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A MAGAZINE

ABOUT

CONTEMPORARY

ART

JANUARY

WWW.DONTPOSTME.COM

dоnt p Ost me

2013

STEPHANIE JUNG ALEX ANDREYEV JORDI DIAZ ALAMA EFIM SHEVCHENKO NEDA VENT FISCHER FLORIAN NICOLLE VICTOR EREDEL EDISON ILAN

ENGLISH VERSION

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“There is nothing new in art except talent.”

A.Chekhov


JANUARY 2013

2 POST ISSUE:

NO.1 (ENG) - ANDREW SALGADO, ALEX KONAHIN, SOPHIA MIROEDOVA, CALLY WHITHAM, OLEG BOOTKOVSKY, FABIAN OEFNER, JAKUB POLOMSKI You can view magazines on our site: www.dontpostme.com


WE OFFER SPECIAL THANKS TO:

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Stephanie Jung

Florian Nicolle

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Efim Shevchenko

Edison Ilan

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Victor Eredel

Alex Andreyev

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Neda Vent Fisher

Jordi Diaz Alama 05


DEAR READERS, DON'T BE AFRAID JUST BELIEVE IN ITSELF...

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DONTPOSTME IS A MONTHLY ART-MAGAZINE ABOUT THE LATEST TRENDS OF CONTEMPORARY ART. A MAGAZINE HAS PUBLISHED ON (RUSSIAN) & ENGLISH WITHIN "ISSUU.COM" SITE. EVERY MONTH THE EDITORS HAS ACQUAINTED READERS WITH PHOTOGRAPHERS, PAINTERS AND ANOTHER KEY FIGURES OF CONTEMPORARY ART FROM OVER THE WORLD. EDITORS - IN - CHIEF: AZAMAT AKHMADBAEV & ZULYA KUMUKOVA (AZAMATAHMADBAEV@GMAIL.COM) EDITOR: ALIMA KUMUKOVA ON A COVER: FLORIAN NICOLLE’S ILLUSTRATION “ADAM” ADVERTISING: ADDONTPOSTME@GMAIL.COM

NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE CAN BE USED WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION OF “DONTPOSTME” ANY CONTENT OF THIS PUBLICATION (ILLUSTRATIONS, PHOTOS & OTHER TYPES OF MATERIALS) COPYRIGHTED BY RESPECTIVE OWNERS PUBLISHED: 24 JANUARY 2013 FACEBOOK.COM/DONTPOSTME VK.COM/DONTPOSTME WWW.DONTPOSTME.COM ST.PETERSBURG

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TOG PHOTOG PHOTOG PHOTOG PHOTOG PHOTOG


GRA GRAPHY GRAPHY GRAPHY GRAPHY GRAPHY


interview

STEPHANIE JUNG

In spite of living in Schifferstadt, a town, located in the south-western part of Germany, Stephanie Jung spends the most part of her spare time in Berlin. And there’s a logical explanation for that: Stephanie loves to photograph big cities, brimming over with life. The main object of each photograph is not the city itself, but the time, which is rapidly rushing around us. http://www.behance.net/stephaniejungart

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DPM:To start with, Stephanie, how did you become a photographer? And, as for the technical equipment, what types of camera do you use? Stephanie: Well, I always loved photography. At the age of 16 I started taking and creating pictures as a hobby. Then, 3 years later, I studied Design and Visual Communication, where photography became even more important to me. After I graduated, I started presenting my work on the internet and people liked it so much that I started to sell my work. Since then I'm working as a freelancer. Currently I'm using a Nikon D300 only with different lenses.

DPM: What do you want to achieve in photography and what are the main goals of your projects? Stephanie: I'm creating pictures because I love showing the world in a different way. My main theme is time and caducity, two things that everybody is confronted with but which aren't visible to most of us. I like to show this part of life, show a moment getting lost in time. I want to show that photography is not just about capturing things we can see, so that we can remember them. It's also about making things and themes visible, that can't be seen at first sight. It's a great medium to take a deeper look at life.

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DPM: Could you please name the most important milestones of your job (f.e. exhibitions, galleries and etc.)? Stephanie: In 2011 I started exhibiting and selling 5 pictures at the Lumas galleries (until now), two weeks ago I had two of my works exhibited in a group exhibition in an art gallery in Lisbon, Portugal. Besides that, some of my images were presented in different art magazines and used as artwork for CD covers.

