special way that will show off their style, their inner beauty.”


JUNE NIRSCHL HEADLINES DICKINSON POETRY SERIES

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June Nirschl’s attitude toward life is reflected in her poetry: Let there be variety. Trained as an English teacher, a job she loved for 15 years, she moved into local government as a municipal town clerk in southeastern Wisconsin. Throughout her careers, Nirschl dabbled in poetry, continuing to find that around every corner lay something new, someone new. Moving to Door County in 2000 enabled Nirschl to continue writing among a supportive group of poets, most especially the Wallace Group. With Judy Roy and Nancy Rafal, Nirschl’s work was published in their initial offering, Slightly Off Q, followed June Nirschl by Two Off Q: A Conversation in Poetry with Judy Roy. The Wisconsin Library Association recognized Two Off Q for outstanding achievement in poetry in 2009. Her most recent chapbook is a solo effort, Before & After. Nirschl’s work has appeared in the Peninsula Pulse, Wisconsin Poets’ Calendar, the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets Museletter, and Fox Cry Review. Her poetry has been awarded the Jade Ring from the Wisconsin Writers Association. On the second Wednesday of every month the Dickinson Poetry Series features a renowned local or regional poet followed by an open mic, providing an opportunity for others to read their poetry. A reception follows affording an opportunity to meet the poets. The public is welcome and there is no charge. The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is located at 10341 Hwy. 42 in north Ephraim. For more information call 920.854.7559.

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

LITERATURE

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(6) Women’s Fine Art Galleries of Egg Harbor’s annual Progressive Art Crawl is happening Aug. 10, 4 – 8 pm. Five Egg Harbor gallery owners and artists representing Angela Lensch Gallery, Cappaert Contemporary Gallery, Lost Moth Gallery, Off the Wheel Pottery and Brilliant Stranger invite the community to an art celebration and samples of their favorite ethnic foods. These five galleries offer a diversity of art in all media. The event is free. There will be a map on the punch card guests can pick up at their first gallery stop. When all five galleries are punched, they will be eligible for a drawing for a gift certificate. Below is a list of the galleries on the crawl. Angela Lensch Gallery, 7653 Hwy 42, 920.868.5088: Featuring Lensch’s unique, hand-woven, gold and silver jewelry as well as a variety of fine art jewelry, glass, sculpture and photography by local and regional artists. Colleen Bins of Chief Oshkosh will show intricate silver and gold metalwork and more. Featured food is a traditional white corn bread native to the

Oneida Nation with a strawberry maple drink. Cappaert Gallery, 7901 Hwy 42, 920.868.3987: Cappaert’s current paintings are focused on the abstracted close-up images of the sunsets and skies from the aerial view of planes. She will serve foods based on Italy; her previous travels there inspired her colors of some new paintings. Lost Moth Gallery, 7975 Hwy 42, 920.495.2928: Showing artist Jeanne Kuhns’ allegorical acrylic paintings inspired by nature, and a miniature show of animal paintings. The featured food is vegetarian sushi and spring rolls and iced tea. Off The Wheel Pottery, 4234 Cty E, 920.868.9608: Showing the work of resident potter Renee Schwaller and a special “Pottery Mushroom Show” with a variety of glazed and painted mushrooms. Mexican-style food will be served. Brilliant Stranger – Ecotique, 7821 Hwy 42, 920.366.0301: Showing one-of-akind wearable art garments and accessories by Dawn Patel, handmade acoustic guitars by Dale Kumbalek, Guatemalan weavings, and more. The featured food is pakora and poppadums with mango chutney and rose water lemonade.

(7) The Trillium Quilt Guild, of Sister Bay, is proud to display its members’ works at The Anderson House at The Corner of the Past historical site south of Sister Bay Aug. 11 – 12, 10 am – 3 pm. The exhibit, For the Love of Quilting II, will feature approximately 30 quilts of varying styles, from traditional to modern, and techniques. Each quilt shows its maker’s creativity, precision and love of the art of quilting. The Trillium Quilt Guild has been part of the Door County art scene for more than 19 years. Fully participating in community and charitable initiatives, its recent projects have included donating quilts to Sister Bay’s Centennial, the Neighbor to Neighbor organization, victims of Hurricane Sandy, the Cancer Center at Door County Medical Center, the Sister Bay EMT/Fire Department, and the Quilts of Valor project. The Trillium Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at the Sister Bay Fire Station, 2258 Mill Road, 10 am – 12 pm. Membership is open to all levels of quilters for a nominal membership fee. New members are welcome.

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featured artist Mariyana Dimitrova is Aug. 5, 10 am – 5 pm. Dimitrova is an artist that explores natural fibers in new ways. Turtle Ridge first became familiar with Dimitrova through her felted garments and shawls. A master felting class with Diana Boykova from Plovdiv, Bulgaria (Dimitrova’s native country), really sparked Dimitrova’s creativity. Her garments and shawls are double-sided, with completely different designs, textures and colors on each side. One shawl reminiscent of a starry night is composed of midnight blue with freshwater pearl beading, angora and merino wool. It reverses to a jellyfish pattern in ocean blue. Her explorations in natural fibers led to working with silk cocoons that she dyes with spinach, turmeric and other natural dyes. Turtle Ridge Gallery/Boutique is located at 11736 Mink River Road in Ellison

Bay. The boutique is open 10 am – 5 pm daily.

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The Classic Collection and the Fall 2017 Anna Beck Collection will be available at Patricia Shoppe Aug. 5, 10 am – 5 pm. The limited edition of fall features pyrite, black sapphire, and blue pearls set in sterling silver and 18-karat gold. For more information, visit patriciashoppe.com or call 920.868.1537.

(5) Turtle Ridge’s opening show for

(1) (Left to right) Contemporary ceramic sculptures by Kensuke Yamada and Rachel Ballard, part of James May Gallery’s August exhibit, Ceramics Sculpture Culture. (2) (Left to right) “Wood Duck Drake” and “Wild Turkey” watercolor paintings by Fran Vail. (3) (Top to bottom) “Koi In the Pond” by Josephine Geiger. Sunflower mosaic by Kellie Hanson. Both are featured artists of Plum Bottom Pottery & Gallery’s Art Show 8: Glass. (4) Sterling silver jewelry by Anna Beck, the newest addition to Patricia Shoppe. (5) Turtle Ridge Gallery will showcase the felted garments, shawls and jewelry of Mariyana Dimitrova. (6) Five Egg Harbor gallery owners and artists representing Angela Lensch Gallery, Cappaert Contemporary Gallery, Lost Moth Gallery, Off the Wheel Pottery and Brilliant Stranger present the 3rd Annual Progressive Art Crawl on Aug. 10. (7) “3-D Explosion” by Laurie Moegenburg. Moegenburg and the rest of the Trillium Quilt Guild will have their works on display at The Anderson House in Sister Bay Aug. 11-12.


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

INDOOR

MUSIC CHAMBERFOLK TRIO, GUITAR CLINIC IN STURGEON BAY (1) The final “Buckets of Rain: The Songs of

PEIL FAMILY HISTORY, WORKING WARRIORS EXHIBIT IN SISTER BAY The Door County Historical Society will host its Saturday afternoon yesteryear programming with “The Peil Family – An Immigrant Door County Family,” presented by Lynn Mattke Aug. 5 at 2 pm in the Collins Learning Center at 2041 Michigan St. in Sturgeon Bay, at Crossroads at Big Creek. The history of the Peil family in Door County began 146 years ago when Karl, Augusta and five of their children arrived from Germany. The family settled on an 80-acre farm in Baileys Harbor at the corner of county roads EE and F. When Otto, the oldest son, turned 30, he took over the farm and sought a wife. Receiving assistance from a friend, a letter was sent back to Germany to ask if the granddaughter of an old friend was interested in coming to “the land of opportunity.” After an exchange of photographs, Otto helped arrange Hedwig’s trip from Germany, and their plans to marry were established. Arriving in Door County, Hedwig became the “force extraordinaire” of the Peil family and raised 10 children on the family farm. Mattke is the retired Director of Independent Senior Housing at Scandia Village, and the granddaughter of Hedwig and Otto Peil. Her mother, Adeline Edmunds, wrote The Loving Spice of Life, depicting the story of Hedwig’s life. Realizing her rich family history, Mattke is happy to share her family’s stories. There is no cost to attend, but an offering will be taken to support Heritage Village at Big Creek. The Door County Historical Society’s next program in the Yesteryear series is a German Festival Aug. 12, 10 am – 3 pm, at Heritage Village. For more information, call 920.421.2332 or visit DoorCountyHistoricalSociety.org. From Aug. 1 – 26, the traveling exhibit Working Warriors: Military Life Beyond Combat will be on display at Corner of the Past Museum in Sister Bay. The exhibit features photographs and artwork from the Wisconsin Veterans Museum collection. The exhibit includes stunning images and brief, thought-provoking prose. About 75 percent of military work is considered non-combat. These roles rarely make the headlines, but are vital to every military operation. Exploring the non-combat roles of military service personnel, including work as beauticians, military police, dentists, mechanics, and photographers, this exhibit showcases an often overlooked but highly relatable side of military life. To enhance the experience, the Wisconsin Veteran Museum traveling trunk for WWII: European Theater will be at Corner of the Past until Aug. 18. The trunk contains uniforms, artifacts, multi-media, and activities that illustrate the Wisconsin soldier’s experience. Visitors can try on the uniforms, handle the artifacts, and interact with the exhibit. Working Warriors will be on display at Corner of the Past Museum, 10310 Fieldcrest Road in Sister Bay. Admission is $5 and free for children ages 12 and younger. For more information, visit sisterbayhistory.org or call 920.854.7680.

Bob Dylan” concert in this year’s Woodwalk Concert Series is Aug. 4 at 7 pm. This is the third rendition of the company’s choice of favorite Bob Dylan songs for the review. This performance includes nine songs new to the review as wall as past favorites: “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door,” “Lay Lady Lay,” “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” “Rainy Day Women,” “My Back Pages” and many more. The Buckets of Rain company includes: Eric Lewis, Katie Dahl, Jeanne Kuhns, Chris Irwin, Rich Higdon and Patrick Palmer. Call to reserve an outside table for a picnic dinner at 5:30 pm before the show. Drinks and treats will be for sale. Woodwalk Gallery is located at 6746 Cty G, one mile off Highway 42, a bit south of Egg Harbor. Tickets are $20 cash at the door; no credit cards or checks accepted. For general seating reservations, call 920.629.4877 or 920.495.2928, or email jeannekuhns53@gmail.com. Door County Makers Space will host Nashville native Mark Stuart for a concert and guitar clinic. Mark Stuart (former lead guitar player for Steve Earle, Joan Baez, Freddy Fender and Steve Forbert) returns to Door County Makers Space to play his style of Americana Aug. 5 at 8 pm. He will then lead a guitar clinic Aug. 6 at 3 pm for all levels of guitar players. Prices will vary depending on the number of attendees but the cost is expected to be around $25-50. The clinic lasts three hours and is a great way to take your playing to the next level. Contact Elliot Goettelman at 920.333.0323 or dcmakersspace@gmail.com for questions or to make reservations. For more information visit doorcountymakersspace.com.

(2) Bluegrass icon Ricky Skaggs and his band

Kentucky Thunder will take the stage at Door Community Auditorium (DCA) in Fish Creek on Aug. 6 at 8 pm. Skaggs was born July 18, 1954 in Cordell, Kentucky. He struck his first chords on a mandolin when he was five years old, and within a year, the child prodigy was sharing stages with bluegrass legend Bill Monroe. By age 7, Skaggs had begun appearing on TV with Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs. He became a

professional bluegrass musician in 1971, when he and his friend Keith Whitley were invited to join the legendary Ralph Stanley’s band the Clinch Mountain Boys. Fifty years later, this 14-time Grammy Award winner continues to work at the forefront of the current roots music revival. In 1982, he became the youngest musician ever inducted into the Grand Ole Opry. Since then, he’s had 13 number-one hits, including “Highway 40 Blues” and “Country Boy,” and played with luminaries like Flatt and Scruggs, Ralph Stanley, Emmylou Harris, Bruce Hornsby, Vince Gill and countless others. Backed by an ensemble of world-class pickers – the renowned band Kentucky Thunder – Skaggs will take over DCA for a blazing evening of bluegrass music. Tickets range from $38 to $65. Advance reservations are recommended and can be made through the DCA box office, located at 3926 Hwy 42 in Fish Creek. The box office is open 12 – 5 pm, Monday through Friday. For tickets, call 920.868.2728, visit dcauditorium. org, or stop by the box office.

(3) Tonic Sol-fa, a top touring vocal group in the U.S., will visit the Peg Egan Performing Arts Center in Egg Harbor Aug. 6. Although they are simply four voices and a tambourine, Tonic Sol-fa has spent considerable time on the road carving their niche as the nation’s top vocal group. In the midst of touring, this quartet has been named one of the top five “must see” groups in America, has been awarded numerous original song and album awards in pop, gospel and holiday genres, appeared on NBC’s Today Show and in the pages of Newsweek magazine. Outings with Jay Leno, Shawn Colvin, and Garrison Keillor have propelled album sales and have earned the group thousands of intensely loyal fans. Tonic Sol-fa has been voted into the Midwest Music Hall of Fame and averaged more than 150 shows annually in 48 states. The quartet has also won their first Emmy Award in the “Musical Composition/Arrangement” category for a song performed in a Toys for Tots public service announcement. The Peg Egan Center is located on Church Street in Egg Harbor, and all concerts are free and open to the public. In case of rain, concerts are held at the Calvary Methodist Church, 4650 Cty E, Egg Harbor. For more information call 920.493.5979.

(4) Fresh from touring in Spain and singing in

castles by the sea, Dayna Kurtz comes to Lost Moth Gallery Aug. 9 with her spellbinding songs and mesmerizing voice.

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HAPPENINGS

FRI 8/4 FESTIVALS

Door County Fair John Miles County Park, 812 N 14th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.7126. Carnival rides, food stands, 4-H animal barns, grandstand events, kids and family tents. Visit doorcountyfair. com for more information.

LIVE MUSIC

Buckets of Rain Woodwalk Gallery, 6746 Cty Rd G, Egg Harbor. 920.868.2912. 5:30pm. Doors open, picnics welcome. 7pm. Show starts. Six of Door County’s favorite musicians reunite to pay tribute to Bob Dylan in a revue that has become one of the peninsula’s favorite concert traditions. $20/person, cash. Johnny Belmont and the Fabulous Cheeseheads Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30-7:45pm. Live music in Hof Restaurant. Free. 8:45pm. Live music in the Yodel Inn. Free. Live Music Waterfront Mary’s Bar & Grill at Beach Harbor Resort, 3662 N Duluth Ave,

Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3191. 4-8pm. Scotty Cash. Country swamp grass. Free. 9:30pm. Still Blue. Seattle based swing/ jazz/blues band. Free. Acoustic Song Circle Prince of Peace Lutheran Church Coffee House, 1756 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7750. 10am-12pm. For more information call or go to “Door County Acoustic Song Circles & Jams” on Facebook. Marybeth Mattson Bearded Heart Coffee, 8101 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9111. 1-3pm. Acoustic folk/ rock. Free. Birch Creek Jazz Ambassadors Vino! Vino! Wine Bar at Stone’s Throw Winery, 3382 Cty Rd E, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9660. 2-4pm. Live music on the patio. Free. Open Mic Glas Coffeehouse, 67 E Maple St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.5575. 6-8pm. Bring your originals, covers, or just your ears to listen. Hosted by Josh Gregory. Deathfolk Stabbur Beer Garden, 10698 N Bay Shore Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2626. 6-9pm. Jess Holland and Nick Hoover playing oldtimey, folk music peppered with tight harmonies. Free. The Ambassadors Sonny’s Pizzeria, 129 N Madison, Sturgeon

Bay. 920.743.2300. 6pm. Live music. Free. Jim Counter Kitty O’Reilly’s Irish Pub, 59 E Oak St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7441. 7pm. Rock, R&B. Free. Matt Wahl Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Playing humorous folk on guitar. Entertaining acoustic guitar and vocals. Free. Hansen Family Singers Red Barn, 1474 S. Shore Dr., Washington Island. 7:30pm. Grandchildren of Barb & Ray Hansen. Live music. $5/adults. $3/children. Mark Stuart The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. Americana/Folk. Free. Catfish & Caviar Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N 1st St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.0700. 8:30pm. The latest in country/ variety rock. In the pub. Free. Karaoke Northern Grill & Pizza, 10573 Country Walk Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.9590. 9pm. Karaoke until midnight. Karaoke Mojo Rosa’s, 7778 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3247. 9pm. Hosted by BadAsh Productions.

THEATER

“Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon

Bay. 920.743.1760. 7:30pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a round-the-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “Oklahoma in Wisconsin” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8pm. A charming “doowoppin’, fish-boilin’ goodtime” homage to Door County that highlights the quirkiness of a family run inn in the 1950s. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats. “The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 8pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “Twelfth Night” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. A clever and lovely comedy of unrequited love. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/ adult. $19/student. $9/ children under 12.

PERFORMANCE

Jazz II Concert Series Birch Creek Music Performance Center, 3821 Cty E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3763. 7pm. Pre-show music in the gazebo or Juniper Hall. 7:30pm. Ellington, Basie, & Miller Vol.2. $34/premium seating. $29/adults. $10/ students. $6/children. Nordic Fiddle Fest Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2216. 7pm. Celtic fiddler Liz Carroll and Norwegian multiinstrumentalist Vidar Skrede. Showcasing fiddle music of Ireland and Scandinavia. A reception follows the concert. Limited seating. Reservations recommended by calling 920.839.2366. $20/person. Cash only.

GALLERIES

Opening Reception The Jabberwock, 219 Steele St., Algoma. 612.293.9764. 5-9pm. For artist pen & watercolorist Kit Leffler. Part of the Steele Street Art Walk. Raku Firing & Gallery Night Clay on Steele, 221 Steele St, Algoma. 920.487.3501. 5-9pm. Paint your own Raku piece. Part of the Steele Street Art Walk. Opening Reception James May Gallery, 213 Steele St, Algoma. 262.753.3130. 5:30-8pm. For “Ceramics Sculpture Culture” curated by Taylor Robenalt. Part of the Steele Street Art Walk.

Opening Reception Steele Street Trading Co. & Gallery, 300 Steele St., Algoma. 920.487.3840. 5:30-8:30pm. For glass and photography artist, Kimberly Lyon. Part of the Steele Street Art Walk.

INDOOR

Duplicate Contract Bridge Stella Maris Church – Egg Harbor, 7710 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.6113. 9am. A tournament style duplicate contract bridge. Operated by ACBL-sanctioned Certified Director and Life Master Barbara Piester; eligible players receive masterpoints. Solo players should contact Barbara Piester to arrange for a partner. $10/player. Coffee Klatch & Jigsaw Puzzle Fish Creek Bookshop & Gallery, 9331 Spring Road - Top of the Hill Shops, Fish Creek. 920.559.9091. 10:30am-12pm. All are welcome to join us for puzzles, coffee, and conversation. Free.

OUTDOOR

Egg Harbor Farmers Market Egg Harbor Farmers Market, 7740 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3717. 8am-12pm. Large assortment of locally grown produce as well as foods and baked goods. Hand crafted items. Monarch Watch Newport State Park, 475 Cty Hwy NP, Ellison


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

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Chris Irwin, Jeanne Kuhns, Patrick Palmer, Eric Lewis, Katie Dahl, Rich Higdon

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Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder.

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Tonic Sol-fa

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Dayna Kurtz. Photo: Zach Smith

Harpeth Rising

Over the past decade, Kurtz has been bestowed with many awards and praises, including being named the Female Songwriter of the Year by the National Academy of Songwriters. Norah Jones and Bonnie Raitt have raved about her in interviews, and she’s performed on such high-profile radio shows as World Cafe, Mountain Stage, Morning Edition and Tell Me More. She’s toured and opened for the likes of Elvis Costello, Richard Thompson, Mavis Staples, Rufus Wainwright, B.B. King, Richie Havens and more. Dayna’s new disc, Here, Vol. 1, released this year, is a live record with career-spanning tracks, culled from her 2016 Dutch theater tour with guitarist Robert Mache. It manages to capture the heart-stopping, edge-of-your-seat mesmerized silence that Kurtz draws from her audiences.

SPORTS

Door County League Baseball Throughout Door County. 920.743.4456. 7:30pm. Egg Harbor @ Institute.

