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MEET THE DIRECTORS

Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler

Strength in Numbers

As codirectors Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler kick off the 11th edition of the show in Miami Beach, they ensure the growth of Art Basel with new initiatives and continued focus on stellar programming and unparalleled quality. By Ken Rivadeneira

L

ast year, Art Basel Miami Beach posted an attendance record of approximately 50,000 visitors—or double the number of visitors when the show premiered in 2002. Codirectors Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler ensure this success every year by securing the most prestigious exhibitors and creating a rewarding schedule of events. “The Miami Beach edition was originally established to strengthen ties both between the Americas and Europe, and between North and South America,” Schönholzer says. Over the years, the show became a cultural phenomenon. In addition to Miami’s idyllic winter weather, what makes this edition attractive to the arts community is the diversity of the culture and its position as a crossroads for emerging artists— especially those from Latin America, who are garnering international attention. “Our art shows are all placed in nexus cities—places where the cultural players of their entire region tend to cross paths,” she says. To that end, 2012’s Art Basel Miami Beach again delivers a strong presence of artists and galleries from Latin America, which this year also extends to Art

Public in Collins Park, curated by Christine Y. Kim and featuring works by Jose Dávila, Teresa Margolles, and Iván Navarro, to name but a few. Planning for this and other sectors of the show begins almost a year in advance. “It starts in the days and weeks after the end of show, when we sit down and discuss what went well and what needs to be further improved,” Spiegler says. The other factor in the show’s success is the careful selection of galleries: “Art Basel greatly relies on the

to connect to “art scenes to which they might not otherwise have access,” Spiegler says. In this regard, Art Basel continues to excel with its debut in Hong Kong in May 2013. “With the launch of Hong Kong, Art Basel will provide collectors and exhibitors with unparalleled, in-person access to the global art community,” Schönholzer adds. With three annual shows in three distinct corners of the world to oversee, Spiegler and Schönholzer have also restructured their roles in the coming year to accommodate this expansion. Spiegler will be director of all three shows, overseeing global development of Art Basel, while Schönholzer will take on the position of director of new initiatives. “Marc and I developed the reorganization of Art Basel together, and I am very much looking forward to taking on this new position,” she says. Rounding out this new executive committee are Magnus Renfrew as director of Asia and a new director of resources and finance. “Under the new structure,” Spiegler says, “we look forward to Art Basel having a truly global role—a strong presence year-round in the art world.” ABMB

—MARC SPIEGLER

strength of its exhibitors, their artists, and the quality of works the galleries are bringing to the show each year,” Spiegler says. “Our comprehensive program of talks, events, and film screenings put the art that comes via our galleries into a broader cultural context.” This point is especially significant at a time when art fairs seem to play a greater role in the art world than ever before, giving collectors and artists opportunities

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF ART BASEL

“Art Basel greatly relies on the strength of its exhibitors, their artists, and the quality of works the galleries are bringing.”

30 Art Basel | Miami Beach 2012

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contents 30 MEET THE DIRECTORS A look at the show’s success with codirectors Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler. By Ken Rivadeneira 52 CONTRIBUTORS

LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

62 MIAMI ART MUSEUM A new exhibition showcases homegrown talent as MAM readies to move into its new home. By Brett Sokol 64 WOLFSONIAN–FIU Three exhibitions that explore labor and production through the years debut. By Nicole Lanctot 66 BASS MUSEUM OF ART A connection to the contemporary art boom gives way to an exciting exhibit. By Rebecca Kleinman 68 NORTON MUSEUM OF ART The museum unveils a quartet of exhibitions for Art Basel Miami Beach. By John Vilanova 70 FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN Bringing urban designs into its lush landscape with four new exhibitions is all natural for Fairchild. By Rebecca Kleinman

74 ART KABINETT The sector once again brings well-curated, one-of-a-kind gems. By Margery Gordon 78 ART NOVA Art Basel delivers another year of newly minted talent. By Michael B. Dougherty 80 ART POSITIONS History, nostalgia, even sheer whimsy—this year’s Art Positions participants borrow a little of each to make their mark. By James Servin 82 ART PUBLIC Collins Park transforms into an outdoor museum. By Margery Gordon 86 ART FILM Even 40 years after its release, Painters Painting continues to demystify the masters. By Adam Schlesinger 88 ART VIDEO This year’s Art Video Nights resonates with rhythmic tension and melancholia. By David Gryn

What Is Your Name My Kid, by Andro Wekua, 2004.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK);

60 MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART Text from the 15th century gives way to videos for the modern age. By Brett Sokol

36 Art Basel | Miami Beach 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Stairway to the Stars, by Bob Thompson, 1962.

Everybody is Full of Shit, by Mel Bochner, 2012.

COLLECTING

98 THE NEXT GARDE Lima and Bogotá produce the next crop of art world professionals to watch. By Rachel Wolff

132 NO LONGER A MAN’S WORLD The biggest changes in the growing Middle Eastern art market are being brought about by women. By Robin Pogrebin 138 THE GREAT PARTNERSHIP The intimate relationship between patron and artist continues to fuel the art world. By Dorothy Spears

106 COLLECTION EVOLUTION Top Miami collectors have a round table discussion about the art world’s trends and changes. Moderated by Bonnie Clearwater

146 ON THE CUTTING EDGE Innovators at various institutions seek new ways to present art and engage in it. By Shamim M. Momin

114 LOCAL SPOTLIGHT The de la Cruz Collection and CIFO both have great reasons to celebrate this season. By Margery Gordon

150 EASTWARD BOUND The upcoming launch of Art Basel Hong Kong sets the stage for a more global art market. By Mary Agnew

116 IN THE FAST LANE Bernar Venet reveals artistry of Bugatti vehicles at the Rubell Family Collection. By Laura van Straaten

CONVERSATIONS

118 LOCALS STRUT THEIR STUFF A Wynwood property doubles as an exhibition showcase for young Miami artists. By Brett Sokol

WORLDVIEW 122 INSPIRED SPACES A look at six of architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron’s latest acclaimed structures. By Julia Cooke

154 ED RUSCHA AND LARRY GAGOSIAN On books, hurricanes, and bank robbers. 156 ANNE PASTERNAK AND THEASTER GATES On engaging in the real and the politics of public art. 158 MARIA BAIBAKOVA AND MATTHEW BRANNON On consumption, neuroses, and favorite books.

Panda Erasers, by Rob Pruit, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALLESSANDRO ZAMBIANCHI (PRUITT); COURTESY OF MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY, NEW YORK (THOMPSON);

96 HONORING A VISIONARY Wynwood Walls celebrates the life of neighborhood developer Tony Goldman. By Phoebe Hoban

38 Art Basel | Miami Beach 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Untitled #113, by Cindy Sherman, 1982.

184 POWER COUPLE Husband and wife Patricia Ortiz Monasterio and Jaime Riestra pave the way for Mexican artists. By James Servin

162 MARIANNE GOEBL AND SEBASTIAN CWILICH On the relationship between art and design, and their new joint venture, Art.sy.

186 BUILDER OF MYSTERIES Sculptor Diana Al-Hadid explores inspiration, illusions, and process. By Julie L. Belcove

164 ART FARE An observational photographic portfolio that turns art fairs into living dioramas. Photography by Andy Freeberg

188 THE UNORTHODOX DEALER Gavin Brown breaks paradigms to revive the cultural community. By Jennifer Stockman

172 ARTIST OF THE YEAR Artist Richard Tuttle philosophizes on the beauty of his work. By Carol Kino

190 DESIGNER OF THE YEAR Design Miami honors the people’s architect, Vito Acconci. By Fred Bernstein

INFLUENCERS

GROUND BREAKING

178 ART LOVERS Power couple Melva Bucksbaum and Ray Learsy bond over their collecting activity. By Julie L. Belcove 180 PLAYING WITH FIRE Artist Cai Guo-Qiang draws an explosive line between art and entertainment. By Julie L. Belcove 182 MODERN MAN Moderna Museet Director Daniel Birnbaum is redefining how the museum presents its works. By Michael B. Dougherty

196 PHOTOGRAPHY’S DAY IN THE SUN The camera medium gets its due respect in the world of art. By Marina Cashdan 200 SHAPING MODERN ART Allan Schwartzman helps create two very special Dallas collections. By Jordan Hruska 202 LOOKING TO AMERICA Design Miami casts a spotlight on the growing affinity for all-American design. By Raul Barreneche

Untitled, by Jannis Kounellis, 1961

Acordada (Caballos y Zapatistas), by Jose Clemente Orozco, 1941.

PHOTOGRAPHY © JANNIS KOUNELLIS/COURTESY OF GALERIE LELONG, NEW YORK & PARIS (KOUNELLIS); COURTESY OF MARY-ANNE MARTIN FINE ART, NY (OROZCO)

160 MÁRCIA FORTES AND JOSÉ OLYMPIO PEREIRA On contemporary arts in Brazil and its growing importance in the world.

40 Art Basel | Miami Beach 2012

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Photo: Michel Gibert. Special thanks: Pierre Stéphane Dumas – www.bubbletree.fr - www.moaroom.com for Boskke Sky Planter - www.gerflor.com.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Unboxing, by Fredrik Nilson, 2012.

204 PROTEST AGAINST FORGETTING An indefatigable curator stops to remember the Serpentine Gallery’s annual Memory Marathon. By Hans Ulrich Obrist

222 GRAPHIC DETAILS Louis Vuitton opens a boutique in Miami’s Design District with a little Retna flair. By Fred Bernstein

206 I AM WOMAN, HEAR ME ROAR We salute six superstars at the Women in the Arts luncheon. By Sue Hostetler

224 RAISE YOUR GLASS A toast to the arrival of TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art to Miami Beach. By Laura van Straaten

208 SPONSORS The support of UBS, Absolut, BMW, NetJets, Davidoff, and Ruinart help make Art Basel Miami Beach the best it can be. By Phoebe Hoban, Stacey Goergen, and Rachel Felder

226 LOCAL ARTIST STUDIO VISITS

218 YOUNG GUNS Some of the biggest movers in today’s art world were born after 1980. By Laura van Straaten

240 THE LAST WORD Collector Eugenio Lopez opens up about the next chapter of contemporary art. By Sue Hostetler

PHOTOGRAPH © 2012 FREDRIK NILSEN

PERSONALITIES

228 SHOW MAP 231 ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2012 Your official guide.

ON THE COVER Sea of Desire, 1983, by Ed Ruscha. Oil on canvas. Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery

42 Art Basel | Miami Beach 2012

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SOUTH BEACH - 616 COLLINS AVE AVENTURA MALL

tommy.com

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF SUE HOSTETLER Senior Managing Editor Ken Rivadeneira

Unsaid/Spoken Unsaid/Spoken Selections Selections Selectionsfrom from fromthe the theElla Ella EllaFontanals-Cisneros Fontanals-Cisneros Fontanals-Cisnerosand and andCIFO CIFO CIFOCollections. Collections. Collections.

Art Director Adriana Garcia Special Projects Art Director Anastasia Tsioutas Casaliggi Photo Director Lisa Rosenthal Bader

Curated by Moacir dos Anjos and José Roca Curated Curated byby Moacir Moacir dos dos Anjos Anjos and and José José Roca Roca Manager, Copy and Research Wendie Pecharsky Research Editors Josephine Cusumano, Christina Pellegrini, Leanne Philip, Ava Williams Copy Editors Nicole Lanctot, Julia Steiner Contributors Mary Agnew, Raul Barreneche, Julie L. Belcove, Fred Bernstein, Marina Cashdan, Bonnie Clearwater, Julia Cooke, Michael B. Dougherty, Rachel Felder, Andy Freeberg, Stacey Goergen, Margery Gordon, Phoebe Hoban, Jordan Hruska, Carol Kino, Rebecca Kleinman, Nicole Lanctot, Shamim M. Momin, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Robin Pogrebin, Adam Schlesinger, James Servin, Brett Sokol, Dorothy Spears, Jennifer Stockman, Laura van Straaten, John Vilanova, Rachel Wolff Franz Erhard Walther, Gegenüber (Area - -distance - -cord - -cord asas"language medium") Single Element nº28 ofof1.of 1967. Franz Franz Erhard Erhard Walther, Walther, Gegenüber Gegenüber (Area (Area distance - distance cord - cord cord - cord as "language "language medium") medium") Single Single Element Element nº28 nº28 1.Werksatz, Werksatz, 1. Werksatz, 1967. 1967. Photo ©Tim Rautert. All reserved. Courtesy Stiftung Franz Erhard Walther and Tim Rautert. Photo Photo ©Tim ©Tim Rautert. Rautert. Allrights All rights rights reserved. reserved. Courtesy Courtesy Stiftung Stiftung Franz Franz Erhard Erhard Walther Walther andand Tim Tim Rautert. Rautert.

Art Basel Miami Beach magazine is a registered trademark of Niche Media Holdings, LLC, and the entire contents of Art Basel Miami Beach are copyright Niche Media Holdings, LLC. All column names are the property of Niche Media Holdings, LLC and may not be used or reproduced without the express written permission of the publisher. Liability in the event of an error is limited to a printed correction. Niche Media Holdings, LLC does not assume liability for products or services advertised herein.

December December December5, 5,5,2012 2012 2012-- March -March March3, 3,3,2013 2013 2013 Special hours during Art Basel Miami Beach: Special Special hours hours during during Art Art Basel Basel Miami Miami Beach: Beach: Wednesday, Dec. 55–5–Sunday, Dec. 9,9,9, 2012: 9am --4pm Wednesday, Wednesday, Dec. Dec. –Sunday, Sunday, Dec. Dec. 2012: 2012: 9am 9am 4pm - 4pm

Untitled Fruit Border Photo, by Peter Coffin, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF HERALD ST., LONDON

Thursday --Friday: Noon --6pm; Saturday-Sunday: 10am --4pm Thursday Thursday Friday: - Friday: Noon Noon 6pm; - 6pm; Saturday-Sunday: Saturday-Sunday: 10am 10am 4pm - 4pm

1018 N. Miami Avenue | |Miami, Florida 33136 1018 1018 N.N. Miami Miami Avenue Avenue Miami, | Miami, Florida Florida 33136 33136 T:T:305.455.3380 | |E:E: info@cifo.org | |www.cifo.org T:305.455.3380 305.455.3380 | E: info@cifo.org info@cifo.org www.cifo.org | www.cifo.org

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MIAMI OPTICS

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PUBLISHER COURTLAND LANTAFF Associate Publishers Susan Abrams, Michele Addison Sales and Business Coordinator Brianna Corrado Account Executives and Directors Asha Andersen, Tiffany Carey, Claire Carlin, Michelle Chala, John Colabelli, Asha Elias, Kathleen Fleming, Dina Friedman, Alex Halperin, Deborah Halpert, Victoria Henry, Nicole Jones, Leslie Judge, Karen Levine, Shannon Pastuszak, Dan RulonMaxwell, Sarah Schaffer, Lauren Shapiro, Jim Smith, Marissa Stubin, Amy Vida, Jessica Zivkovitch Marketing Lana Bernstein, Robin Kearse, Jackie Mailhe, Emily McLintock, Cristina Parra Production, Planning, and Positioning Maria Blondeaux, Jeanne Gleeson, Sally Lyon, Asha Perez, Barbara Shale

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New York 100 Church St., Seventh Floor, New York, NY 10007 Phone: 646-835-5200 Fax: 212-780-0003

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FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

FEB 14–MAY 4, 2013

OPENING RECEPTION FEB 13 MDC MUSEUM ART + DESIGN

FREEDOM TOWER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE 600 BISCAYNE BLVD, MIAMI FL 33132 WWW.MDCMOAD.ORG GENEROUSLY UNDERWRITTEN BY THE MUSIKANTOW FOUNDATION Anomie 2001; Coney 80" X 96", acrylic on canvas, 1997 Collection of Whitney Museum of American Art, NYC, NY

Over the past 11 years, the show has evolved into the most important and influential art fair, symposium, and summit in the United States, and our new issue of the magazine celebrates that. Now on three continents, the Art Basel shows continue to redefine the international contemporary art world. Congratulations yet again to codirectors Marc Spiegler and Annette Schönholzer and their dedicated team for producing a show that promises to feature the most ambitious and highest-quality programming, artwork, and dealers ever. I hope you are prepared to be challenged, confronted, and captivated. As always, the City of Miami—whose landscape is being recontextualized before our very eyes with the addition of new cultural institutions, including the much-anticipated Miami Art Museum—provides the idyllic backdrop for the show. In this issue, we feature some of 2012’s most fascinating art personalities, as well as the next generation of cultural pioneers participating in the show this week. Don’t miss our legendary cover artist Edward Ruscha in conversation with his longtime dealer, the enigmatic Larry Gagosian, chatting about books and bank robbers. We also take a look at architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron’s revolutionary institutional designs around the world. And in a story near and dear to my heart, we explore why photography is finally getting its due respect. In our annual “Influencers” section, writer Julie Belcove profiles the inspirational duo Melva Bucksbaum and Ray Learsy, and young gun Diana Al-Hadid. And finally, Carol Kino sits down with Richard Tuttle, Art Basel Miami Beach’s Conversation Series featured artist this year. Each year the magazine produces a thematic thread—perhaps part of the collective unconscious—that seems to run through many of our profiled personalities. This year, the idea of pushing art outside its traditional confines is clearly top-of-mind. Theaster Gates describes his practice as “an art that can’t separate what happens in the studio from work that happens on the block”; Richard Tuttle says, “Art isn’t just for museum walls or galleries or art fairs… it’s a living thing”; and Shamim Momin’s entire piece speaks to the acceleration of art production and dissemination in alternative locations—as diverse as abandoned, remote, and community spaces. But no matter what distribution or communication methods we come up with next, it’s great artistry that will always matter most. I always most look forward to the VIP preview of the show on Wednesday, but this year I also can’t wait to have a martini at the Absolut Art Bar designed by Los Carpinteros, see the tricked-out Bugatti car by conceptual artist Bernar Venet at the Rubell Family Collection, and help CIFO celebrate its 10th anniversary. So get out there and enjoy all of the unparalleled art that this week has to offer. And remember what the late, great Tony Goldman liked to say: “Time evaporates, emotion elevates.”

SUE HOSTETLER

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Sue Hostetler

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARCO RICCA

ARNOLD MESCHES: A LIFE’S WORK

Art Basel Miami Beach is back for another year, somehow bigger and better than ever.

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Le Corbusier: The Interior of the Cabanon Le Corbusier 1952 – Cassina Reconstruction 2006 December 6, 2012 – January 12, 2013 The reconstructed Cabanon on display for the first time in the U.S.

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

With Suzy Buckley Woodward, editor-in-chief of Ocean Drive.

