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DONTPOSTME

A MAGAZINE ABOUT CONTEMPORARY ART

#7

WWW.DONTPOSTME.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY FINE ARTS

WINTER ISSUE


A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

A K S A C S B C U K E R F U B W S A

V D O U T E G H R L R F B E F B T V

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A A K S A C S B C N K E R O U B T W

V D O N Y E G W R L R F B R E B T V

A K S I A C S B C U I E R F U B W S

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A A K S A C S B C U K E R F U B W S

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A A K S A C S B C U K E R F U B W S

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

V D O U Y E G W R L X F B R F B T V

T B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

A K S A C S B C U K E R F U B W S A

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

A K S A C S B C U K E R F U B W S

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V

A B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

A K S A C S B C H K E R F U B W S A

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V

V D O U Y E G W R L R F B R F B T V


A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

V S V R D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W A S H W T E V I W N V W S N V G B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E T

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W

V C V B D B I E W G Y E F P Y K T L

A S E J N D S K U N E R T V F R E W

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W

A S H W T E V F W N V W S N V S B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W

A K H W T E V F W O V W S N V S B

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L

V S V B D B I S W G Y E F Y Y K S L


DONTPOSTME #7 WINTER ISSUE DONTPOSTME - A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE ABOUT THE LATEST TRENDS OF CONTEMPORARY ART.

IN OUR MAGAZINES, YOU CAN FIND WIDELY POSTED ARTWORKS AND INTERVIEWS WITH

FAMOUS ARTISTS FROM OVER THE WORLD.

............................................................................................................................. EDITORS-IN-CHIEFS, ART-DIRECTORS:

AZAMAT AKHMADBAEV & ZULYA KUMUKOVA EDITOR:

04

ALIMA KUMUKOVA

............................................................................................................................. DESIGNED IN SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA PRINT: PEECHO, ROKIN 75, 1012 KL AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS

ON A COVER: THE GREAT ESCAPE, 2013 BY SAMMY SLABBINCK, COLLAGE

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#7 | WINTER ISSUE

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PHOTOGRAPHY


pt.1 IRIS AYUSO...........................................................9

THOMAS JORION..................................................16 ELISE BOULARAN.................................................27

FABIO MIGUEL ROQUE..........................................36 /


OVERVIEW

IRIS AYUSO This issue begins with photographs created by a young and talented Spanish artist Iris Ayuso.

Her self-story and her creative work perfectly reveal all the features of a modern life – the relationship between the person and the place of his dwelling, which is rapidly changing from day to day.

PHOTOGRAPHY

http://www.irisayuso.com/

9


OVERVIEW

10

PHOTOGRAPHY


OVERVIEW

Iris Ayuso, Santander, “I studied painting and fine arts in Salamanca and Barcelona, Spain. After then, I moved to Madrid and London, where I have been studying a photography master and other media courses. Now, I am working as designer and photographer. In my photos, I want show what I would like to see in pictures. I work as a picture collector, collection moments and pieces of time. My photos talk about the relation of the individual and the space, of how the landscape is being forgotten, and what is strange on it. In my opinion art should be an inoculation and a relief of the reality and the life as we live it. The media and the technology have changed the way of being photographed, and in our days is able to take pictures of everything any moment. So probably, the future photographer will not take any photo, he just selects "nonprofessional" pictures to write their own speech�.

PHOTOGRAPHY

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OVERVIEW

12

PHOTOGRAPHY


OVERVIEW

13

PHOTOGRAPHY


OVERVIEW

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PHOTOGRAPHY


OVERVIEW

15

PHOTOGRAPHY


INTERVIEW

16

THOMAS JORION Is it possible to capture the invisible bond between the material world of the presence and the time which is inevitably moving forward?