DPM: And could you describe the way you create your photo projects? Where do you photograph?


«I LIKE TO SHOW THIS PART OF LIFE, SHOW A MOMENT GETTING LOST IN TIME»

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Stephanie: Creating the project is quite simple, my main focus is on huge cities, at the moment I'm concentrating on Berlin, because I spend a lot of time there and it's a really fascinating city. Normally I wander around the city to discover unique motives and perspectives, mostly scenes of everyday life, but even then it's not that easy to find the right scenery. Finding the right place is the most important and timeconsuming challenge during

rary art. In times of the internet it became really easy to view what other artists are doing and I think this is great for your personal development. I think it's important to get all this inspiration to create someDPM: Our next questions touch your personal attitude thing new, to know what's possible and then experito contemporary art. First of all, Is there anything ment with your own that attracts and maybe in- thoughts and ideas. I get all my inspiration spires you in contemporary from contemporary artists art? What is it, if yes? because my photography is Stephanie: Yes, I get a about life, about the molot inspired by contempoment, about now. my projects. After that, the process is pretty normal; I'm selecting the best photos and doing some postprocessing to optimize the pictures.

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DPM: What's your opinion about the contemporary art today? Could you define a place for photography in art?

possibilities to experiment and develop new styles, you can express yourself easier through photography. Digital photography simplified the work process and because of that it Stephanie: That question is not became really popular to people to that easy to answer, but I think pho- take pictures. The more photogratography gets more important in phers, the more beautiful and new contemporary art during the last work we have to look at and of few years. Today you have so many course more inspiration to everyone.

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DPM: And the last question is about your plans on future: are you looking forward to visiting Russia? At least, some of our megapolises?

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looking forward to it because I haven't been to Russia so far. It will be great to explore the cities, the mood and lifestyle over there.

Stephanie: Yes, I don't have concrete plans for a trip, but I definitely want to visit Russia. Moscow and St. Petersburg would be perfect for a new series and I'm really

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interview

EFIM SHEVCHENKO

For today Efim lives and works in St. Petersburg. He’s famous not only for his magnificent works, but also for his master classes, conducted for everyone who wants to learn the art of photography. Photographs made by Efim Shevchenko are full of feelings and are permeated with warmth, which can be rarely met in modern art. http://www.photodom.com/member/Efim%20Shevchenko

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DPM: To start with, Efim, how is it that you became a photographer? How and when did your interest with photography begin? Efim: I’ll tell you how it all began. When I was about 15, I got a present from my parents; it was an Olympus digital photo camera. I pressed the button and got the picture – it wasn’t capable of anything else. Of course, I didn’t care of a composition of the photographs I took – I just did it for my own pleasure, and that was it. When I graduated from school, I entered the Saint-Petersburg Politehnichesky University. I didn’t have a dream of becoming a professional photographer; I just liked to take shots of my friends from time to time. On the celebration of my coming of age, my brother told me: “Efim, I’ve prepared a present for you, and it’s a thing you were always dreaming about”. The first thing which came to my mind, was a camera, and I was so excited! But I was so disappointed, when he told me that it was a car. When I graduated from the university and began to study journalistic at the SaintPetersburg state University, the first thing I did was selling that car and buying my first professional photo camera. In the beginning there was creativity: an attempt to express myself, my feelings and moods – in one word, metaphysics. Now I feel ashamed when I look at these works, because I didn’t follow any composition rules while shooting. I guess you’ve heard a lot of people saying: “I wanted to convey a message…I wanted to show everyone my feelings…”. I don’t consider photography to be the way of expressing one’s desires, as for me it’s an informational product, which carries a certain idea. If the picture is taken intuitively, it’s seldom understood by viewers. After some time had passed, I began to invite people to my home and to photograph them there. They paid me with oatmeal cookies, which I loved very much, but now I can’t stand them, as I’ve eaten too much. Soon I realized there was no space for creativity in my flat, as all the photographs were executed in the same vein. I started searching for the ways of enriching my works. That’s how I began to create portraits.