Our Ocean Drive team, along with Florida Representative Robert Goodman, is honored to once again publish the official guide for the most prestigious art show in the Americas. This issue is one of the strongest to date, proving not only the health and vibrancy of ABMB, but also the growing appetite for cultural events in South Florida. If you thought last year’s 10-year edition was extravagant, brace yourself—Art Basel Miami Beach is reaching new heights once again: From December 6 through 9, there are more amazing events on the official ABMB calendar than ever before, and more than 260 of the world’s leading galleries will be showcasing their works. Our insider’s guide will ensure you don’t miss out on any of it. Miami continues to uniquely influence the art world. With so much going on, we invite you— whether you’re a local or a visitor—to experience our city during a time unlike any other. After reading through this issue, we’re sure you’ll find more than one perfect event to look forward to. Think of it as an early holiday gift from everyone here at Niche Media! I look forward to seeing you at the art world’s favorite winter meeting place…

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BILL KEARNEY

Can you believe Art Basel Miami Beach is celebrating its 11th year?

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Duane Hanson, Self-Portrait with Model, 1979, life size, polyvinyl with mixed media

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CONTRIBUTORS

JULIE L. BELCOVE A New York-based writer, Belcove covers art and culture. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Financial Times, Elle, Architectural Digest, Town & Country and W, among other publications.

CAROL KINO Carol Kino contributes regularly to The New York Times and is a longtime contributing editor at Art + Auction. Her work has also appeared in T: The New York Style Magazine, Town & Country, Slate, The Atlantic, and The National (Abu Dhabi), among many others. She was a two-time USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, in 2007 and 2011. STACEY GOERGEN Independent curator and writer Stacey Goergen is the director of SmartSpaces, a nonprofit organization that installs contemporary art in vacant urban spaces, and was previously a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She has a master’s degree from the Christie’s Education program, and contributes to magazines such as Gotham and Hamptons, as well as the Whitney Biennial 2008 Catalogue.

MARINA CASHDAN A freelance arts writer and editor based in New York, Cashdan oversees editorial and production of short films at art discovery engine Art.sy. You can find her writing in T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Wallpaper*, Surface, Frieze, and The White Review, among other publications.

FRED BERNSTEIN A graduate of Princeton University, Bernstein writes about art, architecture, and design for a number of national publications, and has published op-ed pieces in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the Los Angeles Times. He has attended every Art Basel Miami Beach.

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CONTRIBUTORS RACHEL WOLFF A Brooklyn-based art and design journalist, Wolff has written for New York magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Departures, Details, Elle, CondĂŠ Nast Traveler, Town & Country, Art + Auction, Modern Painters, and ARTnews, as well as other volumes and publications. She is also the cofounder of SandenWolff, a boutique production company specializing in short films about art and design.

RACHEL FELDER New York City-based Felder focuses on fashion, beauty, art, and lifestyle trends. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Financial Times, Travel + Leisure, WWD, and many other publications. She is the author of Manic Pop Thrill, a book exploring the connection between fashion and music, and coauthor of Fighter: The Fighters of the UFC with designer Reed Krakoff. She is currently working on a novel about her misspent (but admittedly stylish) youth working in the music industry.

ROBIN POGREBIN A reporter at The New York Times since 1995, Pogrebin has covered cultural news for more than a decade. She has also worked as a producer at ABC News and as a reporter at The New York Observer, and writes freelance articles for magazines.

MARGERY GORDON

SHAMIM M. MOMIN

DOROTHY SPEARS New York-based arts journalist Spears is a frequent contributor to The New York Times. An anthology she edited, Flight Patterns: A Century of Stories about Flying, was published by Open City Books/ Grove Press in 2009.

Shamim M. Momin is the director, curator, and cofounder of LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division), a public art nonprofit organization whose aim is to curate site- and situation-specific contemporary art projects in and around the Los Angeles area. LAND was founded in 2009, and has since presented more than 40 discreet exhibitions and programs with contemporary artists.

PHOTOGRAPH BY FRED R. CONRAD/THE NEW YORK TIMES (POGREBIN). ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE SMITH (FELDER)

A South Florida freelance journalist, Gordon specializes in criticism and coverage of news, events, and people in the art world. She has written for ARTnews, Art + Auction, Artinfo.com, The Miami Herald, Ocean Drive, and exhibition catalogues. She teaches composition and journalism at Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida.

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

The Raft, by Bill Viola, 2004.

Avant-Garde Energy

A new exhibition at MOCA features videos by Bill Viola inspired by a 15th-century text—yet resonating with a young set of artists. By Brett Sokol

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all it an irony-free zone. When you step through the front doors of the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (MOCA) for its new exhibition of Bill Viola videos, don’t be afraid to wear your heart fully on your sleeve. “I’ve been noticing a lot of younger artists with a truer connection to emotion in their work, rather than the irony and cynicism to which we’ve become accustomed,” explains MOCA Executive Director and Chief Curator Bonnie Clearwater. The Long Beach, California–based Viola has always eschewed conceptual detachment, Clearwater continues, fashioning a body of videos stretching back to the early 1970s that explores a central theme: “What brings us together in humanity? How do we truly empathize with each other?” As much of the art world returns to those same questions, Clearwater sees a major Viola museum show as overdue. Entitled “Liber Insularum” and inspired by the 15thcentury Florentine text The Book of the Islands of the Archipelago, this Viola show further mines a spiritual vein, collecting many videos from the past decade that rarely have been seen on these shores. The overall effect, as museumgoers move between darkened screening spaces, should be one of blissed-out dreaminess: Much

of Viola’s imagery focuses on slow-motion figures, sometimes dramatically crashing through monumental waves of water, other times repeating small rituals to hypnotic effect. “He is a practicing Zen Buddhist, and that is reflected in his work,” Clearwater says of Viola. “One of the reasons why his films are slowed down to such a languid pace is to point out that there isn’t any one singular

To Clearwater, however, such opinions reflect the attitudes that make Viola so necessary. “Think of how popular yoga is now,” she counters. “The idea of needing to focus on what’s truly inside ourselves, to pull into oneself, that’s the reason [Viola’s] work resonates.” Viola isn’t the only one reevaluating. Plans to more than double the size of the North Miami–owned MOCA were reconsidered after the local bond issue was narrowly defeated this past summer. The architects have finished the construction plans, however, and the expansion is moving forward. “The city continues to be very optimistic [the project] will be seen through,” Clearwater says. Regardless, MOCA’s emphasis on cutting-edge contemporary art continues. In fact, Clearwater notes that the museum’s surrounding neighborhood is percolating with a fresh burst of avant-garde energy, from the Bridge Red Studios complex and alternative exhibition venue to the opening of longtime Miami gallerist Genaro Ambrosino D’Amico’s new space, General Audience Presents. “We’re seeing the breakup of Miami’s art districts because of the changing influx of luxury boutiques,” she says. And what about the migration of vital artists from their old gentrifying nabes to MOCA’s own backyard? “It makes all the sense in the world,” Clearwater offers. “Ours is the audience most interested in what they’re doing.” ABMB

—BONNIE CLEARWATER

moment of existence—we’re all constantly connected.” Of course, such insights haven’t always sat well with critics. As Viola has racked up the art world accolades over the years—from a MacArthur “genius” Fellowship to a career retrospective at the Whitney museum—a strain of dissent has emerged. The New York Times’s Roberta Smith mused on Viola’s air of New Age triteness, while British writer Matthew Collings said that “closing down his sanctimonious bilge would help civilization.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIRA PEROV

“The idea of focusing on what’s truly inside ourselves–that’s the reason Viola’s work resonates [today].”

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

A still from Untitled (Copied II) by Moira Holohan, 2012.

Made in Miami

S

ay good-bye to the Miami Art Museum; say hello to the Pérez Art Museum Miami. This time next year, MAM will be housed in its new Herzog & de Meuron–designed, 200,000-square-foot, bayfront home—rechristened in the wake of a $35 million donation of art and cash from Miami developer Jorge Pérez. But first, there is one last hurrah of an exhibition at the museum’s present downtown locale. “This show is a signal of what’s to come in the new space,” explains MAM associate curator Diana Nawi of “New Work Miami 2013”—assembled by Nawi alongside fellow MAM associate curator René Morales. “We wanted to give a platform to Miami-based art practitioners. As we grow, we hope the art community will grow with us.” For now that means a show as straightforward as its name, spotlighting a slice of fresh work from the local art scene, courtesy of a dozen of the area’s sharpest talents—including painter Bhakti Baxter, sculptor Loriel Beltran, photographer Moira Holohan, sculptor Sinisa Kukec, sculptor George Sánchez-Calderón, and photographer Odalis Valdivieso. It’s a much more concentrated presentation than MAM’s sprawling

Loriel Beltron’s untitled painting on a found poster, 2012.

“New Work Miami 2010,” which featured 35 locals, many fashioning woolly, architecture-steeped responses to the fallout of the real estate crash. But Nawi, a recent hire from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Abu Dhabi Project, says she and Morales had no specific agenda in mind. “We did not go into artists’ studios with a hypothesis,” Nawi insists. “We were interested in what was out there, and we conceived of the show in

perhaps being flipped or being stripped,” Nawi says. “There’s a certain sensuality in the surfaces off which he builds.” But granite can be fairly pricey; it’s rarely left on street corners for the taking. Do these countertops’ prior owners all know their kitchens have become part of a museum show? Or are a few real estate brokers in for a shock the next time they visit their properties? “Loriel has his sources,” Nawi quips wryly. Similarly, several large outdoor advertisements serve as the starting canvases for Beltran’s paintwork. One has to wonder if a few local ad agencies might be surprised to see their products missing from their original bus stop slots. “Let’s let that lie,” Nawi chuckles, preferring to focus on what she calls Beltran’s critique of “middle-class aspirationalism.” Of course, you could also see Beltran’s work as a welcome twist on the art world’s increasingly tired rehash of appropriation, one that offers a devious nod to Miami’s foreclosure crisis. Either way, it’s a testament to an art scene always ready to creatively improvise—and a museum enthused about showcasing that spirit. Miami Art Museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, 305-375-3000; miamiartmuseum.org ABMB

“We were interested in what was out there, and we conceived of the show in response to what we saw.” —DIANA NAWI

response to what we saw.” Accordingly, don’t expect a Biennial-like overview of everything under the South Florida sun. Instead, “there are certain common threads that emerged,” she notes, namely a focus on old-fashioned craftsmanship, coupled with a desire to bring those traditional skills to bear on the raw materials literally found in the streets of Miami. “Loriel Beltran uses found granite countertops that come from houses that are being remodeled, or

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND FRED SNITZER GALLERY (BELTRON); COURTESY OF THE ARTIST (HOLOHAN)

Before the move to its new home designed by Herzog & de Meuron, an exhibition showcasing homegrown talent offers a tantalizing glimpse of what’s ahead at the Miami Art Museum. By Brett Sokol

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

Working-Class Heroes

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world-class research archive and museum, the Wolfsonian–FIU holds more than 150,000 art and design objects from 1885 to 1945—photographs, paintings, textiles, ceramics, furniture, rare books—“yet any one of these items can be used as a lens on our culture today,” says director Cathy Leff. This season, the museum’s engagement with contemporary artists and collectors shows just that. For “Describing Labor” (her first exhibition at the Wolfsonian–FIU), Lithuanian-born, Paris-based artist Esther Shalev-Gerz plumbed the museum’s collection and discovered a number of works depicting heroic laborers—imagery that has all but disappeared in today’s visual culture. She asked 24 people who work with art in some capacity—among them artists, collectors, a journalist, a conservator, a musician, and other museum professionals—to choose one of the 41 items she collected; Shalev-Gerz then recorded each person discussing the history or personal impression of his or her object. (Visitors will delight in both the lesser-known and the iconic pieces in the show, including Margaret Bourke-White’s Life magazine photograph of a gogglewearing female steel worker, as well as Lewis W. Hine’s striking 1921 image In the Heart of the Turbine.) The Viennese Café: The Man of Letters postcard by Moriz Jung, 1911.

resulting two-channel audiovisual installation and 24 photographs document this engagement and Shalev-Gerz’s ongoing interest in cultural memory, dialogue, and negotiation. “The critical mass of art and imaging associated with Art Basel Miami Beach... brings [us] to the fundamental subject of ‘Describing Labor,’” says the show’s curator, Matthew Abess. “Namely, [our] effort to articulate persons, places, or moments— frequently in relation to images and objects—that always eludes articulation.” But the show is not so much about the limits of speech, he says. “[It’s how] a community might form around and through the act of seeing, saying, and listening.” The imagery of the worker vanished La gloire de fer (The as the West transitioned into a more Glory of Iron) by Arthur Waagen, consumer-oriented culture, leaving procirca 1889. duction behind, Abess says. Yet the worker remains a building block in our society, Shalev-Gerz asserts in this show. By reintroduc- representing these artists’ bodies of work,” Leff says. ing this labor imagery, the artist “is using these objects “A major goal of the Wolfsonian is to recognize the as a way to illuminate our time now,” Leff says. “On a roles that both the artist and the collector play in the national level, people are again thinking about produc- contemporary art world.” And just in time for Art Basel Miami Beach, local tion, employment—unemployment—and [reevaluating] artist Bhakti Baxter will create a text-based intervention on the historic Bridge Tender House, on the sidewalk just outside the Wolfsonian–FIU. Abess cites Baxter’s research into the site and his discovery that for the bridge’s 1939 inau—CATHY LEFF guration, the regional director had dedicated the bridge “to the construction of good what work is today, and the value of labor.” Another exhibition—“Postcards of the Wiener for mankind”—whose sentiment served as a launching Werkstätte: Selections from the Leonard A. Lauder point for this show. What resonated with Baxter, says Collection”—is the first major museum exhibition Abess, “is this conversion of labor and the products featuring Lauder’s 300 postcards by 57 artists of the of labor—i.e., a bridge—into philosophical and moral eponymous Viennese cooperative. Dating from 1907 precepts…. [This goes] along with the themes taken to 1919, included are works by Oskar Kokoschka, up by Shalev-Gerz’s project and by the Wolfsonian’s Josef Hoffman, and Egon Schiele, and selections from collection as a whole,” he says. Interestingly, the three exhibitions—all meditations the Wolfsonian’s archives. These popular postcards depicting arts and craft practices allowed the artists and on labor and production—were not originally artisans of the Werkstätte to gain wide exposure, and planned to have complementary content, Abess their affordability helped blur the distinction between says. “It was fortuitous how they all came together so high and low art. “We loved the idea of postcards perfectly.” ABMB

“A major goal of the Wolfsonian is to recognize the roles that both the artist and the collector play in the contemporary art world.”

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE WOLFSONIAN—FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY, THE MITCHELL WOLFSON, JR. COLLECTION

The Wolfsonian–FIU unveils three exhibitions this season that explore labor and production through the years. By Nicole Lanctot

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS Two Planets: Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass and the Thai Villagers, by Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook, 2011.

Reinventing Its Roots The Bass Museum of Art connects its heritage to the contemporary art boom with a groundbreaking exhibit. By Rebecca Kleinman

T

he Bass Museum of Art welcomes a good challenge. In the context of offering its Renaissance and Baroque collections to a new generation, the Miami Beach institution explores how art from all movements is related within the continuum of history with this year’s exhibition during Art Basel in Miami Beach: “The Endless Renaissance—Six Solo Artist Projects.” Though the works share a common thematic denominator, they’re divided into six solo shows versus a single, curated group show as in years past. “I’m proudest of the artists’ diversity in age, gender, and geography,” says executive director and chief curator Silvia Karman Cubiñá, who scored a coup by bringing artists who have never shown in Miami, such as Thai photographer and videographer Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook. It’s always exciting for a museum to tap into a rising artist who’s still new even to avid artgoers.” It’s definitely Rasdjarmrearnsook’s breakthrough year in America. Following her first US solo gallery and museum shows in New York and Baltimore, respectively, she will present works from “Two Planets,” a series in which Thai villagers discuss European painting. Besides linking to the Bass’s mission, it explores and consequently questions conventional Western habits of viewing art.

Dual-Dual portrait sculpture ensemble, by Barry X Ball and Matthew Barney, 2000-2009.

Each of the artists directly or abstractly references the history of art in his or her work. New York–based Barry X Ball represents the former through pieces clearly based on iconic masterpieces and artists. “I guess my claim to fame is that I’m the contemporary artist most engaged with pre-20th-century art,” says Ball, who scans 3-D images of European sculptures and then re-creates them in Mexican onyx, Belgian marble, and translucent calcite. Each piece is finished with approximately 5,000 hours of careful handwork, from carving to polishing. “It was remarkable that the Bass’s mission matched my own. Not

Hermaphrodite, inspired by the Louvre’s original. “The theme is duality, whether [in] the split portraits or the opposing personalities of Envy/Purity,” a two-piece sculpture depicting the famed allegorical Baroque figure in Veiled Woman, who was chaste, and in Envy, a screaming crone with a head of snakes. Cornwall, England–based Ged Quinn is also making his Florida debut with eight oil paintings that revisit classical landscapes by the likes of Claude Lorrain and Jacob van Ruisdael, dating from the 17th to the 19th centuries. He reinvents these masterworks through scale and by making references to contemporary politics, social issues, as well as cultural associations and symbols. “I’m drawn to [the potential of] these old works because most people consider them finished conversations, just old objects hanging in museums,” Quinn says. Also featured are Eija-Liisa Ahtila, a video artist and photographer in Helsinki, Finland; Walead Beshty, a Los Angeles artist whose fragile copper panels and glass sculptures for the show discuss art’s provenance; and Düsseldorf, Germany–based Hans-Peter Feldmann, who collects and reorganizes amateur photos, toys, and other trivial items. The exhibit opens with a VIP reception on December 5, 2012, and runs through March 17, 2013, at 2100 Collins Ave., 305-673-7530; bassmuseum.org ABMB

—SILVIA KARMAN CUBIÑÁ

many Florida museums have a mummy.” Considering that he creates fewer than six works annually and has never even had one available for his gallerists to bring to the fair, the Bass exhibition of 10 sculptures (including four works that have never been presented to the public and one brand-new piece) is a monumental presentation of his output in a single venue. They weigh from 20 pounds for portrait heads, such as the two-sided depictions of Ball’s and artist Matthew Barney’s faces, to 2 tons, like Sleeping

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SPERONE WESTWATER, NY

“I’m proudest of the artists’ diversity in age, gender, and geography.”

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS An English silk scarf featuring British and American forces, ca. 1940s.

