Page 1

.

DONTPOSTME

A MAGAZINE ABOUT CONTEMPORARY ART

#9

WWW.DONTPOSTME.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY FINE ARTS

SUMMER (EXPERIMENTAL) ISSUE


si ereht gnihton tra ni wen tpecxe tnelat vohkehC notnA


there is nothing new in art except talent Anton Chekhov


DONTPOSTME #9 SUMMER (EXPERIMENTAL) ISSUE DONTPOSTME - A MAGAZINE ABOUT

THE LATEST TRENDS OF CONTEMPORARY ART.

IN OUR MAGAZINES, YOU CAN FIND WIDELY PUBLISHED ARTWORKS AND INTERVIEWS WITH

FAMOUS ARTISTS FROM OVER THE WORLD.

............................................................................................................................. EDITORS-IN-CHIEF, ART-DIRECTORS:

AZAMAT AKHMADBAEV & ZULYA KUMUKOVA EDITOR:

ALIMA KUMUKOVA

............................................................................................................................. DESIGNED IN SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA PRINT: PEECHO, ROKIN 75, 1012 KL AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS

ON A COVER: #40, ALEXIS VASILIKOS PATTERNS: MARCELLO VELHO

TYPOGRAPHY FONTS: NEVIS BY TEN DESIGNED BY TWENTY AND NEUE HELVETICA® FONT FAMILY

DESIGNED BY LINOTYPE DESIGN STUDIO IN 2012 MAX MIEDINGER

............................................................................................................................. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE CAN BE USED

WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION OF “DONTPOSTME” ANY CONTENT OF THIS PUBLICATION

(ILLUSTRATIONS, PHOTOS & OTHER TYPES OF MATERIALS) COPYRIGHTED BY RESPECTIVE OWNERS

............................................................................................................................. 18+

#9 | SUMMER (EXPERIMENTAL) ISSUE

........................................................................................................................... VK.COM/DONTPOSTME

WWW.DONTPOSTME.COM 2014


Love Will Tear Us Apart


PHOTOGRAPHY AND FINE ARTS


YANINA BOLDYREVA......................................8

ALEXIS VASILIKOS..........................................14

MARINA RUIZ...................................................22 PER JOHANSSON.............................................30

JACOB VAN LOON..........................................42 PAUL MCCLOSKEY.........................................54

ENDA O'DONOGHUE......................................62

PATTERNS........................................................74


8

YANINA BOLDYREVA


LOGBOOK

http://www.yaninaboldyreva.net/tablet/index.html


T

LOGBOOK

he summer issue of DONTPOSTME starts with the post-apocalyptic photographs made by a young Russian art photographer Yanina Boldyreva. Born in Novosibirsk in 1986, this highly talented artist has already participated in various projects and even had her personal exhibitions held all over the country. The project called “Logbook” came to our notice not only for its content, but also due to the way it’s executed: distorted images show no people; a combination of surrealism, mysticism and charm creates an empty scene for the spectator’s imagination.

YB:“This project shows space surrounding me as the post-apocalyptic world. It hasn’t people, architecture, and only separate ruins which jut out of a ground indicate the past developments. I used pieces of plastic as the filter to hide part of the image and to allocate the details necessary to me in a landscape. I look at the landscape as the astronaut who has visited the planet in years after he abandoned it. Therefore, these works have the personal experiences of the astronaut concerning the myth about the lost past and impossibility to begin new life mix up with documentary fixing for him field notes. Combination of commonness and mystic create an empty scene for the spectator imagination”.


KOOBGOL

KOOBGOL


LOGBOOK

LOGBOOK


14 ALEXIS VASILIKOS


(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE

http://www.alexisvasilikos.net/


(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE


A

lexis Vasilikos is an Athens based fine art photographer. His work focuses on little details and colorful abstractions, subtle movements and snippets of narrative that are apparent but invisible at the same time, ordinary things but of existential importance ,things we usually ignore, the commonplaces, the everyday stuff that surround us, all those things that we consider "nothing in particular" get a closer look and and thus become opportunities to contemplate the mystery of life. He is currently co-editing Phases Magazine with Jerome Montagne.