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DPM: Why did you choose depicted world for the the portraiture genre in viewer will spin around photography? What’s spe- this man. cial about it? So, these are the main reasons why I chose Efim: Humans have the portrait genre. Somealways been the most in- times I feel pity for photeresting creatures on tograph is just a moment Earth. People are interof life, and it’s impossible ested in people, unless to reveal the whole perwe’re talking about soson in one single shot. I ciopaths. We gain wisdom guess, it’s possible, but I and experience from oth- haven’t reached such ers, we expand new hori- heights yet. It seems to zon, develop strength and me that the end of my caself-confidence in ourreer in photography will selves, and become better be marked with a picture, with the help of other depicting my contempopeople. rary, in whom everyone No matter how dewill be able to find himlightful the landscape is, self. if there’s a person on the DPM: What message are photograph, the whole

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you trying to convey to your audience?

Efim: I’m trying to convey to the audience the feelings, emotions and sensations of people whom I photograph. I’m showing the life in the moment. Aesthetically correct bodies, interiors of the rooms, people and their actions are often deprived of life in contemporary photography. Undoubtedly, it’s beautiful, but just for a moment – at least, for me, as I’ve never seen the beauty (beauty by modern standards and tendencies, represented to us by fashion, advertising etc.),


which would leave me excited and astonished for a long period of time. I guess I prefer the realism of people depicted on photographs. And that’s why I take realistic portraits of people.

photo cameras. Then I changed it to Canon 5D, and, finally, fixed on Canon 5D Mark II. I’ve tried to use cameras of other companies, but didn’t find much difference, and continued working with the one I’ve already got accustomed DPM:And as for the techto. nical equipment, Efim, As for the lenses, I what types of camera do mostly apply to the Canon you usually use in your work in order to reach the 50 mm 1.4f, Sigma 28 mm 1.8f, and sometimes I also desired effect? use Canon 85 mm 1.8f, Efim: My first single- and Canon 35 mm 2.0f. I never shoot in the studio, lens reflex camera was and don’t use any filters Canon 40D. I bought it not because I was focused or reflectors. Photography exactly on this brand, but is about light. Learning how to see light is essenbecause I had a lot of tial to developing one’s friend who had Canon

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photographic eye. As for me, it’s better to take portraits with natural light; in the street or near the window.

DPM: Is there anything that attracts and maybe inspires you in the contemporary art?

Efim: There’s a Russian movie “What men talk about”, full of wonderful phrases about the contemporary art. It’s quite a difficult question, and I can’t give any answer, as I don’t really understand what the contemporary art is.


«HUMANS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN THE MOST INTERESTING CREATURES ON EARTH. PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN PEOPLE, UNLESS WE’RE TALKING ABOUT SOCIOPATHS» 29


DPM: And can you call the names of those photographers, whose works you consider to be closest to the ideal? Efim: You can’t make an ideal photograph, because there’s always something to strive for in this sphere. I like the works of such masters, as Sally Mann and Annie Leibovitz. I also like the genre of advertising photography.

DPM: And, finally, how would you describe what’s happening in the field of photography today?

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Efim: As for me, photography is too young to become an art. But I think, everything is well. There exist a large number of photographers, and some of them a rather talented. Let’s see, what will come out of it.

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interview

VICTOR EREDEL

Victor Eredel is a talented photographer from Petrozavodsk, Russia. But if we look through his creation on behance.net, we can find that Victor isn’t restricted to one type of creation. There are collected both picturesque photographs and charming illustrations in his portfolio. However, for this review we have chosen only photos, which reveal us incredible sceneries of Iceland. http://www.behance.net/Eredel

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DPM: First of all, Viktor, ing out as something more how did you become a pho- significant in my life. tographer? DPM: What genre of photography is your favorite Victor: The one thing one? which makes me happy is that I am not a photograVictor: I mostly prefer pher. Photographer is a to photograph my friends profession, but I photoand the places I visit, so, graph whatever I want for I’d say my favorite genres my own pleasure, and I do it whenever I want. I’ve got are portraiture and landa lot of other hobbies, so, I scape photography. wouldn’t single photograph-

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DPM: What message are you trying to convey to your audience? Victor: I’m dead sure that the best photograph is the one you needn’t to explain to anyone. Each person has a right to perceive my works in their own way.

DPM: Could you please name the most important milestones in your career?