SAT 8/5 FESTIVALS

Gallery Aug. 11 with a brand new album, Against All Tides.

tents. Visit doorcountyfair. com for more information. Cherry Fest Lakeside Park, Hwy 57, Jacksonport. 920.823.2288. 8am-4pm. Historical display, car show, fine arts & crafts, food, live music by Highland Road (10am12pm) and Modern Day Drifters (12-4pm), children’s penny hunt (1pm), wagon rides (11am-3pm), and more. Visit jacksonport. net for more information. Czech Fest/Kolache Fest Agricultural Heritage & Resources Farm, N2251 Hwy 42, Kewaunee. 920.388.0604. The largest Czech Festival in Northeastern Wisconsin. Enjoy 2 days of Czech food, Kolache baking demonstrations, Kolache sales, Czech music, beer gardens, Czech vendors and displays. Polka Mass and Czech dinner on Sunday. Visit agriculturalheritage. org for more information. Scandinavian Dance Festival Throughout Washington Island. 920.847.2179. Scandinavian Kaffe and Stavkirke open house at Trinity Lutheran Church, Scandinavian brunch at Bethel Church, dance festival in the evening and worship service at Trinity Lutheran Church. Call or visit washingtonisland-wi.com for more information.

LIVE MUSIC

Live Music and Corn Roast Carrington Pub at the Landmark Resort, 7643 Hillside Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3205. Enjoy freshly roasted corn free of charge while listening to live music. 4-5pm. Cathy Grier. Singer/ songwriter. 5-7pm. The Chocolateers. Northern swamp rock. 7-9pm. Absolut Bratworst. Beer soaked blues rock. 9pm-12am. Jason Fladager. Former and founding member of The Big Wu. Live Music Kitty O’Reilly’s Irish Pub, 59 E Oak St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7441. 1pm. Cosmic Strings. Performing original works, collaborations, and covers of folk, country, bluegrass, reggae, and rock songs. 7pm. Wild Irish Gerry. Celtic favorites. Free. Johnny Belmont and the Fabulous Cheeseheads Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30-7:45pm. Live music in Hof Restaurant. Free. 8:45pm. Live music in the Yodel Inn. Free. Live Music Waterfront Mary’s Bar & Grill at Beach Harbor Resort, 3662 N Duluth Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3191. 2-6pm. Absolut Bratworst. Beer soaked blues rock. Free. 9:30pm. Ryan Thompson.

Bluegrass and classic country. Free. Bedrock Open Music Session Corner of the Past & Old Anderson House Museum, 10310 Fieldcrest Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.7680. 9am-12pm. Bluegrass, folk, old-time, and sea shanties. Bring your acoustic bluegrass type instruments only. Come and sit in anytime. Kevin Crocker Jazz Quartet. von Stiehl Winery, 115 Navarino St, Algoma. 920.487.5208. 12:30-4pm. Jazz. Cuisine from Skaliwags available for purchase. For more info, visit vonstiehl.com/ events. Free admission. Jamie Fletcher Vino! Vino! Wine Bar at Stone’s Throw Winery, 3382 Cty Rd E, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9660. 1-5pm. Live jazz on the patio. Free. John Welch Wave Pointe Marina & Resort, 3600 Cty Rd CC, Sturgeon Bay. 920.824.5440. 1-5pm. Country rock. Free. Double Trouble Casey’s BBQ & Smokehouse, 7855 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3038. 2-5pm. A duo that plays a variety of music from the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s. Free. Irish Folk Music Jam Starboard Brewing Company, 151 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.818.1062. 4-6pm. Musicians from Door County Folk Alliance

for good in the universe. The songs, crafted lyrically by Jordana Greenberg and arranged by all three members of the trio – Maria Di Meglio, Michelle Younger and Greenberg – do not intend to distract from the social and political atmosphere. They are the vehicle by which the band has chosen to add their voices to the ongoing fight for understanding and respect. Woodwalk Gallery features contemporary art and musical performances in an intimate, historic barn setting. The concert begins at 7 pm, and admission is $20. Woodwalk Gallery is located at 6746 Cty G, Egg Harbor. For more information visit woodwalkgallery.com/ concerts.

get together informally and play a variety of Celtic music. You are welcome to bring your instrument, sit in the circle and play music or just pull up a chair and listen. Irish dancers also welcome. Age of Fable Sherwood Point Grill, 6963 County Road M, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.9814. 4pm. Ethereal alt/indie. Free. The Mixtape Boathouse on the Bay, 10716 N. Bay Shore Drive, Sister Bay. 920.854.3223. 5-9pm. From new favorites to old school jams, you’ll hear it all. Free. The Velveetatones Sonny’s Pizzeria, 129 N Madison, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.2300. 6pm. Deep blues and humor. Playing with Cathy Grier. Free. Mostly Water Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N 1st St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.0700. 7-11pm. Tribute to the Eagles and more. On the patio. Free. Dang Ol’ Tri’ole Door County Brewing Company, 8099 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1515. 7pm. 6 piece bohemian folk with entertaining stage presence. Free. Matt Wahl Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Playing humorous folk on guitar.

Entertaining acoustic guitar and vocals. Free. Mark Stuart Door County Makers Space, 26 N. Third Avenue, Sturgeon Bay. 8pm. Americana/ Folk. Limited seating, advance purchase recommended, call or text 920.333.0323. Visit doorcountymakersspace. com or find Door County Makers Space on Facebook for more information. $15/ticket. Burgundy Ties The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. Singer-songwriter rock’n’roll. Free. Shower’oke’ Peninsula Pub, 7899 Cty A, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9001. 9pm. No excuses karaoke with DJ Hope Reyes. Lil’ Davy Max Band Mojo Rosa’s, 7778 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3247. 9:30pm. Vintage Chicago blues. Free.

THEATER

“The Heart of Robin Hood” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 5pm. David Farr’s funny, adventurous tale will surprise you with a new spin on a story you think you know. A Door Shakespeare production.

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Door County Fair John Miles County Park, 812 N 14th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.7126. Carnival rides, food stands, 4-H animal barns, grandstand events, kids and family

(5) Harpeth Rising returns to Woodwalk

Describing their style of music as “chamberfolk,” Harpeth Rising is a trio of violin, cello and banjo. Three classically trained musicians make up the band and they play original music, as intricately arranged as a string quartet, lyrically rooted in the singer/songwriter tradition, and wrapped in three-part vocal harmonies reminiscent of both Appalachia and Medieval Europe. Hallmarks of their music include expansive three-part harmonies, consummate musicianship and a deft, yet soulful, lyrical perspective. Against All Tides, Harpeth Rising’s sophomore album as a trio, is proof that authenticity and complexity can live in harmony. It is an exploration of spirituality in place of fundamentalism, uncertainty as philosophy, and an unwavering declaration that human connection is the ultimate force

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Bay. 920.854.2500. 10am. Look for monarchs in their beginning stages, from eggs to larvae (caterpillars), and collect them so they can be protected through their metamorphosis and released. Come see the active monarch nursery. Meet at the Nature Center. Free. Park vehicle sticker required. Blacksmith Demonstration Heritage Village at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 11am-2pm. Watch local blacksmiths use historic techniques to create pieces made of iron and steel. Some pieces, including custom orders, are available for sale.

Kurtz comes to Lost Moth Gallery with Mache. She said of him, “I’ve loved Robert’s playing for such a long time, and we’ve been friends longer than we’ve been touring partners – he was one of the first musicians to befriend me in New Orleans.” Lost Moth is a lovely, cozy concert venue seating only 25. Coffee, tea and cookies will be provided. Doors open at 6 pm and the shows starts at 7 pm with the Small Forest Girls. Tickets are $20 cash at the door. Lost Moth Gallery is located at 7975 Hwy 42 in Egg Harbor. Call 920.495.2928 for reservations.


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

OUTDOOR MARITIME WEEK IN STURGEON BAY, HIKING TOURS AT THE CLEARING (1) The City of Sturgeon Bay will once again honor its rich maritime heritage with a diverse collection of entertaining and fun-filled events Aug. 5 – 13. Officially titled “Sturgeon Bay Maritime Week: A Salute to the U.S. Coast Guard,” the celebration includes many longstanding annual waterfront events along with a growing list of new activities. In addition to focusing on Sturgeon Bay’s extraordinary maritime history, the week honors the area’s local Coast Guard personnel, past and present, for their service and many contributions to the community. Maritime Week gets underway Aug. 5, 11 am, with a picnic for all active, reserve, retired and veteran Coast Guard personnel and their families. Aug. 6 brings a new event to the Maritime Week calendar. Adopt-a-Soldier Door County and the Sturgeon Bay Fire Department will host an “all you can eat” breakfast at the firehouse adjacent to City Hall from 7 – 11 am. Following breakfast, there will be a BBQ and benefit concert at Martin Park and the bands Last Man Standing and Copper Box will entertain throughout the afternoon. The Harmony by the Bay Summer Concert Series continues Aug. 9 at Martin Park. The

ever-popular Big Mouth and the Power Tool Horns will entertain. The concert begins at 7 pm and will open with a salute to veterans from all branches of the armed forces. The Salute to the Coast Guard Golf Outing is Aug. 10. This public golf event celebrates the Coast Guard’s birthday with a fun fourperson scramble format at Idlewild Golf Course. Contact the Door County Maritime Museum (DCMM) for an entry form and additional details. Thursday’s activities also include the “TGIT” Sail Racing at the Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club that evening. Contact the Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club (920.743.6934) for details. Maritime Week returns to Martin Park on Aug. 11 with an outdoor screening of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone at dusk. Aug. 12 & 13 is packed with maritime activities on Sturgeon Bay’s working waterfront. Aug. 12 opens with the first day of the Door County Classic and Wooden Boat Festival on the DCMM grounds. The many activities at the Classic and Wooden Boat Festival blend with the Maritime on Madison celebration. There will be music, store sales and kids’ activities to keep everyone entertained as they stroll Sturgeon Bay’s historic West Side. On the DCMM grounds, dozens of classic boats will be on display. The construction and the decoration phase in the ever-popular Sikaflex Boat Building competition begins Saturday morning. Watch as two-person teams working feverishly with limited lumber and materials to craft a oneof-a-kind boat that will float, hopefully. The grounds open at 9 am. At the conclusion of Saturday’s activities, head for the Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club for their annual Evening on the Bay events Saturday evening, including live music, boat parade and fireworks. All events are open to the public.

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A youngster enjoys the Door County Classic and Wooden Boat Festival. Photo by Steve Reinke. Maritime Week wraps up Aug. 13 with the second day of the Door County Classic and Wooden Boat Festival. The “sea trials” of the often less-than-seaworthy Sikaflex Challenge vessels is always the highlight of day two. Sturgeon Bay’s designation as an official Coast Guard City in 2014 makes the celebration even more special. Sturgeon Bay is one of only 20 communities nationwide to be named a Coast Guard City and is the first, and only, in Wisconsin.

(2) The 82-year history, folklore and

landscape of The Clearing Folk School are the subject of continuing free, interpretive hikes to the historic campus and buildings, led by volunteer docents on select Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 29. The two-hour hiking tours begin at 1 pm at the Jens Jensen Visitor Center, 12171 Garrett Bay Road, Ellison Bay. No pre-registration is necessary. The terrain is a bit rugged in places, and sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended.

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

HAPPENINGS $29/adult. $19/student. $9/children under 12. “Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.1760. 7:30pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a round-the-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 8pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “Victory Farm” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8pm. Written with humor and tenderness, “Victory Farm” is an uplifting tale of family, forgiveness, and the fruits of our labor set on a Door County cherry orchard during World War II. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats.

PERFORMANCE

Jazz II Concert Series Birch Creek Music Performance Center, 3821 Cty E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3763. 7pm. Pre-show music in the gazebo or Juniper Hall. 7:30pm. Swinging Through the Ages with Mardra and Reggie Thomas. $34/premium seating. $29/adults. $10/ students. $6/children. Peninsula Music Festival Door Community Auditorium, 3924 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.854.4060. 7:30pm. Terry Everson, trumpet. Pieces by Grieg, Offenbach, Gershwin, Lowe/Bennett, Mascagni, Anderson, and Morton Gould. $35-$65/ticket. $10/students & children.

GALLERIES

Glass Blowing Demonstration Popelka Trenchard Art Gallery, 64 S 2nd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7287. Call for details. Free and open to the public. Opening Reception and Artist Demonstration Plum Bottom Pottery & Gallery, 4999 Plum Bottom Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.743.2819.

1-2pm. Demonstration. Josephine Geiger walks through her leaded glass design and cutting process. 2-4pm. Reception featuring glass works. Wine and light hors d’oeuvres provided. Opening Reception Turtle Ridge Gallery, 11736 Mink River Rd, Ellison Bay. 920.854.4839. 10am-5pm. For Mariyana Dimitrova, natural fiber artist. With refreshments on the patio. Trunk Show Patricia Shoppe, 7681 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.1537. 10am-5pm. Featuring the jewelry of Anna Beck. Meet the Artist Linden Gallery, 12001 Mink River Rd, Ellison Bay. 920.854.2487. 2-5pm. Meet Xiao Shunzhi, a master ink and paint artist, and his kids who are rising artists in their own right. Meet & Greet with Artist Demonstration 2forU Design & Gallery, 4140 Bluff Ln, Fish Creek. 920.854.7770. 2-4:30pm. With featured watercolor artist Fran Vail.

FOOD&DRINK

Annual Pancake Breakfast Scholarship Fundraiser Ephraim Village Hall, 9996 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 7:30-11am. Annual pancake breakfast sponsored by the Ephraim Men’s Club to raise money for Northern Door students’ scholarships. Door prizes. $10/adults. $6/children. Summer Wine Fest Series Parallel 44 Winery, N2185 Sleepy Hollow Rd, Kewaunee. 920.388.4400. 12-5pm. Enjoy a day of wine, delicious food, live music, vineyard tours and more. Free admission.

INDOOR

Forward Wisconsin! Peninsula State Park, 9462 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3258. 11am-12:30pm. Plan on 30 minutes to experience the following activities: UnNature Trail, Wisconsin Style. Walk a short trail, counting the number of items that don’t belong in nature. Tell your answer to the naturalist for a “ticket” to toast a pudgy pie pizza (while supplies last) over a campfire. Learn how to be safe around campfires. Stop by the Nature Center any time. Free. Park vehicle sticker required.

LEGO Kids’ Club Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 1-2pm. Kids (K-4th grade) are welcome to build unique creations with thousands of Legos. Many of the creations will be on display all month in the children’s area of the library. Free. Yesteryear Program Crossroads at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 2pm. “Peil Family History,” presented by Lynn Mattke. Held in the Collins Learning Center. Freewill donation.

LITERATURE

Storytime with Olive Fish Creek Bookshop & Gallery, 9331 Spring Road - Top of the Hill Shops, Fish Creek. 920.559.9091. 10:30am & 11:30am. Parents and caregivers are welcome to bring their children ages 5-12 years old for storytime. Free.

OUTDOOR

Birds of Prey Experience Open Door Bird Sanctuary, 4114 County Rd I, Jacksonport. 920.724.1399. 1 pm. Raptor program. See and touch artifacts & visit with birds on display. Adults/$7. Children/$4. 2:30pm. Guided trail hike. Sanctuary Open (12-4pm). Dedication Ceremony and 80th Anniversary Cook-out Ridges Sanctuary – Cook-Albert Fuller Center, 8166 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2802. 11:30am. Cook-Albert Fuller Center Building dedication ceremony. 12-2pm. Cook out and social. No reservations necessary. Nature Center is open and guided hikes are available starting at 2pm. Farmers Market & Heritage Program Corner of the Past & Old Anderson House Museum, 10310 Fieldcrest Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.7680. 8am-12pm. Local farmers and vendors provide fresh produce, sauces, honey, meats, eggs, flowers, bakery, jewelry, wood products & photography. Heritage Program: Don and Carolyn Payne, photography and pastels. Farmers Market Market Square, 421 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.2912. 8:30am-12pm. Large assortment of locally grown

produce as well as foods and baked goods. Hand crafted items. Market accepts FoodShare benefits. Citizen Science Newport State Park, 475 Cty Hwy NP, Ellison Bay. 920.854.2500. 10am. “Living Fossils: A Dragonfly Hike with Paul Burton.” This relatively easy hike takes you to the wetland area of the Mink River Estuary in search of “living fossils. Capture and identify different species of dragonflies. Meet at the Nature Center, Lot 1. Some nets will be available to use. Free. Park vehicle sticker required. Docent-Led Hikes The Clearing, 12171 Garrett Bay Rd, Ellison Bay. 920.854.4088. 1pm. The terrain is a bit rugged in places, and sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended. The 2-hour walks leave from the Jens Jensen Visitor Center. Free. Movie in the Park Waterfront Park Main Stage, 10693 N Bay Shore Dr/Hwy 42, Sister Bay. 8pm. “Secret Life of Pets” (PG). Bring a chair or blanket and snag a spot in the park. Movies begin at dusk.

SPORTS

Pro Mini Golf Tournament Red Putter, 10404 Water St, Ephraim. 920.615.4787. 8am. Sign in. 9am. Tournament play. Players must qualify with a round under par. 3 rounds of golf are played followed by lunch. $30 entry fee. 1st place wins a trophy, $2000 cash, and the Red Jacket. Semi-Pro Football Baileys Harbor Recreation Park, 2623 Summit Rd, Baileys Harbor. 920.609.7615. 4pm. Lincoln-Way Patriots vs. DC Destroyers.

SUN 8/6 FESTIVALS

Door County Fair John Miles County Park, 812 N 14th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.7126. Carnival rides, food stands, 4-H animal barns, grandstand events, kids and family tents. Visit doorcountyfair. com for more information. Czech Fest/Kolache Fest Agricultural Heritage & Resources Farm, N2251

Hwy 42, Kewaunee. 920.388.0604. The largest Czech Festival in Northeastern Wisconsin. Enjoy 2 days of Czech food, Kolache baking demonstrations, Kolache sales, Czech music, beer gardens, Czech vendors and displays. Polka Mass and Czech dinner on Sunday. Visit agriculturalheritage. org for more information.

LIVE MUSIC

The Water Street Hot Shots Kendall Park, 2392 Co Rd F, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2366. 11am-1pm. Vintage blues. Free. Small Forest MacReady Artisan Bread Company, 7828 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.495.2928. 11:30am-1:30pm. Folk. In the gazebo. Free. Jim Counter Simon Creek Vineyard & Winery, 5896 Bochek Rd, Carlsville. 920.746.9307. 1-5pm. Smooth vocals and silky guitar playing. Free. Centerline Wave Pointe Marina & Resort, 3600 Cty Rd CC, Sturgeon Bay. 920.824.5440. 1-5pm. Classic rock and country. Free. Cathy Grier Waterfront Mary’s Bar & Grill at Beach Harbor Resort, 3662 N Duluth Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3191. 2-6pm. Singer/ songwriter. Free. HUSH Cold Country Vines & Wines, E3207 Nuclear Rd, Kewaunee. 920.776.1328. 2:30-5pm. Classic rock. Free. Spice Band Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N 1st St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.0700. 2:30-6pm. Playing all your favorite oldies but goodies. On the patio. Free. Jeff Stoeger and Shed Dog Harbor Park Gazebo, 212 Harrison St, Kewaunee. 920.388.4822. 5:30-8pm. Playing a variety of hits. Bring your own lawn chair, blanket, picnic basket and beverages. Rain locations are Port ‘O’ Call or Lakehaven Hall (no carry-ins allowed at rain locations). Scotty Cash Kitty O’Reilly’s Irish Pub, 59 E Oak St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7441. 6pm. Country swamp grass. Free. Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30pm. Live music. Free.

Ben Larsen Fred & Fuzzy’s Waterfront Bar & Grill, 360 Little Sister Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.6699. 7-10pm. Folk/Americana/ Storytelling. Free. Tonic Sol Fa Peg Egan Performing Arts Center, 7840 Church St, Egg Harbor. 920.493.5979. 7pm. This quartet has been named one of the top five “must see” groups in America. Lawn chairs and carry-in’s are allowed. Held in Calvary Methodist Church if raining. Free. Handpicked Bluegrass Fishstock Concert Series, 3127 Cty F, Fish Creek. 920.421.5555. 7pm. Playing contemporary and traditional bluegrass. “Doc” Retzinger opening. $20/ticket. Cookee Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Folk and fun timeless music. Free. Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder Door Community Auditorium, 3924 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.2728. 8pm. Blazing bluegrass. $38/$50/$65 tickets. $10/Students 18 and under.

THEATER

“Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.1760. 2pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a roundthe-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 7:30pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets.

GALLERIES

Meet the Artist Linden Gallery, 12001 Mink River Rd, Ellison Bay. 920.854.2487. 2-5pm. Meet Xiao Shunzhi, a master ink and paint artist, and his kids who are rising artists in their own right.