Masters and Mavericks

The Norton Museum of Art readies a quartet of exhibitions for Art Basel Miami Beach. By John Vilanova

“W

e have a different kind of energy here and a collection of historical art that is different from what you’d see down there [in Miami],” explains Cheryl Brutvan, curator of contemporary art at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. The museum’s collection of modern American and European art was originally the province of steel magnate Ralph Hubbard Norton, who bequeathed his collection to West Palm Beach in the 1940s. “It’s an incredible gift to this area of South Florida, and it’s probably the only museum where you can see a Gauguin within hundreds of miles,” brags Brutvan. In the run-up to Art Basel Miami Beach, the museum will roll out a series of exhibitions that showcase its emphases on 20th-century modern art and ahead-of-the-curve new artists. First is a competition—five emerging photographers are in the running for the Rudin Prize, a $20,000 award furnished by distinguished patron Beth Rudin DeWoody. Each member of the nominating panel, which included Michal Rovner and Yinka Shonibare MBE, selected one rising talent to have his or her work exhibited and be considered for the award. The winner will be announced on December 4—a

few days before Art Basel Miami Beach launches—but the opportunity for fans to cast votes for their favorites has added an interesting twist. “It’s not a scientific ballot, but it’s great to see how things are trending with people’s responses to the artwork, because it’s all very different,” Brutvan observes. A literal beaded glass menagerie of underwater creatures shimmers along the lobby’s nearly 80-foot wall as part of Rob Wynne’s installation I Remember Ceramic Castles, Mermaids & Japanese Bridges. “It really enlivens

paintings, and drawings. “Remarkably, these canvases of landscape and trees remain an unexplored body of her work,” says Brutvan, who is curating the exhibition. “They reveal her evolving concern with illusion, the plane of the canvas, and the passage of time.” Plimack Mangold will appear at the museum for a conversation about her career that evening. Continuing the Norton’s emphasis on the artistry and impact of popular culture is guest curator Donald Albrecht’s exhibition “Keep Calm and Carry On: World War II and the British Home Front, 1938–1946.” For Brutvan, the emphasis here is “how creativity and ingenuity were still very much a part of enduring the difficulties of life during wartime.” The exhibition will feature films, graphic art, fashion, and clothing, as well as a full-size air-raid shelter. Only a brief drive away from the major festivities in Miami, the Norton Museum has made itself worth the trip. “It’s still such an amazing opportunity for anyone in the art world—people come from all over the globe to attend,” Brutvan says of the weekend. “You’re obviously going to find something that you’ve never seen before, or something that you’ll fall in love with.” Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach, 561-832-5196; norton.org ABMB

the space and [examines] the tropical climate that we live in down here,” Brutvan says. “There’s this kind of memory of that first experience of coming to Florida… this wonderful, poignant memory of trying to hold onto something that is so ethereal and abstract.” As ABMB commences, the museum will unveil the second Recognition of Art by Women (RAW) showcase, which opens December 9 and features the work of Sylvia Plimack Mangold. Titled “Landscapes and Trees,” it will present sixty of the artist’s prints,

PHOTOGRAPHY © MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON

The Norton showcases modern art and ahead-of-the-curve contemporary artists.

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LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

Walking Bench by Pedro Barrail, 2012.

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Second Nature

and hanging plants. “It’s meant [for you] to sit back and relax, and watch the butterflies flutter by,” she says. Other works range from a dayFor Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, bringing urban designs into its lush landscape bed as bird perch by John-Paul with four new exhibits is the natural progression for art. By Rebecca Kleinman Philippé, an Oklahoman painter and designer in New York, to a tranquil resting spot below an elegant airchild Tropical Botanic Garden is seating in a garden context. She says it was a first for chandelier from Chilean designer and sculptor Sebastian Errazuriz. The remaining artists are Gael going for broke this year during Art Basel many of the participants to create outdoor works. “The challenge and research of making something Appler, Christophe Côme, and Pedro Barrail. Miami Beach. Whereas its past exhibits After being displayed at the Seagram Building have focused on solo artists such as Roy that could withstand the elements, from the weather and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New Lichtenstein and Yayoi Kusama, this year ambitiously to the birds, was part of the fun,” says Grajales. Artist Michele Oka Doner looked no further than York, the late John Chamberlain’s sculptures reapexpands with a new design category and four distinct shows with several artists. Despite having a lot going South Florida’s invasive Australian pine and tropi- pear at Fairchild. Fabricated from industrial alumion, this year’s themes and mediums blend beauti- cal almond trees as inspiration for Invasives, which num resembling crumpled foil, their green, copper, and silver hues, as well as fantastical but fully with the world-class garden’s 83 acres organic shapes, relate well to the surroundof signature cycads, palms, flowering trees, ing Seussian tropical trees and flowers. and vines, which manage to reinvent pieces “We couldn’t ask for better fits,” says that have been previously displayed in Lougheed, who also asked Cuban arturban settings, thus making them entirely ist Jorge Pardo to reinstall a work origiworth a second look. The time of day also nally shown at the Hammer Museum in presents distinct experiences, whether in —CRISTINA GRAJALES Los Angeles. “The effect is mesmerizing. dappled sunlight breaking through the cantransforms the destructive species into useful objects Imagine hundreds of red, orange, and white lanopy or in a warm glow fading into darkness. “We’ve been trying to get design in the garden for in the form of mass-produced public benches com- terns that look like they’d be on an Ottoman ship years,” says Lin Lougheed, a trustee who, along with mon throughout urban landscapes. “Her concept in the Battle of Lepanto.” Most viewers will liken Fairchild’s art committee, worked on the arts pro- coincides with Fairchild’s conservation mission for them to pumpkins or blooming buds dangling from branches when they walk through the allée of treesgram to widen the garden’s audience. “When I saw an even deeper meaning,” says Grajales. Sam Baron, the director of the design department of cum-exhibition space. “Jorge really matches our arta piece of seating at Cristina Grajales Gallery during Fabrica in Treviso, Italy—whose playful work Grajales meets-design mission, since his work bridges both New York’s Armory Show, a lightbulb went off.” Grajales, who always has one of the most visited fell for upon seeing his sausage links crafted from worlds,” says Lougheed. The exhibitions are on view during ABMB through booths at Design Miami, curated “Design at Fairchild: handblown glass, invites guests to lounge as if they Sitting Naturally,” which commissioned seven interna- were on holiday in St-Tropez. Designed for a couple, next spring, at 10901 Old Cutler Road, 305-667tionally recognized artists to put a twist on traditional Romantic Benches incorporates a parasol, drink tray, 1651; fairchildgarden.org ABMB

“The challenge and research of making something that could withstand the elements was part of the fun.”

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF CRISTINA GRAJALES GALLERY AND FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDENS

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ART KABINETT

Untitled, by Hélio Oiticica, 1971.

Kabinett of Curiosities This year’s offering is again well-curated, one-of-a-kind gems spread throughout the show. By Margery Gordon

Orange Vulcan, by Jack Whitten, 1968.

PHOTOGRAPH PHOTOGRAPHY BY TKBY (TK); MARIO GRISOLLI (OITICA); COURTESY OF ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, NEW YORK (WHITTEN)

T

he range of media and messages within a single booth at Art Basel Miami Beach conveys the conceptual scope and aesthetic sensibility of each gallery’s program, yet can leave one craving immersion in the vision of an individual artist or movement. Nestled within a select smattering of spaces are the self-contained exhibitions classified as Art Kabinetts. The 20 concise shows singled out by the committee this year spotlight new projects by rising stars and established talents, cast the careers of modern masters in a new light, and gather artists with kindred sensibilities or origins. The kabinett of New York’s Francis M. Naumann Fine Art is a family affair, reuniting the siblings Marcel Duchamp, Suzanne Duchamp, Raymond DuchampVillon, and Jacques Villon. The gallery has winnowed the works from its fall exhibition, which took cues from a 1952 show Marcel Duchamp organized of the diverse quartet at the Rose Fried Gallery in New York. Berlin’s Esther Schipper revisits more recent history with an installation of an early ’70s mail art project by General Idea, formed in 1969 by AA Bronson, Felix Partz, and Jorge Zontal. For Manipulating the Self, the collective asked people to photograph themselves wrapping their arms over their head and reaching down to clutch their chins with their hands. The open call elicited about 100 responses, never before shown in their entirety. By assuming the prescribed position, “you are

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ART KABINETT

Blue Towel, Red Tank, by Hugh Steers, 1988.

object and subject, viewed and [the] voyeur,” the collaborative announcement proclaimed. “The hand is a mirror for the mind.” Indeed, traces of an artist’s raw hand movements offer unique insight into the creative process, making drawing perhaps the most direct extension of a master’s mind. Five decades of draftsmanship by Jannis Kounellis are gathered for the first time by Galerie Lelong. It is an atypical focus on such a traditional medium for the Greek pioneer of Arte Povera, who is best known for his inventive integration of mundane detritus. “Some are clearly studies for works to be done; others are independent artworks that exist for themselves,” says Patrice Cotensin, one of the gallery’s directors, observing that together they reveal “the permanent combination of meditation and spontaneity in his work.” The geometric abstraction and Neoconcrete tension of Hélio Oiticica is recontextualized by the gallery A Gentil Carioca using the work of Jarbas Lopes. Both artists are from the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, a region whose resourcefulness is reflected in the artists’ transformation of prosaic materials into poetic compositions. In the series “Rabiolas” (Kite-tails), Lopes tangles paper

trails around taut strings in shifting reliefs of “paper on lines, rather than lines on paper,” he says, a playful pun when paired with Oiticica’s two-dimensional works from the ’50s through the ’70s. For this work, Lopes deconstructs the visual and cultural movement of kiteflying on windy days when the toys swarm the skies, stalking and intercepting each other. Robin Rhodes at Lehmann Maupin also finds wry inspiration in the quotidian emblems of his homeland,

videos. In the digital animation Open Court (also screening in Art Video), shot earlier this year in Berlin where Rhodes is now based, the artist lobs snowballs with a racket at a Richard Serra Torqued Ellipse. An earlier character’s one-sided match against an imposing icon becomes symbolic fodder for Fiona Banner’s exhibition “Snoopy Vs The Red Baron,” in which she invents and represents ephemera surrounding the epic rivalry that emanated from Charles M. Schulz’s Peanuts comic strip in 1966 to become a popular-culture phenomenon. The beagle’s fantasy from the endearing cartoon of taking on the infamous World War I German flying ace Manfred Von Richthofen (aka the Red Baron) was embraced by a conflicted wartime public and even the military, which adopted Snoopy as its mascot. In a series of unique screen prints, sculptures, and performative elements at Berlin’s Barbara Thumm, the British artist uses this imaginary battle as a motif for “examining how we mythologize ourselves and our histories and are then consequently seduced by these myths of our own creation.” By positioning the human figure at the locus of social movements, three generations of painters personalized the political struggles that defined three consecutive decades. Jack Whitten, Joan Semmel, and Hugh Steers confronted issues—civil rights, feminism, and gay rights in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s, respectively—that remain unresolved and ripe for resurrection by artists and curators today. “You could say that all three of these artists have been marginalia, and part of what we’re doing is bringing them into the mainstream,” says New York gallerist Alexander Gray of this rare thematic grouping in the latest crop of Art Kabinetts. “Looking back, [they’re] really showing the power that visual art has to describe our historical moments.” ABMB

“[Art Kabinetts] are really showing the power that visual art has to describe our historical moments.” —ALEXANDER GRAY

as in Soap & Water, his 2007 sculpture of a bicycle—a status symbol on South African city streets—molded from green dish soap and lying on its side next to a metal pail, threatening dissolution. This sculpture will be displayed in anticipation of his first show, at the gallery’s two New York locations, January 10–February 16, alongside his signature sequential photographs and stop-motion

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF ALEXANDER GREU (STEERS)

A mailer for Manipulating the Self.

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ART NOVA

Steve, by Ry Rocklen, 2012.

Groundings (SE), by N. Dash, 2012.

Super Nova

Art Basel’s forum for the freshest finds delivers another year of newly minted talent.

T

hese days, the conversation around Art Basel Miami Beach often fixates on the marquee artists, the blue-chip galleries, and the red carpet collectors. (Look no further than Tom Wolfe’s new novel, Back to Blood). But there’s still very much a place at the show for the bleeding edge, one where visitors are exposed to work so new it’s barely dry. Since 2003, young galleries and the emerging artists they sustain have been prominently on display at Art Nova. Open to galleries that are at least two years old, Art Nova accepts proposals that are reviewed by a selection committee composed of an international line-up of prominent gallery directors. Nova’s most basic criterion addresses the work itself: the pieces must have been created within the last three years, ensuring that what you see on the walls was essentially last touched by the artists themselves. “There have been so many remarkable projects over the past years,” Art Basel codirector Marc Spiegler observes of the show-within-a-show’s legacy. Spiegler went on to mention past crowd favorites such as Meessen De Clercq’s presentation of work by Ignasi Aballí, Sofia Hultén, and Claudio Parmiggiani. All three artists tackled the concept of memory, such as Parmiggiani’s inventive delocazione process of burning an object’s silhouette onto wood or Arratia, Beer’s show of mixed media work by Katerina Šedá, Javier Téllez, and Omer Fast (with his arresting interviews of American soldiers)—both on display at Art Nova last

year. Or there was Luis Camnitzer’s moving readymade phone book that reinserted the names of 300 “disappeared” victims of Uruguay’s military dictatorship at Alexander Gray Associates, along with Zero gallery’s presentation of work by Victor Man and Pietro Roccasalva, in 2010. “This year’s edition of Art Nova will see an even tighter presentation of galleries and artists, really concentrating the talent we want to show within this sector,” says Art Basel codirector Annette Schönholzer of the 2012 iteration. “Art Nova will feature a diverse selection of new work, often fresh from the studio, which I am particularly delighted about.” Schönholzer mentions that this includes Yael Bartana, Tal R., and Tom Burr at Sommer Contemporary Art; Tania Pérez Córdova and Nina Beier at Proyectos Hydra, by Adam Shecter, 2006.

Monclova; Theaster Gates and Angel Otero at Kavi Gupta Gallery; John Gerrard, Michelle Lopez, and Hans Schabus at Simon Preston Gallery; Dove Allouche, Jonathan Binet, and Jessica Warboys at Gaudel de Stampa; and Hao Liang, Yangjiang Group, and Zheng Guogu at Vitamin Creative Space. Another highlight Schönholzer is personally looking forward to Katrin Sigurdardottir, Iceland’s selection for 2013 Venice Biennale, displayed alongside Hilary Berseth and Michael DeLucia at the Eleven Rivington gallery. So while many in attendance at Art Basel will gravitate toward the Page One names—and there’s certainly nothing wrong with that—there will also be surfacing of work by artists who may not exactly command headlines. That is, not yet. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THOMAS SOLOMON GALLERY (ROCKLEN); ELEVEN RIVINGTON, NY (SHECTER); ADAM REICH (DASH)

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ART POSITIONS

Rising Stars

Drawing on everything from history to nostalgia to sheer whimsy, this year’s Art Positions participants make an indelible mark on Art Basel Miami Beach. By James Servin

A

rt Positions places a spotlight on the innovators who are gaining notoriety and a prominent place on gallerists’ and collectors’ must-have lists. Already they have fast-tracked their way into a tightly edited representation at Art Basel Miami Beach from 16 galleries worldwide. New York’s Fitzroy Gallery, open since December 2010, first showed Colby Bird in a solo exhibition in March 2012. For ABMB, Bird offers a commentary on commercial versus artistic creative work by juxtaposing seven preexisting commercial photographs of flora, fauna, and landscapes against another version of the same images that the artist has reworked in a style that suggests trompe l’oeil painting. A diagonal wall will separate the booth into two triangles. The paired photographs will be displayed on one side of the diagonal, while two sculptures, a hand-hewn chair, and a chandelier will be exhibited on the other. “Both groupings of works are about process, the element of the hand, and the presence of labor,” says Fitzroy Gallery owner Maureen Sarro. RaebervonStenglin gallery of Zurich presents the boldly insouciant work of British-born, Berlin-based Ivan Seal. Seal’s entry, Myame Memorimodulic, focuses on a Miami-related incident he experienced growing up in the factory town of Stockport, England. As a teenager, Seal was enamored of Don Johnson, the television series Miami Vice, and the star’s pastel T-shirts and white jeans. Seal recalls wearing a similar ensemble one night and getting caught in a rainstorm, which rendered his white trousers transparent, revealing his red underwear. A series of paintings associated with this memory will be displayed in linear fashion, “resembling a sentence or code,” says Matthias von Stenglin, co-owner of the gallery. “The paintings— everything from abstract car crashes to over-the-top flower still-lifes—function as a series and generate new opportunities for personal meanings from their juxtapositions to each other.” Making its debut at ABMB, Dublin’s Mother’s Tankstation presents Japanese-born artist Atsushi Kaga. Currently based in New York, Kaga has created Nerd Bag Factory, a durational, crafty installation, “a kind of endurance performance,” says Mother’s Tankstation

gallery founder and director Finola Jones. The piece re-creates a childhood memory of a mother who obsessively sewed colorful quilted fabric bags and insisted, to the embarrassment of her children, that they use them for school. In a booth hung with Kaga’s large-scale colored pencil drawings, small-panel paintings inspired by manga comics and animation, and tapestries, the artist’s mother, Kazuko Kaga, will be on hand to create bags for viewers. During the opening days of the fair, limited orders can be placed—the bags cut and stitched by Kazuko, then painted and collaged by her son. “We chose Atsushi Kaga for Positions because a considerable Women, by Matt Keegan, 2012. amount of his career to date has eventuated in Miami, and his work has a real follow- Archival Digest installation comments on the Turkish ing there,” says Jones. “Also, there is something very modernization period beginning in the late 19th cenupbeat and optimistic about his work that masks a tury, when Western influences hastened the creation of the Turkish republic in the 20th century and a rejection darker meaning.” Another newcomer, Naples’s Fonti gallery, shows of the prior alphabet and customs. Interrelated works artist Christian Flamm, born in Stuttgart and currently include the distillation of history textbooks currently used in Turkish high schools into pedagogical diagrams (framed on the back wall of the booth) and the recycling of textbooks into nesting tables. “The layers of these tables are like the layers of history, which have been consistently altered and repur—FINOLA JONES posed to suit a certain need,” says gallery coordinator Ela Perşembe. For its third Art Positions run, Mexico’s Labor living in London, whose An Alphabet installation will incorporate a local material that the area has in abun- exhibits Irene Kopelman, whose Argentine heritage dance—the sands of Miami Beach—into a sculptural makes her an appropriate choice for the show, says rendering of a new letter system. A glossary directly Labor communications and press associate Debora behind the arrangement of symbols will allow visitors Delmar. Kopelman’s The Challenger’s Report, a twoto decode its message. Ink and gouache drawings of the part installation examining direct and mediated alphabet depicting scenes relating to each letter, much contact with nature, features paintings and drawings like a child’s alphabet book, will be displayed on the of microfossils, and drawings and a clay bas-relief of right wall, while a remaining blank wall will serve as a canyons in Southern Brazil. The installation made its debut earlier this year at Gasworks, London, but “it tabula rasa for visitors’ own projections. Based in Istanbul, Non makes its debut this year at isn’t site-specific, and can be produced in many differArt Basel Miami Beach. For Art Positions, it presents ent variations,” says Delmar. “It fits in very well with the work of Istanbul artist Asli Çavus¸oğlu, whose Miami and its beautiful natural landscapes.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND ALTMAN SIEGEL

“We chose Atsushi Kaga for Positions because a considerable amount of his career has eventuated in Miami.”