«NOTHING SPECIAL – JUST A CAMERA AND A SET OF LENSES»


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Victor: There’s no career, so there’re no milestones.

DPM: And as for the technical equipment, what types of camera do you use in your work? Victor: Nothing special – just a camera and a set of lenses.

DPM: Your series of photos, taken in Iceland, is astonishing. Could you share your impressions about this country? Victor: Oh, it was my second trip to Iceland. I went there with a group of my friends to a music festival ‘Iceland Airwaves’, and then we decided to go around the whole island by car. I’m looking forward to visiting Iceland again, as there are always places to visit and to take photos of.

DPM: It sounds tempting. My next questions touch your attitude to the contemporary art. Is there anything that attracts you in the contemporary art? What is it, if yes? Victor: My attitude to the contemporary art in its traditional sense is rather complicated. I mostly prefer actual art.

DPM: And can you call the names of those photographers, whose works inspire you the most? Victor: I usually like some certain series of photographs, but I don’t any favorite photographer.

DPM: And, finally, how would you describe what’s happening in the field of photography today?

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Victor: As long as photo techniques are getting more and more affordable to people, photography is developing well. Of course, the number of uninteresting photos is increasing too, but many really talented guys got a chance to develop in this sphere.

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interview

NEDA VENT FISCHER

The first thing you should know about this photographer is that her photos are there almost in every blog on Tumblr, which testifies not only to her being popular and respected, but also to her being very talented. Full of beauty, mystery and romanticism, Neda’s photographs can take your breath away!

http://www.nventfischer.com/

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DPM: To start with, how you became a photographer? And what types of camera do you usually use?

est; I learned to be happy with much less. The greatest camera in the world won’t make you a great photographer unless you have a talent. I use Nikon D3100.

graph. I don’t create art for the sake of others; I create art for the sake of myself It's very selfish. When I am done, I put it on display for others to Neda: Originally I look at it. It’s up to them wanted to be a drato try to define it. To feel maturge. So I went to DPM: What do you want to it, or not to feel it, to wonstudy at Academy for Film achieve in photography and der about it, or not to wonand Theater in Belgrade, it what are the main goals of der about it, to like it or didn't pass long when a your projects? not to like it. good friend of mine asked me to capture his process Neda: I want to be DPM: Could you of film making. So natuable to live trough my art, please name the most imrally I picked up a camera while sharing my passion portant milestones of your and discovered that not and visions. job (f.e. exhibitions, galonly I enjoy it more, it was As for main goals in leries and etc.)? less stressful for me to tell my projects, that is not a the stories and express very easy question to anNeda: I started taking myself that way. swer. My work is very per- photos 6 years ago, but It’s wonderful to have sonal, it’s a combination of things became really serigreat super expensive Pro passion, my visions, my ous for me in November equipment, but to be hon- mood and subjects I photo- 2011.

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DPM: And how do you create your photo projects? Do you prefer to work in Paris or do you usually take longdistance trips in order to find the better place for photographing?

ing about, what attracts me moments before I start to photograph Mainly outside, because I love the natural lights. I live between Paris and Belgrade. But it’s true that I have more photos Neda: It’s impossible to explain, of Paris than Belgrade. Mainly because but as I said earlier, my work is very Paris is my muse and Belgrade isn’t. I personal. It’s a combination of passion, also have a privilege to travel a lot. So visions, mood and a subject. It dewherever I am, I try to capture the pends on where I am, what I am think- things and feelings that surround me.

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«THE GREATEST CAMERA IN THE WORLD WON’T MAKE YOU A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER UNLESS YOU HAVE A TALENT» 51


DPM: Our next question touches your personal attitude to contemporary art. Neda:My personal attitude toward contemporary art depends really on what I am looking at. I cannot generalize it, nor define it. It’s individual. I have a lot of friends who are visual artists; some of them are photographers, some painters, some sculpturists. When facing their art, I try to understand their vision, to feel their passion, to understand their story.

DPM: Neda, Is there anything that attracts and maybe inspires you in contemporary art? What is it, if yes? Neda:The fact that modern art created in present time becomes timeless attracts me a lot. Also, I like the fact that it’s a mainstream it’s provocative, it triggers the reactions, and it’s not something that attracts masses of people, but the true art lovers and people who don’t follow trends.