FOOD&DRINK

Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser Sturgeon Bay Fire Department, 421 Michigan St.,


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

OUTDOOR

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The Door County Sports & Classic Car Show returns to Egg Harbor on Aug. 12. Photo by Len Villano.

The Clearing Folk School hosts two-hour hiking tours on weekends through late October.

Hiking dates include Saturdays and Sundays, and are scheduled as follows: Aug. 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27; Sept. 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24, 30; Oct. 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 & 29. Visitors are welcome every day to the Jens Jensen Visitor Center Bookstore and Gift Shop Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4 pm, plus Saturday and Sunday through October from noon to 4 pm, located at 12171 Garrett Bay Road, Ellison Bay. In addition, the public may visit The Clearing’s historic campus on Saturday and Sunday only (May-October) from noon to 4 pm. This historic

campus area of the property is closed to visitors Monday through Friday for the privacy of students. For more information, call 920.854.4088 between 8 am and 4 pm, Monday through Friday, stop at the Jens Jensen Visitor Center or visit theclearing.org.

(3) The Door County Sports & Classic Car show returns for the sixth year, Aug. 12 in the Village of Egg Harbor. Come explore all the village has to offer while taking in sleek sports cars, stunning classic cars and their new

modified category. The Door County Sports & Classics Car Show runs from 10 am to 3 pm. Sponsored by the Egg Harbor Business Association, the Door County Sports & Classics Car Show partners with United Way of Door County to solicit votes with winners to be selected in six categories: Owner’s Choice Sports Car, Owner’s Choice Classic Car, Owner’s Choice Modified Car, Fan Favorite Sports Car, Fan Favorite Classic Car and Fan Favorite Modified Car. Cars will be on display in Harbor View Park and at the Nicolet Bank parking lot. Cars may

also be parked at Lena’s parking lot on the south end of town across from the Liberty Square Shops. Registration is $15 the day of the event. Register from 8 – 9:45 am at Lena’s parking lot. The first 150 entrants will receive a dash plaque and swag bag. Raffles will be held throughout the day for entrants. There will be a DJ playing music all day at each parking area. For more information, call 920.868.3717 or visit EggHarborDoorCounty. org.

HAPPENINGS Sturgeon Bay. 414.333.6648. 7-11am. An all you can eat breakfast with pancakes, bacon, sausage, fruit, juice, and more. Raising funds for the Adopt A Soldier care package program. $10/ person. $5/ages 10 & under. Fish Boil Fundraiser Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Church, 4767 Dunn Rd, Institute. 920.743.4842. 11am-2pm. All you can eat. All plates include onion, potatoes, rye bread, coleslaw, and dessert. Featuring a silent auction and bag auction items, live music by Jerry Voelker and the Jolly Gents, and Belgian pie sale. $13/ adults (fish). $6/ages 5-10 (fish). Free/4 & under. $6/ adults (hot dog or sloppy joe plate). $3/10 & under (hot dog or sloppy joe plate).

INDOOR

OUTDOOR

Door County League Baseball Throughout Door County. 920.743.4456. All games at 1:30pm. Baileys Harbor @ Washington Island. Kolberg @ West Jacksonport. Sister Bay @ Maplewood. The Mighty Viking Cup Peninsula State Park Golf Course, 9890 Shore Rd, Ephraim. 920.868.3258. 12-5:30pm. Help support the Gibraltar Booster Club and Scholarship fund. Contact the Clubhouse at 920.854.5791 for more information.

MON 8/7 LIVE MUSIC

Peninsula Ukulele Club The Cookery Restaurant & Wine Bar, 4135 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3634. 3:30-5pm. Come to enjoy some live music by this local club as they practice, during the wine bar’s happy hour. Cheryl Murphy White Gull Inn, 4225 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.3517. 5-8pm. Playing the harp during dinner. Terry Murphy Olson Park, 9998 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 920.854.4989. 6-8pm. A mix of originals, classic folk, bluegrass, blues, country and vintage rock. Free. Ruby James Donny’s Glidden Lodge Restaurant, 4670 Glidden Drive, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.9460. 7-10pm. Acoustic jam. Free. Cathy Grier The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624.

THEATER

“Oklahoma in Wisconsin” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 6pm. A charming “doowoppin’, fish-boilin’ goodtime” homage to Door County that highlights the quirkiness of a family run inn in the 1950s. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats. “Twelfth Night” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. A clever and lovely comedy of unrequited love. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/adult. $19/ student. $9/children under 12. “Doctor! Doctor!” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8:30pm. A retiring small town physician recruits his young big city nephew to take over his practice. A charming tribute to the nostalgic nature of innocent, smalltown life in Door County, where residents reluctantly but humorously adapt to change. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats.

GALLERIES

Artist Demonstration Artzy Studio, 10329 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 12-3pm. Cynthia L. Koshalek demonstrates her skills with ceramics. Pottery Demonstration TR Pottery, 4133 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.1024. 2-3pm. Watch pottery being thrown and shaped on a potters’ wheel and interact with Tony. Learn about his creative process and how he makes the forms sold in the gallery. Opening Reception Washington Island Art & Nature Center, 1799 Main Rd, Washington Island. 920.847.2025. 4:30-6pm. For the “Northern

Exposures” show featuring work by Doug Clarke.

INDOOR

Community Playgroup Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church, 323 S 5th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6218. 10:30-11:30am. Come to meet and have fun with other parents and young children. All families welcome. Informational Presentation Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 3-5pm. Red Cross representatives talk about the “nuts and bolts” of becoming a volunteer and explain their experiences. Stop in, meet current volunteers, and discover the volunteer opportunities available. Informational Presentation Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Library, 2323 Mill Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.2721. 6:30-8pm. Red Cross representatives talk about the “nuts and bolts” of becoming a volunteer and explain their experiences. Stop in, meet current volunteers, and discover the volunteer opportunities available.

LITERATURE

Book Sale Fish Creek Library, 4097 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3471. 11am-5pm. Browse for books in the hallway between the library and visitor center. Proceeds benefit the Fish Creek Library.

OUTDOOR

Scavenger Hunt Peninsula State Park, 9462 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3258. 10am-1pm. Activity takes about 20 minutes. Prizes for trying. Stop by the Nature Center anytime. Free. Park vehicle sticker required.

TUE 8/8 LIVE MUSIC

Birch Creek Jazz Ambassadors Lakeside Park, Hwy 57, Jacksonport. 920.823.2288. 10:30am-12:30pm. Don’t miss these tremendous young musicians play during the farmers market. Birch Creek Ambassadors Noble Square, 4167 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.2316.

2:30-4:30pm. Jazz combo. Free. Katie Dahl White Gull Inn, 4225 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.3517. 5-8pm. Original folk music over dinner. George Sawyn 5th and Jefferson Coffee House, 232 N 5th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.1719. 6-8pm. Acoustic jazz guitar. Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30pm. Live music. Free. Nick Hoover & Jess Holland Fred & Fuzzy’s Waterfront Bar & Grill, 360 Little Sister Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.6699. 7-10pm. Old-timey folk peppered with tight harmonies. Free. Pat & Augie The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. Featuring Pat Schorr of Shaker & The Egg and Augie from Muddy Udders. Free. Open Mic Waterfront Mary’s Bar & Grill at Beach Harbor Resort, 3662 N Duluth Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3191. 9pm. Live music.

THEATER

“The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 8pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “The Heart of Robin Hood” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. David Farr’s funny, adventurous tale will surprise you with a new spin on a story you think you know. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/adult. $19/student. $9/children under 12. “Victory Farm” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8pm. Written with humor and tenderness, “Victory Farm” is an uplifting tale of family, forgiveness, and the fruits of our labor set on a Door County cherry orchard during World War II. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats.

PERFORMANCE

Peninsula Music Festival Door Community Auditorium, 3924 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.854.4060. 7:30pm. Melissa Snoza, piccolo; Amy Sims, violin; Paul Ledwon, cello; Christi Zuniga, piano; Joan DerHovsepian, viola. Pieces by Vivaldi, Beethoven, Wolf, and Strauss. $35-$65/ticket. $10/students & children.

FOOD&DRINK

Together Tuesdays Door County YMCA – Sturgeon Bay Program Center, 1900 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.4949. 9:30-10:30am. A light breakfast served in the social lounge. Free to all. Together Tuesdays Door County YMCA – Northern Door Program Center, 3866 Gibraltar Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3660. 9:30-10:30am. A light breakfast served in the social lounge. Free to all.

INDOOR

Door County Quilters Guild Sturgeon Bay United Methodist Church, 836 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3241. Join other quilters to work on your craft. Contact Gloria at 743.3171 for more information. Family Program Crossroads at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.5895. 10-11am. Glaciers. Discover how the Great Lakes were formed and learn about the creatures that live in the inland seas. Meet at the Collins Learning Center. Free and open to the public. Duplicate Contract Bridge Stella Maris Church – Egg Harbor, 7710 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.6113. 12pm. A tournament style duplicate contract bridge. Operated by ACBL-sanctioned Certified Director and Life Master Barbara Piester; eligible players receive masterpoints. Solo players should contact Barbara Piester to arrange for a partner. $10/player. Genealogical Research Assistance Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Library, 2323 Mill Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.2721. 1-4pm. The Northern Door Genealogical Society representatives will help patrons do genealogical research. Just stop in.

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Appel’s Bluff Naturalist Guided Hike Ridges Sanctuary – Cook-Albert Fuller Center, 8166 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2802. 2pm. Meet at the Nature Center. $5/members. $8/ adults. Free/18+under. Adopt A Soldier Fundraiser Martin Park, 207 S 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 414.333.6648. Raising money to help create care packages for service members. Featuring live music by Last Man Standing and Copper Box, food, beverages, raffle prizes, and more. Visit AdoptASoldierDC. com for more info. Farmers Market Baileys Harbor Town Hall, 2392 Cty F, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2366. 9am-1pm. Browse locally made & grown products from Door County farmers & artisans featuring everything from produce to handmade clothing. Come hungry and grab lunch and

SPORTS

8-11pm. Singer/ songwriter. Free. Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 8:45-10:30pm. Live music. Free.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Salsa Dancing Sturgeon Bay Jaycee Hall, 340 Jaycee Ct, Sturgeon Bay. 920.306.4576. 6pm. Group dance lesson. $10. 7pm. Open dancing to Salsa, Cha-cha, Bachata & Merengue ’til close. Free. Drink specials. NO partner required. Great for beginners. SingAlong Ephraim Village Hall, 9996 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 920.854.9688. 7:30pm. Come with your voice, leave with a smile. All ages welcome. Free.

dessert from one of our food vendors with ready to eat items. Rain or shine. Farmers Market Huntington Bank, 208 Steele St., Algoma. 920.487.2041. 9am-2pm. Local produce, bakery, and other homemade products. Docent-Led Hikes The Clearing, 12171 Garrett Bay Rd, Ellison Bay. 920.854.4088. 1pm. The terrain is a bit rugged in places, and sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended. The 2-hour walks leave from the Jens Jensen Visitor Center. Free.


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

THEATER & PERFORMANCE BIRCH CREEK’S ADULT BAND CAMP, A COUPLA WHITE CHICKS ON ROGUE STAGE

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(1) Peninsula Players Theatre, in conjunction with its production of the Tony Award-winning musical The Bridges of Madison County by Jason Robert Brown and Marsha Norman, will host a pre-show seminar Aug. 10, 6:30 pm, at the theater. The Bridges of Madison County first captured the nation’s attention in 1992 when Robert James Waller’s novel became a bestseller, then again in 1995 as a major motion picture starring Clint Eastwood and Meryl Streep. The film was shot on location in Madison County, Iowa and six covered bridges were featured. Nowhere else in the Midwest can so many covered bridges be found so closely grouped together, thus Madison County and the bridges have become a tourist destination. Waller, while on leave from work, was taking a pleasure trip to photograph the famous bridges within an 11-mile radius of Winterset, Iowa. The bridges were built with covers to protect the roadway because it was cheaper to replace the boards of the roof and walls rather than replace the heavy beams of the actual bridge. The Covered Bridge Festival celebrates the bridges each fall as well as the birthplace of John Wayne. Waller’s trip was an inspiration to him and within three weeks he had finished the novel. Peninsula Players will host a discussion with Jon Jarosh, Door County Visitor Bureau director of communications and public relations, as he talks about the impact of books, films and articles on destinations from a tourism standpoint. The Bridges of Madison County performs Tuesdays through Saturdays at 8 pm and Sundays at 7:30 pm with a 4 pm matinee Aug. 13. Discount tickets are available for groups of 15 or more. Individual ticket prices range from $41 to $47. For more information or

(1) (Above) Jon Jarosh, Door County Visitor Bureau’s director of communications and public relations. (Center) Katherine Duffy performs in The Bridges of Madison County. Also pictured in the background are Rengin Altay, fiddler Lynn Gudmundsen and Elizabeth Haley. Photo by Len Villano. (Right) Steve Koehler and Cory Goodrich in Peninsula Players’ production of The Bridges of Madison County on stage through Aug. 13. Photo by Len Villano.

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(2) Lola DeVillers and Rachel Siezer in Rogue Theater’s newest production. (3) Jim Stombres during his last concert as band director at St. Charles North in spring of 2015. Photo by Mary Beth Nolan. to reserve tickets, call 920.868.3287 or visit peninsulaplayers.com.

(2) August brings heat and laughter to the

Rogue Theater stage with A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking, by John Ford Noonan. This was Rogue Theater’s debut show in November of 2013. That show starred Lola DeVillers and Katie Lott, and was directed by Bill Bauernfeind. The show takes place in suburban Westchester County, New York, in the kitchen of Maude Mix, who is having a tough day: her husband is off on a weekend spree with his secretary and she can’t get rid of the pesky

neighbor who has just moved up from Texas. Mix is a stereotypically uptight housewife living on Charlemagne Lane somewhere in Westchester County. She enjoys things neat and tidy, and is extremely protective of her privacy. But into her life bursts her new neighbor, Hannah Mae, a loud, high-spirited woman from Texas. Hannah Mae badgers Mix into friendship and the two eventually join forces against their errant and erring husbands. Lola DeVillers stars as Maude Mix and Rachel Seizer as the pesky Hannah Mae Bindler. The show is directed by Stuart Champeau. DeVillers is a teacher, actor and director. She holds a master’s degree in education and has been an educator in Sturgeon Bay for more than 25

years. She manages and is co-artistic director of Rogue Theater with her husband, Stuart Champeau. Seizer, a 2016 Sturgeon Bay High School graduate, now studies at Madison College. She was most recently seen in the all-female production of Love’s Labour’s Lost. She plans to continue her studies and pursue a degree in theatre at Edgewood College. The show runs Aug. 10-13 and 17-20, at 7:30 pm Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2 pm Sunday. Rogue Theater is located at 340 Jaycee Court in Sturgeon Bay. The show includes adult content. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students. For more information, call 920.818.0816 or find Rogue Theater on Facebook.

(3) As the saying goes, age is just a number, and this is especially true in regard to music. The Adult Concert Band Camp, held Aug. 19 – 22, at Birch Creek Music Performance Center is a unique opportunity for those who wish to grow in their musicality, or just want to spend a fun weekend in Door County. The camp is co-directed by three wellrespected and award-winning musicians: Chip Staley (Naperville, Ill.), Steve Sveum (Sun Prairie), and Jim Stombres (St. Charles, Ill.). Stombres said of the camp, “It’s something that’s meant to be enjoyable…dig the horn out and play a little bit and come up and have the experience and share your love of music with other people that feel the same way as you.” Stombres has been a high school band director for 37 years in three suburban Chicago high schools, finishing his career at St. Charles North High School. He has spent 29 summers at Birch Creek on faculty for the Big Band Jazz sessions. For the first time on Birch Creek’s campus, adults in the community will get the opportunity to perform onstage in the centuryold Dutton Concert Barn. “That’s the vision of this, you come up and learn, and interact in an environment that’s pretty unique, giving a concert in a barn and being able to experience the county,” said Stombres. The combined knowledge and musicianship of Staley, Sveum and Stombres in addition to playing alongside fellow musicians will be an experience of a lifetime. For more information about the adult band camp visit birchcreek.org.

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

HAPPENINGS Activities at the Library Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 1:30pm. Matinee Movie. “Beauty and the Beast.” (2017 PG 2:09 Family/Fantasy/ Musical). 6-7:30pm. End of Life Doulagivers Presentation. Discussing the need for closure for all facing the end of their lives, and ways that loved ones can help with this process. All present are invited to share with others while exploring this new concept supporting the dying and their caregivers. For reservations and more information, visit marggiehatala.com This is a free, donation based community event.

LITERATURE

Ephraim Weekly Readers Ephraim Library, 9996 Water St, Ephraim. 920.854.2014. 10:30am. Book club members gather to discuss short readings such as magazine, newspaper, or online articles and book chapters of interest. For more information contact Mary 920.854.2014. Stories and Fun Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 10:30am. For babies, toddlers, pre-schoolers, and their parent or caregiver. Enjoy specially themed stories with Miss Beth and stay afterward to talk with other parents while the children play together. Contact Beth at 746.7119 for questions. Free. Book Sale Fish Creek Library, 4097 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3471. 11am-5pm. Browse for books in the hallway between the library and visitor center. Proceeds benefit the Fish Creek Library. Readers Rampant Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Library, 2323 Mill Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.2721.

2:30pm. “The Beautiful Mystery” by Louise Penny will be discussed in the Community Room. Listeners and participants welcome. Light refreshments served. For a full book list call or visit doorcountylibrary.org.

OUTDOOR

Jacksonport Farmers Market Lakeside Park, Hwy 57, Jacksonport. 920.823.2288. 9am-1pm. Do your shopping locally with a wide variety of local farm products and hand crafts on the lake in Jacksonport. Blacksmith Demonstration Heritage Village at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 11am-2pm. Watch local blacksmiths use historic techniques to create pieces made of iron and steel. Some pieces, including custom orders, are available for sale. Garden Door Presentation Peninsular Agricultural Research Station, 4312 Hwy 42, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.5406. 7pm. Join the Door County Master Gardeners as they invite guest speakers to present on different topics and utilize the garden for demonstration purposes. Bring your own chair, limited seating. Dress for the weather. Free and open to the public.

WED 8/9 LIVE MUSIC

Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30-7:45pm. Live music in Hof Restaurant. Free. 8:45pm. Live music in the Yodel Inn. Free.

Dayna Kurtz Lost Moth Gallery, 7975 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.495.2928. 6pm. Doors open. 7pm. A blend of jazz, folk, pop and blues. Cookies, coffee and tea available. $20/at the door. Beth Chafey-Hon Settlement Shops, 9106 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3788. 10am-12pm. Playing a variety of styles on violin. Hard Maple Fireside Restaurant, 11934 Hwy 42, Ellison Bay. 920.854.7999. 5-7pm. A group of Door County musicians that specialize in bluegrass, folk and other acoustic music. Joined by special guests each week, all proceeds from performance go to charity. Visit facebook. com/HardMapleMusic/ for more details. Free, goodwill donations appreciated. Brett Newski Waterfront Park Main Stage, 10693 N Bay Shore Dr/Hwy 42, Sister Bay. 6-9pm. Indie rock n’ roll. Bring a chair or blanket and snag a spot in the park. Free. Open Mic Red’s Pub & Grill, N6318 Hwy 42, Algoma. 920.487.5431. 7pm. Live music. Big Mouth & the Power Tool Horns Martin Park, 207 S 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.2912. 7-9pm. Eclectic mix of blues, jazz and original music. Bring a blanket or lawn chair. Food and refreshments available. Rain location: CenterPointe Marina, 77 S. First Ave. Ken Ferry Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Singer/songwriter who preforms shows centered around the vintage acoustic sounds of the 1960’s and 1970’s. Covers and originals. Free. Copper Box The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister

Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. A melting pot of Americana, roots, rock, polka, country, jazz, blues and Zydeco. Free. Katie Dahl The Cookery Restaurant & Wine Bar, 4135 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3634. 8pm. This Door County folksinger is known for her sharp-witted lyrics, intricate melodies, and engaging performances. Free.

THEATER

“Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.1760. 7:30pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a round-the-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “Oklahoma in Wisconsin” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8pm. A charming “doowoppin’, fish-boilin’ goodtime” homage to Door County that highlights the quirkiness of a family run inn in the 1950s. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats. “The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 8pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “Twelfth Night” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. A clever and lovely comedy of unrequited

love. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/adult. $19/ student. $9/children under 12.