We managed to find an artist whose works reflect an answer to this question showing

the relationship between the material and the temporal. Thomas Jorion is a French photographer living in Paris and traveling the world looking for exciting motifs. His amazing project

‘Timeless Islands’ includes a series of photographs presenting the life of abandoned buildings and places of Germany, USA, Japan and Italy.

http://www.thomasjorion.com/

TIMELESS ISLANDS


OVERVIEW

TIMELESS ISLANDS


OVERVIEW

“I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHY I LOVE PHOTOGRAPHING THESE ABANDONED PLACES”

DPM: When did you first become interested in art and photography? When did you become a photographer? Thomas: I became a photographer learning the photo by myself. Using books and tests made with my first camera. I decided to become a professional photographer four years ago. I realized that if I did not try now I will regret all my life. DPM: Thomas, how did you come to your personal style in photography? Thomas: I haven't tried one style over the other because I was doing my pictures without looking at the other. I haven't studied photography so I think not to be influenced by some photographers. I always had the chance to take pictures as I wanted and how I wanted. DPM: Could you please tell about your approach or philosophy in photography? Thomas: I think I'm very basic. I like to do aesthetic photos more than conceptual. I do not touch anything in the composition of the scenes I photograph. And I'm not doing post-production. To summarize I photograph what I see and I transmit it to others without intervention. DPM: When did you realize that you have become a famous photographer? Thomas: I don't know what it means to be a famous photographer but I realize that I sell photos around the world and I do interview and also publications on every continent. So it may be a form of celebrity. But I think I have to wait a few years before answering to this question seriously. DPM: What types of camera do you use? Thomas: I mainly use a large format camera 4x5" with film. Sometimes I also use a medium format. on the left page: on top: Popora, Villa, Italy - 2010 L’anticamera, Villa, Italy - 2009 on the previous page: Scalone, Villa, Italy - 2010 all photographs from “Forgotten Palaces” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS

19


INTERVIEW

Shizen, House, Japan - 2009 from “Konbini” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

Palace, Movie Theater, United States - 2009 from “Another America” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

22

DPM: Could you please comment on the "Timeless Islands" project? What inspired you to create this amazing project? Thomas: I don’t know exactly why I love photographing these abandoned places. Perhaps it goes back to the time when I was a child. I visited abandoned houses with my friends in my neighborhood. When I bought my first camera in 1996, I naturally started photographing abandoned manors around my home, and since then, I've never stopped shooting this subject. I think that what inspired me these photographs, are the films I watched when I was young. As Akira from Otomo or Blade Runner, Alien, Planet of the Apes. DPM: Could you name any photographers whose names are among the most significant in contemporary art, in your opinion? Thomas: I'm sorry I have no idea. Like I said I rather work alone, I don't look at what is happening in the world of the photography. DPM: And the last questions are about Russia and Russian photography: do you know anybody in modern photography or in other spheres of contemporary art from Russia? Thomas: Again I'm sorry, but I don't know any Russian photographer. I'm sure there are some very big, but as I am self-taught, I have a very bad photographic culture. DPM: Thomas, are you looking forward to visiting Russia? Thomas: Of course ! I only know Moscow that I visited on vacation. But i know there are a lot of places to visit for my photographs. But I do not speak Russian and I think it's complicated to visit the country alone without someone who speaks Russian. on the right page, top: Octo, Church, United States - 2009, below: Candy Bar, Movie Theater, United States - 2007 both photos from “Another America” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

23

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

Nauka, Military Hospital, Germany - 2010 from “In quest of Soviets” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

Cisterna, Cements Works, Italy - 2009 from “Revolution off” gallery

TIMELESS ISLANDS


INTERVIEW

ELISE BOULARAN Elise is a young French photographer who explores the world through her own prism of reality.