DPM: What's your opinion about the contemporary art today? Could you define a place for photography in art? Neda: In my opinion contemporary art is more popular than it ever was. Maybe because there are more and more visual artist out there in the world sharing their visions of reality today. Photography is art.

DPM: And the last question is about your plans on future: are you looking forward to visiting Russia?

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Neda: My goals for the future are to prosper as a photographer. The road is long and wild is the wind… I am looking forward meeting the other part of Slavic nation, yes.

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CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO CONTEMPO


ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY ORARY

ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART


interview

FLORIAN NICOLLE

Florian Nicolle is a twenty-six years old graphic designer and illustrator from France. His artworks are distinguished not only for their appearance, but also for unusual approaches to painting. In his creation, Florian has tried to show every character and every moment of life through his personal view, which is combined with his passion to art and experience. http://www.neo-innov.fr/

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DPM: To start with, how tion and what are the main did you become an illustra- goals of your projects? tor? Was it difficult for you or not? Florian: My main goal in each illustration is to Florian: In fact the il- catch an emotion, a feellustration came later and ing, with spontaneity and naturally, it was only after rigor. That's why the pormy degree and some pub- trait is my favorite topic. lish of my personal illustrations on internet that I DPM: Florian, could you noticed the interest of please name the most impeople/clients for this part portant milestones of your of my work. Now, I work job (f.e. exhibitions, galessentially for illustration leries and etc.)? projects. Florian: I am essenDPM: What do you tially commissioned by want to achieve in illustra- agencies for working with,

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on projects, or directly by brands. I am very rarely exposed in galleries.

DPM: And could you describe the way you create your projects? What techniques do you use in the process of drawing? Florian: I draw all by hand on paper, using watercolor, pencil, china ink. Then I digitalize the illustration to continue it in Photoshop, using a graphic tablet. For adding details, contrast, light, typo‌


«MY MAIN GOAL IN EACH ILLUSTRATION IS TO CATCH AN EMOTION, A FEELING, WITH SPONTANEITY AND RIGOR»

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DPM: Our next questions touch your perFlorian: Renew things, getting a visonal attitude to contemporary art. sion or a point of view new. While reIs there anything that attracts and maybe specting some important points aesthetic inspires you in contemporary art? What (to me). is it, if yes? DPM: And the last question is about your Florian: Generally, I do not like con- plans on future: Florian, are you looking temporary art. However I love the new forward to visiting Russia? wave of illustrators / graphic designer, Florian: Honestly, I don't think so. digital. What attracts me is the stylization of forms and colors. I rarely do vectorial illustrations but I love that as well.

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DPM: What does the notion of contemporary art mean to you?

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interview

EDISON ILAN

Edison Ilan is a painter living in St. Louis. After the period of abstract painting, Edison has created his own style, which was a great success, as, according to his own words, 2012 is the most productive year in his career. Now this painter shows us a number of interesting portraits, which are full of fine lines, brush strokes and deep colors on a closer examination. http://www.edisonilan.com/

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DPM: To start with, Edison, who or what inspired you to become an illustrator? How did you begin to draw? And was it difficult for you to make a career of such a successful painter? Edison: My mother was an artist. She surrounded me with creativity from an early age. When people validate your work it's very easy to say you are an artist. When others, especially artists, say they don't get it or your work isn't fresh enough... those people make it difficult. Criticism of all shades pushes my work.

DPM: What do you want to achieve in illustration and what are the main goals of your projects? Edison: Right now I am a painter. Of course I would like to show my work and if sales ensue I would have the means to do more. Ultimately my goal is to establish an art community, one with which I could grow and help others. As for the material work I've always had an obvious attraction to interactive art. I'm not sure in what capacity but I know I want to pull the enthusiast into the work. Until then I'm going to focus on painting. Presently I'm consumed with the Mythological Creatures Series. I've had a tendency recently to allow animals as subjects for some ironic or metaphorical purpose. In this newest series the animal has become a human being. I chose women of the golden age of cinema because they seem more elusive. They've never seemed real. In that sense they are mythical but I didn't want to inspire ideas of Bigfoot or Santa Clause. They're more like mystical creatures. The irony is beauty.