PERFORMANCE

Jazz II Concert Series Birch Creek Music Performance Center, 3821 Cty E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3763. 7pm. Pre-show music in the gazebo or Juniper Hall. 7:30pm. A Century of Swing. $34/premium seating. $29/adults. $10/ students. $6/children. Birch Creek Jazz Ambassadors Waterfront Park Main Stage, 10693 N Bay Shore Dr/Hwy 42, Sister Bay. 2:30pm. Don’t miss these tremendous young jazz musicians. Bring a chair or blanket and snag a spot in the park. Free.

GALLERIES

Scrimshaw Demonstrations Scrimshanders, 10353 N Water St, Ephraim. 920.854.5407. 2-4pm. Resident Scrimshander Gary Kiracofe invites guests to stop in and experience the creation of an American folk art “two hundred years behind the times.” Located in the Shops and Gardens of Green Gables. Draw DoCo Life Drawing Peninsula School of Art, 3900 Cty F, Fish Creek. 920.868.3455. 6:30-8:30pm. Figure drawing. Artists are to provide their own drawing materials and easels. No reservations needed. Walkins welcome. $15/session.

INDOOR

Wizard Wednesday Forestville Library, 123 Hwy 42, Forestville. 920.856.6886. 2-4pm. Kids and families are invited to enjoy a variety of hands-on, learning activities. Tetragon 2 Club Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon

Bay. 920.743.6578. 7-8pm. Come and play. Team Trivia Night Brick Lot Pub, 253 North 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.9339. 7-9pm. Teams of 2 or more can compete for great prizes. Multiple categories each night. Hosted by Eric Natwick. No entry fee.

LITERATURE

Book Sale Fish Creek Library, 4097 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3471. 11am-5pm. Browse for books in the hallway between the library and visitor center. Proceeds benefit the Fish Creek Library. Emily Dickinson Poetry Series Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Door County, 10341 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 920.854.7559. 7pm. Featuring June Nirschl, followed by an open mic, providing an opportunity for others to read their poetry, and reception. Free.

OUTDOOR

Settlement Farmers Market Settlement Shops, 9106 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3788. 9:30am-1:30pm. Fresh locally grown produce, plants, flowers, homemade breads, delicious jams, salsa and canned goods along with homemade arts & crafts. Blacksmith Demonstration Heritage Village at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 11am-2pm. Watch local blacksmiths use historic techniques to create pieces made of iron and steel. Some pieces, including custom orders, are available for sale. Country Walk Shops Farmers Market Country Walk Shops, 508 Country Walk Dr, Sister Bay. 2:30-5:30pm. Featuring homegrown/handcrafted goods from Door County and Wisconsin.


Docks-ology Sunset Service Anderson Dock, Ephraim. 920.854.2804. 7:30pm. Rev. Barbara Sajna, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. Singer, New Day Singers. Bring a chair or blanket for your comfort. Rain location: Ephraim Village Hall, 9996 Hwy 42.

THU 8/10 LIVE MUSIC

Cheryl Murphy White Gull Inn, 4225 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.3517. 5-8pm. Playing the harp during dinner. Birch Creek Jazz Ambassadors Harborview Park, 7809 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3717. 5pm. Tremendous young jazz musicians. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and enjoy the terrace setting. Rocker Sonny’s Pizzeria, 129 N Madison, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.2300. 6pm. Playing music from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. Free. Greatest Hits Polka Band Fireman’s Park, 231 Maple St, Luxemburg. 920.606.0311. 6-8pm. Playing old time favorites. Bring your own chairs, food and beverages. Troy & Mic Malloy Root Bistro & Wine Bar, 23 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.9463. 6-8pm. Jazz. Free. Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30pm. Live music. Free. WRiTERS NiGHT Tambourine Lounge, 59 N. 2nd Avenue, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.5571. 7-9pm. Songsters, jokesters, and poets unite at this open mic for original work. Spectators and performers welcome. Hosted by Cathy Grier. No cover. Almost LIVE Band Fiddler’s Green, 1699 Jackson Harbor Rd, Washington Island. 920.847.2610. 7-10pm. Featuring Doc Westring, Tom Noonan & Steve Rice. Scotty Meyer Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Bluesy rock. Free. Dead Horses The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. Folkgrass. Free. Last Man Standing The Cookery Restaurant & Wine Bar, 4135 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3634. 8pm. Blends of gospel, swing, folk, hillbilly jazz, honky tonk and high octane bluegrass. Free.

THEATER

PERFORMANCE

Jazz II Concert Series Birch Creek Music Performance Center, 3821 Cty E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3763. 7pm. Pre-show music in the gazebo or Juniper Hall. 7:30pm. The Great American Big Band. $34/premium seating. $29/adults. $10/ students. $6/children. Peninsula Music Festival Door Community Auditorium, 3924 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.854.4060. 7:30pm. Anna Lee, violin. Jiannan Cheng, guest conductor. Pieces by Suppe and Dvorak. $35-$65/ticket. $10/students & children.

GALLERIES

Progressive Art Crawl Throughout Egg Harbor. 920.868.3987. 4-8pm. Five women’s fine art galleries of Egg Harbor host. Each gallery serves international food from their favorite places to travel. Off the Wheel Pottery, Lost Moth Gallery, Cappaert Contemporary Gallery, Brilliant Stranger-Ecotique, and Angela Lensch Gallery. Artist Reception Fine Line Designs Gallery, 10376 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 920.854.4343. 4-7pm. Featuring oil and cold wax artist Nan Helscher, oil painter Todd Voss, woodworker Dave Turner, and multi process painter Donna Brown.

INDOOR

Rotary Club of Sturgeon Bay Meeting Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club, 600 Nautical Dr, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6934. 12pm. Lunch. 12:20-1:15pm. Greg Coulthurst discusses “Dunes Lake.” Host Greg Miessner. Visiting Rotarians welcome. Coffee and Conversation Sunflower Cottage, 55 West Yew Street, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7943. 8-10am. Self-sufficient seniors are invited to drop in for complimentary coffee and conversation. Friendly Crafters Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 9am. Join other paper crafters to work on your creations. Trillium Quilt Guild Meeting Sister Bay Fire Station, 2258 Mill Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.4021. 10am. Dedicated to promoting interest in all areas of quilting. Guests are welcome. Trivia Night Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N 1st St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.0700. 6-8pm. Hosted by Nick Freimuth. Come with friends or on your own and join in. Lake Lessons Ridges Sanctuary – Cook-Albert Fuller Center, 8166 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.2802. 7pm. “Using Citizen Science to Track Great Lakes Fish Migration.” Join Dr. Karen J. Murchie to learn how you can join the Shedd Aquarium projects that are using citizen scientists to document fish migrations in the Great Lakes. Free.

LITERATURE

Read to a Therapy Dog Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Library, 2323 Mill Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.2721. 10:30-11:30am. Kids can read out loud to a special dog who loves to listen. Book Sale Fish Creek Library, 4097 Hwy 42, Fish Creek. 920.868.3471. 11am-5pm. Browse for books in the hallway between the library and visitor center. Proceeds benefit the Fish Creek Library. Read to a Therapy Dog Sturgeon Bay Library, 107 S 4th Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.6578. 4-5pm. Kids can read out loud to a special dog who loves to listen.

OUTDOOR

Blacksmith Demonstration Heritage Village at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 11am-2pm. Watch local blacksmiths use historic techniques to create pieces made of iron and steel. Some pieces, including custom orders, are available for sale. A Walk by the Springs Three Springs Nature Preserve, 10442 Three Springs Road, Sister Bay. 920.746.1359. 3-5pm. Walk through the swampy forests and coastal marshes of Three Springs preserve. Approximately a 1 mile walk over fairly level terrain. All kids attending will receive a free nature journal and outdoor activity kit at the end of the walk. No registration necessary. Free and open to the public.

FRI 8/11 FESTIVALS

Shanty Days Celebration of the Lake Throughout Algoma. 920.487.2041. Featuring a parade, car cruise and show, 150+ arts and crafts & street fair vendors, 5k walk/run as part of the Bellin Title Town Series, food, beach volleyball tourney, fireworks, kid’s area, fishing contest, book sale and entertainment for the entire family. Live music all weekend/8 bands. Visit algomachamber.org for full schedule or to register for the parade or be a vendor.

LIVE MUSIC

Harpeth Rising Woodwalk Gallery, 6746 Cty Rd G, Egg Harbor. 920.868.2912. 5:30pm. Doors open, picnics welcome. 7pm. Show starts. Dynamic and powerful, this trio of young women includes expansive three part harmonies, consummate musicianship and a deft yet soulful lyrical perspective. $20/person, cash. Matt Endres Band Hof Restaurant at the Alpine Resort, 7715 Alpine Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3000. 6:30-7:45pm. Live music in Hof Restaurant. Free. 8:45pm. Live music in the Yodel Inn. Free. Live Music Waterfront Mary’s Bar & Grill at Beach Harbor Resort, 3662 N Duluth Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.3191. 4-8pm. Ryan Thompson. Bluegrass and classic country. Free. 9:30pm. Velveetatones. Deep blues and humor. Free. Acoustic Song Circle Prince of Peace Lutheran Church Coffee House, 1756 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7750. 10am-12pm. For more information call or go to “Door County Acoustic Song Circles & Jams” on Facebook. Marybeth Mattson Bearded Heart Coffee, 8101 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9111. 1-3pm. Acoustic folk/rock. Free. Birch Creek Jazz Ambassadors Vino! Vino! Wine Bar at Stone’s Throw Winery, 3382 Cty Rd E, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.9660. 2-4pm. Live music on the patio. Free. The Moonlighters Stabbur Beer Garden, 10698 N Bay Shore Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2626. 6-9pm. Seasoned duo playing a variety of genres from 50s to today. Free. Whiskey Ditch Kitty O’Reilly’s Irish Pub, 59 E Oak St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.7441. 7pm. Classic & contemporary rock. Free. Dan Harvey Band Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N 1st St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.0700. 7-11pm. The perfect blend of 80s, 90s, and rock. Free. Kristin Diable Door County Brewing Company, 8099 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1515. 7pm. Americana soul rock-n-roll. Free. One Two Many Gibraltar Grill, 3993 Main St, Fish Creek. 920.868.4745. 7:30pm. Blues/Jazz. Free.

Dirty Deuce The Garage at Husby’s, 400 Maple Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.2624. 8-11pm. The musical mathematicians of rock and roll. Free. Karaoke Northern Grill & Pizza, 10573 Country Walk Dr, Sister Bay. 920.854.9590. 9pm. Karaoke until midnight. Armchair Boogie Carrington Pub at the Landmark Resort, 7643 Hillside Rd, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3205. 9pm. Bluegrass/ Jamgrass/Funkgrass. Karaoke Mojo Rosa’s, 7778 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3247. 9pm. Hosted by BadAsh Productions.

THEATER

“Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.1760. 7:30pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a round-the-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking” Sturgeon Bay Jaycee Hall, 340 Jaycee Ct, Sturgeon Bay. 920.818.0816. 7:30pm. Maude Mix is having a tough day when her loud and high spirited new neighbor, Hannah Mae, bursts into her life. Hannah Mae badgers Maude into friendship and the two eventually join forces against their errant and erring husbands. Show includes adult content. $15/ adults. $10/students. “Oklahoma in Wisconsin” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8pm. A charming “doowoppin’, fish-boilin’ goodtime” homage to Door County that highlights the quirkiness of a family run inn in the 1950s. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats. “The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 8pm. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “Twelfth Night” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. A clever and lovely comedy of unrequited love. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/adult. $19/ student. $9/children under 12.

PERFORMANCE

Jazz II Concert Series Birch Creek Music Performance Center, 3821 Cty E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3763. 7pm. Pre-show music in the gazebo or Juniper Hall. 7:30pm. The Great American Big Band. $34/premium seating. $29/adults. $10/ students. $6/children.

Art/Speaks Margaret Lockwood Gallery, 7 S 2nd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.868.1457. 11:30am-1pm. A free ekphrastic writing lab for those interested in writing in response to art. Come to write and to share work.

INDOOR

Duplicate Contract Bridge Stella Maris Church – Egg Harbor, 7710 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.6113. 9am. A tournament style duplicate contract bridge. Operated by ACBL-sanctioned Certified Director and Life Master Barbara Piester; eligible players receive masterpoints. Solo players should contact Barbara Piester to arrange for a partner. $10/player. For the Love of Quilting II Corner of the Past & Old Anderson House Museum, 10310 Fieldcrest Rd, Sister Bay. 920.854.7680. 10am-3pm. The Trillium Quilt Guild display approximately 30 quilts that encompass styles from traditional to modern. Held in the Anderson House. Coffee Klatch & Jigsaw Puzzle Fish Creek Bookshop & Gallery, 9331 Spring Road - Top of the Hill Shops, Fish Creek. 920.559.9091. 10:30am-12pm. All are welcome to join us for puzzles, coffee, and conversation. Free. Environmental Presentation Baileys Harbor Town Hall, 2392 Cty F, Baileys Harbor. 920.743.6003. 7pm. “The Great Lakes in a Time of Hyper Change” presented by Cameron Davis, the Obama Administration’s chief liaison to Congress in Great Lakes matters. Free.

LITERATURE

Book Sale The Book Corner, 401 3rd St., Algoma. 920.487.2295. 8am. Join the Algoma Library Friends at a new location for the annual book sale.

OUTDOOR

Movie in the Park Martin Park, 207 S 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.746.2912. Dusk (approximately 8:30pm). “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (PG, 2hrs 32mins) will be shown. Bring your blanket or lawn chairs and enjoy an evening under the stars. Free. Egg Harbor Farmers Market Egg Harbor Farmers Market, 7740 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3717. 8am-12pm. Large assortment of locally grown produce as well as foods and baked goods. Hand crafted items. Blacksmith Demonstration Heritage Village at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St, Sturgeon Bay. 920.421.2332. 11am-2pm. Watch local blacksmiths use historic techniques to create pieces made of iron and steel. Some pieces, including custom orders, are available for sale.

GALLERIES

Artist Demonstration Fine Line Designs Gallery, 10376 Hwy 42, Ephraim. 920.854.4343. 11am-2pm. A featured artist demonstrates their technique for gallery guests.

LIVE. WORK. PLAY. Locally Owned and Operated

doorcountybroadband.com • (920) 868-9100

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HIGH SPEED INTERNET IN DOOR COUNTY

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

“The Bridges of Madison County” Peninsula Players, 4351 Peninsula Players Rd, Fish Creek. 920.868.3287. 6:30pm. Pre-show seminar. Jon Jarosh, Director of Communications & Public Relations, discusses the impact of books, films and articles on destinations from a tourism standpoint. 8pm. Show. A ravishingly beautiful musical based on the novel by Robert James Waller. $39-$44/tickets. “Doctor! Doctor!” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 6pm. A retiring small town physician recruits his young big city nephew to take over his practice. A charming tribute to the nostalgic

nature of innocent, smalltown life in Door County, where residents reluctantly but humorously adapt to change. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats. “Candide” Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N 3rd Ave, Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.1760. 7:30pm. A witty and wacky satire of an operetta, Candide takes the audience on a round-the-world romp of idealistic optimism as it clashes with a series of absurdly unfortunate events. $28/general admission. $12/students. $7/child (12 & under). “A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking” Sturgeon Bay Jaycee Hall, 340 Jaycee Ct, Sturgeon Bay. 920.818.0816. 7:30pm. Maude Mix is having a tough day when her loud and high spirited new neighbor, Hannah Mae, bursts into her life. Hannah Mae badgers Maude into friendship and the two eventually join forces against their errant and erring husbands. Show includes adult content. $15/ adults. $10/students. “The Heart of Robin Hood” Bjorklunden, 7590 Boynton Ln, Baileys Harbor. 920.839.1500. 8pm. David Farr’s funny, adventurous tale will surprise you with a new spin on a story you think you know. A Door Shakespeare production. $29/adult. $19/student. $9/children under 12. “Lumberjacks in Love” Northern Sky Theater, Peninsula State Park Amphitheater, 10169 Shore Rd, Fish Creek. 920.854.6117. 8:30pm. Four burly lumberjacks live in a state of manly bliss at the Haywire Lumber Camp in Northern Wisconsin – until an encounter with a plucky mail order bride interrupts life as they know it. The result is big belly laughs and beautiful music. Vehicle sticker not required. $22/Adults. $11/ Students. $6/Children 12 years old and under. $7/extra charge for reserved seats.

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

HAPPENINGS


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

PERSPECTIVES By the Numbers Wisconsin Drinking Water Last week the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources released the Wisconsin Public Water Systems 2016 Annual Drinking Water Report. Here are some facts from the report. The full report is available on the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov; search “drinking water.”

LETTERS POLICY Do you have an opinion you’d like to share? To see it on Peninsula Pulse’s letters page, please follow the guidelines here and send to: Peninsula Pulse, 8142 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor, WI 54202; (preferred) email letters@ppulse.com; or submit online at doorcountypulse.com.

56 The number of public water systems in the state that obtain their water from surface water rather than underground sources. The surface water systems serve some of the largest populations, including Milwaukee and Green Bay.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Photo: Len Villano

76 The number of public water systems in the state that experienced contamination violations – bacteria, nitrate, arsenic and radionuclides were the most common contaminants found.

99 The percentage of public water systems in the state that met the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Maximum Contaminant Level standards.

443 The number of water systems owned by entities other than municipalities, which could include mobile home parks, apartment buildings and long-term care facilities.

611 The number of municipally owned systems in the state. They serve 80 percent of the population.

891 The number of non-transient, non-community water systems. These include schools, office buildings, industrial facilities, dairies and other businesses.

• Letters must be addressed to the editor in order to appropriately distinguish them from general company correspondence. • Generally, we limit letters to 500 words. • Letters must include contact information, including name, daytime telephone, mailing address and email address. Only the author’s name and town of residence will appear in the paper. • Anonymous submissions will not be accepted. • Peninsula Pulse reserves the right to edit, to add titles to and/or retitle submissions, to print at the time of our discretion, and to refuse. • Peninsula Pulse reserves the right to refuse any letter at any time due to limited space or for any reason deemed appropriate. • Multiple letters addressing the same or similar topics may be omitted. • Letters not appearing in the print edition may, but are not guaranteed to, be printed online. • Opinions expressed within the letters on our pages – regardless of political, religious or philosophical content – should be accepted as those of their authors and not those of Peninsula Pulse, its owners or its staff. • Questions regarding our policy can be sent in writing, or call 920.839.2121 for more information.

1972 The year federal standards were enacted for public water systems.

2,600 The number of inspections of public water systems by DNR staff and its partners to ensure compliance with construction, operation and maintenance requirements.

9,463

Development At What Cost? After riding my bike from the corner of Lampert west on Highway 42/57, over rumble strips located on the edge of the road, I discovered Grant Ave. I traveled north to find the site that was chosen by the

developers for a 56-unit apartment complex, and was approved by the Plan Commission on June 21, 2017. To my dismay, I found no road exiting the development site. I explained during public comment at the July 5, 2017, common council meeting, during my three-minute timeframe, that the proposed planned unit development was an isolated development due to the fact that there was no exit, except the highway entrance. I also explained that it was benefiting not the Sturgeon Bay School District, but neighboring Southern Door. Finally, I urged the council not to make the same mistake in creating a development such as on the north side of Egg Harbor Road that they have not fixed in 15-plus years. Fast-forward to the July 18, 2017, council meeting, it was brought to the city’s attention, through a Memorandum Agreement between the City of Sturgeon Bay and Wisconsin DOT (permit dated Oct. 15, 2009). We currently have 40 units, and are allowing 56 more plus 14 townhouses (totaling 110 units). It was stated the tipping point which required a traffic study for the development was 100 units, by Community Development Director, Marty Olejniczak. Mayor Birmingham stated the city will only benefit by $23,000 of taxes a year from the development of the 56 units. What will it cost the city to develop a 1/3-mile of road, which could include such barriers as condemning and the possible use of eminent domain? People first. Honor your agreements. Paul Anschutz Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The number of transient non-community water systems. They include motels, campgrounds, parks, restaurants, taverns and churches.

11,408 The number of public water systems in Wisconsin, more than any other state in the nation.

HELLERTOON

650,000 The number of people served by the state’s largest municipally owned system, which is Milwaukee Waterworks.

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$14.5 million The amount the DNR awarded to 38 communities, including $300,000 to Sturgeon Bay Utilities, to replace some of the 170,000 lead service lines in water supply systems statewide.

$24 million The amount the DNR provided in financial assistance through the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program, which helped 14 communities make needed infrastructure improvements to their drinking water systems.

$1.5 billion Estimated infrastructure costs between now and 2031 for small community water systems serving fewer than 3,300 people.

$7.1 billion Total cost for water infrastructure needs in Wisconsin by 2031.