(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE


(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE

(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE


(IF YOU EVER SEE ME PLEASE) REMIND ME I'M INVISIBLE


22 MARINA RUIZ


NIIT

http://www.marinaruizvallejo.com/


B “

y night, nothing seems to be what it really is. There is another light illuminating us and with it a distinct ambience unfolding. Nature turns into artifice and artifice gains life. The city is transformed, everyday life spaces become uncanny and the familiar unfamiliar. The series NIIT (Night) employs imagination, dream and fiction to navigate in the nocturnal landscape. This experimental work opens up towards a personal universe – a night dream wherein forms are diluted while lights and shadows become the main protagonists. The randomness of the photographic shoot gains importance in the final result, allowing to rework the image with a different perspective. The title of the series brings together four concepts related with the images (Nocturn, Iluminate, Ilusorial, Tranformation), establishing a determined reading of the photographic sequence�.


NIIT

NIIT


30 PER JOHANSSON


PAINTINGS

http://www.konstnarperjohansson.se/


Undersaeker


I

t’s a well-known fact that abstract expressionism can be vivid, surprising and surrealistic, but today it is quite difficult and almost impossible to find something new and interesting in this movement. Sweden - based artist Per Johansson is the one who breaks this stereotype creating bright and memorable paintings appearing to the viewer as balanced abstracted landscapes, having some common features with Gerhard Richter’s and Maurice Sapiro’s works.

“When I paint I always strive for the moment when there is life. I want the colors to vibrate and glow of presence, I never finish before. My paintings are inspired by the small and big wonders of nature. I’m especially fascinated by light and its ability to illuminate and transform.Through my new paintings I want to express feelings like longing, hope and presence”.


Himmelfaerden


Mod


Himmel


Vaerregn


Naervaro


Glod


42 JACOB VAN LOON


PAINTINGS

http://jacobvanloon.com/


Into Lists. Water-based media on panel, 12x16". 2012


C

hicago-based artist Jacob van Loon has one of the most popular blogs on tumblr.com. His influence and importance for young artists in the network has already become a fact because Jacob is one of those who became world famous thanks to the Internet. Apart from this, Jacob van Loon is not just a net artist, as exhibitions of his artworks are often held in the cities of the USA, and some of his pictures have already been purchased for various private collections all over the world.


DPM: To start with, please, Jacob, tell us, how did you become a painter? When did you understand that painting has become an integral part of your life?

JVL: Painting is the most recent manifestation in my arsenal that developed as a result of experiences with photography, design and illustration from my academic career. I still feel like my painted work has more in common with the act of drawing than painting. Something about the impermanent nature of watercolor and mixed media approach appeals to my tastes and tendencies. DPM: Where does your motivation come from? How did you come to your own style in art?

JVL: Originality, as conventionally understood, has never been my chief concern. I think devices like originality and ingenuity are holistic considerations of what already exists. The desire to create something new comes from a place of unrest or dissatisfaction. I try to consider as much art and history as I can while creating new works, instead of trying to invent a clean slate unaffected by anything that already exists. DPM: What message do you convey through your art?

JVL: I approach most new work with a well-defined set of ideas, and painting is the way I put those ideas through the lens of personal experience. The ideas I am influenced by might vary from piece to piece, although I choose certain themes to work within, or take similar opinions away from individual ideas. What's most fascinating to me is when someone looking at my work is able to create their own experience with the painting, whether or not their ideas align with mine. I've had people tell me my work reminds them of the inside of a cave, and other people say it reminds them of the collapsed terrain around the gas chambers in Auschwitz.


DPM: Tell us about the key moments of your art career? When did you get a feeling of having gained a reputation of a talented painter?

JVL: As steady as my output is, I would describe the reception I garner as sporadic. There are high, busy times as well as lower periods where my momentum seems to stagnate. I'm not sure how this element functions for other people in my field. I've managed to gain a large part of my network online through sites like Tumblr and Behance. This year I've explored more local opportunities to establish footing in Chicago. Despite the changes I sense about how my work is received, I typically don't go more than a day without working on a project or starting something new. DPM: Jacob, what projects are you working on now and when will we have an opportunity to see them?