Her photographic work is addressed into the history, and she tries to retrieve something muted and undefinable in her work. Her photographs are both sharp and blurred and contain the

saturated colours and haze of the polaroids. In recent years Elise has been published in numerous magazines all over the world and exhibited her work mainly in France but also in various European countries and the US.

http://www.eliseboularan.com/

S/T | VAPORS

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INTERVIEW

28

S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

“I LIKE PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE WHO MAKE ME FEEL SOMETHING AT FIRST GLANCE” 29

DPM: Elise, could you tell us about your latest photo project "s/t"? How did you create it? Where did you shoot? Who had participated in your project? Elise: I create it like a speech. We can say that it's about all these questions and images in my head… all this stories which collide… mine, the others ones… And I use ambulation as a creative process. I like driving with my car where I feel attracted. For example, here in France, there are several locations like Dordogne, Aude, many places around Narbonne, Biarritz or Paris. It's my entourage. It's important in my approach to photograph my family, my friends, and surprising meetings, those who change you. I like photographing people who make me feel something at first glance. Complex people, with dark or lightening personalities, people who intrigue me. DPM: What types of cameras do you use as usual? Elise: I worked for a long time with Polaroid. Now, I am looking for another way of using digital and argentic camera. DPM: What inspires you the most? Elise: The enigma. DPM: Elise, could you tell us about your collaborations with musicians and other artists. How did it come to working with them (f.e, Shigeto)? Elise: It's my photographer job, commissioned part. I've a lot of artist or musician friends. But it is amazing, there is no fate. When I meet new artist, generaly something special happens. And friendship often follows. My recent work with Shigeto is a good example for that.

S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

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S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

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S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

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S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

S/T | VAPORS


INTERVIEW

/

FABIO MIGUEL ROQUE

36

Fabio Miguel Roque is a Portuguese photographer who in his 27 has already made several solo /

exhibitions. He has gone through various stages in photography, from photojournalism to

documentary, and lately began focusing on a more conceptual style. According to his own words, through conceptual photography Fabio wants to explore more personal matters, and it’s what /

happens in his latest project ‘Awake’.

http://cargocollective.com/fabioroque

AWAKE


INTERVIEW

AWAKE


INTERVIEW

DPM: Fabio, what inspired you to create "Awake" project? /

Fabio: My main inspiration when creating my project "Awake" came precisely from the period of my life I was living. It was mainly a period of uncertainty, I had a lot of questions, and this led me to want to do something different artistic level. Regarding the type of image I wanted something dark, which reflected precisely the kind of life that was taking, I have some influences from Antoine D'Agata and Paul Nozolino. /

DPM: How and where did you find special places for your creative work? Fabio: Actually, I did not seek special places, the places where I photographed, are places of my day to day, they do not have anything special, but if we pay more attention we can see that after all, are places with a history to tell, are degraded paths, many of them dead, ways in which I passed, numerous times with my dogs in cold, dark nights. /

DPM: What is the main message of "Awake" photo project? Fabio: The main message? In the background, the main message is that although some paths are dubious, there are times in our lives where we need to go through these paths, and in the end, we go out there, stronger. /

AWAKE

39


pt.2 KRIS KNIGHT...........................................................45

VICTORIA SELBACH..............................................54

SAMMY SLABBINCK...............................................70

JAREK PUCZEL .......................................................81

PATRICK LAUMOND............................................96

JOE BOWMAN.......................................................103


FINE ARTS


OVERVIEW

KRIS KNIGHT Kris Knight is a Canadian painter whose fantasy portraits of androgynous youth are haunted and sensuous. Most of his characters are disenchanted ones lost between youth and adulthood. Knight's works stride between a contradicting palette of sensual primaries and ghostly pastels, reflecting his interest in 18th Century French portraiture. http://www.krisknight.com

SECRETS ARE THINGS WE GROW

45


OVERVIEW

With “Secrets Are The Things We Grow” Canadian artist Kris Knight paints a cast of characters who consciously conceal aspects of themselves from those around them. They hide truths of who they are, where they come from and whom they love. They fear shame, rejection, gossip and embarrassment. They whisper stories but never want the story to be about them. Secrets have roots, they have currency, they accumulate and grow with time; some are short lived, while others haunt generations. Knight’s character’s front, they put on airs, and they pass; some bluff while others reveal their confessions without saying a word. Stemmed from personal stories, these young men isolate themselves from those around them. Some of Knight’s portraits appear as islands, while other paintings portray the bonds formed when secrets are revealed to those held closest. Within these portraits are references to the garden and exercises in pattern work representing how secrets are rooted and grow with time and sometimes take over. These ambiguous portraits depict the balancing act of deeply holding secrets but longing to let them go.