DPM: Edison, could you please name the most important milestones of your job (f.e. exhibitions, galleries and etc.)? Edison: Today, as Edison Ilan, I have yet to show my work anywhere other than the internet. From 2004-2008 I exhibited under the alias, Triad (almost exclusively in St. Louis). Before that, between 1997 and 1999, I exhibited under my birth name. Though the Triad era was more successful there's nothing quite like exposing yourself for the first time.

DPM: And could you explain how you create your projects? What the kinds of tools are you use in creation? Edison: For the newest work I've started using acrylic paint. I had used oils for years (more notably during the abstract period). After my year and a half hiatus from painting I found using oils was not immediate enough if I were to appreciate painting subjects again. Acrylics gave me the freedom to evolve a piece much more quickly. For the base coat (the abstract background) I use and assortment of squeegees, spatulas, bowls, cardboard, foam, crumpled newspaper, a lot of water and even an old toothbrush. When time comes for the subject to be painted I stick mostly to brushes, though I sometimes use my fingers and my favorite spatula (cake spatula I bought for 50 cents).

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«NOVELTY IN PAINTING CONSISTS MAINLY NOT IN A SUBJECT NEVER TREATED BEFORE, BUT IN GOOD AND NEW GROUPINGS AND EXPRESSIONS» 72


DPM: My next questions touch your personal attitude to contemporary art. So, is there anything that attracts and maybe inspires you in contemporary art? What is it, if yes?

enormous impact on my work and process. Notable artists: Adrian Ghenie, Daniel Pitin, Zsolt Bodoni, Justin Mortimer and Nicola Samori. This is a family of artists that define art, in my Edison: There are numerous artists opinion. If I could add to a previous working today who, to me, seem timequestion... A goal of mine is to simply less. This is a unique and difficult qual- be mentioned with such artists. ity to find in an artist and has had an

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DPM: Could you give your own definition of contemporary art? Edison: My opinion is best summarized by this quote from, Poussin. Novelty in painting consists mainly not in a subject never treated before, but in good and new groupings and expressions. By these means a subject that is common and old can become singular and new." I have that written just above where I work.

I've read it every day for the better part of a year and it still means the same thing; I already have everything I need to inspire me.

DPM: And the last question is about your plans on future: Edison, are you looking forward to visiting Russia? Edison: I would definitely enjoy a prolonged stay in Russia... Who's paying?

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interview

ALEX ANDREYEV

Alex Andreyev, an illustrator from Saint-Petersburg, has been creating his unique paintings for more than 20 years. His works are the great example of what would the parallel reality look like, if there was (or maybe is?) any. It would be as bright and full of charming stories, as it’s shown in his illustrations.

http://www.alexandreev.com/

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DPM: Alex, how did you become an illustrator? Was it hard for you in the beginning of your career? Alex: I can’t call myself an illustrator. What I do, is divided into several main directions. First of all, I do graphic design work. I work as an art-director at the advertising agency. The second direction is the concept art. We’re just finishing the work on the large animation project ‘Kin-Dza-Dza’. And I also create illustrations just for myself, because it’s my favorite pastime. Those works which were created for Stanislav Lem’s literary works are not illustrations, as the book illustration has other tasks and other methods. I define this genre as concept art for movies that will never be made. Sometimes I also create covers for books, but, definitely, it’s not my occupation. DPM: How would you characterize the style of your works in your own words? You use both digital and manual techniques, don’t you? Alex: As for the techniques, it’s called digital painting. First of all, I got an education of a graphic painter. I’ve been working in this sphere for quite a long period of time, but I wasn’t really satisfied with the results of my work. The fact is that in any graphic techniques, whether it is etching, linocut, pencil drawing or pen drawing, I’m always a prisoner of technology, and I have to take into account its limitations.

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In the traditional forms of art the impact of technology on me was quite overwhelming, it was limiting my freedom. I mean several restrictions and stylization in graphics, that great amount of time I had to waste until the paint had dried, etc. Moreover, both oil painting and etching classes require a separate workshop, and, unfortunately, acid is harmful for our health. So, there exist a lot of difficulties, distracting me from carrying out my creative tasks. But probably the thing is that I’m lazy. If I don’t see at once the results of my work, I can’t go on. I just take the stylus instead of a brush and begin to draw on the tablet, here and now, to observe the results of my work immediately. In the Adobe Photoshop I don’t see the technology at all, so that I don’t have to pay any attention to it, and it’s the most appropriate and almost ideal technique for me. Many of my friends, who are also artists, can’t stand this my point of view. There were the times when we were arguing the toss over it. Anyway, everyone has his own opinion. By the way, the same situation is with the books. I haven’t read paper books since 2000, and I don’t miss the smell of ink and the rustle of pages at all. As for the style, it’s rather difficult (and not really much interesting) for me to characterize it in any way. I’m not an art-critic, and it’s their business. I’ve heard they usually call me a surrealist.