$384 billion The cost of water infrastructure needs by 2031 across the nation. Source: Wisconsin Public Water Systems 2016 Annual Drinking Water Report – compiled by Jim Lundstrom

If you can’t stop thinking about it... buy it! HIGHWAY 42 ACROSS FROM THE AUDITORIUM, FISH CREEK

Where’s the Common Sense? I am sure I’m not the only one frustrated about the battle over the proposed downtown westside Sturgeon Bay waterfront hotel complex! The issue is whether or not the government owns and can sell a strip of land between an 1835 highwater survey line and the actual waterfront. The sparring parties were told to “negotiate” a compromise line. Geez. A high-water line is not a matter of negotiation, it’s a matter of survey by competent authority. Secondly, since 1835, the highwater line has been altered by fill in Sturgeon Bay, and probably every other city of any size on the Great Lakes. In Sturgeon Bay, does the government really own Utopia Circle and the SB Yacht Club – both built on fill? The entire downtown waterfront, using the 1835 line, is probably government owned, too. No? A 2017 high-water survey would reflect reality. I’m thinking the line would probably be at the exact edge of our current shore, as we are pretty much at an all-time high right now. Let’s not forget, a high-water line marks the boundary of navigable water. Let’s face it, the Door County Maritime Museum is not in navigable water. Sturgeon Bay did a fine job concerning the Stone Harbor hotel complex and grounds, which includes a beautiful public boardwalk, public restrooms, and public water access. The obstructionism concerning this similar project, based on the never-before-cited-nor-enforced 1835 high-water argument, is nuts. Whatever happened to common sense? Tom Felhofer Union, Wis.


JOHN SCALZI

Politics Matter Given the unpopularity of President Trump (the last ABC poll showed his approval rating at 36 percent) and the highly partisan atmosphere in the U.S. Senate and House, we Americans can feel powerless and just throw up our hands and switch it all off. However, I think “politics” still matters. What happens in Washington determines the fabric of our lives: our jobs, our incomes, our health care, our environment, our education, the roads we drive on, and the list goes on. I’ve always believed our democracy works because we live in a country that values, respects, and supports all Americans, regardless of age, religion, race, wealth or sexual orientation. I don’t think President Trump should be speaking at rallies that are only his supporters. He is the President of all Americans. A small reminder: he lost the popular vote by three million votes. And I don’t think our legislators should be looking to enact their agenda without talking to their constituents in face-to-face meetings or at public town halls. And I certainly don’t think legislation should be crafted in secret as the Republican health care bill has been. At the time of writing this letter, we still don’t know the details and cost of the latest Republican plan. Politics depends on us, on who votes and who speaks up. This seems especially important as our democracy is challenged every day by a President who doesn’t seem to understand how our democracy works: we have three equal branches that work separately as checks and balances to each other. I feel that President Trump’s inability, or lack of desire to work with, or lack of respect for the other branches of government is undermining our democracy. The president is not above the other branches

Thanks So Much Thanks to every individual who donates food and clothing to Feed & Clothe My People.Your help is valuable to so many.

of government. All the branches are equal. To me, this lack of respect and understanding of our democracy is very worrisome. Our elected officials work for us. We have to keep letting them know how we feel and keep them accountable. Senators Baldwin, Johnson, and Congressman Gallagher need to hear from us, their constituents and citizens. Letters, phone calls, faxes, emails do get recorded and counted. The 2018 midterm elections are coming up. Let’s keep our democracy alive and well by being active and involved. Glenna Peters Sister Bay, Wis.

204 N. 14th Ave. • Sturgeon Bay 54235 feedmypeopledoorcounty.com 920.743.9053

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

Feed and Clothe My People

If you want me to treat your ideas with more respect, get some better ideas.”

Hours: Monday & Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm Tues. Wed. Fri. 10 am - 2 pm

FLOORING

The King of Rhetoric For the last six months the American people have been subjected to one media spectacle after another by our President. He has managed to not release his taxes or relinquish his business ties. He surrounds himself with family members in government when he stated they were going to run the Trump businesses. No one is immune from his threats. He harasses his own choices in government if they don’t agree with him. He speaks highly of Putin and denies Russian ties and makes fun of other world leaders, while we are subject to a continued flow of Twitter attacks. I have to say, the embarrassing speech/rant he made at the Boy Scout Jamboree is one of the most inappropriate, bombastic and rhetoric filled to date. As I have read, listened and watched the happenings of the last six months, I have to conclude that an innocent, respectful, intelligent person does not act like this. Carol Schmidt Baileys Harbor, Wis.

See What’s New In Carpet, Wood, & Luxury Vinyl Plank 2613 So. Bay Shore Drive, Sister Bay 854-2842 Mon. - Fri. 9am - 4:30pm; Sat. 10am - 1pm

$35 Wine & Specialty Food Market • Unique Gifts & Home Decor Daily Wine Tastings & Food Pairing Plates

“Hand-Made” Fudge • Donuts & Pies Made Daily Open Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm Sunday 10am-4pm 8813 HWY 42 between Egg Harbor & Fish Creek (formerly Ray’s Cherry Hut)

UTV/Kayak RENTALS TOURS SCENIC CRUISES 920 421 ILND (4563)

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Olive’s

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• Toys • Books • Games • Puzzles

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(920) 868-DOOR (3667) • www.whitecottagereddoor.com


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

The whole secret of the study of nature lies in learning how to use one’s eyes.”

GREEN

GEORGE SAND

Let “OUR” experienced Door County Agents be “YOUR” Agents!! www.theactionrealty.com 619 N. 8th Ave. • Sturgeon Bay 920-743-6906 • stbay@theactionrealty.com

Exhibits and events that highlight the culture of the Belgian settlements. Hours: Friday, Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

1255 County DK, Brussels, WI 54204 www.belgianheritagecenter.org MaryKay Shumway, ABR®, CRS®, CTA® Exclusive Buyer Agency Exceptional Listing Services door-county-properties.com

“MaryKay was our Buyer Agent, and we honestly doubt there could be anyone else that knows Door County the way she does! Great energy and a true professional to the end.” -Claudia and Roman A., Illinois and Europe Lake, WI

Kellstrom-Ray Agency, Inc. est.1948

REAL ESTATE

PO Box 108 / 2294 Sunset Drive Sister Bay, WI 54234 Phone: 920-854-2353 Mobile: 920-421-0038 Email: shumway.mk@gmail.com

Matthew House Thrift Shop PO Box 140 • 7896 HWY 42, Egg Harbor, WI 54209 920-868-2731 • friz1995@charter.net

3 6 Display Volunteers Needed 1-2 hours weekly Developmentally disabled & other Door County non-profits to benefit from sale of donated items.

USUALLY OPEN 10-4 daily

Travel Discoveries II 920-854-4295 • Ellison Bay Home Office • Watseka, IL Call Amy or Julie (owners)

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Let us show you the world!

The Door County Environmental Council invites you to

“The Great Lakes in a Time of Hyper Change” 7:00 pm, Friday, Aug.11 at the Town Hall in Baileys Harbor

This free program is presented by

Cameron Davis, the Obama Administration’s chief liaison to Congress in Great Lakes matters.

920-743-6003 www.dcec-wi.org

Photo: Dan Eggert

DOOR COUNTY LAND TRUST SURPASSES 8,000 ACRES PROTECTED The Door County Land Trust announces they have now surpassed 8,000 acres protected from development through the addition of 106 acres to the Chambers Island Nature Preserve. Door County Land Trust Executive Director Tom Clay said, “We are pleased that with this most recent acquisition we are surpassing two milestones – 8,000 acres are now protected by the land trust, and at 593 acres, Chambers Island has become our largest nature preserve. Chambers Island is an important piece in the picture of Door County’s conservation.” Chambers Island provides vital stopover habitat for migratory birds. The island is dominated by hardwood and cedar forests with contiguous canopy, an inland lake called Mackaysee, and wetlands including a leather-leaf muskeg (bog), the only one of its kind in Door County. Protecting Chambers Island was recognized as a priority during joint conservation planning sessions with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, The Nature Conservancy and others. The 8,000 acres protected by the Door County Land Trust are the result of several land protection methods that create corridors of conserved lands benefitting native plant and wildlife species. The Land Trust owns and manages 15 nature preserves and 24 natural areas, which comprise about 4,100 acres protected. Additionally, 3,200 acres are permanently protected through conservation easement agreements with private landowners. An additional 700 acres have been protected and transferred to other organizations for ongoing care. “There is urgency to our work in Door County. Protecting our thriving plant, fish and bird habitats now creates a refuge in an otherwise rapidly changing world,” said Door County Land Trust Director of Land Program Terrie Cooper. “The Land Trust is poised to protect the most vulnerable places on the peninsula, like the interior of Chambers Island which is so important to the birds migrating over the bay each year – more than 169 species identified so far.” For more information and to become a land trust member, call 920.746.1359 or visit doorcountylandtrust.org.

CAMERON DAVIS ON THE HYPER CHANGE OF THE GREAT LAKES The Door County Environmental Council welcomes Cameron Davis, a natural resource and water quality expert, who will present Cameron Davis “The Great Lakes in a Time of Hyper Change” Aug. 11, 7 pm, at the Baileys Harbor Town Hall. For more than three decades, Davis has worked to develop and implement water quality and quantity policy. Appointed by the Obama Administration, Davis was senior adviser to two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrators in Washington, D.C. Under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), he coordinated 11 federal departments to manage $2.2 billion in funding to state, municipal, tribal, business and civic stakeholders, and the nonprofit community. It was the largest Great Lakes restoration investment in U.S. history. Funding financed contaminated sediment cleanups, fish contaminant matters, dam removals, wetland and habitat restoration, runoff reduction, invasive species prevention, and other related water resource matters. Davis also served as a lead negotiator with the U.S. State Department in its development of the 2012 U.S.Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

DCEC

Davis was also president and CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, Chicago and is lead author of the Great Lakes Legacy Act, which leverages federal-private funding partnerships for cleanups to rehabilitate riverside and coastal property values. Davis received two honors for his work in the Great Lakes region. On June 26, he was recognized for his work managing the Great Lakes Advisory Board (GLAB). He helped establish the GLAB, comprised of business, environmental, municipal, state and academic interests, to ensure buy-in for GLRI investments. On the same day, Environment & Climate Change Canada presented Davis with recognition for his “past, present, and future contributions” to Great Lakes health with the U.S.Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Davis is vice president of Consulting Engineers and Scientists, Inc., one of the nation’s leading geotechnical, environmental, water resources, and ecological science and engineering firms. He is responsible for guiding the firm’s Upper Midwest water quality, policy, infrastructure and other water resources efforts.

CREW MAPPING GREATEST WETLAND THREATS IN DOOR COUNTY A four-person summer crew is mapping invasive species populations in the Door Peninsula Coastal Wetlands Ramsar site to prioritize the areas under greatest threat from Japanese knotweed, European marsh thistle, phragmites, reed canary grass, glossy buckthorn and narrow-leaved

cattail, all of which are known to be a threat to the health of these wetlands and the native plants and animals that depend on them. The Nature Conservancy was awarded a $186,200 grant from the Sustain Our Great Lakes program to hire the seasonal crew for two years to control invasive species and restore and enhance coastal wetlands within the Door Peninsula Coastal Wetlands Ramsar Site, a 11,443-acre wetland complex in northern Door County designated as a Wetland of International Importance by the Ramsar Convention in 2015. The grant is being matched with additional funding from the Nature Conservancy and The Ridges Sanctuary, as well as volunteer hours donated to the project, to bring the total funding for the project to more than $413,600. The crew will also map populations of any new invasive species they find and give native plants a boost by controlling these invaders. “We’re very excited about the work this crew is doing,” said Kari Hagenow, Nature Conservancy land steward and coordinator of the Door County Invasive Species Team, “because it will allow us to make real progress in removing some of the worst populations of six non-native species that are invading the coastal wetlands in our Ramsar Wetlands area. It also gives us the flexibility to move quickly when we find a new invasive that requires immediate attention.” Private landowners in Door County interested in learning how to identify and control invasive species on their land can contact the Door County Invasive Species Team hotline at 920.746.5955 for more information.


HISTORY

RUDYARD KIPLING

IEDS

Door County News, August 5, 1926

All items are from the Door County Library’s newspaper archives, and they appear in the same form as they were first published, including misspellings and grammatical errors.

Door County News, August 5, 1926

The Weekly Expositor Independent, August 6, 1880 Pier Burned. Mr. A. Anderson’s pier at Ephraim, burned last Monday night at 12 o’clock. The pier was one of the best, if not the best on Green Bay waters. The warehouse, which contained about $500 worth of boxed clothing, 400 bushels of wheat, 10 tons of feed, 6 barrels of sugar, coffee, etc., were also burned with the pier. The total loss is estimated at $4,500 or $5,000. Though nearly or quite a total wreck, the pier will be rebuilt, work on the same to begin at once.

Door County Democrat, August 5, 1905 Boys Struck By Lightning. The heavy electrical storm Thursday evening came near being the death of three young men in the town of Sevastopol. Johnnie and Paul Bischno, sons of John Bischno, ran into a barn when the storm broke for the purpose of getting shelter from the rain. Just after entering the barn the building was struck by lightning and the shock rendered both boys unconscious. John received the heaviest shock and did not regain consciousness for several hours and is still in very serious condition. Geo. Heidman Jr., son of Geo. Heidman of Sevastopol, was out in the field driving the cows home, and was struck by lightning receiving a very severe shock. He was rendered unconscious, and bled from the nose, eyes and mouth, but it is thought that he will recover. Door County Democrat, August 3, 1917 PARK POPULAR PLACE Peninsula State Park is becoming widely known throughout Wisconsin, and Sept. A.E. Doolittle states that thousands of people have visited it this summer, an average of over 75 automobile parties having motored to the park daily since the latter part of June. Yachting parties have also found it an ideal place at which to spend their time, and it is a common sight to see a number of little pleasure craft

anchored off shore, and at the docks on the Fish Creek and Ephraim shores of the park. The golf links are becoming popular and are being used almost constantly, and are now in good condition for the lovers of this popular sport. Door County News, August 5, 1926 30,000 Cases Cherries Are Packed In Day On Friday of last week one of the largest single day’s pack of cherries in the history of the industry was made. There were 30,000 cases of cherries canned at the three factories of the Door County Fruit Growers Canning Co., located here and at Egg Harbor and Sister Bay. The trees are laden until the limbs bend to the ground and have broken in some instances. Not only this but the fruit is of an exceptionally high quality, with a very few exceptions where slight damage was done by hail. Door County News, August 3, 1939 GOV’T BOAT TO BE BUILT HERE Contracts for three 48-foot government boats have just been awarded to Peterson Boat Works, Fred Peterson, president, announces, and work will be started in two weeks to enable them to make fall delivery. The three boats will be used in inspection work by the U.S. Engineering department from the New Orleans port. Several men will be hired to do the work, Mr. Peterson states, for the three boats will be built simultaneously, there being sufficient facilities to do so.

Regular deadline for line classifieds is noon on Tuesday for the Friday issue. Available at doorcountypulse.com. To submit, email classifieds@ppulse.com or call 920.839.2121.

ANNOUNCEMENTS LOST AND FOUND LOST IN RECENT STORM Yellow Current Design single person kayak and a tan colored triangular piece of pier decking were lost near Murphy Park in recent storm. If found, please call 414.659.3933 Lost Necklace July 13th. Possibly lost in Fish Creek shopping or medical areas. Sentimental value. Token of gratitude in return. 920.839.2298 or chrisw1293@gmail.com

MISCELLANEOUS LAST CALL! Donate nautical items! Donate nautical items from A to Z! to: “BOATHOUSE SALE: Door County Maritime Museum Classic and Wooden Boat Festival. August 12-13 920.746.0516 or 920.743.5958 Crafters Connection Made it another year! If you have never visited the shop come see us. Rag rugs, crafts, furniture and second hand items from 20 vendors. Open 10am-4pm. 1050 Hwy 42 Ellison Bay in the big red barn Breast Cancer Financial Assistance Are you dealing with breast cancer? Is a loved one? Do you need screening? The Sue Baldwin Fund, Inc. can help. To download an application or to learn more about financial assistance provided by The Sue Baldwin Fund visit www.suebaldwinfund. com or call 920.839.1114

Sunroof, Heated power seats, 4 cylinder, Auto Trans. $5,895 Young Auto Sales 920.743.9228 youngautomotive.net 2010 VW CC Turbo Well equipped, Blue metallic, Heated leather seats, Hard top. 101k miles. $8,995 Young Auto Sales 743.9228 youngautomotive.net Cars For Sale 1985 Vette Pearl $7500. 87 Fiero GT $4500. 89 Jag XJ6 $2500. 91 Alfa 164 $4000. 96 Cad STS $2200. 98 Olds Aurora $3000. 99 Audi Quattro $1500. 89 Honda Pacific Coast $2600. Details 920.839.5454 2000 Toyota Solara 167K Miles. Black with leather interior. Good condition. $1,899 OBO. 920.421.0073 1972 Buick Skylark

Four door, hard top. Original Wildcat 350 V8. Same owner for 10+ years. Runs, but needs some work. Stored indoors in winter. $2500 OBO. Motivated seller. Leave a message or text 920.495.4414

MISCELLANEOUS Storage or Parking structure

AUTOS CARS 98 Honda Accord – new brakes – $2500 114,954 miles / V6 / Automatic / AC / Leather seats / Sunroof / New tires at 103K miles / Rear brake pads, rotors, calipers at 112K miles / Front brake pads, rotors at 113K miles 920.495.1323 2006 Subaru Legacy Special Edition AWD 4 door, White, Beige interior,

Parking or storage structure 21’ long 14’ high 12’ wide. Metal pipe framing with tarp top and zippered ends. New tarp still in box. Asking $1500. New tarp was $1000. Fish Creek. 414.322.0617

SUVS 1990 Jeep Wrangler for sale 133,000 miles, runs great,some rust, soft top. $2750 OBO. 920.743.7656

Door County Democrat, August 3, 1917

Anderson Docks-ology Ecumenical Sunset Services August 9 Rev. Barbara Sajna

SHOP SMART

960 Green Bay Rd., Sturgeon Bay Carpet • Hardwood • Vinyl • Tile

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

New Day Singers

Rain location: Ephraim Village Hall, 9996 Highway 42

Plank Flooring Starting at $1.50/sq. ft. Carpet Starting at $0.75/sq. ft. www.FloorMartDoorCounty.com

Free Estimates • 920-743-6222

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Wednesdays at Anderson Dock, Ephraim — 7:30 p.m.

Floor Mart

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

The Democrat, August 3, 1893 THE NEW ASSESSMENT. BIG INCREASE IN THE VALUATION OF CITY PROPERTY. The result of the work done by the board of review of this city, which completed its labors last week, shows that there has been an immense increase in the valuation of both the personal property and real estate of this city. This year the real estate is valued at $546,795, and the personal property at $365,325, making a total of $912,118. In 1892 the total valuation of the city was $539,262, there being an increase during the past year of $372,856, or about 69 percent. This very large increase is not caused by growth of the city, but is mainly due to the fact that the city officers elected last spring were pledged to reform the method of assessment formerly in

vogue here and to assess all taxable property at its real value.

CLA SSIF

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

Bethel Baptist Church

bethelellisonbay.org | Pastor Joel Rose

WEDNESDAY

Elevate Youth

7:00 - 8:30 PM

* Meets at First Baptist Church

Next Step Classes Coffee Fellowship Worship Service

SUNDAY

9:15 AM 10:15 AM 10:45 AM

852 Europe Bay Rd. | Ellison Bay, WI | 920.854.4490

CLASSIFIEDS 2008 Jeep Liberty Limited One Owner. Dual power leather seating, sunroof, tow package, 99k miles. $11,300 Young Auto Sales 920.743.9228 or youngautomotive.net

TRUCKS

New Evangelical Free Church in Northern Door County

Interested in being part of a new church? Work on Sunday? … Worship on Monday! Give us a call: 920-333-3544 Check out our web site: www.theorchardefca.org www.facebook.com/TheOrchardEFCA Now meeting on Monday evenings. Places vary.