on the previous page: Ivory (2013, Oil on Canvas, 40x30") on the left page: Loose Lips Sink Ships (2013, Oil on Canvas, 40x30")

SECRETS ARE THINGS WE GROW

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OVERVIEW

49

LAUREL ISLAND 2013 OIL ON CANVAS 60X48"


OVERVIEW

50

HOME CUTS 2013 OIL ON CANVAS 40X30"


SOFT PINK 2013 OIL ON CANVAS 16X20"


FABERGE 2013 OIL ON CANVAS 48X36"


INTERVIEW

54

VICTORIA SELBACH An experienced viewer is accustomed to seeing a naked woman body in paintings of

the Renaissance period. Later on the art of the nude has been traced in a large number of works. However, a series “Nudes� created by an American painter Victoria Selbach raises the technique

of this highly delicate issue to a new level. The subject is revealed as the light weaves through the figure, brushing against surfaces, announcing volume, creating depth and illuminating the emotion beneath the surface. The light reveals the beauty that is clearly there while the shadows mask in mystery all that is present yet just beyond the viewers sight and current understanding.

http://www.victoriaselbach.com/

NUDES


NUDE 3

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 36 X 36


INTERVIEW

“MY EXPLORATION CONTINUES THROUGH WORKING WITH AN ARRAY OF AMAZING WOMEN”

DPM: When did you first become interested in art and painting? What were your early experiences? Victoria:I started feeding my love of making at a very young age, as a scrawny kid growing up in a beautiful rural setting. Allergic to hay, pollen, grass, and some critters, I spent most of my time drawing, imagining, ‘coloring’ and making things indoors. I believe we are all born artists, as well as adventurers, scholars, dancers, musicians ... but we begin to define ourselves in one way or another throughout life. That childhood gave me two very strong impulses. I began defining myself, with the reinforcement of those around me, as ‘different’, a creative artistic person. Secondly I had the sense of not fully fitting in or maximizing myself in the environment around me. I developed a strong need to break out, travel, adventure, look at things differently. It propelled me to spend part of a summer in NYC at 16 and by 18 I had made NY my home. The confluence of those two forces ignited ‘how’ I became an‘artist’. DPM: What are your main sources of inspiration? Victoria: I am completely fascinated by the light. As a fair skinned blue eyed redhead I shrink from harsh light. Through the years spent in Manhattan I relished the night light, the gritty streets of the cavernous city, rarely searching out the open air and nearby beaches. Yet somehow I have come full circle. Now I cannot get enough of expansive vistas, dappled sunlight, the light that creates lush greenery, the complexity of glorious skies, the depth of luminous twilight and long shadows. That new way of seeing has changed everything for me. The moment when light collides with shadow and recedes into darkness drives my lust and creates the foundation of my work. I am drawn to the light as it reflects off, rolls over and emanates from within the human form. DPM: When did you discover your personal, specific style in art? Victoria: There was not one moment of discovery but rather an unfolding. Even as a child I was drawn to faces and the unique energy of individuals. I am often mesmerized by the character, texture, supple fullness, gesture and unique glow, or lack of it, from individual men women and children. However it is women that draw me in with a connection and empathy that drives the inspiration to paint. I suppose that has been my core starting point. When I stopped spending the vast bulk of my time in the city my life changed, and with it the way I see. My fascination with the light became a dominant force in my work at that time, about 5 years ago. I don't expect this is to stagnate at all. I have no predictions to offer and no intention of trying to control the way I see or my passions. It would be wonderful to be allotted perhaps another 50 years of watching it all unfold but I better get busy and paint because there is certainly no guarantee of that.

NUDES

57


INTERVIEW

59

NUDE 1

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 36 X 48


INTERVIEW

60

NUDE 2

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 36 X 30


INTERVIEW

DPM: Could you please describe the way you create your paintings? Tell us about your "Nude" project. Victoria: Prior to the Nude series I was working on larger than life heads creating giant images of friends. When I decided to pull back and focus my gaze on the whole body I thought I needed to begin by turning my gaze on myself before asking others to bare all for me. So the original 'Nude' series is a group of self portrait nudes. Taking my gaze away from the face allowed the presence of light, shadow, and form to become the focus.