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ART PUBLIC

Sculpture C, by Alice Aycock, 2012.

Art in the Open

Collins Park transforms into an outdoor museum during Art Basel Miami Beach. By Margery Gordon

T

he mantra of “location, location, location” is hardly limited to real estate. It’s no secret that the balmy charms of Miami Beach played a role in its selection as the winter home of Art Basel and perennially sweeten its appeal for art lovers from colder climes seeking creative inspiration against a tropical backdrop. The Art Public sector embraces the seaside setting of Collins Park, which stretches from the Bass Museum of Art to the shore, a few minutes away from the main attraction at the convention center, offering visitors a chance to enjoy the outdoors without leaving the art behind. “I’ve always been very interested in working off-site, at alternative sites, outdoors, and working with artists on new projects, and thinking about the media and scale [of

those contexts],” says Christine Y. Kim, who has curated Art Public for the second consecutive year in collaboration with the Bass Museum of Art. Currently curator of contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Kim previously cofounded Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND), a nonprofit initiative for commissioning and presenting public art. Some of the works in Art Public were sparked by the specifics of this site, while others adapted from distant locales find natural affinities with this landscape, including a few that even incorporate extant features of the space. The abstract relief encasing the Collins Park rotunda since 1962, Florida artist Albert Vrana’s The Story of Man, becomes a 360-degree screen for Miguel Andrade Valdez to project photographs of public art

from his hometown. “Monumento Lima” documents the commissions of civic organizations that are rarely crafted by professional artists nor fixed at one address in the Peruvian capital. “The pieces are inscribed within a complex series of alternative sculptural paradigms— perhaps more intuitive and whimsical—in which color and texture stick out as vital elements due to their changing and random nature,” explains Revolver Gallery. “Because both their shape and their finish find themselves subject to alteration in a short period of time, in many cases the link between the monuments and what they commemorate can quickly dissipate.” Recorded sounds from Lima’s streets—motors revving, horns honking, cell phones ringing—mingle with Peruvian popular music for a disorienting soundtrack broadcast by speakers surrounding the rotunda. The tactile surfaces onsite are echoed in a folding screen compromised of blocks, presented by Almine Rech of Paris. Los Angeles–based artist Mark Hagen describes his work as “cast cement units in various geometric shapes with textures from found consumer packaging, recycled cardboard, packing tape, and molds I made of 47-year-old graffiti from a cement and coral stone wall at the edge of the Bass Museum of Art property.” The wide range of material impressions and cultural references heighten the tension of imposing a modular order on a mundane shape-shifting substance. The gray matter of cement and human tissue merge in Teresa Margolles’ artistic benches that are haunting meditations on mortality. The austere modern contours of her lounges offer cold comfort, weighted down physically and psychologically by a subversively morbid ingredient: the liquid used to cleanse the corpses of victims of the drug- and gang-related violence plaguing parts of Mexico. This residue of indelible sins taps the knowledge of forensic medicine Margolles gleaned as a university student in Mexico City, where she is now represented by Labor. The first batch of these benches were commissioned for the botanical garden in Margolles’s hometown of Culiacán, where they served as memorials to fallen residents; the similar series in Art Public was stationed outside of LACMA for the past year as part of a LAND exhibition.

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY AND GALERIE THOMAS SCHULTE (AYCOCK)

Riser, by David Keating, 2012.

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ART PUBLIC

Bonhomme de Neige, by Pierre Ardouvin, 2007.

“All these works have a specific kind of poetry that is poignant—and in some cases pungent—but more nuanced and subtle than perhaps last year,” Kim muses. “It felt important at that moment to bring together works that spoke to a level of social critique happening nationally and internationally.” In contrast, this time she had “no rhyme or reason with generation or medium or aesthetic that I was going for, but a more thoughtful range of sensibilities that are timely.” A more suggestive strain of social commentary arises in the playful yet pointed performance that Jamaicanborn Dave McKenzie conceived while “thinking about an image that one might already see in that space.” Planes will circle Collins Park on three days during the fair, trailing marriage proposals between popular unisex names. “These wedding banners take something that people would often consider to be private and make it a public act, announcing it to the world at large,” observes McKenzie, now based in Brooklyn. “If you’re gay, to do that is a different type of public-making, from coming out to wanting to get married and dealing with how the law would view that act, a very private act outlawed in a very public way.” The performance sculptures by Juliana Cerqueira Leite are activated by the conditions of their creation, the “primal” maneuvers imprinting their core. “The acts that

Declaration, by David McKenzie, 2012.

create them are very basic,” notes the Chicago-born and London-educated Brazilian, who recently relocated to Brooklyn, where she continues to explore “how we deal with our own materiality and physicality.” In a series of laborious steps, Leite packs custom-built containers with clay that she displaces by crawling inside and carving out just enough to accommodate her petite frame, then pushes her way back out and casts the “extruded hollow space” as a visceral record of her own personal occupy movement. Climb, a fresh piece presented by São Paulo’s Casa Triângulo, traces her arduous ascent through a claylined tube, harnessing her rock-climbing experience. When the narrow route she forged is filled with a weatherproof mixture of acrylic, vinyl polymer, and plastic, it leaves a gnarled pillar that inverts the evidence of her exertion, wearing the signs of striving like Lilliputian handprints on Gulliver’s sleeve. “The conceptual content of the sculpture is the form created by this drive to climb,” says Leite, “and all that drive suggests.” The human ambition that propels New York is palpable in “Park Avenue Paper Chase,” Alice Aycock’s series of sculptural assemblages—one of which will be

“All of these works have a specific kind of poetry that is poignant— in some cases pungent.” —CHRISTINE Y. KIM

seen at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach. These works will be eventually installed at six locations along the eponymous thoroughfare in spring 2014. The longtime New Yorker (represented at the show by Miami’s Fredric Snitzer and Berlin’s Galerie Thomas Schulte) found in that urban energy a forceful corollary to the circular natural phenomena that fascinate her. “Although I’m thinking a lot about whirlwind and flow and wind dynamics, it seemed to me that with Park Avenue, this notion of this wind that would blow up and down the avenue and leave these pieces of paper scattered… and that sense that you can create this kind of randomness, interested me,” says Aycock. Unveiling Twin Vortexes, the first of these sweeping formations in white-coated aluminum (donated by Alcoa), on Miami Beach— where “wind patterns are so significant” that the specter of hurricanes outstrips a slower residential pace—pares the metaphor back to its organic genesis. The balance, movement, and fluidity, as well as the rigor and significance of the concepts behind these works are what attracted Kim and what the sector’s curator hopes will transfix and transport all of us. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS (MCKENZIE); PAUL KAUSMIN GALLERY (NAVARRO + SMITH)

Street Lamp, by Ivan Navarro and Courtney Smith, 2012.

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ART FILM

Robert Rauschenberg in Emile de Antonio’s Painters Painting, 1973.

Demystifying the Masters

O

ne does not have to be an expert on American Abstract Expressionists from the 1940s to the 1970s to recognize the artists’ names and many of their masterpieces. But, as a, a documentary film producer, I love to tell a great story about fascinating topics or people that both entertains and maybe enlightens the viewer about a thing or two. When telling these stories, filmmakers usually hope to find archival footage that gives viewers insight into a world that either intrigues or mystifies—or offers a better understanding of our history. Emile de Antonio’s Painters Painting, from 1973, exemplifies this ideal in its depiction of the legendary New York Abstract Expressionist artists. As a political documentarian, de Antonio used the verité style as well as archival footage to effectively convey his point of view; he was a true independent filmmaker before that idea became vogue. A visit to MoMA or the Whitney inevitably reveals

works of art by artists with marquee names such as Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, and Jasper Johns. Their works are considered to be academically stellar, and they have entered the annals of art history as some of the most important contributions to 20th-century art. But ordinary mortals coming to view these might also ask: Who were these artists? What was Jasper Johns’s or Frank Stella’s inspiration? How did these people sound when they spoke? What did they wear? And, most important, what were their creative processes? In Painters Painting, these visionaries tell their stories, engrossing the viewer in their own words and addressing these questions without the need of a story arc—or a story at all. Seemingly, de Antonio never intended to have a narrative, as the film’s purpose is to reveal the artists in their raw states; nothing seems to be edited out. In one instance, Jasper Johns tells us about a time when

de Kooning was apparently mad at Leo Castelli: de Kooning had said to Johns, “If you give that son of a bitch two beer cans, he’ll sell them.” Well, Johns thought that was in fact a wonderful idea, and so conceived and cast his Ballantine Ale Cans. And frankly, that is the beauty of this film. We hear the legends’ thoughts and even see their techniques, making the work that much more pleasurable to appreciate. It also makes it more accessible, of course, but the film is most satisfying in that these masters are presented as human beings, stripped of the mythos surrounding their distinguished reputations. For both seasoned art collectors and art enthusiasts, this film is not just timeless—it gets better with time. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EVERETT COLLECTION

Even 40 years after its release, Painters Painting continues to resonate with its humanization of influential artists. By Adam Schlesinger

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ART VIDEO

Poetry in Motion

The selection of films for this year’s Art Video Nights is a collective showcase of rhythmic tension and melancholia. By David Gryn

T

he notion of “poetics” emerged as a tool to enliven my selection of films to include at this year’s edition of Art Video Nights, a curated screening of works by some of the most interesting and thought-provoking international artists. I mixed up the films and put them into programs that matched a poetics and rhythm that formed in my head. I gave each program a poetic title taken from the films in each group, such as “Love, Time & Decorum” or “Waltzing, Driving & Reflections.” We had to select seven hours of film from more than 100 submissions. The sounds, music, and rhythms in the artworks informed my viewing and selection process, in addition to the films’ potential for engagement. During my analysis of the works, my desire grew to select films with an intense melancholy, carrying an inherent tension or anxiety that was mesmerizing in some way. Particularly exceptional this year are films made by several artists: Ryan McGinley, Nick Abrahams, and Ragnar Kjartansson, working with the music of Sigur Rós, and Adam Shecter with Antony and the Johnsons, along with the films of Mauricio Lupini, with their

distinct Latin bossa nova jazz soundtrack. A great surprise was the work of Jumana Manna, an artist whose work engaged me on every possible level via her use of poetic and earthy language, music, imagery, film quality, narrative, and incisive storytelling. There are also compositions with the amazing multitechnical levels of William Kentridge,

Goodman Gallery), India (Chemould Prescott Road), China (ShanghArt and Long March Space), Turkey (Non), and Iceland (i8). Their diverse flavors add to the European and North American galleries, matching the global audience that inhabits and visits Miami Beach. It was also inspirational to receive submissions from galleries that had not submitted work to Art Video last year, such as White Cube (Josiah McElheny), Marian Goodman Gallery (Eija-Liisa Ahtila and Amar Kanwar), Ibid (David Adamo and Michael Portnoy), Hauser & Wirth (David Zink Yi), Yvon Lambert (Mircea Cantor), and Johann König (David Zink Yi, Michael Sailstorfer, and Jordan Wolfson). The audience is composed of not just art-world collectors, critics, curators, artists, and gallerists, but also the widest possible general public. My decisions on what to screen at this event are based on what I genuinely like and what logistically works with a varied audience in the context of the outdoor setting of SoundScape Park—a 7,000-squarefoot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, designed by Frank Gehry. There were times when watching last year’s program that the hairs on my neck tingled in thrilling excitement. I know that this year there will be many of those moments in each program, and I look forward with eager anticipation. David Gryn is founder and director of Artprojx, a leading agency that screens, curates, and promotes artists’ movingimage projects. ABMB

“My decisions on what to screen are based on what I genuinely like and what works logistically in an outdoor setting.” —DAVID GRYN

Jesper Just, Pedro Reyes, and Rashaad Newsome. The unique animations of Takeshi Murata and Billy Grant and a new piece by Tim Davis offer alluring anticipation that never comes, along with the melancholia in Sam Samore’s various films. I was delighted to select inspiring works from galleries all around the world: South America (Labor, Ignacio Liprandi Contemporary Art, A Gentil Carioca, Galeria Leme, Galeria Nara Roesler, and Mendes Wood), South Africa (Stevenson and

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN MCGINLEY/VARÚO, 2012/TEAM GALLERY

Still from Varvo by Ryan McGinley, 2012.

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COLLECTING

The late Tony Goldman at Wynwood Walls. Kenny Scharf mural at Wynwood Walls, 2011.

Honoring a Visionary

A

s it does every year for Art Basel in Miami Beach, Wynwood Walls, Miami’s celebrated graffiti oasis in the heart of the Wynwood Arts District, is getting a seasonal face-lift. But this year’s enhancement has an added significance. Real estate luminary Tony Goldman— known as the man who more or less put Miami’s South Beach (not to mention Manhattan’s SoHo) on the map and who, with art maven Jeffrey Deitch, director of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, cofounded the Walls in 2009—passed away in September at age 68. As a fitting tribute, for the 2012 edition of the Walls, artist Shepard Fairey (known for his iconic Obama poster) will revamp his large mural outside Wynwood Kitchen & Bar (a restaurant owned by Goldman) to include a portrait of the late real estate pioneer. Jessica Goldman-Srebnick, COO of Goldman Properties’ hospitality division as well as principal and managing partner of Goldman Properties, says of her father: “I like to say that he wore ‘Tony glasses.’ He could see beauty and opportunity where others would see grime and grit.” Wynwood Walls and its companion project, Wynwood Doors, together incorporate some 40 works and run along Northwest

Second Avenue between 25th and 26th Streets. They range from a typically zany and fluorescent-hued Scharf mural to a sculpture of a deer in camouflage by Ron English. There is Nunca’s huge and rowdy mural and Ryan McGinness’s Day-Glo 33 Women. For his wall, famed New York graffiti artist Futura went totally abstract. “There isn’t anyplace like it, with so many murals. It really is remarkable,” Scharf says. In a sense, Wynwood Walls got its start in SoHo. Deitch recalls: “Everybody who had a presence in SoHo knew Tony. He frequently visited my gallery, and one day the subject of resurrecting Keith Haring’s legendary mural on the Bowery and Houston came up. Tony said, ‘I own that wall.’ I couldn’t believe it! And that’s how our collaboration started. Tony’s specialty in real estate development was not just to develop a building or complex, but to really build a neighborhood, like he did in South Beach, working with the community. We came up with the idea of a kind of outdoor museum of street art in Wynwood and started with a building Tony owned. It has expanded into something very significant, and it’s become one of the major artist attractions of Miami.

During the week of the art show, it’s one of the things people flock to see. It includes most of the top-tier international street artists.” It also includes the Shop at the Walls, which this December will be selling special “Go-Kits,” with paper, spray paint, and stencils, to turn average citizens into itinerant graffiti artists. An exhibition called “Time Evaporates, Emotion Elevates” (a favorite Goldman expression) will display light-box paintings created by Wynwood Walls artists. In the evenings, frazzled art fair visitors can relax during Yogart, a nightly yoga class. As Scharf says of a memorial garden honoring Goldman, slated to be completed in September 2013, “This is something that Tony instigated. It was so sad to hear that he died, and I just thought how perfect a tribute a garden is—because it’s growing and alive. The same could be said of Wynwood Walls, which continues to evolve.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTHA COOPER, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND WYNWOOD WALLS (WALL); MIA NUNEZ (GOLDMAN)

Wynwood Walls celebrates the life and accomplishments of neighborhood developer Tony Goldman. By Phoebe Hoban

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PRESENTS

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COLLECTING

Untitled, from the series Propícios, by Anna Maria Maiolino.

Solita Mishaan

The Next Garde [ LIMA, PERU ] Giancarlo Scaglia, Gallerist and Artist Four years ago, Scaglia made a bold decision. The then on-the-cusp artist—known for his sociopolitically charged oil on canvas renderings of dark street scenes and Lima youths—had just wrapped his second solo show with one of the best and most reputable galleries in Peru, Lucía de la Puente Galerîa de Arte, when he up and left to start his own space with a few like-minded friends. They called the gallery Revolver (as in “to stir” in Spanish) and framed it as a platform for fellow upand-coming artists in Peru. They focused on curated group shows from the get-go, adopting a collectivelike ethos with their programming. The approach certainly caught on: Revolver has been invited to stage pop-up displays at similarly experimental spaces both in the region and around the world (20 Projects in London

and Nueveochenta in Bogotá among them). “We move Revolver as a group of artists,” Scaglia says, “like a brand.” Scaglia’s own work will be on view in Revolver’s Art Basel Miami Beach booth, alongside that of Jerry B. Martin and José Carlos Martinat—who, in the past has invited gallerygoers to paint, tag, and deface his crisp, white models of Brutalist Latin American architecture. The gallery also scored a piece in the show’s Art Public, Miguel Andrade Valdez’s Monumento Lima, a six-minute super-cut of the many Rotary Club monuments scattered throughout the city. [ LIMA, PERU ] Juan Carlos Verme, Collector Verme made his first fine art acquisitions while attending university in Zurich. He did so, he says, by blowing his dorm-room furniture budget on two prints by Miró

and happily slept beneath them on the floor. He was— as one might guess—hooked. Now, Verme’s holdings may include works from Europe, the United States, and greater Latin America (featuring pieces by Scaglia, Martinat, Ishmael Randall Weeks, Roni Horn, and Leo Villareal), but the Peruvian entrepreneur and private investor has become a critical advocate for his country’s artists, galleries, and institutions as well. He has served as chairman of the board of the Museo de Arte de Lima

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PABLO GARCIA (MISHAAN)

Lesser-known Latin American art hubs Lima and Bogotá are rising in prominence, joining their Brazilian, Mexican, and Argentine counterparts as increasingly significant players in the international art scene. Here are the artists, curators, collectors, and dealers to watch. By Rachel Wolff

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COLLECTING

(MALI) since 2005 and is an active member of the acquisitions committee for Latin American patrons of Tate Modern. MALI’s gradual renovation and expansion will be complete with the debut of its new permanent-collection galleries next year. “It’s going to be like this huge aircraft carrier of art, stranded in Lima,” Verme says. He’s also active in training the next generation of patrons and collectors—something he sees as critical to Lima’s future growth and success. “We are very aware of the fact that we need more and better collectors,” he says. “This is one of our prime concerns at MALI and something we have fostered since the beginning of my term.” Up now: a sprawling solo show from the renowned British conceptualist Martin Creed.

Double 11, by Sandra Gamarra, 2011.

Angel, by Sandra Gamarra, 2008.