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DPM: Who or what influenced your art the most? Alex: I can call a large number of names, but I will definitely miss someone. My favorite artist is Zdislav Beksinsky. I also love the literature, music and movies of the Soviet period, the most interesting time in cultural terms. Honestly, I’m charmed with aesthetics of that time, which is forever gone now. It was a boundless space for ideas. Of course, everything I said has nothing to do with politics, as this sphere of human life is absolutely alien to me.

DPM: Alex, what message do you want to convey to your audience? Could you name the main goals of your art? Alex: I wouldn’t like to convey anything to my audience and to anyone except myself. As for the goals, the main is to fix certain states of awareness (suddenly flashed childhood memory, a vision on the edge of sleep), and to stay in them for some time. Quoting David Lynch, you can define it as a journey of intuition. It’s important for me to convey these states with minimal distortion, as consciousness turns on only in this case. I experience these states again and again while drawing, and that’s what I get an incredible pleasure from. That’s the main reason why I do what I do.


«THE

HUMAN BRAIN IS THE MOST COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN THE KNOWN UNIVERSE, AND CONSCIOUSNESS IS A THIN FILM ON THE SURFACE OF THE OCEAN OF UNCONSCIOUSNESS» 84


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DPM: Alex, could you name the most important milestones of your work as an illustrator? What are you proud of the most? Alex: The only thing I’m proud of is that I managed to interest such person as Georgiy Daniel in my works. There’s quite a little number of people whose opinion is significant to me. Georgiy Nickolaevich is among them – moreover, I consider him to be one of the greatest producers of our time, on a par with Terry Gilliam and Jean Jenet. One more important milestone is, definitely, the beginning of our work on the ‘Kin-Dza-Dza’ project.

DPM: What does the notion of the contemporary art mean to you? How would you define it? Alex: I don’t know what the contemporary art is and why we should separate it from art in general. But I surely have a point of view about art in general. As for me, the best definition of art is given in the book ‘The Power of Silence’ by Carlos Castaneda: “He went into his dreaming journeys the way a wild animal prowls for food. An animal never shows up at a site when there are signs of activity. He comes only when no one is around. The nagual Elias, as a solitary dreamer, visited, let's say, the junkyard of

infinity, when no one was around - and copied whatever he saw, but never knew what those things were used for, or their source.” For me, creativity has never been associated with a product of the conscious intellectual activity. As I’ve already said before, I define my art as the fixation of certain states of consciousness. I don’t want to talk about the mechanism that operates here, because I’m not inclined to believe neither in mysticism, nor in intellectual speculation. However, the human brain is the most complex structure in the known Universe, and consciousness is a thin film on the surface of the ocean of unconsciousness. And anything can be happening in this ocean. I would say that the work of the intellect and consciousness is a craft. A few years ago one artgallery has shown interest to my works and I was asked to do a solo exhibition. But they had one condition: I had not only to hang my paintings out, but also to create an interactive installation. There was nothing difficult for me in doing it, as I constantly create such so to say metaphors at my work in the advertising agency. The journalists, who came to the exhibition, wrote a lot of articles about this installation, as it was "fashionable" and "modern", and com-

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mented condescendingly on my creative works. It was disappointing and absurd to read these articles. I don’t want to say that I don’t like the new and modern forms of interaction between the artist and the audience. The matter is that I don’t like the approach, in which the artist must try to be modern and relevant and follow certain styles and trends. For me there are no styles, different from the personality of the author. First, a bright personality appears, and then a certain style and approach associates with it and becomes typical. Those people, who consciously try to follow some style, look like imitators for me.