2000 F150 4X4 Well maintained. chrisw1296@ gamil.com or 920.421.0334 93 Toyota Pickup 2wd 5 speed – $2500 153,855 miles / Standard Cab / 4 cylinder / solid frame / new clutch at 122K miles / new exhaust at 124K / New tires at 140K / New valve cover gasket, plugs, cap, rotor, wires at 150K Call 920.495.1323 Chevrolet Silverado Truck Silverado Z71 4 wheel drive extended cab LT1. Power locks & windows, auto dual zone A/C, remote vehicle starter, EZ lift tailgate pkg., factory 18in aluminum wheels, remote keyless entry, 160K miles, excellent condition, tonneau cover, black with black interior. Accident free. 920.883.8444

VANS

Unitarian Universalist A LIBERAL COMMUNITY OF FAITH

Find Service Podcasts & More At uufdc.org KID ACTIVITIES OFFERED DURING SUNDAY SERVICE

Fellowship oF Door CoUnty

August 6 – 10:00 am Peter Conroy Law and Disorder: The Calas Affair IN THE UU GALLERY Ethnic Textiles of China

DICKINSON POETRY SERIES Wednesday, August 9, 7 pm June Nirschl 10341 hwy 42 ~ north ephraim ~ 920.854.7559

2003 Chevy Express 2500 5.3 L Cargo van, reliable, clean and runs great. 79,000 miles. $8000 OBO. Call 920.743.9633

FOR RENT APARTMENT Apartment For Rent 2 bdr apartment on west side of Sturgeon Bay. Refrigerator, range, A/C unit, heat, basement storage. No pets. No smoking. Lease and security deposit. $540/mo. 920.743.3836 Apartment For Rent 2 bedroom apartment. 2 minutes from Gibraltar School in Fish Creek. Available 9/1. Utilities included, lease required. 920.421.1015

ROOM FOR RENT Baileys Harbor Room in two bedroom apartment, full length wall closet, shared bathroom, female preferred, no pets, internet, $400/mo. AugustOctober. Call 715.581.6146

Room for Rent $450/month. In home 2 miles south of Egg Harbor. Call John @ 701.729.8390

STORAGE Winter Storage Indoor Space available for boats, cars, campers, etc. $16 per linear foot. Fish Creek Hwy 42 & A. Hardt’s Acres, call 920.868.5050

VACATION RENTAL Cole’s Resort/Kayak & Canoe Rentals Bring the family to stay with us on beautiful Rowleys Bay in our spacious, modern 2 and 3 bedroom cottages for rent with full amenities and fire pits. Relax in our fabulous, roomy lighthouse suite for $99 per night for 2. Private lake access, onsite kayak and canoe rentals for our guests or the public, no guide needed, save money. Explore the famous Mink River from our property, only a stone’s throw away, enjoy world famous bass fishing on the Mink, surrounded by Newport State Park, Mink River Estuary and Nature Conservancy. Amusement parks, biking and hiking trails, golf courses, fine dining and shopping close by. 1081 County Road ZZ, Rowleys Bay. 920.421.1257 or 920.421.2157 Vacation Rental Parkview Beach Cottage, furnished vacation rental, across from the beach/marina park in beautiful Sister Bay. Has some openings in August, September and October. For 10 people, fully furnished, WIFI, cable TV. Smoke and pet free. For rental info contact sharonc@newwis.com. 920.421.0993 or kimerzinger@ yahoo.com 715.572.7634

FOR SALE FIREWOOD Logcrafter, LLC Dry split firewood delivered to your campsite. Face cord, 1/2 cord, full cord. 920.746.0122

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS Air Conditioner Fedders 12,000 BTU window air conditioner. Be cool cheap. Call 920.493.1572 SALE! SALE! SALE! Girls bikes $30 & $40, Schwinn $35 needs work; lg. breakfront

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PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

The Cowboy Church of Door County

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday Worship 9:30 am Fellowship 10:30 am Master’s Cup Coffee House

Tues-Fri, 9am - 4 pm FREE WIFI

Sturgeon Bay Christian Counseling (920) 559-2815 Paul Thierfelder M. Div., M.A.

Pastor James Gomez 1756 Michigan Street Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 920.743.7750 • princeofpeacesb.com

SUNDAYS 10 AM In the Tidball Horse Barn located at 12376 Timberline Rd., Ellison Bay. One mile north of Uncle Tom’s Candy Store. For Further Information Contact Pastor Lloyd at (920) 421-1327

St. Paul Lutheran Church (E.L.C.A.)

Sunday Worship 10:00 A.M. and 8:00 A.M. in July & August

Swivel, rocking recliners Two swivel, rocking recliners $75 each. Beige faux leather 970.390.5521 Kitchen Corner Hutch Two glass shelves in upper cabinet, one glass shelf in lower cabinet. White porcelain knobs. Older, but beautiful condition and not very heavy. $150. 715.499.2857, Sherry For Sale TV Unit 3 piece dark wood combination TV/VCR unit with sides for vases, photos etc. Very nice shape. $250. Call 920.854.4018 Oak Farmhouse Table w/4 Chairs and Bench Large, oak, farmhouse table with 4 chairs and 1 bench. 44.5 inches wide x 84 inches long. Beautiful condition. $400. 715.499.2857, Sherry

Dolly Master Tow Dolly. Newer tires. Priced to sell at $375 OBO. Call 920.493.1572 Tractor 544 International tractor, gas, power steering, wide front with 75in Freemen 4000 front-end loader. Excellent starter, not pretty but great personality. $4,100 or best offer. Also, 6ft bush hog available. Call 920.493.1572 Granite vanity tops New/never used (2) 4’ black pearl granite tops with porcelain undermount sink. Ends are unpolished. $195 each OBO. Call 920.868.2522. 45” & 54” looms for sale 45” Herald 4 harness loom & 54” Norwood 4 harness cherry loom & bench. Call Gloria 920.839.2693 For Sale Used gas furnaces. New dehumidifier. Hardwood firewood. Cheap. Call 920.495.9404 Tractor and Crawler Loader Ford Tractor Jubilee, 2 speed. Transfer case, landscape box, landscape rake. $3,000 OBO. 450 Case Crawler Loader, diesel, 4 cyl. W/filters/ fuel/lube oil/hyd oil. $6000 OBO. Call 920.854.2086 Display Panels

Door County Interiors & Design Free Measure. Free Estimate. Up to 25% off Hunter Douglas Blinds. Up to 40% off Carpeting and Tile. 7266 Highway 42 – 2 miles south of Egg Harbor. 920.868.9008, open 7 days a week.

MISCELLANEOUS COPPER SCULPTURE FOUNTAIN A “cattails fountain” crafted by John Lange of Fountain City, WI. Shaped like 5 cattails w/water coming out of 2. Water falls onto large leaves making a sound like rain on a roof. Base and pump included. $200. 920.818.1039 Kohler Whirlpool Like new fiberglass 3’6” x 5’ deck, Kohler fairfax faucet, 6 jets. $295. Call 920.868.2522 LAWN-MOWER 8-HP MURRAY riding lawn mower/with bagger, cheap. 920.743.6863

4 Right angle display panels on rollers. Each panel face 3.5’ X 7’ ready to use. $75 each. 414.322.0617 Mounted Spot Lights 4 Mounted spot light rails with 5 spots each with plug in wiring. Spot lights included. $50 each rail. Extra spots and bulbs available. 414.322.0617 HYLINE ORCHARD FARM MARKET 2 miles north of Egg Harbor on Hwy 42. (920.868.3067) OPEN YEAR ROUND 9am to

The United Methodist Church We Are Merging Excitement and Hope IntoDoors. a Vital Faith. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open

Calvary & Zion

8:45 Zion

Worship

8781CTY CTY FF 8781 Fish Creek, WI

Between Fish Creek and Baileys Harbor

10:30 Calvary Calvary 10:15 4650CTY CTY 4650 E E Egg WI WI EggHarbor, Harbor,

Message: How did the early church settle disputes? 5 pm Fri 1/23 Acoustic Jam Open Mic & Meal @ Calvary Rev. Jane Michael Morris Rev. Sommers

parishoffice@calvaryzionumc.org parishoffice@calvaryzionumc.org

920.868.3112 920.868.3112

www.calvaryandzionumc.org www.calvaryzionumc.org

Ephraim Moravian Church

Fully Accessible & Hearing Loop System Sunday Services 8 a.m. (½ hour service) 10:00 a.m. Traditional Service (Nursery Provided)

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Canterbury Lane, Sister Bay - 1st left off Hwy. 57, south of 42/57 intersection The Rev. Barbara J. Sajna * 854-9600 http://stlukes-sisterbay.org

$1000 new – sacrifice $100; vintage sofa wood carved and upholstered in excellent condition $125; Franklin wood burning stove $50; 3pc white bedroom $80; 2 brown chest of drawers $35 each; Singer sewing machine with bench $50; NordicTrak skier $75; table saw $25; wood dining room table – seats 6 – claw foot legs $60; drum table $45; 4 oak chairs + fabric to upholster seats $80 Call 920.854.4860

A Friendly Place to Worship - All Are Welcome Wednesdays Summer Worship Worship with Communion 6pm Schedule Adult Bible Class 6:30pm 8:00am, 9:30am Communion Every Worship 4167 Juddville Road • 920.868.2826 stpaullutheranjuddville.360unite.com Rev. Frank Kauzlarich

Both Services followed by coffee & conversation 920-854-2804 9970 Moravia Street ephraimmoravian.org


CLASSIFIEDS 5pm. HOMEMADE CHERRY & APPLE PRODUCTS FROM OUR ORCHARDS. Wood pellets pickup or delivery available. Cooler kept apples, honeycrisp, macintosh, cortland, red & golden delicious. Also our cherry and apple pies baked or ready to bake. A variety of cheese, cheese spreads and cheese curds. Door County beer and wines. Natural homemade soaps. Door County Watch Us Grow liquid fertilizer. Honey crisp dried apples, large variety of fruit pie fillings including Cherry & Honey Crisp apple. Jams, Jellies, Pies, Salsa, BBQ Sauce, (Cherries: frozen, canned and dried), Cherry Cider, Honey Crisp Blend Apple Cider, our new apple grape and peachy apple and apple cranberry ciders. Fresh Eggs, Maple Syrup, Honey, Pickles, Spices, Fudge, Gifts & Gift Boxes and Much More. Pick Your Own Cherries and Apples in season. Six Generations Growing and Marketing Fruits and Vegetables. Wholesale and Retail products. We ship UPS. Accept WIC checks. Door County Kraut Co. Sauerkraut, Fridge Pickles, Currants, Croissants, Kringles, Danish, Pies, Unique Sweet, Sourdough & Savory Breads, Cookies & Bars, Smoked Whitefish Dips, Asiago Cheese Spreads plus much more. Call 920.839.2288  with requests, questions or for order pick-up. At Baileys Harbor Farm Market Sundays, Jacksonport Tuesdays.

SPORTING EQUIPMENT Shotgun NEW Browning Cynergy 20 ga., O/U, 26” barrels, fiber optic sights, 6 lbs., $1395. Call 920.421.2260

more. Many household items, furniture, beds, porch swing. Fishing rods, reels, tackle boxes and supplies. Lots of tools. Antiques including old kitchen items and cookie box collection. Telescope (full size) with tripod. Some dolls and rare Beanie Babies. Power generator, nail guns, UW gear coats etc. and Weber grills. Multi Family Garage Sale Aug.4 Friday 9am-6pm & Sat Aug.5 8am- 3pm 2863 County Rd S Sturgeon BayFurniture, Bikes, Helmets, Tools, Appliances, Toys, Collectibles, Grandpa’s Attic GARAGE SALE 1809 Falcon Lane, Ellison Bay. We’ve blended two families making you the lucky recipient of all our extras. We have a little bit of everything to set up a new home. Fri & Sat 8/4 & 8/5 9am-5pm. Sale of Cool Stuff of Lifelong Collector Antiques, collectibles, books, vintage clothing, household items, DVDs, dishes, glass and pottery, art, furniture, good golf equipment, no kid stuff. August 5 & 6: 9am-3pm. 1064 N. Elm Rd, Ellison Bay. Garage Sale – Sturgeon Bay Fri 8/4 & Sat 8/5 8am1pm. 5910 Lake Lane. 3 family garage sale. Indoor/ outdoor furniture, kitchen wares, gardening & tools, snowshoes, bikes, 12ft boat with accessories, ladies/ mens clothing L/XL brand name and much more.

MISCELLANEOUS SPECIALS

FREE-CYCLING MISCELLANEOUS Free Piper Organ Free Piper II organ. Call 920.854.5023

GARAGE/YARD SALE Cherry Fest Rummage Sale at Clark Lake 8/3, 8/4 & 8/5 8am-5pm. Hwy 57 to WD N of Sturgeon Bay or Cave Point Rd and follow signs. 12 families or

For Sale at Hyline Orchard Bedding plants, flowers, vegetables, flower baskets, potted fruit trees, wood double ground mulch, pick-up or delivery available. Light or dark mulch. Planting seed potatoes also eating potatoes, red or russett. Hyline Orchard, 8240 HWY 42, Fish Creek. 2 miles north of Egg Harbor. 920.868.3067

ACTIVITIES Kayak and Canoe Rentals at Coles Rowleys Bay Cabins From our private beach.

Lowest prices, best service, flexible hours, large 17’ canoes, single, double & fishing kayaks. A stone’s throw from the famous Mink River. Beginners lesson $15/1 hour, Mink River trip/$30. Happy customersno guides needed. Save $$. 1081 Cty ZZ, Rowleys Bay. 920.421.2157 or 920.421.1257 Mink River Estuary Cruise See the recently accessible Mink River Estuary aboard Capt. John’s Pontoon. 920.246.8088 Professional Tennis Instruction Professional Tennis Instruction. Doorcountytennisservice. com or call 561.632.4477

PETS MISCELLANEOUS ATTEND-A-PET Professional In-home Pet-sitting WHERE YOUR PETS ARE AS IMPORTANT TO US AS THEY ARE TO YOU! Serving northern Door County. Fully insured & bonded, over 25 years experience. Please call Sally at 920.854.5347. www.attendapet.com

REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL House for Sale Year round Egg Harbor home on quiet dead end lane, furnished 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, full basement, 2 car garage, deck overlooking golf course. $254,900. Contact: nansea550@gmail.com Newer Duplex on 2 Secluded Acres

1100 sq. ft. per unit with 2 bedrooms each, cathedral ceilings in upper, energy efficient, all appliances included, ash/birch flooring and cedar trim, beautiful wooded setting near Garrett Bay. $155,000/entire building. Call 920.421.1001

BETHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH

3028 Church St. (Cty Hwy Q) Ephraim, WI 54211-0707

Worship services are streamed ‘live’ and archived at BethanyEphraim.org

SISTER BAY MORAVIAN CHURCH 10924 Old Stage Rd., Sister Bay Join us for our Hearty Breakfast! Sat, Aug 12, 8:30-10:30 am. Eggs, pancakes, potatoes, corned beef hash, muffins, cereal & more!

In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, love.

Come into His presence – just as you are! Receive the blessings Jesus has for you!

handicapped Pastor Sue Gunderson 7973 Hwy 57, Baileys Harbor, WI 54202 accessible Phone: 920.839.2224 Web: Immanuel-Lutheran.org

Canoe For Sale 17 ft. aluminum canoe, Grumman Eagle, very good condition with pneumatic tire caddy and oars. $279. 920.854.2724

Door of Life

CHRISTIAN CHURCH where faith meets real life

2731 Hwy 42 On the Hill Overlooking Sister Bay

Sunday Service: 10:00 am Pastor Ed House Joyful Praise Praise &&Worship Joyful Worship Biblical Answersto to Today’s Today’s Challenges Biblical Answers Challenges ALL ALL ARE ARE WELCOME! WELCOME! Café ♥❤ Nursery & Youth Services Food Pantry Café Youth Services ❤ ♥Food Pantry

is alwayson on ♥Our is always open open Our Our lightlight is always Ourpantry pantry is always

ForFor More Information: More Information: www.Facebook.com/Doorofl ife 421-1525 www.Facebook.com/Dooroflife (920)(920) 421-1525

“BOATHOUSE SALE”! Donate nautical items Donate any nautical items from A to Y (art, clothing, deco, fishing, hardware, sailing, yacht) to the: “Boathouse Sale”. Door County Maritime Museum Classic and Wooden Boat Festival August 12-13 920.746.0516 or 920.743.5958

Worship Services 7:45 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Supervised nursery care is offered for children up to age six Sunday morning from 8 a.m. till noon.

CAMPER/MOTORHOME

www.sturgeonbayumc.org

RV For Sale 2015 Salem by Forest River. 36ft BHBS, sleeps 6 comfortably. House refrigerator and updated queen mattress. Power awning, power jacks, DVD player, 2 TV’s. Bought new for $21,000, priced at $13,500. Parked at Beantown in Baileys Harbor. Contact Dennis at 817.733.8641 or leave message at 920.839.2686

CESSNA C172N SHARE & HANGER 3D2 Gib/Ephr Airport Full partner share plus and hanger — 1978 Cessna 172N– N739JB–VFR/IFR– Aircraft and hanger based in Northern Door County (3D2) Door County Green and White by owner. Share expenses with partner/owners. Excellent way to fly with reduced costs. New annual May 2017. Text or call 920.421.0578 for info and pictures.

836 Michigan St - Sturgeon Bay

Pastor Chris Leonard

Hearing Assisted Loop System

Bible Centered Worship Church Phone 868-3811

Handicap Accessible

Cottage Row & Main • Fish Creek 5:30PM Saturday Night • 9:00AM Sunday Worship 11:00AM Sunday Peninsula Park Service Bible Study: 1:30 Wednesday www.ccfishcreek.com

Rev. David Ruby, Pastor

Office (920) 868-3241

WEEKEND MASSES, MAY 27, 2017 – SEPTEMBER 3, 2017: Saturday: 4 pm Fish Creek, 5 pm Sister Bay & 6 pm Egg Harbor Sunday: 7 am Egg Harbor, 8 am Baileys Harbor, 9 am Fish Creek, 10 am Sister Bay, 11 am Jacksonport & 1 pm Washington Island www.stellamarisparish.com

EVERYONE WELCOME!

August 6 - 8 and 10 a.m. The Rev. Dr. Scott Stoner Director of Living Compass Ministry, Milwaukee and Nicholas Center, Chicago

Worship with us at the historic 1890s “Little White Church” in Jacksonport.

f

Corner of North Cave Point Road & Hwy 57 United Methodist services Sundays at 9:00 jacksonportmethodist.org

Holy Nativity

3434 County Rd. V, Jacksonport Saturday Communion at 5 p.m.

Christ the King

512 Michigan St., Sturgeon Bay Sunday Communion at 9:30 a.m.

Open and Affirming – All are Welcome

ELCA, Ellison Bay, WI Church Office: 920-854-2988 Pastor Jim Honig

Memorial Day weekend through mid-October 9:00 AM 10:15 AM 10:45 AM

Traditional worship w/communion
 Fellowship and coffee
 Contemporary worship w/communion

For more information on church activities visit: www.shepherdofthebay.org

Help Wanted Hotel Housekeeper

Part-time through the fall Experienced preferred but will train Great Wages - Great People Call 920.868.3113 to apply

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Rev. Olin Sletto 920-743-3286 www.cckhn.org

(Communion 1st and 3rd Sundays) _______________________________

Main St. at Cottage Row Fish Creek

10 a.m. Worship 920.854.4080: Office Phone All Who Follow Christ: Ministers Rev. Kerry D. Krauss: Pastor

Welcome to the Episcopal Church

Immanuel-Lutheran.org (Communion 2nd & 4th Saturdays)

Sunday Morning Liturgical Worship – 9 a.m.

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Visiting Pastor

October 2 & 9 Rev. Martin Ruge VisitorsNeenah, always welcome. WI

BOATS Boats 3 two person kayaks and kayak trailer. 1 Wilderness Palmico (red 14ft, like new). 2 Necky Manitou II (15ft, one yellow, one blue). All have rudders, in very good to excellent condition and ready for paddlers. Trailer holds up to 12 kayaks. Paddles and PFD’s available. Package deal possible. Call 920.493.1572

The Church of the Atonement (Episcopal)

Sunday Worship 9:30 AM

Memorial Day WI through Baileys Harbor, 54202Labor Day

Saturday Night920.839.2224 Praise Worship – 5 p.m.

REC VEHICLES

MISCELLANEOUS

2017 • 135th Season

August 6 and 13 October &9 Rev. Brian 2Beckstrom Rev. Martin Ruge Waverly, Neenah, WI IA

Door County Home Motivated seller: affordable year round 2 bdrm/1bath quiet residential retreat in northern Door County on .43 acre. Call 920.421.1720

SUMMER WORSHIP 7973 Hwy 57SCHEDULE

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

Immanuel Lutheran Church-LCMC

Christmas Worship Christmas Eve Candlelight Service 7 PM Centered on God’s Word10 – AM Learning to live it Christmas Day Worship


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

John JohnTong Tong Jean JeanTong Tong Owners Owners

3886 County 3886 CountyMM Sturgeon Bay, WIWI54235 Sturgeon Bay, 54235 Phone Phone920•746•4416 920•746•4416 www.idlewildkennel.com www.idlewildkennel.com Hours Hours M-F M-F 8-48-4 8-11 SatSat 8-11 Sun 7:30, 3-5 Sun 7:30, 3-5

DAVID R. CLOWERS Attorney & Counselor At Law

Over 40 years experience helping others with Social Security benefits, family, juvenile, criminal, simple wills, estates, and bankruptcy matters. 1/2 hour Free consultation available. 207 South Fourth Ave. • Sturgeon Bay, WI 54234 Tel: (920) 743-1716 • Fax: (920) 743-6914 Email: clowers@doorpi.net

The Bay Lofts Apartments

Luxury Living By The Bay

CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES Look for additional Service display advertisements within this section.