JVL: Most the work I am completing this summer and fall is for upcoming exhibitions in Chicago, including my first solo show coming in January 2014. I have started working in pen after taking a few years off from the medium, midscale pieces influenced by botanical plates and other scientific illustration. I may have some opportunity to work with Anobium Books with upcoming designs for publication. I am currently seeking out more opportunities for projects that allow me to use both art and design together. DPM: What has impressed you in art lately?

JVL: I see something new every few days that resonates with my personal tastes, but the one experience I had recently was being able to view "Painting the Void" at the Chicago MCA. It was a body of work curated by Paul Schimmel, focusing on modern works created internationally as a reaction to the post World-War economy, also under the influence of Cold War politics in the 50's and 60's.


DPM: What interests you the most except drawing? Have you got any hobbies or talents?

JVL: I have a (mostly unrealized) natural capacity for creating music, and I've played drums on and off for years. I have a growing interest in video as a medium, but no time to pursue it right now. I enjoy unconventional travel, to less desirable places in what are considered America's "flyover States". I'm also known for taking disastrously long walks through depressed and unsafe areas. Chicago is America's most ethnically segregated city, which makes long walks through well-defined areas interesting. DPM: What is the most worth-visiting place for you in Russia?

JVL: I’ve never been to Russia but it’s high on my list of places to visit. Two of my favorite artists, Andrei Tarkovsky and El Lissitzky. Most every Russian artist I admire comes from a different place in Russia and a different walk of life, but there is a permeating characteristic to all Russian art making it apparent that both the natural and socio-political environment of the country are a constant conceptual anchor. Alexander Sokurov made the great experimental historical film Russian Ark at the Hermitage, and even though that’s such a canned response to your question, I’d be a fool not to make it there at some point in my life.


Quincy Station, 1946. Watercolor on paper, 22x30". 2013


Station II. Graphite, watercolor and acrylic on paper, 14x14". 2013


Station III. Graphite, watercolor and acrylic on paper, 14x14". 2013


Dogtown Common. Water-based media on panel, 24x48". 2012


54 PAUL MCCLOSKEY


THE OMEGA

http://www.paulmccloskeyart.com/


V

isual artist Paul McCloskey was born in Ireland. He attended the National College of Art and Design (N.C.A.D) Dublin from 1981 and graduated in 1986. Paul also attended De Montfort University UK and was awarded a Masters Degree in Fine art painting (MFA) in 2011. He is a professional member of ‘visual artists Ireland’ and has exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally throughout the UK, London, Venice and New York, he has received many awards and his work is in numerous private and public collections.

“My most recent paintings ‘The Omega (awakenings 3d)’ builds on my previous series ‘Awakenings (The Alpha)’ and ‘Awakenings Reloaded’ this is the third in the trilogy of the awakenings theme. They consist of a number of 15 cubes, 10 of which are wall mounted and 5 of which are suspended at varying heights from the ceiling, allowing the viewer a full 360 degree view of the works, also inspired by the landscape, what we perceive as everyday and perhaps ordinary, the places we merely glance at without allowing ourselves to get lost in the breathtaking creation and beauty that surrounds us. This visual influence is determined by the surrounding landscape of my environment, but its intention is primarily as a catalyst in expressing divinity and is therefore secondary to this expression, the primary purpose being process, allowing and presence. on the left page: “Through silence you were revealed” (top), “From the inside out”