“I focus on art from the Latin American region to show that it is as good and valuable as art from elsewhere.” —SOLITA MICHAAN

off the Web as well, with displays at past editions of the Arcomadrid art fair, the São Paolo Biennial, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC) and, most recently, at Tate Modern, where Gamarra and LiMAC are currently featured in a collection-based show called “Setting the Scene.” Gamarra has also learned how to make the most out of LiMAC’s ambiguous online presence. “We get many e-mails from people thinking it’s a true museum,” she says, speaking through a translator. “We thought, let’s play with that fiction and reality. Someone traveling to Lima who likes contemporary art will end up on our site. It becomes a platform and it can play the role of some kind of agent.” [ BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA ] Solita Mishaan, Collector For the Caracas-born collector—who now splits her time between Bogotá and Miami—art was in her DNA. Mishaan’s parents were also collectors (though of the more traditional sort—think Renoir,

Chagall, Soutine), and she spent many childhood weekends gallery- and museum-hopping. One of Mishaan’s first personal acquisitions was a “Stage” painting by the Argentine artist Guillermo Kuitca. The strange and theatrical composition spoke to her, she says, and inspired her to explore the vast talent living and working throughout the region. Mishaan’s collection focuses strictly on contemporary Latin American art, and is punctuated by the work of many regional luminaries she has acquired—Alfredo Jaar, Juan Araujo, Matias Duville, and Mateo López among them. Mishaan’s mission, however, extends far beyond the collection itself. “I focus on [art from] the Latin American region to show that it is as good and as valuable as art from elsewhere,” she says. “The art of this region deserves to be displayed on museum walls among the global masterpieces of the 20th and 21st centuries. It’s a shame that it has taken so long for Latin American artists to be recognized.” To help quicken the process and cement such artists’ roles and influence abroad, Mishaan serves on acquisition committees for Latin American art at

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF PHOTO APJHJ

[ LIMA, PERU ] Sandra Gamarra, Curator and Artist As of now, Lima does not have a museum dedicated exclusively to contemporary art. So Gamarra, a Lima-born painter and installation artist living in Spain, decided to launch one herself—at least in theory. Gamarra founded the online Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Lima (LiMAC) in 2002, while still living in Lima, to fill that void and, in part, to riff on the ways in which we spend so much of our lives on the Web. Its “collection” revolves largely around Gamarra’s own exquisitely rendered paintings of photographs of artworks installed in other galleries and museums (as seen in books and exhibition catalogues). But what started as a fun, slightly Dada art endeavor of her own has blossomed into something of a nomadic art space as well as an influential online platform for Latin American art. Gamarra redesigned the site this year, and has invited a curated roster of artists to join the museum’s permanent holdings (fellow Peruvians like Iván Esquivel, Annie Flores, Nicole Franchy, Santiago Roose, and Pier Stockholm among them) by submitting an artist statement and digital portfolio of their work. LiMAC has hosted several pop-up installations

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COLLECTING

Primero Estaba El Mar, by Felipe Arturo, 2012.

Beatrice López and Katy Hernández

when we talked about Frida Kahlo or Rufino Tamayo. They’re artists of the world; artists of the same height and grandeur as others.” [ BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA ] José Roca, Curator The peripatetic Estrellita B. Brodsky adjunct curator of Latin American art at Tate will leave a permanent mark on his hometown with the opening of FLORA arts+nature next year. The alternative art space—which deals specifically with the relationship between nature and contemporary art—is based out of a house in the San Felipe neighborhood of Bogotá, but will revolve largely around its artist-in-residence program in Honda, a historic colonial town about 90 miles outside of the city. In the past four years, Roca worked as an independent curator, focusing largely on Brazil and the United States. His credentials include a 14-year stint as director of Bogotá’s Museo de Arte del Banco de la República; the 2011 Mercosul Biennial in Porto Alegre, Brazil; and museum and gallery shows in New York, Philadelphia, Montreal, Barcelona, São Paulo, and Los Angeles. But something is abuzz in his hometown, he says. He was ready to come back. “The art scene has always been strong,” he adds, but nobody was there to see it. “Nobody came to Colombia because of the perception of insecurity that came with the drugrelated issues and violence.” In the last few years the situation has improved. Investors and tourists started

arriving—among them, art tourists. There was a small but fertile scene waiting for them. It has grown as a result, with new galleries and a new art fair, artBO, cropping up over the past few years, as well as new collectors to support them. FLORA will host its first artist-inresidence this summer. [ BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA ] Beatriz López and Katy Hernández, Gallerists López, a curator, and Hernández, an art historian (both specializing in modern and contemporary Latin American art), founded Bogotá’s La Central in 2009 to produce, support, and disseminate work by artists who, López says, are “committed to social, political, and cultural themes, and present an original relationship with their environment.” Unsurprisingly, the exhibitions they’ve mounted since have been more akin to those one might find in a nonprofit or a small museum than those typically mounted in a traditional commercial gallery. López and Hernández represent several buzzworthy Colombian artists (Alberto Lezaca, Juan David Laserna Montoya, and Felipe Arturo, among them), but they’ve also been known to invite international artists to Bogotá to create projects and exhibitions in collaboration with locals. The gallery—which debuted a slick new tri-level space last year—has also been a fixture at an increasingly prominent crop of Latin American art fairs like Zona Maco, arteBA, and ArtRio, and is a

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PALOMA VILLAMIL (ARTURO)

the Museum of Contemporary Art of Montreal, Tate, MoMA, and the Miami Art Museum in addition to her work with Art Basel Miami Beach, the Israel Museum, the Prado, the Museo Jacobo Borges in Caracas, and Bogotá’s artBO art fair. Her efforts are undoubtedly working. “Now you go to a gallery in London, Spain, France, the United States, you see they have at least one or two artists from Latin America,” she says. “And they’re not just ‘Latin American artists’ like before,

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COLLECTING

Cápsuleas de Tiempo, Leyle Cárdenas, 2011.

Con Posición Descompusta, Leyle Cárdenas, 2010.

first-time exhibitor in the Art Positions section of this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach. For López, the endeavor is a follow-up project of sorts to 24/7, an alternative art space she cofounded in London and ran in the mid2000s. It’s a bold and enviable pedigree, though she did, for a time, dabble outside of the visual arts: After studying literature in college, López worked as a scriptwriter for a Colombian soap opera. [ BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA ] Felipe Arturo, Artist The Colombian artist and architect’s work has a tendency to alter whatever his given exhibition space may be, often using modest and readymade materials like concrete, bricks, paperback books, and plastic bins to create unexpected (and sometimes interactive) sculptures and installations. Arturo has exhibited extensively throughout Latin America and Spain but now, he’s poised for wider recognition in the States, Europe, and beyond. He will have a solo booth at this year’s edition of Art Basel Miami Beach via his Bogotá gallery, La Central. His display is something of a musing on the medium concrete itself—a cheap, fluid material that, he says, allows for “improvisation, experimentation, and a fluidity of space and life,” particularly in an urban setting. Arturo has used concrete in past works to create steel-rod-supported monoliths and surprisingly elegant objects closely resembling

Brancusi sculptures or Grecian urns. In this display, titled Ten Letters, he morphs the material into a series of alphabetic letters and perfectly arced crescent waves. The display riffs on the Brazilianborn notion of “concrete poetry” as well, in which a poem’s letters and words are presented in a shape

Riegner, moved her program to the budding metropolis in 2005. (She opened the original space in Miami in 2001). Whether in Miami or Bogotá, the mission remains the same: to promote the work of mid-career and established Colombian artists at home and abroad. Cárdenas (who earned her MFA at UCLA in 2004 and nabbed the highly coveted Joan Mitchell Foundation grant in 2007) had her first solo show with the gallery in 2008 and has since remained a lynchpin in Casas Riegner’s overall programming. Her photographs and delicate sculptures and installations may appear

“Bogotá is receiving a lot of visits from curators and artists. They are discovering the best-kept secret of contemporary art.” —FELIPE ARTURO

that evokes what said poem might mean. Like many of his colleagues, Arturo is incredibly optimistic about the current state of Colombian contemporary art. “People abroad recognize names like Doris Salcedo or Miguel Angel Rojas, but I can say that at least another 100 Colombian artists of the same relevance are going to be discovered in the next decade,” he says. “Bogotá is receiving a lot of visits from curators and artists. They are discovering the best-kept secret of contemporary art.” [ BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA ] Leyla Cárdenas, Artist Bogotá’s Galería Casas Riegner has been a critical asset to the local scene ever since its founder, Catalina Casas

abstract, but they are often rooted in (and, in some cases, extracted from) the environments that surround and inspire her. She makes sculptures out of peeled paint and found sedimentary rocks; she snaps tightly cropped photos of crumbling buildings and streets; and she makes elegant laser-cut paper tableaux that represent disintegrating maps. Casas Riegner will present a solo booth of Cárdenas’s work as its contribution to Art Basel Miami Beach. The installation will comprise several new sculptural pieces made from wall, ceiling, and floor fragments plucked from an apartment in an old republican-style building in Bogotá. The apartment will be re-created to some extent inside of the booth, the fragments suspended within a delicate wire framework. ABMB

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11/1/12 12:43 1:25 PM 11/14/12 PM


COLLECTING

FROM LEFT:

Dennis Scholl, Debra Scholl, Bonnie Clearwater, Ella Fontanals-Cisneros, and Irma Braman.

Collection Evolution

Top Miami collectors discuss the trends and changes in the art world that have an impact on the way they do business. Moderated by Bonnie Clearwater

I

n honor of Art Basel Miami Beach 2012, Bonnie Clearwater, executive director and chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, conducted a special roundtable with local collectors Irma Braman, Ella FontanalsCisneros, and Dennis and Debra Scholl. Here are excerpts from their discussion. BONNIE CLEARWATER: I just reread the transcript of our conversation at Art Basel Miami Beach last year on the occasion of the show’s 10th anniversary. Here we are a year later to discuss everything that is new. I recently returned from a trip to Brazil and the São Paulo Biennial. I felt connected with many of the Brazilian and Latin American artists there, partly because of what Ella Fontanals-Cisneros has done with her collection and her CIFO foundation in Miami. All of us work with contemporary art in Latin America, but Ella has made it her focus. How has your program evolved? ELLA FONTANALS-CISNEROS: Two years ago, we started presenting a prize for accomplished artists in Latin America to promote their art outside of their countries. We bring them to the United States, we give them an exhibition, we connect them with

the galleries, and then we try to travel the exhibitions outside of Miami. It’s very interesting to see throughout these 10 years what has happened with Latin American art and the interest all over the world for Latin American art. The most recent exhibition I did was in Cuba. We presented an exhibition of all contemporary art—not just Latin American, but global art. DENNIS SCHOLL: Where did you show it? EFC: We showed it at the Museo de Bellas Artes, the main museum. On the opening day we had almost

in Latin America—everyone knows us. A lot of our prize winners were in the São Paulo Biennial. BC: It’s one thing to support the artists, but then there’s this idea of how to get the art out into the world. Artists might be famous in their own city or country, but how can they bring their work out beyond that? Ella, you clearly have given this a lot of thought, based on the kind of programs you are doing and through building your advisory committee. EFC: Two years ago we started putting Latin American curators on our board of advisors, so now we have many places in which we have curators providing input. BC: One of the purposes of an art fair is to distribute artwork worldwide. This year, MOCA has led trips for its members to Documenta in Germany, Art Basel in Switzerland, the Armory Show in New York, Frieze London, and in May we’re going to Art Basel Hong Kong. Having the Internet provides incredible access. I’m wondering if any of you think it will reduce the need for us to travel to see art. IRMA BRAMAN: I can’t imagine that anyone who is a really serious collector would buy online—if we’re talking about buying. But I said that about clothing, and I was wrong. Just because I don’t do it does not mean other people are not doing it.

—BONNIE CLEARWATER

3,000 people in two hours. People in Cuba are very cultured. I have come to understand that the only way that we’re going to help these people is by opening windows for them and exposing them to new ideas. DENNIS: We all work with artists early in their careers, and it is interesting to watch when they begin to gather some momentum, and you see them at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and institutions like that. EFC: It’s been hard work, but everywhere we go now

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY JAMES

“Artists might be famous in their own city or country, but how can they bring out their work beyond that?”

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COLLECTING

Materia en Reposo III (Mexico), by Damián Ortega, 2004.

FROM LEFT:

Ella FontanalsCisneros, Bonnie Clearwater, Irma Braman, and Debra and Dennis Scholl.

EFC: I think you’re right. If you’re a collector, you want to touch. DENNIS: This summer, I got a call from a dealer who said there’s a piece of art in Documenta that fits your collection. I said, “Great. When you bring it back to the States I will come look at it.” He says, “Oh no, I need to know tomorrow.” He sent me the images, and I looked online. And it looked good, but it was a lot of money… so I jumped on a plane and went to Documenta for 12 hours just to see the work in situ. When you talk about digitally looking at art, it depends on whether it’s videos and photographs. That’s easy. It gets a little bit harder depending on the tactile nature of the medium. So the farther away you get from the representation of the artwork, the harder it is to say yes. BC: Dennis, did you buy the work at Documenta? DENNIS: I did. I saw the work and it was great. Then I looked to my right and there was a painting by the same artist. It was nine by 12 feet and looked like it went together with the other painting. I called the dealer right from there and we bought both. BC: May we ask who it was? DENNIS: Not yet. BC: What was the experience of seeing it in person that confirmed it for you when you saw it? DENNIS: Texture. Paintings aren’t for touching, but the depth perception is important. The painting was a little bit optical. You really can’t see the opticality—the color, everything about it—on the Internet. BC: Irma, I know you went to Art Basel in Switzerland this year, and that you and your husband, Norman, have been looking. Have you bought any work lately?

IB: We haven’t bought anything in a year. We tried once. We were the underbidders, which of course, doesn’t count. We’re eager to buy something; we just have to find it. BC: By being the underbidder, does that mean that there are new collectors out there to contend with? IB: I can assume that someone who wasn’t a collector last year is a collector this year. We all see collectors from new countries more than we see American collectors. BC: From going to Art Basel for more than 20 years, have you seen a change in the kind of work that is shown? IB: Definitely. The kind of work we were originally buying is now unavailable. The artwork of the early 1960s is either held in private hands or in museums. Consequently, we have changed our art perspective, our taste, and what we’re looking for because it was either “stop or change.” We went with the change instead of stopping collecting. EFC: Also, you see a lot more of the young artists in Art Basel. Lots of Latin American artists. It’s a commercial entity, so they’re probably focusing more on emerging artists. BC: I was struck during my recent visit to Frieze Masters in London by how many conceptual artists from the ’70s were shown. This work was not created for the art market; rather, it was intended to subvert it. Much of this work did not have worldwide exposure. Is it because the work from the ’60s and ’70s is so rare that these galleries are looking at untapped areas to represent?

EFC: I see it differently. I think that museums cannot get a hold of any of the [blue-chip] art anymore. They are so expensive. The interest that has really developed for conceptual art is more of an institutional thing than a private thing. This is a forgotten era or period, one that people are still not touching. I think it’s because the work was available and not so expensive, so they started presenting that. I love conceptual art. But of course, it’s kind of difficult for a collector to be involved. DENNIS: The market has shifted so much that for the past 10, maybe 12 or 13 years, we’ve bought everything because you could get everything. Now that it’s shifted so much and there are so many new players, we’re circling back. We started out being print collectors, and then we were contemporary photography collectors. Then we bought everything for a while, and now we’re going back to our roots again. DEBRA SCHOLL: We’re starting to buy drawings. Dennis and I have always been governed by our environment. When we started collecting prints 34 years ago, we were in law school and couldn’t afford much, but it was a way to be connected to the art world. As we’ve progressed, we upped our collection a little. And now we moved from our home into a condo, and we thought that drawings would be the perfect way to go. It’s worked out for us in a lot of ways. It keeps it fresh. I think Dennis always has a 10-year itch with how he collects. DENNIS: Also, given the cult of personality and money that has grown up around the contemporary art world recently, it feels good to go back to something

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY JAMES (ROUNDTABLE)

Bonnie Clearwater

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COLLECTING

FROM LEFT:

Prefatory wall collage from glaze stamp from Banishing God Art Pottery; Wheel of Flesh, longhair; J Cornelius car coat, all by Aaron Angell, 2012.

that has the artist’s hand in it. EFC: It’s wonderful that a lot of people want to collect now, but then I think, Where are we going? Does it stop? Is it something about today that people don’t know where to put the money? DENNIS: It’s partly that, sure. It’s safe-haven money. Hard assets. EFC: Do you think it’s going to continue? DENNIS: I think it’s very cyclical. It goes up, it goes down. I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about that as a collector. EFC: Still, you need to measure that. For example, in my collection, we have a great deal of Latin geometrical art—around 600 pieces. My idea is that one day it will be public, so I need to continue buying. It’s not that I can stop. BC: But you are thinking of it as something that is going to be a comprehensive collection, and therefore you are able to identify the gaps, what is needed. Not all collectors work that way. One of the things I’ve noticed traveling this year to the various major international curated exhibitions— Documenta, Whitney Biennial, São Paulo Biennial—is how the curators made their selections. People don’t generally grasp the difference between art fairs and curated exhibitions. The works that typically were shown in these big festivals for the last decade often were film projections, works that were performative, and installations. It was work that filled the order for these big shows. IB: Sounds like the Venice Biennale. BC: Exactly. The work in these big exhibitions was

still very much part of the art market. But this year, I noticed a change. Many of the artists were dead, underrecognized, or they worked outside the realm of the commercial art world. It seemed like the curators were making an effort to search outside of the art market to find artists who had been overlooked to the point that they died without recognition; or, like aboriginal artists or artists who lived in psychiatric hospitals, practitioners who worked without any concept of an art market. I have never seen such a divergence between the market and current curatorial practice as I do now. DENNIS: I’m seeing two things. I think there is a high

DEBRA: With Locust, it’s been a tremendous boon for us. We have so many people who would never have known that Locust existed if not for Basel. We had Ruben Ochoa last year, and it was very successful. This year, we have Theaster Gates, which is our most ambitious project to date. I think part of it is having a great director. But the other part of it is having Basel give great recognition to all kinds of artists and art organizations in this community, and I think that’s what Basel has been tremendous about in terms of opening up the aperture for everyone in this community. DENNIS: People forget that this community had an incredible visual arts presence 15 or 20 years ago, and Art Basel shined a bright light on that. It gives this community a chance to show its best self. We’ve all worked over the years to make sure that every single year when people come down here it’s different, special, and exciting. We’ve done things for the Art Basel VIPs that we wouldn’t do for anyone else, and we’ve never quit. And it started with the collectors and institutions. Because of that, Art Basel continues to be the juggernaut of the art world that it is. IB: We also all know people who have moved here, gotten vacation homes, or rented for months at a time because they came to Miami for Art Basel, and then they fell in love with the city. It’s a great addition. DENNIS: When all is said and done, Art Basel is about having the best collectors in the world, visiting with the best dealers in the world, seeing the best art in the world. That’s what it’s here for. We are very lucky to have it. ABMB

—DENNIS SCHOLL

degree of interactivity in some of the work. Because of the digital world, people have been able to access information in such a profound way now that they become very proprietary about what they want to do. So the artists are being more interactive, more open with their audiences because they know that their audiences want to curate their own experiences. If you’re going to allow the audience to participate, that doesn’t always generate a work product that is consumable. BC: What can we say now about the impact of Art Basel Miami Beach on Miami in its 11th year? What’s happened with young artists? Debra, I know you’re so involved with Locust Projects.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE CLARK, COURTESY OF WORLD CLASS BOXING

“This community had an incredible visual arts presence 20 years ago, and Art Basel shined a bright light on that.”