CARPENTRY CLEAN IT…FIX IT…BUILD IT! Door County Handyman available for business and residential projects. Licensed, insured, experienced. Photos and references available. Tom at 920.743.9727

CLEANING UTOPIA CUSTOMIZABLE CLEANING For The Clean Of Your Dreams! Sturgeon Bay & Door County. Extensive commercial & residential experience. Excellent references. Fully insured. Competitive rates. Call/text 920.559.0809. Email: utopiaclean@aol.com Web: utopiaclean.com Heather Scholl’s Cleaning Service 920.217.1566. Certified Bonded & Insured. www. HeatherSchollCleaning.com

The Bay Lofts offer the best of Door County Living in the heart of the waterfront district with all the amenities. On site fitness center, club house and proximity to the many trails and parks. Call or email to schedule your visit today! 920-333-1942/ www.TheBayLofts.com /info@urbanapex.com

CAREFULLY, INSUREINSURE CAREFULLY, DREAMDREAM FEARLESSLY. FEARLESSLY. CALL ME CALL TODAYME FORTODAY A FREE FOR A FREE QUOTE.

QUOTE.

American Family Mutual Insurance Company,

American Family Mutual Insurance Company, American Family Insurance Company, American Family Insurance Company, 6000 American Parkway, Madison 6000 American Parkway, Madison WI 53783 WI 006441—Rev. 11/1511/15 © 2015 © 2015 006441—Rev.

Sister Bay, WI 54234 (920) 854-4609

53783

G.A. Computer Services, LLC Fish Creek Custom Web design with online commerce. Web Hosting. Business Support Plans. Virus, spyware removal. Guaranteed Virus free – Custom Computer Environment. Wireless Networks. Custom built computers. Personal Instruction. PCdoctorDC. com 920.421.1757

LAWN/YARD CARE

Jennifer Schmatz Agency 2525 S. Bay Jennifer Shore DriveSchmatz Agency Jennifer P.O.2525 Box 47S. Bay Shore Drive Sister Bay, WI 54234 P.O. Box 47 (920) 854-4609

American Family Mutual Insurance Company, American Family Insurance Company, 6000 American Parkway, Madison WI 53783 006441—Rev. 11/15 © 2015

COMPUTER

911 Lawn Care and Firewood Services Looking for more clients. We are now scheduling spring leaf

and brush clean ups. Cuttings as Needed. Offering Maintenance Mulch Topsoil Plantings Seeding. Call with questions. Free Estimates. A Family Business 920.495.4740 Appel Outdoor Maintenance We offer full-service Lawn Care to all of Northern Door. We also offer mulch sales and installation. Ask about our new Fertilizer Program. We make your property stand out! Call 920.421.2477 Peninsula Tree Service **Full Service Tree and Landscape Company**Tree cutting and removal/Tree & Hedge Trimmimg**Tree planting/Firewood/ wood chips**Lot clearing/Brush Chipping/ Stump Grinding**Snow Plowing 920.746.8861 or 920.559.9119–cell Triptow’s Tree Service, your trees, our experts Removal • thinning • view improvement • climbing • emergency service • firewood prep • splitting upon request • brush chipping. Reliable & fully insured. 920.883.7480 Total Lawn Care General property management. Organic and conventional lawn care treatments. Snow plowing. www.doorcountylawns. com or call 920.333.0252

MISCELLANEOUS Clock Repair and Maintenance Antique and new. Mantel, wall hanging and grandfather clocks. Draeb Jewelers, 50 N. Third Ave., Sturgeon Bay. 920.743.4233 A.M. Enterprises AutoCare Domestic/import vehicle diagnostics, maintenance,

Boat/RV/Vehicle Storage Units

Fish Creek Egg Harbor

For info call 920-421-1032

42

E

57

c o n c e p t

s a l o n

245 Kentucky St. * Sturgeon Bay * (920) 818-3052

Horton’s Painting and Moving Still time to have those outside projects finished before fall. Or we can organize your interior paint projects for the winter. Also specialize in small moving jobs. Call 920.421.4870 Pat’s Painting Interior and exterior work. Power washing. 26 years experience, fully insured. Call 920.493.0345 or 920.868.3910

PRINTING/DESIGN 2forU Design Gallery. Commercial & Pet PHOTOGRAPHY 17 years experience. DVDs for TV. SCANS to digital. Archival printing Photos & Fine Art reproductions. Old Photo Restoration. FEATURED ARTISTS: Ed Fenendael, Heidi Atanasov.  2forUDesign.com 920.854.7770 Fish Creek.

WANTED MISCELLANEOUS Antiques Wanted We pay cash for old kitchen cupboards, chimney cupboards, drysinks,

HELP WANTED Look for additional Help Wanted display advertisements within this section.

CHILDCARE Full Time Early Childhood Educator Early Childhood Educator wanted as regular, full time, year ’round teacher at Northern Door Children’s Center. The preferred candidate will have an EC degree and/or EC teaching experience but all interested applicants are encouraged to apply. Must have a passion for children, be a team player and willing to work with all age groups: infants, toddlers, preschoolers and school age children. Competitive wage, 4 day work week. Contact Cindy or Sue at 920.854.4244 or ndccme1@ gmail.com for an application or forward resume to 10520 Judith Blazer Drive, Sister Bay, WI 54234

Full Ser v ice Sa lo n, Sp a , & Ta nning

10610 Meadow Lane, Sister Bay • 854-1011

Baileys Harbor Jacksonport

Rocky Ridge Storage

ls ntale e R b air vaila h C A

Katie Voight owner/stylist

920 • 854 • 9107 Sister Bay, WI 54234 Country Walk Shops - Upper Level PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

PAINTING Exterior/Interior Painting Decks and powerwashing. Egg Harbor and north. Experienced. Insured. Small jobs welcome. Winter interior quote? Better call Paul! 920.395.9219

TO RENT 1-bedroom apartment wanted long-term lease Wanted: 1-bedroom or large studio apartment for rent. Long-term lease of possibly 18 months desired. Location: Egg Harbor or vicinity (Bailey’s Harbor, Fish Creek, etc.) Availability starting Aug/Sept/ Oct/Nov. Please contact: crbaum@ameritech.net

A

3487 County E, Baileys Harbor

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JunkMonk & Wildflower Reimaginations + odd jobs. Furniture making/refurbishing, tiling, painting and handyman jobs. Call Jeff at 262.620.6856

wardrobes, work benches, crocks, gold & silver coins, weather vanes, guns, duck decoys, small safes, old advertising and more. Questions welcomed. Eberts Antiques Manitowoc. 920.682.0687. Open all year

Tangled l.l.c.

Rocky Ridge Storage 1/4 mile west of the intersection of County A & County E (Peninsula Center) Ephraim

repair, detailing. For appointments: 920.839.2288, 2604 Grove Rd., Baileys Harbor, WI. www. amautocare.com

Unit 31 • Garden Level Country Walk Shops Sister Bay • (920) 854-9866

women’s & men’s cuts • color • balayage make-up • waxing • nails bridal & special occasion services

britta SALON

Stylist/Master Colorist Britta Nelson Nails by Linda Crockett 10431 Hwy. 42 | North Ephraim Located between Summer Kitchen + The Spa at Sacred Grounds

612.810.8938 | vagaro.com/BrittaSalon

Please call 920.868-5225 to schedule your appointment. 920.868.5225 4614 Harbor School Rd. Suite 3, Egg Harbor

Ace Insect Killer $1.99 each

Ace Wild Bird Food 20lb, $9.99 each

Jungwirth Ace Hardware

10636 N Bay Shore Dr. • Sister Bay • 854-2411 OPEN Mon. - Fri. 8 - 5; Sat. 8 - 1; Closed Sunday


Kellstrom-Ray Agency, Inc.

CLASSIFIEDS Ephraim Motel Is looking for housekeepers. Full time and part time. Housing available. Apply in person or call 920.421.1859

HEALTH CARE Case ManagerBehavioral Health Door County Human Services seeks candidates for FT Case Manager. Qualified candidates for this position will have a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work, Psychology or a related human services field; have supervisory experience working with individuals with mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Will perform intake functions and screens individuals. Primary focus on these positions will be either (a) supporting individuals served by the county’s emergency mental health crisis system, (b) supporting individuals enrolled in the comprehensive community services program, (c) adding support to individuals with the Adult Protective Service/ Adults at Risk System. $22.56/ hour. Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at www.co.door. wi.gov. Deadline: August 14, 2017 – 4:30pm EOE

2nd Shift Front Desk – AmericInn Prior front desk/administration experience and computer skills are a plus but not required. Individual must have great customer service and communication skills. Position demands a self-motivated individual adept at problem solving. Starts at $10/HR, year round, part-time with every other weekend off 24-32 hrs/week. Apply in person. The Hilltop Inn-Front Desk Position The Hilltop Inn is looking to fill a part time Front Desk position. Weekday evening and both weekend shifts available. Benefits include above average starting pay, end of season bonus and  paid holidays. Stop in to apply at 3908 County Road F Fish Creek or email interest to manager. hilltopinn@gmail.com

HOTEL/LODGING Gordon Lodge is Hiring! Enjoy a beautiful, friendly work environment, competitive hourly wages and a 50% discount on meals at Top Deck. Experience is a plus, but not required. Looking for full and part time housekeepers, full and part time front desk staff, event bartenders and event wait staff. Housing and bonus available. Visit us at http:// gordonlodge.com/ to print and fill out an application or pick one up. Email application to glodge@gordonlodge. com. Please reference the department you are applying for in the subject line.

procedures. Social media & computer skills. Knowledge Of Logical Solution & OTAs is s plus but not necessary.  Wednesday & Weekends required @$12$14/hr. Email: lynne@ applecreekresort.com  Questions: 920.421.0663 AmericInn Sturgeon Bay – Night Audit The night auditor is responsible for performing all end of day reports, setting up breakfast, assisting in laundry and accommodating hotel guests from the hours of 11 pm to 7 am; alternate weekends required. Year round with wage premium. Starting at $11 or more depending on experience. Apply in person today! Housekeeper- Julie’s Park Cafe & Motel Julie’s in Fish Creek is looking for a part time or full time housekeeper. Stop in or call 920.868.2999 to apply.

LANDSCAPING/ MAINTENANCE

High Point Inn Has Immediate Openings! High Point Inn in Ephraim is looking for the right motivated individual to join our team in the following year-round positions: Housekeeper: Full-time and Part-time. Front Desk Representative: Part Time. High Point Inn offers a competitive wage and employer matched SIMPLE IRA. For more information, call Missy or Faye at 854.9773, or stop by for an application. Front Desk Fish Creek Hotel Learn to Perform Front Desk/Duties. Self Starter, Attention to details, Follow

Peninsula State Park Golf Course Join our team! Grounds crew needed. Full time through October. Contact Mike at 920.493.8849 or send resume to PO Box 275 Fish Creek, WI 54212.

MISCELLANEOUS Boys & Girls Club Hiring Fall Staff Boys & Girls Club of Door County imagines a community where all young people experience health, academic success and good character. Multiple part-time Fall 2017-18 positions are detailed at bgcdoorcounty. org/employment. Positions

Help Wanted – Firewood Bundler Person needed to bundle firewood. Flexible hours. Must have own transportation. Paid per bundle. 920.746.0122

920.823.2777 Mini, Large, and Drop off Boat Storage For heated and custom built space/units call 920.819.4988

Townline Timber services, inc

Commercial and Residential Tree Service • Lot, Road and Driveway Clearing • Tree Maintenance and Removal • Brush and Whole-tree Chipping • View Improvement • Bobcat “Brushcat” Brush Cutting • Aerial Bucket Work and Climbing • Power Stump Grinding • Firewood and Woodchips Delivered

Local Mulch - Firewood - Free Delivery FREE ESTIMATES AND TREE INSPECTIONS

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ENGINEERED to meet your needs.

• RIP RAP • LAUNCH RAMPS & DAVITS • TUG & BARGE WORK • DREDGING

MIKE KAHR P.E. (920) 421-1001

Northern Door’s Premier Residential Community

Registration should take between 30 and 60 minutes. Students must attend with a parent or guardian during a time that works best for you on either of these days. egistration should take between 30 and 60 minutes. Students must attend with a Registration should take between 30 and 60 minutes. Students must attend with a Registration should take between 30 and 60 minutes. Students must attend with a parent or guardian during a time that works best for you on either of these days. parent or guardian during a time that works best for you on either of these days. arent or guardian during a time that works best for you on either of these days. parent or guardian during a time that works best for you on either of these days.

Open House n Sat & Su 1 1 1

See It All At

Agency Owner

LNIELSEN@FARMERSAGENT.COM http://agents.farmers.com/lnielsen

We appreciate you taking the time to attend these important days!

920 /743-9999 or 877 /330-6333 Accessible Transportation Community Initiative

Many transportation services have been implemented/expanded in the past 10 years. Now is the time to plan for the next 10 years!

Your Input is Needed by August 11, 2017

Complete a Survey for a Chance to WIN a Gift Card https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DoorCountyNeedsAssessment Surveys may also be obtained by contacting Door-Tran at: 1009 Egg Harbor Road in Sturgeon Bay or call 920/743-9999 or email info@door-tran.org Surveys can also be obtained from any of the following team members: City of Sturgeon Bay, Door-Tran, Door County Human Services or Senior Community Center, NWTC and United Way of Door County This project is funded in part by Easterseals Project Action Consultants. Results of the Survey’s will be reviewed during a two-day planning meeting in late August.

www.cottageglen.net

We appreciate you taking the time to attend these important days! We appreciate you taking the time to attend these important days! We appreciate you taking the time to attend these important days! We appreciate you taking the time to attend these important days!

Laura Beck Nielsen

FREE

or see us on YouTube at Cottage Glen at Ellison Bay or call 920-854-2353

In-Home Estimates

Low Price Promise!

DAVE’S MOWING AND MORE, LLC Servicing Northern Door Free Estimates • Fully Insured

Protecting Door County’s Best Interest Since 1958

“FREE” NO OBLIGATION INSURANCE REVIEW! CALL TODAY TO SEE IF YOU ARE PROPERLY INSURED!

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Locally Owned & Operated *Must present coupon. Offer not valid with other offers or discounts. Offer valid at time of estimate only. Valid thru 08/31/2017.

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209 Green Bay Rd. PO BOX 470 Sturgeon Bay, WI 920.743.6565 or 800.371.6565

Lawn Care | Snow Removal | Landscape Mulch | Spring Clean Up | and More!

New Office and Showroom Opening Soon! 606 N. 12th Ave Sturgeon Bay, WI

- Shutters - Wood Blinds - Roller Shades - Vertical Blinds - Silhouette Window Shadings - Woven Woods - Custom Drapery and More!

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Gibraltar Secondary School 3924 State Hwy 42, Fish Creek, WI 3924 State Hwy 42, Fish Creek, WI Student registration for the 2017-2018 school year will occur on Student registration for the 2017-2018 school year will occur on Student registration for the 2017-2018 school year will occur on Student registration for the 2017-2018 school year will occur on Tuesday, August 8 Student registration for the 2017-2018 school year will occur on Tuesday, August 8 Tuesday, August 8 Tuesday, August 8 11 am to 2 pm and 3 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, August 8 11 am to 2 pm and 3 pm to 7 pm 3 pm to 7 pm 11 am to 2 pm and 11 am to 2 pm and 3 pm to 7 pm Wednesday, August 9 11 am to 2 pm and 3 pm to 7 pm Wednesday, August 9 Wednesday, August 9 Wednesday, August 9 9 am to 12 pm and 1 pm to 4 pm Wednesday, August 9 9 am to 12 pm and 1 pm to 4 pm 9 am to 12 pm and 1 pm to 4 pm 9 am to 12 pm 1 pm to 4 pm 9 am to 12 pm and and 1 pm to 4 pm Registration should take between 30 and 60 minutes. Students must attend with a 3924 State Hwy 42, Fish Creek, WI Gibraltar Secondary School 3924 State Hwy 42, Fish Creek, WI 3924 State Hwy 42, Fish Creek, WI

During this time, administrators and staff will be on hand to assist with: During this time, administrators and staff will be on hand to assist with: • Classroom teacher assignment (elementary) and class schedule (secondary) During this time, administrators and staff will be on hand to assist with: uring this time, administrators and staff will be on hand to assist with: During this time, administrators and staff will be on hand to assist with: • • Classroom teacher assignment (elementary) and class schedule (secondary) Pictures by Network Photography for yearbook and purchase. Classroom teacher assignment (elementary) and class schedule (secondary) • Classroom teacher assignment (elementary) and class schedule (secondary) • •Classroom teacher assignment (elementary) and class schedule (secondary) • • Pictures by Network Photography for yearbook and purchase. Payment of Fees: lunch account and athletic/extra-curricular activities Pictures by Network Photography for yearbook and purchase. • Pictures by Network Photography for yearbook and purchase. • •Pictures by Network Photography for yearbook and purchase. Elementary Classroom supply lists and 2017-18 School Calendar ••• Payment of Fees: lunch account and athletic/extra-curricular activities Payment of Fees: lunch account and athletic/extra-curricular activities • Payment of Fees: lunch account and athletic/extra-curricular activities • •Payment of Fees: lunch account and athletic/extra-curricular activities • Free/Reduced Lunch Form • Elementary Classroom supply lists and 2017-18 School Calendar Elementary Classroom supply lists and 2017-18 School Calendar • Elementary Classroom supply lists and 2017-18 School Calendar • •Elementary Classroom supply lists and 2017-18 School Calendar • Update Parent/Guardian Information: Phone, Address, Email, Emergency Contacts • Free/Reduced Lunch Form Free/Reduced Lunch Form • Free/Reduced Lunch Form • •Free/Reduced Lunch Form • Update Parent/Guardian Information: Phone, Address, Email, Emergency Contacts • Update Parent/Guardian Information: Phone, Address, Email, Emergency Contacts Update Parent/Guardian Information: Phone, Address, Email, Emergency Contacts • Update Parent/Guardian Information: Phone, Address, Email, Emergency Contacts

Locally Grown. Serving Wisconsin. I’ll Come to You! Call 608.237.3747

• RIP RAP MIKE KAHR P.E. 854-2492 • LAUNCH RAMPS & DAVITS • TUG & BARGE WORK • DREDGING

1168 Main Road Washington Island, WI 54246

920.839.2777

Sister Bay warehouse year round positions e-tailer, inc. seeks staff for our Sister Bay warehouse to help serve our growing national customer base. These are year-round positions. Friendly and casual work environment. Full time or part time. Starting $12/ hour. Warehouse staff can quickly earn up to $20/ hour based on measured productivity. This is a job which requires you to be on your feet for extended periods of time. Contact jobs@etailerinc.com

Patented

2294 Sunset Drive Sister Bay, WI 54234

10x20 and 10x30 dimension units available. Limited availability 20x40 reserve for 2017.

Year round jobs Sister Bay – weekend and 2nd shift e-tailer, inc. is growing fast – we are adding weekend and second shifts in our Sister Bay warehouse. Packing small parcels to serve our national customer base. Year-round positions. Full or part time. Flexible scheduling. Friendly and casual work environment. Also seeking day shift workers. Starting $12/hour. Warehouse staff can quickly earn up to $20/hour based on measured productivity. Contact jobs@etailerinc.com

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DISTRICT REGISTRATION DAYS For ALL STUDENTS PreK-12 For ALL STUDENTS PreK-12 DISTRICT REGISTRATION DAYS For ALL STUDENTS PreK-12 For ALL STUDENTS PreK-12 For ALL STUDENTS PreK-12 Gibraltar Secondary School Gibraltar Secondary School Gibraltar Secondary School

est.1948

PERMANENT RESIDENTIAL DOCKS All of our work is custom Custom Engineered designed and

Gibraltar Area Schools Gibraltar Area Schools Gibraltar Area Schools

920-854-2353 www.kellstromray.com

PERMANENT RESIDENTIAL DOCKS One-time Installation!