Also the cubes question and challenge the staple of painting being confined to the two dimensional surface, pushing the boundaries into the third dimension. The cubes suggesting the dichotomy of spirit, being all things in all directions at once and is also a more literal translation of the work of post impressionist painter Cezanne and the subsequent Cubist movement, however the painted surfaces of my work has more in common with the Romantic philosophy , in particular that of Turner. The varied and stunning Irish landscape, coupled with our unsettled weather and therefore often fleeting and mottled light, inspires me greatly. Often a view will change or an area will be illuminated by a simple break in the clouds, highlighting as if a shimmering treasure or jewel, a corner of a field, the side of some rocky cliff or the dynamic sweeping curves of a valley reminding us that we are an integral part of and connected to a whole. Effectively, this encourages us to see and, most importantly, feel its beauty and spirit and therefore reconnect to this vital part of us. In areas, sky and earth are as one, evoking the sense of personal growth, the sense of awakening to the beauty, divinity and perfection, to the divine order within all things. This suggestion of heaven and earth in constant struggle, merging yet separable, solid yet amorphous all suggest the multidimensional nature of the spiritual, the beginning and the end, the alpha and omega, the struggle within, between the conditioned self and the divine/spiritual self”.

on the right page: “In my heart I have hidden your word” (top), “Amazing Grace”


“And I saw a new heaven and a new earth”


“My eyes hurt as if never used”


6 2

ENDA O'DONOGHUE


PAINTINGS

http://www.endaodonoghue.com/


Ellipsis ( 2012 ) Oil & Acrylic on Canvas , 180 x 240 cm


B

orn in Ireland in 1973, Enda O’Donoghue is now living and working in Berlin. In his work Enda uses photographs sourced from the Internet and plays with random throw-away moments of everyday life, merging them together in various interconnected themes. The painterliness of his technique works with the disposable nature of his subjects to make the work sometimes poignant and melancholic, or alternatively brittle and harsh. Art of O’Donoghue is deeply influenced by the digital high speed reality we now live in, and he transports these seemingly meaningless sound-bite images from a place of apparent futility to one that questions and searches for meaning through the transformative act of painting. DPM: Enda, how did you become an artist? Why did you decide to paint in glitch style?

EOD: How did I become an artist? Well, it certainly wasn't a very direct route. I was never brought to galleries, museums or anything like that growing up but I used to draw a lot and eventually progressed on to painting. I think, as far as I can remember, the first things I was interested in drawing and painting were images from comic books and I have a vague recollection of using a notebook to draw and meticulously catalogue every superhero that I could find.


I became interested in computers around the age of 8 or 9, first with a Sinclair ZX81 which I think had just 16 kilobytes of memory and then, my very first upgrade a year or two later, to a ZX Spectrum which introduced colour graphics, 8 colours in fact and a whopping 48 kilobytes. As limited as they were it was through these first computers that I became very interested in computer graphics and also programming. So actually when I left school first I went to university to study computer programming and spent about 3 years completely immersed in that world but eventually realised that it simply wasn't satisfying me. So I left and then more or less on a whim enrolled in an art course which led onto to studying painting in art college a few years later and from the start that just felt right. I guess it is quite natural that the influence from my time studying computers would be very present in my artwork. Although initially the idea of painting seemed to be the complete opposite to the structure and logic of programming languages and the mathematics that I had come from but it didn't take long before all of these past influences began seeping out and infecting the way that I approached painting and art. Over the years I worked professionally teaching multimedia applications and as a web designer, developer and programmer, so I think there is no way for me to avoid dealing with the digital world and the technology in a very direct way. My interest in the digital errors and glitches is partly an aesthetic fascination, coming from a love of their purely abstract qualities and also it comes from interest in the hidden structure underlying digital images. We live in a world that is increasingly reliant on computers. They are like a hidden presence underlying everything. Like the noise of any machine, the glitches expose or remind us of the presence of the technology.


wow, my stomach looks great! ( 2010 ) Oil on Canvas , 100 x 130 cm


Reno ( 2011 ) Oil on Canvas , 180 x 240 cm


They invade and obscure the perfection of the image, break down and interrupt the normal flow of communication and challenge us to fill in the blanks or to put the pieces back together, while also offering a reminder, a brief flash, of how the visual information has been interpreted, manipulated, reduced, compressed and ultimately transmitted. DPM: How did you create your recent projects - Entropy, Is Feeling Luck, etc.? Did you take any special photographs for these projects? And could you please describe the process of creating your artwork?