62

My exploration continues through working with an array of amazing women. We spend joy filled hours in a fairytale-like location where the muse and I wonder through the house and gardens chasing the light and long shadows. We find those spots where the warmth of the light ignites the movement and gesture. That warmth leads the muse from the push and pull of the cold shadows as she instinctively is drawn into the light. That search often leads to windows and doorways where the sheets of light and darkness create a three dimensional environment either with the angles of walls and surfaces visible or implied. The physical realm is distanced by the importance of the light as it exists on its own and as it rolls over and emanates from the human form. Unique perspective and the strength of the angles in the environment, body and slashing shadows create the abstract foundation. Watching the way the light rolls over the figure, weaving in and out, announcing volume before receding into darkness not only creates the visual strength of the composition but fractures what is present and alludes to all that is just beyond our current understanding. Once the composition is set and I begin painting, my eye focuses on the light itself, piercing the layers of light present in all it’s complexity and rebuilding it with layers of pigment veiling the canvas. While in the act of building my intention is to set any preconceived notions, historical references and unsolicited scraps of atelier handbooks that float around masquerading as zeitgeist, out of my mind. Allowing searing vision, instructed by the light, to lead the pigment onto the canvas.The texture of the paint, the potential richness and thickness of the medium, the mark-making and physicality of the paint itself does not direct my choices. I believe in the purest sense what defines each artist is the way we see or choose to see. My eye is on the light. DPM: What message do you put into your paintings? Could you characterize your philosophy? Victoria: The true impetus of my work is a personal one. I am not painting to make a statement or promote a concept or agenda. My work hits me in a profound way and that indulgence in itself is ‘enough’. I suppose what I dare hope for, is that on occasion, it makes a strong visceral impact on others. When that does happen it is an amazing thing to share and of course brings me great joy. With that said, I must admit that as I progress through a painting or a series, spending the many hours in my own head, it does open conversations that fold meaning into the work. An intertwining of personal, as you say, ‘philosophies’ begin to become embodied in the work. I am fully aware that these things I see would not appear to others. It is my experience of the work. (Although I am beginning to hint at them as I title the pieces.) The beauty of a piece when it resonates with a viewer is that it triggers an inexplicable visceral response that is very personal to them. In the end their own unique introspection is what I would hope to‘show’the viewer.

NUDES


MARY 5

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS. 58 X 28,


INTERVIEW

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NUDE 9

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 30 X 48


NUDE 5

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 48 X 24


INTERVIEW

DPM: Victoria, which of your exhibitions was the most significant one? Victoria: I have had 2 solo shows in NYC. The first at BNH on East 73rd street and last year ‘Grace in the Light’ at Dacia Gallery on the lower east side. It is always wonderful to have the opportunity to present your current body of work in its entirety. DPM: Could you name an artist who has astonished you in art lately? Victoria: A complete jaw dropper was the Jenny Saville show at the Gagosian 2011. Her drawings of mother and child in motion completely swept me off my feet. Such energy (not to mention it felt like Jenny Saville channeling Mary Cassatt. Who would have ever expected that!) Large scale drawings that capture such movement always take my breath away. I remember seeing Diego Rivera's Pneumatic Drilling, full-scale cartoon for a mural in Mexico and having a similar feeling. It was awe-inspiring how with such economy of line a drawing could send a vibrating force right through my sternum. DPM: Give us two or three artworks which have changed a sense of contemporary art within XXI century? Victoria: Any work of the 21st century strong enough to change the trajectory of contemporary art is only beginning to form slightly under the radar. I imagine it will be based in extreme technology or transmittable on a viral scope and yet hit individuals in a personal and guttural way. We are at the cusp of breaking down walls that offer a false sense of isolation and separateness. The most powerful art of the 21st century will contribute to propagating that awareness. DPM: And the last question: what are you preparing for your audience in the near future? Victoria: Not yet released from the studio my new body of work includes 'The Miraculous Conception' paintings Modern images representing Mary: The Mother of Lord Jesus, Maya: The Mother of Lord Buddha and Devaki: The Mother of Lord Krishna.... Now that I've completely caught you off guard you'll need to visit the studio. I am currently working on a new series,‘Dervish’. Paintings of my contemporaries that celebrate the divine by releasing the hold of conformity, limitations, restrictions and the forbidden to revel in the emotional and profound. Woman that embrace their own energetic complexity while emphasizing openness, acceptance andtolerance.