Gibraltar Area Schools Gibraltar Area Schools DISTRICT REGISTRATION DAYS DISTRICT REGISTRATION DAYS DISTRICT REGISTRATION DAYS

REAL ESTATE

include Sawyer Site Lead, Youth Development Professionals, and Program Leads. Excellent training provided for staff. Submit application to J. Davis, PO Box 579, Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235. Boys & Girls Club values diversity in our staff. High school applicants welcome.

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

Buying or Selling Door County Property? Contact the Professionals


SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 199

Free Estimates

Carpet • Tile • Wood • Laminate Fully Insured

920.421.1366 • noordoorfloor@yahoo.com

Is your insurance competitively priced? Let’s find out! Call for a free review and quote. A second opinion is never a bad idea.

Email: dc@davidinsurance.com Phone: (920) 854-2387

CLASSIFIEDS OFFICE Telecommunicator (911 Dispatcher) Door County seeks candidate for full time position. Individual will operate police/emergency communications equipment, receive & dispatch police, fire and emergency calls via telephone & electronic dispatch equipment. Requirements: High School diploma or equivalent; ability to type 35 wpm; excellent oral communication skills; and ability to work under sporadic periods of stress. Starting wage $17.06/ hr. Applicants required to successfully complete the following: Typing Test, Skills Test (telecomm simulation), Oral Interview, Background Check, Psychological and Introductory Period. Deadline: August 16, 2017, 4:30 p.m. Apply on line at www.co.door.wi.gov. EOE Door County YMCA Seeks Welcome Center Coordinator

The Door County YMCA, Sturgeon Bay Program Center, has a full-time opportunity to build relationships and improve member services

in our great organization. Customer service background is necessary; associates degree in business or a related field is preferred. Starting pay $28-31,000 per year, with a full benefit package. Interested applicants can apply by August 7, 2017. Visit our website: DoorCountyYMCA. org for more information. Friends of Peninsula seeking new Business Manager Exciting opportunity to join the Friends of Peninsula State Park. Seeking motivated, hard working and creative person with an interest in nature and recreation. Send cover letter and resume to tillyistheone@yahoo.com by August 16th 2017. Find details at www.peninsulafriends.org Office Opening Office position working with database software as well as Access, Word, Excel and MSOutlook. Accuracy, organizational skills, ability to meet deadlines, and attention to detail are a must. Benefits: retirement plan, health insurance stipend, year-end bonus plan, 40 hr week (4 – 9 hr days & 4 hr Fridays). Competitive wage. Send application to: Whitetails Unlimited, Attn.: Office Manager, PO Box 720, Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 Door County Child Support Administrative Supervisor Management position responsible for supervising, coordinating, planning and directing activities of staff.

Back to Basics Market Farm

Finally!!

Investment & Farm Real Estate

5th and Jefferson Coffee House Has an immediate opening to fill a year-round, weekday 30-38 hour position. Desired qualities are self-starter, mature, excellent with people, team approach and ability to multi-task well. Duties will include baking, cooking, barista (will train). If qualified, email resume to 5thandjefferson@ gmail.com or pick up an application from 8-5. 232 N. 5th Ave Sturgeon Bay. Server- Julie’s Park Cafe Julie’s in Fish Creek is looking for a server that can work until mid to end of October. Must be able to work mainly nights. Please stop in or call 920.868.2999 to apply. Kitchen & Dining Room Staff The Clearing in Ellison Bay has part-time openings on its kitchen/dining room

Fast • Professional • Residential • Commercial wuollett@gmail.com * 614-743-4621

Immediate Opening for

Experienced Fitter/ MIG Welder Interested in becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant? If so, Inquire at Good Samaritan SocietyScandia Village about class sponsorship opportunities and sign-on bonuses. 10560 Applewood Rd. Sister Bay, WI 54234 Apply on-line at www.good-sam.com, call if need assistance. 920.854.2317 AA/EEP M/F/Vet/Handicap

Offered by Online Auctions Ending August 22, 2017 Potential Business Space Investment Opportunity Open House: 8/21 • 10-11AM Open House: 8/21 • 11AM-12PM N1896 State Rd 42, Kewaunee 317 Center St, Kewaunee

www.hyauctions.com

PENINSULA PULSE  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM

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Join the Twisted Tree team, located in the Country Walk Shops in Sister Bay. Year-round positions available, must be able to work weekends. Email info@twistedtreepharm.com!

Office: 715-837-1015 Bryce Hansen 715-418-1030, Barry Hansen or Roger Hansen. Wisconsin Registered Auctioneer License # 225, 2434, 227 1264 5th Ave, Prairie Farm, WI

The Cookery – Hosts The Cookery Restaurant is hiring hosts for the fall season. Morning and/or night shifts available. Parttime or full-time. Work in a family run, fun, fast paced environment in downtown Fish Creek. Contact Courtney at 920.868.3634

Door County window Cleaning

A job you can show up to wearing leggings or joggers. Twisted Tree at the Pharm considers dressing for success to mean wearing a hoodie and running shoes to work!! We know that comfortable people are creative people, so bring your positive attitude, your creative mind, your strong work ethic and go out on a limb...

Hansen & Young,Inc.

Part Time Bartender – Alpine Resort Seasonal worker needed: Part time Bartender. Saturday and Sunday nights. Call 920.868.3000 or email vacation@alpineresort.com

now offering pressure washing

920.421.1647 •

TERMS: 10% down bank draft or check, balance due at closing in 45 days. 10% buyer’s fee added to final bid price. More details online. Real Estate agents: contact office for co-broke terms.

PROFESSIONAL Development & Marketing Director Become a member of the Boys & Girls Club of Door County Executive Leadership Team. Primary responsibilities include executing resource development strategies, researching/ writing prospective grants, foundations, meeting with individual donors and providing leadership for the organization’s fundraising events. Creative solutions and innovative ideas are a must have. Competitive salary commensurate with experience. Send cover letter and resume att: Julie Davis, PO Box 579, Sturgeon Bay, WI

RESTAURANT

15% off First service with this ad! FREE estimates

Farm Fresh Eggs Organic-Free Range Omega 6/3 8307 High Plateau Rd. Baileys Harbor

Investment Opportunity Orchard, Cropland, Farmstead Open House: 8/21 • 12-1PM Open House: 8/21 • 1-2PM 1318 Ellis St, Kewaunee E2693 Old Settlers Rd, Kewaunee

Provides administrative support and backup to the Child Support Enforcement Agency Director. Performs limited case management and all tasks in accordance with policy/laws/regulations. Associate Degree in Criminal Justice, Human Services or related degree required. Three (3) years progressively responsible office management, supervisory skills and supervisory experience. Experience with court and correction systems. Door County offers a generous benefit package with a wage of: $22.56-$25.78 DOQ. Apply on-linewww.co.door. wi.gov. Deadline: August 11, 2017, 4:30pm. EOE

Strong mechanical back ground needed and willing to work in a team environment. Working knowledge of light to medium steel fabrication, Blueprint reading and Math skills a must Wages based on experience. Benefits Include: 401K program, Health Insurance Profit Sharing Apply at Hi Tec Fabrication 811 S Neenah Ave. Sturgeon Bay WI 54235 920-746-0925

Staudenmaier Chiropractic Wellness Center, S.C. is searching for an office receptionist who is enthusiastic, knowledgeable, friendly, and able to multi-task, to add to our team at our fast-paced clinic. Interested candidates should email their cover letter and resume to: OM@BackToWellness.org

Bussers & Dishwashers

30 N. 18th Ave., Suite #3, Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 (920) 743-7255

Stop for Application of Call 854-2841


staff. Hours are flexible. Pay is competitive. Work environment is pleasant. The season runs through October. Call Mike at 920.854.4088 or email mike@theclearing.org Wild Tomato Wild Tomato is looking for some new faces to join our team! Looking for Fall and Winter servers, hosts, and carry-out cashiers. Interested? Contact sara@ wildtomatopizza.com or stop by our Fish Creek or Sister Bay location. Line Cooks Boathouse on the Bay is seeking experienced line cooks. Full-Time and PartTime year round/seasonal positions are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Competitive wages. Well structured new kitchen led by Head Chef and General Manager. Come be part of Door County’s best new waterfront creation. Apply in person 10716 N. Bay Shore Dr. Sister Bay or call Mike 920.421.0498. Resume to Mike@boathousedcw.com The Clubhouse Grill at Stonehedge Golf Egg Harbor Now hiring bartenders & wait staff. Full time & part time. Open year round. Experience not necessary-will train. All applicants welcome. Flexible hours and competitive wages. Please stop in or call to apply. 4320 County Rd E, Egg Harbor. 920.868.3398

PC Junction Help wanted: nights – waitstaff & kitchen help. Flexible hours. Call Denise 920.421.0865 Mill Supper Club Looking for servers, bussers and dishwashers 3 to 4 nights a week. Call Don or Shelly at 920.743.5044 Horseshoe Bay Golf Club Horseshoe Bay Golf Club is looking to fill several positions. Looking for full time servers, bartenders, as well as line cooks. Applications available online at www. horseshoebaygolfclub.net Shoreline Restaurant Help wanted. Hostesses, bussers, bartenders, dishwashers, sous chef, line cooks and prep cooks. Call Mike or Mary 421.0355 or 421.0365 Top Deck is Hiring! Enjoy a beautiful, friendly work environment, competitive hourly wages and a 50% discount on meals at Top Deck. Experience is a plus, but not required. Looking for Host/ Hostess, wait staff, bussers, dishwashers, bartenders, line and prep cooks, breakfast cooks and breakfast attendants. Housing and bonus available. Visit us at http:// gordonlodge.com/ to print and fill out an application or pick one up. Email application to glodge@gordonlodge. com. Please reference the department you are applying for in the subject line.

Help WantedGreens N Grains We are looking for a parttime year round salesperson. Knowledge and interest in health and natural products is required. Besides working with customers, checking out, opening and closing, this position would also be our produce manager. Must be able to carry 40# boxes up and down stairs, must have a good knowledge of and love for fresh produce and an eye for creating displays. *Please email your resume to: info@Greens-N-Grains.com, or mail to Greens N Grains, PO box 225, Egg Harbor, WI 54209 or stop in for an application- 7821 Hwy 42, Egg Harbor. 920.868.9999 Bluefront Cafe Hiring lunch hot line cook. Competitive wages. Seasonal or year round possibility. Call Susan 262.893.2134 or email bluefront86@gmail.com

RETAIL Red Oak – Wine Server Red Oak Winery is looking for a year round part time sales position. If you are looking for a rewarding job that requires customer interaction and great conversations give us a call. Red Oak is a growing business and needs sales personnel. Weekends and Holidays are required as this is a tourists based business. Computer skills required. Compensation based on experience. 920.743.7729

TECHNOLOGY Network Technician Door County Technology Services Dept. seeks candidates to install, configure, and trouble shoot networking and microcomputer hardware and software systems, including telephone systems and providing technical assistance and training to users. Post high school training in data processing, computer software and hardware, and networking. Minimum of one year of progressive work experience with personal computers, or Microsoft Certification. Minimum of one year of experience with PC Client / PC Server. Minimum of year of experience working with Ethernet network hardware and switching methodologies. Minimum Associates degree in computer related field strongly preferred. Starting $22.56/hr. Excellent benefits Apply on-line at www.co.door. wi.gov. Deadline: August 9, 2017, 4:30 p.m. EOE

A Door County Waterfront Resort

Stone Harbor is looking for some energetic team members in the following departments. • Full Time/All year Saute’ Cook • Full Time Maintenance/Engineer Person • Housekeeping Full & Part Time • Front Desk Full & Part Time If you are looking for work all year around and a fun family oriented team, see us today! Apply in person!

920.746-9307 2017 Summer Staff Positions Available • Taste Bar • Retail Sales • Vineyard & Grounds Care • Outdoor Deck Staff Competitive Wage + Tips Possible Year Round Positions Please apply in person at the winery or email resume to simoncreekvineyard@hotmail.com

GIBRALTAR AREA SCHOOLS Fish Creek, Wisconsin Engage, Empower, Excel

TEACHING VACANCY POSITION DESCRIPTION REQUIREMENTS

CONTRACT SUBMIT

Secondary Math Teacher

This is a 1.0 FTE secondary teaching position. • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Licensure (1400 Math) • Gibraltar Area School District is committed to fostering a learning environment that promotes instructional excellence, student achievement and academic rigor. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package to highly-qualified professionals. Additional financial incentives are available to educators earning advanced degrees. • The Gibraltar Area School District is seeking a dynamic and innovative educator who can create an engaging classroom environment that challenges all students to high levels of learning and achievement. Essential to this position is the ability to work collaboratively with colleagues as part of a professional learning community, build positive relationships with students and families and partnership with local businesses, artists and community volunteers in order to foster enriching learning experiences for all students.

This teaching position begins with the 2017-18 school year. Letter of Interest* • Resume • Three (3) current letters of reference–dated within the past 3 years • Three (3) references with phone numbers *(Internal applicants only need to send a letter of interest)

TO

DEADLINE

The deadline date is 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 10, 2017.

GIBRALTAR AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

Year-Round Employment Charge Nurse RN or LPN $7,500 sign-on bonus CNA $4,000 sign-on bonus $15.50/hr. Shift options available Universal Workers, Cook/Dietary Aide/ Housekeeping $2,000 sign-on bonus/shift options available Valid until August 31st

10560 Applewood Rd. Sister Bay, WI 54234 920.854.2317 AA/EEP M/F/Vet/Handicap

Apply in person or call 920.421.1859 Town of Jacksonport Part time Position The Town of Jacksonport is seeking applications for the part time position of Town Clerk/Treasurer. Average 20 hour work week. Salary plus meeting per-diems. Qualifications: Education: Associate degree in business, human resources, or accounting OR comparable work experience in one of these areas is required. Valid Wisconsin Driver’s License. Must be bondable. Experience: • Three to five years of experience in financial management, budget preparation, accounting, personnel, or administration. • Working knowledge of government budgeting, finance, public relations preferred. • Strong oral and written communications skills. • Working knowledge and proficiency with Microsoft Word and Excel required. Working knowledge of QuickBooks a plus. A complete job description can be obtained by calling the town office at 920-823-8136, by e-mail request sent to jtownclerk@jportfd.com, or by visiting the town website at Jacksonport.org (see homepage under “spotlight”). Please submit a current resume with a cover letter summarizing experience, along with the contact information for three work related references to: Elissa Taylor, Town Clerk Town of Jacksonport 3365 CTY V Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 The deadline for submitting your resume and cover letter is August 21st, 2017. Expected start date in the position would be October 1, 2017.

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT MANAGER Position open to head a three-person accounting department for nonprofit organization. Bachelor’s degree in accounting is required and the ability to work with minimal supervision. Working with Sage/MAS90 accounting software or similar software as well as Word and Excel are important. Strong written, verbal, interpersonal and customer relations skills needed. Must be organized, detail-oriented, hard working with proven team building experience. Salary is commensurate with skills and experience. Benefits include retirement plan, monthly health insurance stipend, vacation, paid holidays, and 40-hour work week (four 9-hour days & 4-hour Fridays). Interested candidates should email a resume and cover letter including salary requirements to khartwig@whitetailsunlimited.com Deadline to apply is August 7, 2017 Whitetails Unlimited is an equal opportunity employer

Little Sweden has an opportunity for an Administrative Assistant. We are a year-round resort. The Administrative Assistant assists the General Manager and office management staff in the following areas: resort operations, sales, front desk procedures, account maintenance, and other duties as assigned. The ideal candidate will possess: experience in office procedures, excellent customer service skills, effective communication skills, ability to multi-task and work in a fast paced environment, excellent time management and problem-solving skills. We will provide guidance and training. We offer a generous salary, flexible hours and excellent benefits package and the opportunity to work with a great team at one of the best resorts in Door County. Please email resume to kaylee@hedeen.com or call Kay Hedeen 920-743-7225

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PAPER COPIES ONLY – NO FAXES OR EMAILS PLEASE Tina Van Meer, Superintendent Gibraltar Area School District 3924 Highway 42 * Fish Creek, WI 54212

Full or Part-time Shifts Available

Full-Time & Part-Time Housing Available

DOORCOUNTYPULSE.COM  AUGUST 4–11/2017 • v23i31  PENINSULA PULSE 

Stone Harbor Resort 107 N. 1st Ave Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235

Simon Creek Vineyard & Winery 5896 Bochek Rd Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235

Housekeepers Needed

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1996

CLASSIFIEDS


Door County’s Original Cheese made fresh everyday using the milk from local Door & Kewaunee farms.

Mon-Fri: 8am-5pm • Sat: 8am-4pm • Sun: 10am-4pm

FRESH CHEESE CURDS • STRING CHEESE • CHEESE SPREADS • GIFT BOXES SPECIALTY CHEESE • BRICKS • WINE • SAUSAGE • JAMS & DIPS TWO GREAT DOOR COUNTY LOCATIONS FEATURING: DELI - Dine In or Take Out STURGEON BAY • 2189 Cty. Rd. DK

Factory Tours - By Appointment Only Algoma • 248 Cty. Rd. S

920.825.7272

920.487.2825

www.RenardsCheese.com

HIDDEN RIDGE RESORT

Tiny House Cottages for Sale Borders Potowatomi State Park Club house with indoor pool, whirlpool & sauna. Spacious lounge area with fireplace. Well maintained & managed resort. 3692 Sapphire Lane Unit #101

6620 N Rocky Ridge Circle Unit #202

Pr ice

All tours the depart fr om ty n u o C r o Do on ti ta S y e ll o Tr rth o n e (one mil on r o rb a H of Egg ). Highway 42

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NEW

“Half the Fun is Getting There!”

$49,000

$29,900

• Tiny House/Open Concept/Fireplace

• 1 BR/1 Bath, 28x10 deck.

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60

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Bloody Mary & Brunch Tour

Scr een por ch 2B R/

$75,900

Enjoy 3 unique stops for Bloody Marys [or Mimosas] & Sunday Brunch at the Log Den. Bring your spouse or gather a group together for a great end to your week. $57.95. Departs Sundays at 10 am.

• 1 BR 1 Bath & large living room with sleeper sofas

• Private custom fire pit/patio area and a 12x12 shed.

Step aboard the “trolley of the doomed” as we share tales of the darker side of this spirited peninsula. Adults $26.95 / Kids $19.95. Nightly at 7 pm.

winning Door County Wineries and fabulous lunch at Galileos Restaurant. Adult $65.95. Departs Daily at 10 am.

me

Hug e R/ 1B 6579 S. Rocky Rd. Unit #16

• “Ghost Tours of Door County”

Premier Wine Tour of Door County Private tastings at 4 award

$39,500

• Move in ready with large double decks.

Ghost Tours: Nightly

Wine, Spirits & Brew Tour

• Includes 27 ft. Innsbruck Travel Trailer

$39,900

Tour 3 majestic lighthouses. Waterfront scenic lunch. $65.95. Departs Monday through Friday at 10 am.

(New) - Private Tastings at two Wineries, a Distillery and a MicroBrewery. Top it off with a fabulous , lunch at Crate Restaurant. (Saturday’s only). Departs at 10 am. $65.95.

3683 Diamond Lane Unit #80

3684 Topaz Ln Unit #113

Lighthouse Trolley Tours

Enjoy the “intoxicating” tales of four of the peninsula’s haunted pubs and taverns. Must be 21 years old. Adults $39. Departs Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7 pm.

$22,000

$54,500 • Corner lot, ample parking & 9x 14 shed.

Overlooking scenic bluffs with great island vistas. Adults $15.95 / Kids $10.95 2-12 yrs. 4 tours daily.

• “Haunted Trolley Pub Crawl”

6606 Pearl Lane Unit #207

6591 S. Rocky Rd. Unit #20

Scenic 75-Minute Narrated Tours

OPEN SATU HOUSE R AUG DAY, 11:00 . 5 - 1:00

Door Real Estate, LLC

Sue Shortall (920) 493-0002 | Lori Flick (920) 493-4606 Office: (920) 743-7888 www.ThinkDoorCounty.com

Beer & Burger Tour D oo r C o

unty’s Souvenir Destination !

920-868-1100

www.doorcountytrolley.com

Beer sampling at 3 unique beer destinations with a burger & fries. Cost is $55.95 person. Departs Tuesdays and Fridays at 1 pm.

Wisconsin Supper Club Tour

Experience a classic Supper Club evening with stops for a Wisconsin Old Fashioned, Supper Club entrees, and live music. Monday, Wednesday, & Friday. Departs at 6:00pm. $67.95

Peninsula Pulse - 2017 Hal Prize - August 4-11, 2017 v23i31  

Each fall, the Peninsula Pulse newspaper in Door County, Wisconsin invites people of all ages, backgrounds and artistic abilities to submit...