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COLLECTING

Sprache der Vögel, by Anselm Kiefer, 1989.

Local Private Collections Make sure to hit these local exhibition spaces this week. WORLD CLASS BOXING “Raga for Fishwife” by Aaron Angell November 10, 2012, through February 28, 2013 Hours during Art Basel Miami Beach: Wednesday–Saturday, 10 AM–4 PM 170 NW 23rd St., Miami, 305-438-9908; worldclassboxing.org

MARGULIES COLLECTION AT THE WAREHOUSE

LOCUST PROJECTS Exhibition: Theaster Gates, “Soul Manufacturing Corporation” Project Room: Jacin Giordano, Wound, Bound, Tied, and Knotted Bus Shelter Project: Nicole Eisenman Monday, December 3–Saturday, December 8 Hours during Art Basel Miami Beach: Monday– Saturday, 9 AM–5 PM; Sunday by appointment. 3852 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-576-8570; locustprojects.org

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MARGULIES COLLECTION

Sculpture: Anselm Kiefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, Simryn Gill Installation: Amar Kanwar, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, Roberto Lange Video: Kader Attia, Nathalie Djurberg, Leandro Erlich Photography: Sabelo Mlangeni, Barbara Probst, Wael Shawky October 17, 2012, through April 28, 2013 Hours during Art Basel Miami Beach: Tuesday–Saturday, 9 AM–4 PM; Sunday 9 AM–2 PM 591 NW 27th St., Miami, 305-576-1051; margulieswarehouse.com

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COLLECTING

Seasonal Change

This December, the de la Cruz Collection examines classic sources of inspiration with an updated exhibition space. By Margery Gordon

Local Spotlight

One of Miami’s top private collections, CIFO, unveils its latest acquisitions and celebrates its 10th anniversary. By Margery Gordon

A

mong the most eagerly anticipated treats each December during Art Basel Miami Beach is the opportunity to tour the exhibition spaces of local collectors. This season is especially celebratory for Ella Fontanals-Cisneros, an entrepreneur and philanthropist now marking the 10th anniversary of her family’s Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO) with an ambitious array of initiatives. The foundation annually commissions new work from emerging and mid-career Latin American artists with grants that have exceeded $500,000, and this winter it inaugurates a quadrennial curatorial achievement award with an exhibition at the CIFO Art Space, in a 76-year-old downtown warehouse. The winner, Bogotá-based José Roca, and runner-up, Moacir dos Anjos from Recife, Brazil, devised a framework of free association befitting this collaborative exercise. “We chose the starting point, the middle work, and the end point, and then we tried to make subtle changes from one piece to the next,” Roca explains. “The three we chose all deal with language and communication, from what is about to be said to the aftermath of communication, when all has been said and done.” A drum circle waxed into silence by Paulista Tatiana Blass for her 2010 commission sets the tone of “unsaid/spoken.” Rafael Lozano-Hemmer holds the center with Voz Alta (Loud Voice), documenting a memorial created for the 40th anniversary of the 1968 massacre of student protesters in Mexico City, which converted free speech from a public megaphone into flashing beams to illuminate the sky of his birthplace. The sequence closes

with another piece drawn from Fontanals-Cisneros’s personal collection: deaf American artist Joseph Grigely’s 2005 patchwork of paper scraps inscribed with one-sided snippets from 223 Conversations. While Fontanals-Cisneros continues to collect a discerning range of contemporary works from around the world, she estimates that about a third of her holdings are concrete and abstract. “That’s my taste— buying anything that has that feeling of abstraction or architecture inside of it, because I love architecture,” she says. Fontanals-Cisneros is looking for a permanent exhibition space for CIFO Europa, recently established in Madrid, which presented selections from her collection during the 11th Havana Biennial last spring. She is also set to build a public art library in Cuba, where she saw a need for access to art books. Among the first works on the shelves of the forthcoming biblioteca will undoubtedly be the 400-page tome Pulses of Abstraction in Latin America, featuring images of more than 200 works from the geometric core of Fontanals-Cisneros’s collection and scholarly essays that she says make it “more didactic and scholarly than a coffee-table book.” One of the authors, Mari Carmen Ramírez, curator of Latin American art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, will speak at a book launch during the exhibition opening on the morning of Wednesday, December 4. More breakfast events follow, including on Thursday, December 5, a tour of “unsaid/spoken” by its curators and a talk by Inés Katzenstein, director of the art history department at Torcuato di Tella University in Buenos Aires, on curating private collections. ABMB

Hope, by Alex Katz, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK);

223 Conversations, by Joseph Grigley, 2005.

Prominent contemporary collector Rosa de la Cruz takes a very hands-on approach to curating the museum she and her husband, Carlos, built in the Design District three years ago. This season she is “reimagining” the space, transforming the airy center of the second floor into an indoor sculpture garden to reflect how architecture and landscape have historically inspired artists. A roll-down shutter, a safeguard ubiquitous in urban shopping districts, is carved from solid granite by Adam McEwen, a New York–based Brit. Ombre stucco panels by Alex Israel, one of several emerging Los Angeles artists featured this year, are intended as backdrops, so that “whatever object is standing in front of them is going to have a certain glow,” de la Cruz says. “Nowadays, the image has to be frozen in time,” she observes. “It’s not about the way we see ourselves, but the way media sees us, the way we see models, the way magazines airbrush the images.” She sees this quality in Carlos’s first purchase by Alex Katz, a portrait of New York dealer Gavin Brown’s wife, Hope, and on one side of Wilfredo Lam’s 1942 masterpiece of a woman centaur, Femme, which has long hung in the de la Cruzes’ bedroom on Key Biscayne and is the sole addition to the modern classics on the third floor. “We have historical work here in the collection, but we can’t always be looking back; we have to look forward.”

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COLLECTING

Venet’s design uses engineering equations from Bugatti.

In the Fast Lane

A

rt Basel Miami Beach wouldn’t be the same if the Rubell Family Collection didn’t showcase a surprising spectacle just for the occasion. This year, in addition to two brand-new exhibits, the real wow factor at the private space in the Wynwood Arts District takes the form of a car creatively customized by New York–based French conceptual artist Bernar Venet. And it’s not just any car—it’s a Bugatti Grand Sport, a machine of beauty with the base price of 1.4 million euros. Also opening at the RFC this month are two new shows, starting with London-based Colombian artist Oscar Murillo’s first solo exhibition in the United States. It features paintings he made last summer during a five-week residency at the RFC—the museum’s first ever, says cofounder Mera Rubell. The second new show is the group exhibition “Alone Together,” whereby each of the 28 artists have a room presenting his or her works, many of which were created specifically for this exhibition. Artists showcased include Maurizio Cattelan, Takashi Murakami, Neo Rauch, and Rosemarie Trockel. But it’s the blinged-out Bugatti and the story behind it that seem bound to steal the show. Every artist knows Picasso’s statement: “Every act of creation is first an act of destruction.” But for Venet, a longtime Bugatti aficionado, it took on a whole new meaning when the company first proposed to him

to have his way with the venRendering of Bernar erable vehicle. “My first reacVenet’s Bugatti. tion was, ‘How can I do that?’” he says. “You don’t paint on a sculpture by Michelangelo!” (While he wasn’t Michelangelo, the Italian-born Ettore Bugatti, who founded the company, was from a family of artists and considered himself one as well.) So how could Venet tinker with a cult-status object, for which the tiniest ding is a cause for horror? “I was intimidated at the beginning,” he says. “You cannot do something that will make it vulgar. You have to add something positive to it.” Venet, who has received the highest cultural honors throughout Europe and is represented in important public and private collections worldwide—including LACMA, Centre Pompidou, MoMA, and the Guggenheim—is known for creating abstract pieces that play with the language of mathematical concepts and scientific theories. “I thought about writing on the car Bugatti’s math equations that [allowed] it to go 407 kilometers per hour,” Venet recalls. The artist met a number of times with Bugatti’s design team and picked a handful of formula equations that he says “are real and totally specific to Bugatti.” Bugatti chief designer Achim Anscheidt insists that the stencils Venet designed to paint on the exterior and to embroider the interior of the vehicle make “reference

to the technical formulae of our engineers without fully revealing their secrets.” The result is a windswept appearance, “[as if] the speed of the car erased the equations and the text,” Venet says. When Bugatti told Venet that it wanted to showcase his Grand Sport at Art Basel Miami Beach, he suggested a collaboration with the Rubells. “They always look for things that are ambitious and totally original,” he says. Mera and Donald Rubell began collecting Venet’s work when they met him in New York in the 1970s. “He was already an accomplished artist. But he was also a devoted and intelligent collector,” says Mera Rubell, who credits Venet with broadening her approach to collecting. “We would sit there during long dinners and talk about art all the time. It was a significant experience for us as young collectors. He gave us the artist’s perspective on collecting.” While Venet’s Bugatti will be on display at the Rubell Family Collection only for a few days, a Bugatti representative says it will be priced and available for sale afterward. “Cars are always an endless obsession to men, but now I can understand it,” Rubell says. “I have never driven a Bugatti, but I hope to!” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY © GRAND SPORT BERNAR VENET, BUGATTI, 2012

The Rubell Family Collection, Bugatti, and artist Bernar Venet reveal the artistry of the legendary automobile brand’s mechanical DNA. By Laura van Straaten

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COLLECTING

Locals Strut their Stuff A Wynwood property turned popup exhibition showcases young Miami artists. By Brett Sokol

T

here will be chickens—that much is assured in this year’s edition of CasaLin, the pop-up outdoor exhibition that annually transforms a charmingly modest Wynwood property into one of Art Basel’s must-see stops. “Three hundred and sixty days of the year, it’s a private home,” chuckles Lin Lougheed, the owner of the house in question. “And then five days of the year, the family there has to grin and bear it as their A performance garden turns into a site-specific installation by young by Christy Gast at CasaLin, 2009. Miami artists.” The exact details always remain a mystery until the opening brunch reception—when an art-world Who’s Who descends on CasaLin to sip world,” he says. Many observers would disfrom freshly sliced coconuts filled with rum, nibble agree with that humble self-assessment, noton cheese-filled pastelitos, and then take a gander ing Lougheed’s role as a Fairchild Tropical at the handiwork of Miami’s creative class. And of Botanic Garden trustee and founder of its own course, take in at least one chicken-themed project. art program, as well as a former key Miami “It’s a tradition,” laughs Lougheed—one that speaks Art Museum trustee. “I wanted to help all to CasaLin’s only-in-Miami origins. these young Miami artists. Lougheed and his partner were Everybody else was getting driving through Wynwood back exposure during Art Basel, in 2003, discussing the need for and what about Miami’s artsome dedicated office space. As ists? I wanted to make sure a renowned author of language they have a chance to be instruction books with several best seen by the curators from sellers to his name—and more in the MoMA and the Whitney, works—Lougheed was hoping to as well as all the museum find a quiet, garden-shrouded writdirectors who come from all ing spot. “We had to stop the car to over the country.” —LIN LOUGHEED let a hen and her little baby chickens This year’s CasaLin iteraLin Lougheed and cross the road,” he recalls. “As we were waiting, I saw a tion, playfully entitled “Out of Site,” is being Maggie Cuesta at curated by veteran Miami gallerist Fredric FOR SALE sign and thought, ‘This is perfect!’ We bought CasaLin last year. Snitzer (one of two dealers in South Florida the house that day.” Eight years later, Lougheed still hasn’t quite gotten exhibiting in the Art Basel fair at Miami Beach’s around to moving out of his cramped Miami Beach Convention Center). At press time, the show’s roster this year’s show will emphasize CasaLin’s lush flora, home office; the Wynwood home’s former owners was still being finalized, though Lougheed expects with many of the artworks “camouflaged” within the have stayed on as tenants with the caveat that they fresh work from previous participants Michael grounds. By the week’s end, though, it’ll all be packed play makeshift docents every December. “I’m not Loveland and Josh Levine, as well as a “chicken chair” up. “The chickens need their rest,” quips Lougheed. CasaLin, 55 NW 30th St., Miami. Open Dec. 6–9, 9 a gallerist, I’m not a businessman; I’m just a person (complete with live fowl) from a token out-of-towner, who is modestly involved in the periphery of the art Chile’s Sebastian Errazuriz. Snitzer has also promised AM to 5 PM; brunch on Thursday, Dec. 6, 9–11 AM. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BENJAMIN THACKER

“Everybody else was getting exposure during Art Basel, and what about Miami’s artists?”

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WORLDVIEW

Inspired Spaces

The upcoming Pérez Art Museum Miami is just the latest of Herzog & de Meuron’s universally acclaimed architectural creations—each one being a veritable work of art. By Julia Cooke

O

n both a visual and programmatic level, architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron’s museums are staggeringly diverse. Scales, collections, topographies, and collaborations vary. The only uniting motif is an insistence on tailoring the firm’s monumental yet playful aesthetic to the requirements of each institution. As the much-anticipated Pérez Art Museum Miami nears completion—this is, after all, the last iteration of Art Basel Miami Beach to occur in a pre-PAMM Miami art landscape—we highlight Herzog & de Meuron’s celebrated institutional architecture.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK); PHOTOGRAPHY © HERZOG & DE MEURON; VISUALIZATION BY ARTEFACTORYLAB

PÉREZ ART MUSEUM MIAMI PAMM will debut in fall of 2013 on a new 29-acre waterfront area called Museum Park—a fitting name for the institution, and integral to its design. Wedged between the city and Biscayne Bay, the museum nestles in the center of a series of gardens. First, visitors enter on a platform surrounded by the vertical gardens canopied by the museum’s flat extended roof. Visitors will also be able to explore the park, where plans call for outdoor sculptures, including a work donated by Design Miami cofounder and principal Craig Robins. Amid the 60 slim columns that stand next to the suspended gardens, PAMM’s 120,000 square feet of interior space is composed of lifted boxes that appear to hover just off the ground, creating an interconnected gallery amid the green.

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WORLDVIEW

PARK AVENUE ARMORY, NEW YORK CITY With its stunning period chambers, New York’s Park Avenue Armory—built between 1877 and 1881—is one of the city’s great historic landmarks. But until 2006, it foundered somewhere between clumsy attempts at alteration and sheer disrepair. The space is half military facility and half social club: Its 55,000-square-foot drill hall is among the largest column-free interior spaces in the city, and its opulent front reception and social rooms were designed by Gilded Age greats like Louis Comfort Tiffany and Stanford White. Today, the ongoing project to both preserve and reinvent the space as an arts hub marries historical conservation with contemporary intervention. By using period decorative motifs and techniques in new ways, Herzog & de Meuron, who are overseeing the revitalization of the building, simultaneously highlights the structure’s history and present-day cachet. And with a program that includes Tom Sachs and the avantgarde classical ensemble International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), the Armory is anything but stuck in the past.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUCY DAWKINS (TATE); JAMES EWING, 2011 (PARK AVENUE ARMORY)

TATE MODERN PROJECT AND THE TANKS, LONDON Few would pair together old oil tanks with art, but that’s just what these catacomb-like spaces—the first phase of the Tate Modern Project—once were. The Tanks, clover-shaped subterranean tanks that once held a million barrels of oil, opened this past summer with a dizzying program of live art, performance, installation, and film, including works by Filmaktion, Sung Hwan Kim, Lis Rhodes, and Juan Downey. The warren of chambers combines the found and the fresh, the oversized and the intimate, using subtle structural intervention that highlights its rawness, hinting at what’s yet to come as Herzog & de Meuron builds upward to more than double the Tate’s gallery space.

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WORLDVIEW

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK); PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHU PLACEK

PARRISH ART MUSEUM , WATER MILL The newest of the firm’s museums opened just last month with an exhibit of Long Island resident Malcolm Morley’s paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Standing amid the tall grasses of the Hamptons, the museum consists of two long “wings” that are connected by a corridor, which doubles as an exhibition space. The westernmost wing features the public areas: lobby, shop, café, and theater, while the central portion contains 10 skylit galleries, which vary in size from 500 to 3,000 square feet and whose interior walls can be removed if needed. The eastern wing houses offices and storage. With a deceptively simple design of oversized wood beams, imposing concrete walls, and a pitched roof overhanging a covered wraparound porch and bench, the Parrish feels like an effortless addition to the landscape around it.

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WORLDVIEW

DE YOUNG MUSEUM, SAN FRANCISCO With a collection that ranges from anthropologically significant African, American, and Oceanic art to international contemporary art—plus American paintings, sculptures, and decorative art objects dating from the 17th century to today—the de Young Museum required a unique approach. The resulting distinct yet interconnected spaces provide a range of interior spaces that answers this diversity. In its 84,000 square feet of exhibition space, unexpected doses of wood and galleries that vary in size and shape, provide a range of viewing experiences. And clad in oxidizing copper, the museum’s tower has become a landmark-within-a-landmark, twisting as it does out of the tree canopy of Golden Gate Park. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HERZOG & DE MEURON (BARRANCA MUSEUM OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART)

BARRANCA MUSEUM OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART, GUADALAJARA Perched on an edge of the lush, 600-meter-deep Huentitán Canyon by Guadalajara in central Mexico, the Barranca Museum doesn’t try to compete with nature. Instead, its collection of lofted galleries sit atop independent supports, wedged into one another for connectivity, that allow scenic views from the ground level. The structure is conscious of the rugged landscape around it but rather than juxtaposing art and view, it invites visitors to luxuriate in both independently. With a location near the University of Guadalajara, an expansive shaded plaza, with a café and restaurant, the museum aims to be a cultural hub on the precipice between Guadalajara’s cosmopolitan zone and the canyon below.