NUDES

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MARY 2

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 30 X 48


OVERVIEW

70

SAMMY SLABBINCK Sammy Slabbinck’s dynamic surreal collage prints are familiar to a large number of people. This Belgian artist’s works are memorable due to his eye for muted tones and surreal compositions.

Inspired by vintage magazines and books, he has been collecting them for a long time, and then

started to create unique collages, combining vintage photographs with contemporary compositional

styles. Especially for this issue of DONTPOSTME Sammy was asked to pick out some of his latest works to be shown to our readers. Enjoy it!

http://sammyslabbinck.tumblr.com/

COLLAGES


SEAFOOD

2013, COLLAGE ON PAPER


OVERVIEW

on this page:

The Big Push

2012, collage on paper

on the next page: Boxing in Vienna 2013, collage on paper


OVERVIEW

74

DISCOVERY OF MODERN ART 2013, COLLAGE ON PAPER


OVERVIEW

77

INTO THE WILD 2013, COLLAGE ON PAPER


MIND THE BEATLES, DARLING! 2012, COLLAGE ON PAPER


LOVERS (2) OIL ON CANVAS, 45 X 45


INTERVIEW

JAREK PUCZEL

81

Jarek Puczel is a Polish artist who approaches his work with the idea that life is a movie or a game of illusion and the world is a playground where different realities play with one another.

We’ve been dreaming of setting an interview with him since we’ve seen his breathtaking ‘Lovers’ series, which shows heads of couples in a semi-abstract but immediately recognizable style,

surrounded by nothing but a beautiful soft colour. Jarek willingly gave us an interview and told us how he became one of the most famous artists of today.

http://puczel.pl/

PAINTINGS


INTERVIEW

“WHEN WE LOVE EACH OTHER, WE EXPERIENCE A CONNECTION OF FEELINGS, THOUGHTS, AND IN A BROADER SENSE - FUSION OF MALE AND FEMALE ENERGY” 82

DPM: How did you become interested in art? When did you realize that painting has become an essential part of your life? Jarek: For many years I revolved around painting, being involved in different art disciplines. I played in a band of electronic music and was filmmaking. I must say that this general artistic background is constantly vivid and helpful for me. As a painter I was participating for many years in several art portals. For people like me, living far from a big art centers, it has been a good way of showing works to wider public. Of course, in this "art ocean" you can drown and completely disappear. That's why I have participated in a competitions like this, from which finally something has moved in my carieer ...I mean jured showcase contest in 2010 organized by artslant.com, US based art portal. I have got into the group of 10 international finalists from different disciplines of art. It was my "turning point" from which I had to wholly engaged in painting. Of course, if you are a painter, you need to show your work "physically" in the galleries. In that time I worked in the Publishing House as a graphic designer, and this was absorbing a lot of my time and energy. That's why I started to think about quiting this post. And finally did it. Hard decision, but gave me the strength and possibility to focus on my inner reality. Then the "miracles" began to happen ...I was completely amazed when two hours after the termination of my job contract I got a call from a significant gallery in Warsaw. They asked me if I would like to arrange a solo exhibition! DPM: . Jarek, how did you find personal, original style in art? Who or what inspired you the most? Jarek: Artists tend, more or less consciously, to express of their personality in the form of the "style". I like creators who approach to this with a distance, defending against freezing life in the shape of their "own style", do not holding it too tightly. We should remember that the style, treated as a mask of the personality, can be rejected if limits us. It's a bit like "zen" in art: the purification from illusions, the pursuit of simplicity, flexibility and flowing with the stream of life. That is why, I like artists using a "wide range of forms", for instance Maurizio Cattelan or Wilhelm Sasnal. DPM: What’s the meaning of your works? If there any message you’re trying to convey to your audience? Jarek: It is difficult to answer this question clearly, because in every painting I try to show different ideas (except for the series). Some of the works depict the contrast of different realities, which are available simultaneously for certain event. Most of the works is outright dedicated to the love, which can be sweet or/and bitter but always is a powerful force. As for the meaning of my works, I like a short description taken from a german website: "Puczel catches the calmness of apparently simple and unspectacular situations with an impressive modesty and apparent ease".