EOD: Almost all of my recent work has used found images; I rarely ever use photographs that I have taken myself. Instead I have been collecting and cataloguing images from various mostly online sources for years, and I continue to add to that collection on an ongoing basis. In general I have been drawn to the more low quality images where there are obvious signs of pixelation, noise, static, transmission errors or visual artefacts. Often these are unprofessional photographs or images from the early years of digital photography and a lot of the images have originated from mobile phone cameras. So something that started off being viewed through that little window of the screen on a phone is eventually blown back up to life size through the painting process.

With these recent projects the mix and selection of the images I've used and subject matter has been crucial. I have always tried to avoid an arbitrary selection or purely aesthetic selection and generally the idea of working in straight series based work bores me. So I have been attempting to guide the selection in a more deliberate and defined way with an open-ended underlying narrative thread that runs through everything and this is something which continues to evolve with my work.


Right now I am generally guided by subject matter which results from ongoing research into different areas of interest that I have and currently I am looking at images and videos mainly dating from the early 70's, so some of my future work could look quite different. When it comes to the actual painting process I have tried to define a set of procedures for myself so that instead of simply copying the image it is more like a translation, with painting, as a visual language, in the mix as an active element and where the process itself plays and important role, so it generates its own errors, or manual glitches and in a way it celebrates the idea of human error. It typically begins on paper where I manually divide up or dissect the image into irregular blocklike sections based on some pre-determined system, sometimes defined by shape and colour or the detail in the image and sometimes this is more game or puzzlelike in structure. Then the image is reconstructed by painting these isolated pieces one by one building together almost like a jigsaw-puzzle over a period of weeks and sometimes months. It is a very slow process, in fact it intentionally exaggerates the slowness normally associated with painting. So the element of time is very important in all of this, the painting in a sense stretching the image out over time and even though the final painting could easily be described as representational or realistic, it is built out of individual pieces that are often very abstract in nature. For me the act of making art has always been a little like inventing a game with its own the rules and then, isolated within that system, in that world, as the sole player of the game following those rules, playing along and all the while pushing at the self imposed boundaries just to see what happens.


artificial light ( 2012 ) Oil on Canvas , 180 x 240 cm


Fuzzy Memory ( 2012 ) Oil on Canvas , 70 x 95 cm


DPM: Could you characterize a glitch art as a special type in contemporary art of today?

EOD: I have been fascinated to watch the community build up over the past few years around the idea of glitch art and I have met a few of the people who are really into all of that in a big way and it is really amazing to hear the various ways that they try to manipulate the technology, and in some cases to almost break the technology, so that they can get a particular effect or introduce a particular uncontrollable error into the system. I think that idea is really interesting and there are many parallels between that and both music and painting, particularly with abstract painting. But I think that there is a danger that as time goes by what you might call glitch art ends up being very empty and that the images or works produced are seductively beautiful but noting else, flat, pretty and empty. I think it is more interesting when artists use those ideas, the possibilities and that way of working and then transform it in some way or else use it with a solid idea running through it. In that way often we don't see or think of it is glitch art any longer, it is simply a device or a by-product within something else, it serves a greater purpose. DPM: Is there anyone who has recently astonished you in art?

EOD: Most recently an exhibition that grabbed me was a show of paintings by the Romanian artist Adrian Ghenie. Quite different work to what I would normally gravitate towards but some of the most interesting painting that I've seen in a long time. It's one of the great things about living in a place like Berlin, the amount of art that you get to see on a regular basis and particularly for painting it is of course important to see the work in the flesh instead of simply in books or on the internet.


EUGOLIPE


EPILOGUE


w w w . dontpostme . c o m

DONTPOSTME #9 (SUMMER ISSUE)  

Featuring Yanina Boldyreva, Alexis Vasilikos, Marina Ruiz, Per Johansson, Jacob van Loon, Paul McCloskey, Enda O'Donoghue and Marcello Velho...

DONTPOSTME #9 (SUMMER ISSUE)  

Featuring Yanina Boldyreva, Alexis Vasilikos, Marina Ruiz, Per Johansson, Jacob van Loon, Paul McCloskey, Enda O'Donoghue and Marcello Velho...

Advertisement