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COLLECTING

21600 Pages, by Hadieh Shafie, 2012.

No Longer a Man’s World

W

hen Leila Heller started her New York gallery 30 years ago, it wasn’t easy to get collectors to consider buying Middle Eastern contemporary art. “Most of the audience had zero interest,” Heller recalls. “I was lucky if I sold to some oil company in Houston. The artists of the Middle East have always been great artists. Attention given to them has changed.” Indeed, that attention has steadily escalated over the last few years, making the Middle East market one of the fastest growing. From New York to London to Dubai, collectors, galleries, museums, and

art fairs are all showing a greater appreciation for art from the region; Middle Easterners are showing a increased interest in buying art; and once-marginal Middle Eastern artists have developed important international reputations. Like Heller, many of the key figures fueling that growth are women. They include museum

professionals like Sheikha Mayassa Al Thani, head of the Qatar Museums Authority; Aisha Al Khater, director of the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha; and Rita Aoun-Abdo, the executive director of the cultural department of the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Cultural Authority, which oversees the museum projects. At one point, more than 90 percent of cultural institutions in Palestine were headed by women,” says Reem Fadda, an associate curator for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation’s Abu Dhabi Project. In addition to Heller, galleries with women at the helm include Egeran Galeri in Istambul

“At one point, more than 90 percent of cultural institutions in Palestine were headed by women.” —REEM FADDA

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF LEILA HELLER GALLERY

Women are bringing about the biggest changes in the growing Middle Eastern art market. By Robin Pogrebin

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COLLECTING

Leila Heller

Golden Circles, by Gulay Semercioglu, 2012.

(Suzanne Egeran), the Sfeir-Semler Gallery in Berlin, Beirut and Lebanon (André Sfeir-Semler), and Rampa, also in Istanbul (Leyla Tara Suyabatmaz). In 2009, the Metropolitan Museum of Art appointed Sheila R. Canby as the curator in charge of its department of Islamic art; she had previously served as curator of Islamic art and antiquities at the British Museum. Last year, the Met also signaled its commitment to Islamic art in square footage, opening the new Islamic wing (the Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia) after eight years of renovation. The Sfeir-Semler Gallery, which focuses on artists working in the Arab world, has mounted one-person exhibitions in the region by Walid Raad, Akram Zaatari, MARWAN, and others. In a recent interview with San Francisco Arts Quarterly, Sfeir-Semler said Westerners still have misconceptions about Middle Eastern artists. “You should know that many artists from the Arab world are not Muslims. Many of them are Christians, a few others are Jewish, even though they’re Arabs,” she told the interviewer, Andrew McClintock. “So it’s very wrong to formulate Middle Eastern art by religion. You don’t speak of art in the Western world by referring to it as Christian art, do you? This is probably the biggest failure of viewing the art in the Arab world. We should formulate it around the language and the culture because they all speak Arabic, and that is the main link.” Female curators and artists in the field are also ubiquitous, creating what some of them describe as a sense of sisterhood around Middle Eastern art, with

women mentoring one another. Fahrelnissa Zeid, for example—a Turkish artist known for her abstract mural-like paintings who died in 1991 at age 90—tutored a generation of artists in Jordan. Among her protégés is Suha Shoman, an artist and collector who founded Darat al Funun, a home for Jordanian art and artists. Women have achieved prominence at the most prestigious institutions, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where Linda Komaroff is the curator of Islamic art, and the British Museum, where Venetia Porter is curator of the department of the Middle East. Women are often working together. The curators deciding what art will fill the galleries of the high-profile Abu Dhabi Guggenheim, for example, includes a team of three women: Suzanne Cotter, Fadda (also curator of the UAE National Pavilion for the Venice Biennale 2013), Valerie Hillings, and Sasha Kalter-Wasserman. “It’s a very female-dominated industry,” says Antonia Carver, who runs the Art Dubai international art fair. “A lot of very strong women are cultural leaders. There

are a lot of very positive role models.” Women have also distinguished themselves as patrons and collectors, like Sheikha Salama Bint Hamdan Al Nahyan, who has her own foundation that bears her name, and Sheikha Hoor Al-Qasimi, director of the Sharjah Art Foundation, which oversees the Sharjah Biennial. And there is a long and growing list of female Middle Eastern artists, both established and emerging, who have captured public attention, like Lara Baladi and Susan Hefuna from Cairo; Mona Hatoum from Palestine; Yto Barrada, the founder and director of Cinémathèque de Tanger in Morocco; Lamia Joreige, who founded the Beirut Art Center; and, maybe most well known in the United States, Shirin Neshat from Iran. “A lot of people say to me, ‘Why do you have so many women who are artists?” says Heller, who represents those such as Reza Derakshani and Negar Ahkami. “It wasn’t by choice, but a lot of the good artists are Middle Eastern women.” Heller makes a point of juxtaposing these artists with more established Western artists, as she did last summer in “Rock, Paper, Scissors,” an exhibition that featured Hadieh Shafie alongside Louise Bourgeois, Louise Nevelson, and Jackson Pollock. “I try to not marginalize my artists by doing the niche shows,” she says. “It shows the quality and the level of how good these artists are that they can hold their own in a show like that.” Perhaps ironically, it is the very sexism entrenched in Middle Eastern culture that has allowed women to thrive in contemporary art, experts say; because

OURTESY OF LEILA HELLER GALLERY (SEMERCIOGLU); PHOTOGRAPHY BY IKE UDE, COURTESY OF LEILA HELLER GALLERY (HELLER) COURTESY OF GLADSTONE GALLERY, NEW YORK AND BRUSSELS (NESHAT)

Ibrahim, by Shirin Neshat, 2012.

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Sahar Lotfi, by Newsha Tavakolian.

The Fortune Teller, by Camille Zakharia, c. 1962

culture is widely considered women’s work, it is one sphere in which they are largely left alone and allowed to function with relative freedom. “Culture is a realm in which women are able to do well,” says Melissa Chiu, director of the Asia Society Museum in New York. “In some environments, it’s seen as being okay for women to be in that arena.” Indeed, some female artists have taken that freedom to considerable lengths in their artwork. Women artists in Saudi Arabia are now estimated to outnumber the men, according to The Economist, which also noted how various artists at the most recent Art Dubai fair tackled discrimination head- on. Nadia Kaabi-Linke, a Tunisian artist, addressed the clothes many women are forced to wear; Newsha Tavakolian, an Iranian artist, took photographs of women doing what is forbidden to them in Iran, from singing in public to swimming; and Maha Malluh of Saudi used religious extremists audio tapes from the 1980s to illustrate the tight controls and overt hostility women face from radicals. At the same time, some cultural adjustments are required. Art Dubai, for example, doesn’t show explicit nudes or any art for that matter that might be perceived “as being overtly offensive to any religion,” Carver says, “not only Islam, but also

Christianity and Hinduism.” Perhaps the most striking area of growth in Middle Eastern art has been among galleries, experts say; about 40 have sprung up in Dubai alone over the last several years. Janet Rady was inspired to start her London gallery representing Middle Eastern artists after seeing “Word into Art: Artists of the Modern Middle East,” a 2006 exhibition at the British Museum that explored writing as a method of communication and an art form in ancient and Islamic cultures. At first, there was “a feeling of being out in the wilderness,” Rady says. “Nobody wanted to know about the artists, nobody understood them.” But little by little, people started to hold exhibitions of Iranian art in London, she says, and now there are several galleries that focus almost exclusively on Middle Eastern art. The increasing consumer interest is quantifiable. The first Art Dubai in 2007 included 40 galleries and drew 5,000 people; the last such fair in March included 75 galleries and more than 22,500 people attended. The fair is seeing an influx in young collectors and people are coming from all over the Middle East— Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan, India, Pakistan, and the United Arab Emirates. “People are invested emotionally as well as

financially because it reflects on their identity as Middle Easterners,” Carver says. “Even the most loyal of us have been surprised by the level of interest and the fact that it hasn’t waned.” American and European art institutions—like the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, the Aspen Art Museum, and the British Art Museum—have jumped on the bandwagon, in part because they are responding to their patrons and curators, who want to learn more about the region. Galleries and museums are also trying to help educate the public with panel discussions, lectures, and exhibitions. Often lost in the excitement over Middle Eastern art, experts say, is a deeper knowledge of the field and an understanding of its long-standing traditions. To highlight this storied past, in 2010, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art opened in Doha, Qatar, with a collection of more than 6,000 works from the 1840s to the present. An Abu Dhabi outpost of the Louvre is expected to open in 2015, followed by the Guggenheim’s branch there, slated for 2017. “The frenzy of the market is only recent,” Fadda says, “but anchors itself on a vivid and historical art scene which goes way back.” The Asia Society has for the last four years been developing “Iran Modern,” a comprehensive survey of works from Iran between the 1950s and the 1970s. “It’s an argument for multiple modernities,” Chiu says. “Modernism didn’t just occur in Paris in the early 20th century. It occurred in other places. Iran was an international player in the ’60s and ’70s. It’s a story that really hasn’t been told.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTTESY OF JANET RADY FINE ART (ZAKHARIA)

Is the very sexism entrenched in Middle Eastern culture what has allowed women to thrive in contemporary art?

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WORLDVIEW

Dinner Party, by Will Ryman, 2010.

The Great Partnership

A

merican book enthusiast Phil Aarons tracked down the enigmatic Terence Koh during a search for the real-life creator of the zine persona Asian Punk Boy. Greek visionary Dakis Joannou’s fascination with the Swissborn artist Urs Fischer was ignited by a visit to Sadie Coles Gallery in London, where three burning candles shaped as life-sized female nudes revealed partially melted heads and rivulets of wax trickling down their faces. Miami-based magnate Marty Margulies spotted an abject figure of a man seated on a fragile-looking chair in the booth of a bustling art fair and responded by initiating the first of many phone calls to New York sculptor Will Ryman.

Exactly what about a work of art piques collector interest, and exactly where that interest will lead, has been a subject of fascination since the Medicis’ support of Michelangelo triggered the great flourishing of art in Renaissance Italy. And as time and history continue to demonstrate, the benefits of such liaisons are typically shared. While commissions by late-19th-century industrialists filled the pockets of John Singer Sargent and James McNeill Whistler, for example, these artists’ portraits also conferred power and status on their patrons. Peter Brant’s early support of Andy Warhol kept Factory activities in full swing, while providing the business-minded producer of paper pulp enviable entrée into a world of iconoclastic chic.

With the art world today—a sprawling megamall compared to the mom-and-pop shop it was even 35 years ago—and with an often eye-popping variety of artworks to choose from, three prominent collectors have been looking inward, examining their own personal enthusiasms, while seeking out artists whose work further articulates these interests. The results have proven life-changing for all involved. As the board chair of Printed Matter, a nonprofit devoted to artist-made books, Phil Aarons, for example, “is a book person,” according to his wife, Shelley. It was Aaron’s fascination with books that first led the couple to Terence Koh. Since his discovery of Jeff Koons at an East Village gallery nearly 30 years ago, Dakis

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MARTY Z. MARGUILES, MIAMI, FLORIDA

Long a cultural phenomenon, we look at how the close relationship between patron and artist continues to fuel the art world. By Dorothy Spears

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WORLDVIEW Marty Margulies

Will Ryman

Joannou’s personal compass has directed him toward art such as Urs Fischer’s, which employs unorthodox materials and takes a variety of radical forms. “Urs is dealing with today’s culture and life. It’s not academic,” Joannou says. For Margulies, a longtime devotee of the lifelike figurative sculptors George Segal and Duane Hanson, Ryman’s downtrodden characters, which called to mind people one might encounter outside of the artist’s Bowery studio, also struck a certain nerve. “These foolish figures resonated with me. They had a certain whimsy and a certain sadness,” says Margulies. That the acts of making and collecting art are both profoundly personal might seem to suggest that initial buyer excitement over a young artist’s work would inevitably result in lasting friendship. But some collectors prefer to avoid personal contact, even with those whose work they ardently endorse. “I do have my episodes with certain artists,” says Marieluise Hessel, whose collection serves as a teaching tool at Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies. “But I’m always afraid to get too attached—afraid they’ll

take me over and won’t let me move on.” Artists, for their part, are also often “wary of collectors and their motivations,” according to the Manhattan dealer Gavin Brown. Which is why the friendships that have emerged over the past decade between the Aaronses and Koh, Joannou and Fischer, and Margulies and Ryman appear so remarkable. They hinge at least as much on alchemy as they do on art. And they boil down to the same essentials as most fruitful relationships: common interests and openness on everyone’s part to whatever is possible. A decade ago, Koh was a student of graphic design in Vancouver, when “Phil started contacting me out of the blue, saying that he loves books, and that he loved Asian Punk Boy,” he says. Aarons’s initial goal of ordering copies of Koh’s zine for sale at Printed Matter was soon matched by a request from Koh: Would Phil be willing to commission a book? “It was a little strange because we had never met him,” recalls Aarons, referring to the Chinese-born Koh, who was

then living in Canada. But it was also intriguing, so Aarons agreed. Over the coming months, the book became more and more ambitious. “It was getting bigger, and more expensive,” Shelley says. “Then Terence said, ‘I’m coming to New York, and I’m going to send you the piece.’ And when Phil said, ‘I’ll give you my FedEx account number,’ Terence replied, ‘Well, it’s gotten a little bigger.’” It took three men to haul the crate holding the “book” up to their apartment, the Aaronses say, adding that it was filled with a mysterious white powder, which made them wonder how it had cleared customs, since security was still high from 9/11. The greatest surprise: Inside the crate was not a book at all, but rather an elongated box with mirrored sides, a white fake-fur skirt, and a white fur-lined interior containing an assortment of smaller compartments filled with personalized objects, including a white pillow bearing Koh’s initials and an embroidered image of a Pegasus. Koh credits the Aaronses blind faith in him, and

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER HARHOLDT (MARGULIES)

The friendships that have emerged between collectors and artists boil down to having common interests and openness.

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WORLDVIEW Untitled, by Urs Fischer, 2011.

Joannou and Fischer in Fischer’s installation.

the excitement he felt during the making of his first sculpture—now jokingly referred to as “The Coffin”— with “kind of tugging at me to become an artist.” And over the years, the bond between the Aaronses and Koh has taken almost as many forms as Koh’s art. For his first museum survey at Austria’s Vienna Succession in 2005, for example, a poetic installation in which a bed, a chair, and a refrigerator hover in hazy white light amid 125 glass vitrines displaying a mix of kitschy devotional objects, Koh asked Aarons to contribute a catalog essay. “He is the only person who has all of my books and zines, so I thought it was important that he write a little essay,” Koh explains. A year later, in honor of Aarons’s birthday, Koh transformed Javier Peres’s Berlin gallery for a single night during the Berlin Biennial into a “black forest,” covering the gallery in black paper leaves and making a black dinner—with black truffles, and black risotto with squid ink, “because it

was my black phase then,” Koh remembers. When Shelley co-curated a group show, “Boys of Summer,” at Fireplace Projects in Amagansett in 2008, she included a work by Koh (that she and her husband later bought) and hired Koh’s partner, Garrick Gott, to design the catalog. And perhaps most strikingly, in 2009, the Aaronses hosted Koh’s wedding to Gott at their home in East Hampton, “making it into almost like a Terrence Koh installation and performance” according to Koh, who designed his own bridal gown for the occasion. Now Koh’s artworks and photographs appear interchangeable with mementos and family photos in the Aaronses’ Manhattan apartment, an observation Koh finds pleasing. “It’s a two-way process, like an opera or a live performance. Just as they affect me, I think I affect them in equal measure,” he said. Koh’s Manhattan dealer, Sean Kelly, agrees. “The Aaronses were very, very early collectors of Terence’s.

They have been incredibly supportive of his work since the start, so I think it’s a rewarding relationship for all of the parties involved.” Fischer was still a teenager, when he first saw the book Artificial Nature. The text was in English, or Greek, which he didn’t speak, Fischer said, recently, adding, “It just made no sense.” What did make sense, however, was the imagery, which served as inspiration for the young artist’s developing mind. And although it would be years before he realized that his beloved book was published by Joannou’s Athens-based D’Este Foundation in the early 1990s, Joannou, for his part, had already bought the candle piece What If the Phone Rings from Coles by the time he and Fischer met for the first time at the opening of the 2003 Venice Biennale. “The weather was so hot and humid at that Biennale. People could barely move,” recollects Fischer, adding, “I don’t think anybody even looked at the show.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEFAN ALTENBURGER, © URS FISCHER, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GALERIE EVA PRESENHUBER, ZURICH (FISCHER)

Fischer’s generosity introduced a level of camaraderie into his relationship with Joannou, which exists to this day.

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WORLDVIEW

Phil and Shelley Aarons with Terence Koh on his coffin piece.

Fischer doesn’t recall whether he was in the Giardini—where his sculpture Skinny Afternoon, depicting a skeleton gazing into a vanity mirror—or simply making the rounds at one of the pavilions, but eventually he found himself standing beside Joannou. The collector looked, rather predictably, hot. And Fischer, who had stolen two handtowels from his hotel earlier that morning, passed one to Joannou, because, as Fischer put it, “When it’s very hot, you can get sweaty, you know?” Did Fischer’s generosity trigger Joannou’s purchase of Skinny Afternoon from Eva Presenhuber in Zurich? Probably not. But it did introduce a level of camaraderie into his relationship with Joannou, which exists to this day. “I’ve always found it unusual for an artist to talk about a collector in the terms that Urs talks about Dakis. It’s familiar and affectionate. And there’s a lot of trust,” says Brown, Fischer’s New York dealer. “Dakis has had long-term relationships with artists that Urs respects, so I think Urs is always really

interested to hear Dakis’s advice in terms of how to position his own work,” said Coles, speaking from London, adding, “Urs is extremely charismatic and has enormous drive and energy and intellect, and that really excites Dakis.”

sold Margulies Ryman’s 2005 work The Hotdog Stand, “They formed a bond pretty quickly.” For nearly a decade the two regularly get together when Margulies is in New York, over breakfast at the Tribeca restaurant Bubby’s or to see gallery exhibits in Chelsea, and they speak by phone every six weeks or so, according to Ryman. “There’ve been some business ventures I’ve called Marty to ask his advice on, and when he said ‘bad idea,’ I didn’t go ahead. He’s also given me lots of advice about my personal life, family, and so on,” says Ryman. (Once, when Margulies had two tickets to go see Aretha Franklin at Radio City Music Hall, and his wife couldn’t attend, Ryman happily went in her place.) And although the opportunity hasn’t yet arisen for Margulies to host Ryman’s wedding—Margulies did instruct Ryman to “Call me right away” when his girlfriend was expecting their first child in October. “I like Marty. I love him, actually,” says Ryman. “He’s a real father figure.” ABMB

After Margulies bought Ryman’s first artwork, SelfPortrait, featuring the aforementioned abject character sitting on a flimsy chair at an art fair, Ryman received a phone call. “Margulies said, “‘Will?’ I said, ‘Yeah?’ He said, ‘Marty Margulies. I’m coming to your studio,’” Ryman recalls. Ryman was familiar with the collector—Margulies also owns work by the artist’s father, painter Robert Ryman. According to dealer Tracy Williams, who

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TERENCE KOH

Terence Koh’s artworks now appear interchangeable with family snapshots in Phil and Shelley Aarons’s apartment.