PAINTINGS


GERARD PHILIPE OIL ON CANVAS, 60 X 50


INTERVIEW

84

LOVERS (3) OIL ON CANVAS, 45 X 45


INTERVIEW

PAINTINGS


INTERVIEW

87 DPM: Could you describe your "Lovers" series of paintings? Jarek: The works from this series express the need to capture an important aspect of love, which is the common space of people in love. When we love each other, we experience a connection of feelings, thoughts, and in a broader sense - fusion of male and female energy. These images can be seen as the embodiment of the idea of yin-yang. Pink and black paint, imposed with thick "impasto" brushstrokes, have become a visual equivalent of this psychological area ... surface get wavy, subjected to an alternating rhythm of disturbances, tensions and calms. I tried to bring out here the sensual and energetic aspect of being in love. DPM: In your CV there is much information about exhibitions held all over the world. Could you please tell us about some key moments of your art-career? When did you realize that you have become a famous painter? Jarek: Actually it started with the popularity of the "Lovers" series ( ...this power of love!). These paintings have really opened many paths and opportunities. The most important time was a period between spring and autumn 2012, when I received a requests from two publishing houses - from Munich and Milan - to use "Lovers (2)" on the book covers. But much more surprised me a proposal from... Hollywood. The team of the director Spike Jonze asked me to use the "Lovers (1)" as a part of the movie set decor ("Her", with a Joaquin Phoenix in main role). Then came the offer of cooperation from a Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. Since this time, this gallery has become my "representation gallery" and my paintings have participated in international art fairs in US and Europe. DPM: Is there any artist who has made a strong impression on you recently? Jarek: I like humor and lightness in art, that's why Pandemonia Panacea has amazed me recently. It is a London based artist who is dressed in a colourful latex and looks like a pop-art female doll. Character is inspired by comics, in particular by Roy Lichtenstein art. Of course, we should remember that not only the new phenomena in art could be revelation. For instance, recently I listened to Schubert's piano sonatas, and found in them fragments that touched me with its freshness. on the left page: Romance (oil on canvas, 60x50 cm) Dream (oil & acrylic on canvas, 90x60 cm)

PAINTINGS


INTERVIEW

89

LOVERS (1) OIL ON CANVAS, 40 X 40


INTERVIEW

90 DPM: And aside from work, what are you in to? Jarek: I love traveling and exploring new places, although quickly getting used to the old ones. In june of this year I have visited London and this city has impressed me much; especially that it was my first stay there. I saw a lot of art collections - Tate Modern, Saatchi, National Gallery, etc. Before that, many of these "iconic" artworks I had only seen in books... I know I won't be original saying that I love Italy. But this country is so inspiring mix of old and new. Probably the most interesting place and time for me is Venice during the Biennale of contemporary art. DPM: What is the most interesting and worth—visiting place (city, museum and etc.) for you in Russia? Jarek: I would like to answer in a little different way than suggested by the question ... Russia means for me a place in the soul. I have never been in your beautiful country until now, but my imagination has been strongly influenced by Andrei Tarkovsky films and music such composers as Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninoff. Russia is also written in my family history. My mother with her parents were deported to Siberia and lived in the vicinity of Krasnoyarsk. Despite this difficult history, they had always mentioned an ordinary Russian people as good-hearted. DPM: Are there any exciting projects that you’re working on now? Jarek: Until now I has not painted a big canvases. But a few weeks ago I received an offer from Robert Fontaine Gallery to prepare a larger works for the upcoming fairs "Art Basel Miami". So I just working on it... And I have already scheduled a solo exhibition in Austrian gallery Sandhofer in Salzburg. That's pretty soon, because opening will be held on February 28. So I have a lot of work and feel good about it...