DPM: And our last question, Alex: what new are you preparing for us in the nearest future? Alex: We’re planning to publish an edition of my art album in the next two months. It includes my best works of the last 15 years. Despite the fact that it will be quite large (there will be about 70 pages and nearly 200 works in it), and of high paper and printing quality, we tried to reduce its value to make it affordable – it will cost cheaper than 1000 rubles. If you’d like to order it, please contact me at the address andreevbox@gmail.com, as it won’t be sold in the shops.


interview

JORDI DIAZ ALAMA

J.D.Alama is considered to be one of today’s most famous and respected painters not only in his native Spain, but in the whole world. His artworks are appreciated by both conventional art lovers and knowledgeable professionals, desiring to buy at least one of Alama’s masterpieces.

http://diazalama.com

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DPM: To start with, how tinued studying in Flodid you become an artist? rence-Italy at the FloWhere did you study? rence Academy of Art, with Daniel Graves, Jordi: Since I was a Ramiro Sanchez and many little kid I’ve got it very other great artists and clear that I meant to be teachers. Meanwhile, I an artist. I had certain kept my education growskills and so I was drawing ing up during summer with all the time, I really had a painters like Odd Nergood time drawing. I study drum and Antonio Lopez at the University of Fine Garcia. Arts in Barcelona. When I DPM: What do you want was donde there, I went to achieve in art and what to Madrid in order to study a postgraduate edu- are the main goals of your projects? cation with Guillermo Munoz Vera painter, sharJordi: The artist has ing his workshop at the to capture a reality, you Arauco Academy. I con-

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have to express and publicize an idea or concept that you want to convey and explain through your own reasoning and subjective opinion. In my paintings I always try to have a concept behind an idea or criticism, current issues and problems but the treatment of these ideas are very subtly and indirectly in many cases. I try to represent contemporary reality, and the reason of it and the way that it is painted shows my speech, position and expressive-representative opinion about this reality.


«EACH CANVAS IS A CHALLENGE AND A PUZZLE TO SOLVE»

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DPM: Could you please name the most important milestones of your carrier (f.e. exhibitions, galleries and etc.)? Jordi: I have had several important moments in my career as an artist that helped me to promote myself and grow as an artist. The skill and the concept acquired in the time of a work is not all, I mean, is also important the recognition that helps the development of your carreer. One of these important moment was when I won the 6th Figurative award organized by the museum MEAM (European Museum of Modern Art) in Barcelona, one of the major international competitions on realistic figurative painting at the time. Also, another achievement to highlight my carreer and that gave me recognition was being selected for the BP Portrait Award 2010 at the National Gallery in London. Working at the University of Fine Arts in Barcelona also has meant a personal goal to reach satisfaction on my career, it all gave me more self-confindence and it encourage me to keep painting.

DPM: And could you explain how you create your artworks? Jordi: Every artwork I made has its own strategy and different process. Each canvas is a challenge and a puzzle to solve. If I have a general procedure, a specific palette generally I use to paint and then there is this particular view of my about the colours and concepts, identifying some common ground and personal style. I give as much importance to the drawing before applying the paint itself. Working in a fairly traditional way, yet I like to use certain modern expressive elements, loose brushstrokes, modern colors... etc. Also, a very important part of my creative process is the music.


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DPM: Our next questions touch your personal attitude to contemporary art. Is there anything that attracts and maybe inspires you in contemporary art? what is it, if yes? Jordi: Yes, there is. There is a lot of good contemporary art. You just need to know how to discover it and recognize it. The figurative and realistic trends create the influence in my work and inspire me more in my painting, but I can find work of abstract tendency that also may inspire me or give me some ideas about ther color, texture, line, etc.

DPM: What's your opinion about the contemporary art. What does it mean personally to you? Jordi: There is so much bad art today but also to much good art with real quality. Today coexist a plurality of trends and art movements from abstract art to minimalism until reach a more realistic trend. What is questionable today is the low educational level, which determines the quality of the work and the knowledge of the target audience.

DPM: And the last question is about your plans on future: are you looking forward to visiting Russia?)

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Jordi: For sure. Russia has a very good traditional school. Currently I'm considering to come to your country in order to study and learn the systematic russian contruction in terms of the drawing.

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DONTPOSTME #2  

We are glad to introduce you DONTPOSTME #2 (eng) – a new issue of magazine about contemporary art. In this issue: - interviews with photog...

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