on the right page: Escape from the city (oil & acrylic on canvas, 61x46 cm) Couple (oil on canvas, 60x50 cm)

PAINTINGS


INTERVIEW

PAINTINGS


INTERVIEW

92

GIRL ON A SEESAW OIL & ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 65X50 CM


AT SCHOOL (1) OIL & ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 120X80 CM


OVERVIEW

96

PATRICK LAUMOND Patrick Laumond is one of the most interesting and specific artists using various forms and

approaches in his creative work. He is also the founder of the ‘MetaHism’ artistic movement,

which includes a large series of works which express a model of the whole universe in a comprehensive body of work. This meta-paradigm embodies both in its visible and invisible chain of events happening in the world.

http://www.laumond.com/ photograph courtesy of P.Tapissier

METAHISM


THE COUNTERWEIGHT OF THE GRAVITY METAHISM 2013


OVERVIEW

on the top: Translation, MetaHism, 2013 in the mid: Infinity, MetaHism, 2013 below: A Work Can Replace An Other One, MetaHism, 2013

METAHISM


OVERVIEW

AN ORIGINAL PARADIGM “Our own perception guides and shapes the process of what we know.” “My search is about how to express a model of the whole universe in a comprehensive body of work. I explored the notion of the void, creating works that generate a multidimensional space and seem to destabilize our assumptions about the world and express dualities such as reality and illusion, solidity and intangibility, certainty and uncertainty… How to shape questioning, doubts, assumptions and human condition? In this conceptualization it appears I can express any form of representation or thoughts in a paradigm of unity.” Laumond

METAHISM

99


OVERVIEW

THE CARRYING (SYSTEMA) METAHISM, 2007


OVERVIEW

DUAL PRESSURE-(CENTRAL EFFECT OF ROTATION) METAHISM, 2013


OVERVIEW

JOE POWERS BOWMAN Joe Powers Bowman’s creative work is the last thing we want to share with you in this issue. His maddeningly detailed drawings are all executed in the same manner, rendered only in ink, yet somehow still managing to capture the textures and architectural intricacies. Due to Joe’s own specific style of creating art his collages can’t leave any viewer cold! http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpowersbowman

DRAWINGS

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OVERVIEW

104

“My artistic process usually begins with research into different architectural styles and historical movements, through which I build a list of interesting buildings and structures to draw. Once I have assembled a large enough list of subjects, I draw them freehand in as much detail as possible, then photocopy them onto archival paper, cut them out, and assemble them. A finished collage contains anywhere from twenty to six hundred such components. When asked for biographical information, I usually submit the following: Joseph Bowman (1752-1779) was a Virginia military officer during the American Revolutionary War. He was second in command during George Rogers Clark’s famous campaign to capture the Illinois country, but was injured in an accidental gunpowder explosion afterwards and subsequently died of his wounds. He was the only American officer killed during the Illinois campaign.”

DRAWINGS


OVERVIEW

DRAWINGS


OVERVIEW

DRAWINGS


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H H K Y K L B M L I T I W E Y W Q L U O Y A B I A B U S B L U A H B L

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H H K Y K L B M L I T I W E Y W Q L B I A B U S B L U A H B L A B L A

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L W B H S E X X Z L P I V M B S Z Z A B L A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V

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A S K J N D S K U G E R Y V F R E W


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DONTPOSTME #7 (WINTER ISSUE)  

In this issue: interviews with Thomas Jorion, Elise Boularan, Fabio M. Roque, Victoria Selbach and Jarek Puczel overviews: Iris Ayuso, K...

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