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WORLDVIEW

On the Cutting Edge The institutions—and the innovators behind them—that seek new ways to present art and engage in it. By Shamim Momin

R

ecently there has been substantial attention given to large museums making the (very admirable) effort to incorporate practices and ways of working that extend beyond more familiar object-based presentations within their own walls. In my own experience, it was a central concern of the Whitney 2008 Biennial I cocurated with the fantastic Henriette Huldisch, inspiring the adjunct site of the Park Avenue Armory as a means to address these expanded practices, and was the source of thinking behind the founding of LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division), the nonprofit I cofounded and currently direct. This development, then and since, is usually referred to as “performance,” though I would suggest it’s not as discipline-confined as that, but rather incorporating a range of practices that are time-based and durational, interactive, interventionist, ongoing and, yes, performative as well. Many, perhaps even most, of the artists engaged in these modes work in a variety of media, including the more “traditional” forms of painting, sculpture, and photography—in other words, their interests are less about defining themselves by media, but rather by concept, with realization based on whatever suits said concept the most. Audiences, increasingly sophisticated in reading visual culture of

all types and more attuned to the fluidity of genres, are embracing these practices as never before. While I certainly think it’s an important shift on behalf of major institutions, it is equally important to look at the other side of this development—at some of the critical organizations whose missions have always been to embrace and support new practices, and which are of a size where that type of responsive nimbleness is truly possible. Historically, it is these organi-

Marfa, December 2011, by Garth Weiser, 2011.

of writing on the this process—on the obliteration of the outside, the underground, or the avant-garde, and the leveling of information and participation. I won’t elaborate here too much, but the result of which is an oddly more balanced evolution of new thinking and practice. Whether or not one laments the contraction of time in the process of the alternative becoming mainstream, or thinks it more democratic, or sees it from both directions, it is undeniable that one effect of these changes is the greater presence and attention being paid to the previously oftunacknowledged efforts of the innovative organizations that were among the early responders, so to speak, to the artists’ ideas and shifts in ways of working. Many of these were the first to shift their own structures and processes to match those of the artists—whether as non-sitebased organizations (typically denoted as “public art,” though I would argue that’s a very one-sided description of their missions) or as smaller “alternative” art spaces that see the artist as their true leaders and informants. We see this nationally and internationally, but for the sake of this piece, I note here those I know best in the national sphere. We see it in the radical growth and presence of Creative Time (founded in 1974), under Anne Pasternak’s inspired leadership beginning in 1994,

zations, groups, or community endeavors, where those larger museum developments are originally sited—as well it makes sense to be—but it has often been a linear evolution of ideas in the past. That is to say, much like any alternative, underground, or innovative creative moment (in music, film, dance, fashion, theater, etc.), new art practices often made their way step-by-step from the most intimate groups and spaces to some visibility, then greater visibility, finally to be embraced by the more mainstream conditions. There are reams

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MARY LOU SAXON

New art practices often made their way from the most intimate groups and spaces to greater visibility to be embraced by the more mainstream conditions.

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WORLDVIEW

Tomoaki Suzuki, by Carson, 2012.

which has exponentially increased its impact— Somewhere I Read, by Arto Lindsay, 2009. not just evident in the increase of budget (from $375,000 to $3 million), programming, staff (from private and nonprofit institutions. In full disclosure, I one staff member to 22), and newly expanded departments, but also in the growth and impact of know their extraordinary commitment and 24-hourthe board. Creative Time boasts a membership of a-day dedication very personally, as they were the the gravity, seriousness, and commitment previously intrepid hands-on producers of the hugely complex, only afforded to major site-based museums. Similarly, aforementioned Park Avenue Armory project curated the much more recently founded Friends of the High for the Whitney. Their willingness to say yes, imperLine art program, High Line Art (2009), catapulted vious to any logistical issue or monetary stumbling into public awareness with the full force of its influ- block, was the essence of belief in the artist’s idea. In the area of working with unusual sites, makential and impactful supporters. It created a massive outreach effort to save the old elevated train structure ing them a part and parcel of the concept of a projin Manhattan, preserve New York history, and turn it ect, Performa (founded in 2004, with four biennials into a unique public space. Thus far, it has maintained dedicated to performance art to date) has been an a commitment to high-end programming that seeks to combine challenging public art projects— often those not associated with the genre, in the mode of video, film, performance, sound works, and billboard interventions—to a community mission, influential model, in large part because of its charismatic leader, founding director and curator RoseLee without diluting the importance of either. Steadily increasing their visibility and presence Goldberg, whose long experience and credibility in since their 2000 founding, both in New York and in this realm have accelerated its relatively few iterations extended sites elsewhere, Yvonne Force Villareal and difficult-to-grasp structure into a major presence and Doreen Remen’s endeavor, Art Production Fund from the outset. An organization founded in 2009 by (APF), puts artists’ proposals first and follows their lead curator Manon Slome—just post economic disaster— in assisting to produce large-scale events and projects No Longer Empty is also a renewed spirit of thoughtotherwise thought daunting, by partnering with both ful, inclusive, and rigorous site-specific thinking, taking

into account the possible opportunities and ideas emerging from financial devastation, and trying to engage empty storefronts and other abandoned spaces in New York as sites of commissioned art projects, programs, activities, and community collaboration. Other evidence of this shift in balance, and of a more three-dimensional nonprofit art world, is the increasing number of collaborations between “alternative” spaces and larger institutions, as well as their ability to function on their own in surprisingly remote areas and communities. The recent partnership between the Hammer Museum and LAXART in Los Angeles for the first Los Angeles biennial, “Made in L.A. 2012”— wherein the institutions collaborated equally on the curatorial effort and outreach—was unprecedented in the equivalency and, consequently, validation it afforded between a major institution and an intentionally small, flexible alternative space. Ballroom Marfa, founded in 2003, has also partnered with the High Line on a major project, but it largely retains its unapologetically specific site in the remote town of Marfa, Texas, where it successfully and quite visibly commissions projects on-site and throughout the town and environs in multiple media, works with innovative curators around the world, and supports elaborate programming around each endeavor. Ultimately, I don’t mean to suggest that such organizations can or will take the place of major institutions. (Hey, I grew up with museums, too, and love them all as family.) I merely propose that these smaller, cutting-edge groups are gaining increasing relevance, are on greater par with those bastions of culture, and represent an important evolution in creative understanding—something both the purveyors of culture and its audience can always use more of. ABMB

High Line Art catapulted into public awareness with the full force of its influential supporters.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY AUSTIN KENNEDY (HIGH LINE); © PAULA COURT, COURTESY OF PERFORMA (LINDSAY)

MOS Architects, 2012.

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WORLDVIEW

Eastward Bound

The world looks to the debut of Art Basel Hong Kong in 2013 as that region’s robust cultural climate continues to grow in global importance. By Mary Agnew

H

ong Kong’s newfound status as an art and cultural hub has in no small way been cemented by the takeover of the annual Hong Kong International Art Fair (ART HK) by MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd., owners of Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach. The inaugural Art Basel Hong Kong in May 2013 is set to solidify international confidence in Hong Kong’s unique position as the cultural epicenter of Asia. However, much of the necessary infrastructure needed to create such a hub has been in place and growing in recent years throughout this vibrant and multicultural city. Hong Kong has long been a gateway to the rest of Asia, and in particular, China. As a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the country, Hong Kong enjoys rules of law and freedoms that are not available in all areas of China. There are also logistical advantages, such as the absence of import duties, which is remarkably beneficial for collectors. As such, “It provides the ideal platform from which to work with collectors across this fast-developing and forward-looking region,” says Nick Simunovic, managing director of Gagosian Gallery. “Hong Kong is a world-class hub city—one that allows Gagosian to address the potential in mainland China, as well as our established clients in countries like Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore,” he says.

These sentiments are echoed on a grass-roots level by homegrown and emerging galleries such as 2P Contemporary Art Gallery, which this year became the first Hong Kong gallery to ever exhibit at Liste during Art Basel in 2012, and will participate for the first time at Art Basel Hong Kong next year. Owner and director Pui Pui To adds, “Hong Kong has no currency restrictions. With its SAR status, Hong Kong can independently arrange its own trade agreements with other nations. As a result, Hong Kong attracts a variety of international galleries and auction houses looking to establish

The Hong Kong skyline.

Spring, led by founder and director Mimi Brown. It will work very much in conjunction with the existing Hong Kong–based nonprofit institutions of Para/Site Art Space and the Asia Art Archive. But most significantly, 2012 is a year that has seen huge strides made in the much-lauded and longawaited development of the West Kowloon Cultural District. Within its confines is M+, Hong Kong’s first museum of visual culture, which this summer received the donation of one of the world’s most extensive and illustrative Chinese contemporary art collections from former Swiss Ambassador to China Uli Sigg. “M+ will both be a confirmation of a situation that has developed over a number of years and will probably also function as a catalyst for future development, in some ways not dissimilar to the role Tate Modern played in London around 2000,” says Lars Nittve, the museum’s executive director. Art Basel Hong Kong is set to become one of the three most important annual global art shows, and will undoubtedly be the best place to see and discover Asian contemporary and modern art. Today, Hong Kong is the third-largest global art market, just behind New York and London, and the art world there is rapidly developing into a global cultural center of gravity. ABMB

—NICK SIMUNOVIC

themselves in the city.” Amid the influx of major international commercial galleries such as White Cube, Galerie Perrotin, Simon Lee, Pearl Lam Galleries, and Pékin Fine Arts comes the equally essential development of the nonprofit art institutions. The creative ecology in Hong Kong cannot survive at length without proper not-for-profit public institutions in place, and 2012 has seen the foundation of a substantial nonprofit space on the south of Hong Kong island called

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEDIOIMAGES/PHOTODISC

“Hong Kong provides the ideal platform to work with collectors in this region.”

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Conversations

I wanted to give it to someone else, by Julieta Aranda, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK);

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF GALERIE MOR . CHARPENTIER

In this special annual section, we pair art-world luminaries for candid, behind-the-scenes conversations. This is what they had to say.

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On the eve of his 75th birthday, our cover artist, Ed Ruscha, talks to his longtime dealer, Larry Gagosian, about books, Hurricane Sandy, and the bank robber Willie Sutton. LARRY GAGOSIAN: Hey Ed! It’s been a couple of interesting days in New York. ED RUSCHA: You went from a sleek sailboat off Italy to a rowboat up Madison Avenue, didn’t you? LG: It’s just horrible down there [in Chelsea]. ER: I saw photos of your 21st Street gallery, with all those soggy books and the waterline on the wall. LG: It’s about four feet. All the art is OK—that’s the main thing. Your art is safe. It will probably take a couple of weeks to get this all sorted out. Stay dry in LA in the meanwhile. I hear it’s a beautiful day… that it’s going to be 80 degrees today, so we pretty much hate you. What are we going to talk about, Ed? ER: I’m looking forward to the show we’re going to put on at the gallery downtown on 24th Street. That’s

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all work pertaining to books, paintings of books, and paintings on books. LG: It’s going to be some of the work you exhibited at the Kunsthaus Bregenz. That’s kind of the heart of the show, right? And you’ve added some new works, which fit in very well. ER: Yes, there are a few new works, so I think that will round it out. It’s a span of time from the ’60s to the present day, such as the books that I did early on. I’m not going to be showing my actual books there, but it will be everything that sort of spins off from that—part of the bigger picture. LG: I’m really looking forward to this. I thought the show at Bregenz was really A-plus. It was really tight and just made a lot of sense. It was a superelegant and intelligent show. I’m excited that people in New York will be able to see these works. I think it’s going to be something to look forward to, particularly after Hurricane Sandy. I could even use the word “serious” to describe it. ER: It’ll be different in the sense that it’s not close in my history. It goes way back there. The kernel of it goes to when I first started thinking of myself as an artist, when there was really no sort of hope in making a vocation out of my artistry. Today it’s a little different, isn’t it? Art schools promise big futures for everyone that comes out of them. The few artists that operated back then were doing it for the sport of it. We never really thought we could sell anything. Now it’s a much more advanced world. But that’s when I started making books, thinking about books, and learning how to set type—printing and all of that stuff.

Lar

LG: It’s certainly true that art has become a career, for better or worse. In a way, you’re probably lucky to have started out in a time when you could just thrash around and see if you had any real talent and something to say. I think that now there is a lot of financial pressure across the board. It probably does change the attitudes of artists and the way they make art. But there are still good young artists coming up, and somehow it keeps going. ER: It sure does. Every so often people say, “Well, everything’s been done! There’s nothing left to do; all the ‘isms’ have been investigated.” I don’t find that to be true. Like you say, there are younger artists who come along and have sort of shoot-from-the-hip attitudes. They want to knock you out of your chair and open the gates to heaven. And sure enough, they can do it—even in the world of abstract art and nonobjective painting. There are many artists on the scene now that are really going at it—doing things we haven’t seen before. I don’t find there to be any sort of lag in the art world at all. It’s a very accelerated time for all of it. LG: It probably has a lot to do with technology and the distribution of information. You certainly couldn’t do this 20 years ago. No one had iPads. There was no Internet or transmission of images. It’s become more democratic. With any kind of device, you really have access to any art that was ever made. It is mind-boggling when you think of it that way. ER: True. And now we have artists making works with computers. Well, that started a few years ago. There was a whole generation of artists who were fearless in their searching, and that it didn’t necessarily have to be Jackson Pollock’s style of slashing and throwing paint on a canvas—it could be something else. It could be made with computers or printing.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PATRICK MCMULLAN, COURTESY OF GAGOSIAN GALLERY

CONVERSATIONS

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arry Gagosian LG: There’s a pretty interesting show right now by a young artist named Wade Guyton. He makes all of his images on a jet printer, which is something I haven’t seen before. It’s pretty cool, actually. Everything is generated off a printer in his studio—no paintbrushes. ER: Well, there we go. New technique—bring it on! LG: It’s a good time, though. It goes in cycles. I don’t think there is a constant flow of interesting talent. As far as I’ve been involved, looking back into the ’50s and postwar art, there are periods that appear to be more interesting than others. Now is a rich period. It didn’t feel quite as interesting 10 years ago. I don’t know why that happens. But it just feels like there are many relevant and exciting things coming out of studios, certainly not just in New York but also in Los Angeles. This is a very good moment for artists in Los Angeles, don’t you think? ER: Yes, there are so many more artists and galleries than there were 10 years ago. It has really blossomed. My problem here is that I don’t get to go out and see galleries, because I have a job. I’m in my studio so I don’t have much time to see what’s going on. It used to be that the sticks were places where artists could live off by themselves and not have to worry about the frenzy of the art world. New York has always been the

LG: You feel it, too? Do you feel it in your work? You don’t seem like you’re that affected by it. You move forward, but it always feels like it’s at your own pace. It doesn’t feel like you’re particularly troubled by it whereby you have to change your strategy. The way your work develops is interesting. It seems like it becomes more and more relevant, even with all these new developments and artists. Your work seems more central now than it ever has, and maybe that’s because you’re in Los Angeles. ER: I am in a different area code, aren’t I? I’m 213 and you’re 212. That’s only one figure off, but who knows. I look back on all my work, and I see that I have not changed that much. Things that I do today, I would have still been knowledgeable of at 18 years old. I don’t find myself changing that much. You grew up here, didn’t you? LG: I was born in downtown Los Angeles, and I grew up on Normandie Avenue—that forgotten part of Los Angeles. It’s kind of a blur when you drive through it to downtown. I went down there recently and drove by

“I don’t think there is a constant flow of interesting talent. As far as I’ve been involved, looking back into the ’50s and postwar art, there are periods that appear to be more interesting than others. Now is a rich period.” –ED RUSCHA

home base—the hot spot—for the forward motion of art. Communication, like you say, is going so fast now that influences are swallowed up by these people way out in the sticks. And then you add computers to all that and there’s nobody who’s behind the times. It’s an acceleration we’ve never seen before. That translates into some sort of recycling of our ideas. And those things get tired. You can get tired of looking at certain things, listening to certain kinds of music—tired of it all. It becomes like a hamster wheel. Styles goes in and out. It is a cycle; we’re all a part of it, and we can’t escape it.

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my old neighborhood, and it hasn’t really changed all that much. ER: [That neighborhood] is like living in a scratchy black and white movie. That’s still the way I see Los Angeles. LG: I like that about the city. Oh—I recommend a good book called Sutton about the bank robber Willie Sutton. He has a famous quote: When he was asked why he robbed banks, he said, “Because that’s where the money is.” It’s such a fascinating story. He was released from prison in 1969. He never used a gun nor did he ever hurt anyone. What an interesting guy. ER: Wasn’t his name Willie “The Actor” Sutton?

LG: Yes! ER: He would go into banks in different disguises. This guy entertained us with his disguises and managed to get away with it! LG: Speaking of disguises, how do you reinvent yourself? How do you develop and move forward, Ed? ER: I approach every day like I’m expecting some kind of spastic activity. There are no a-b-c steps to anything I’m doing. I wish I could actually compartmentalize my approach to whatever I do when I’m making art, yet I can never be that way. I go in and I work. I do a bunch of illogical things and hope I make all the wrong mistakes. LG: It seems to be working. I like these book paintings a lot; they’re wonderful. These big, open books are fantastic. Personally, I think they’re some of the most interesting paintings you’ve ever made. ER: I feel like some of those paintings are reminders to me that the idea of books—which appear to be coming to an end with bookstore closings and electronics—are kind of like the pity of decay in the world. I almost feel like I’m documenting this thing and at the same time reflecting on the aging qualities. ABMB

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Anne Pasternak, president and artistic director of Creative Time, speaks with artist Theaster Gates about engaging in the real, contributing to communities, and the politics of public art. ANNE PASTERNAK: When approached by a curator from Birmingham, Alabama, about an exhibition commemorating the events of 1963 when police turned fire hoses—set to a level that would peel the bark off trees—onto children, you said, “My fire hose can’t stand in the place of an 80-year-old woman who was there when the fire hoses were being used. While sometimes it is important to operate at the level of the symbolic, sometimes it is equally important to operate at the level of the real.” Engaging the real

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is much harder than the safe space of the gallery or studio. I know the more Creative Time helps artists venture into the real world, the more we confront the difficulties of this—from pressing up against legal limitations to pressures of censorship. What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered in operating at the level of the real in your work? THEASTER GATES: One thing is that with the symbolic encounter in the museum, it stays for three months, let’s say. Then the work goes away. That’s the nature of the museum. When you engage in a place with real people and you have a three-month engagement, that’s called the beginning of a relationship. If that work is going to be impactful or interesting, there are actual relationships to nurture. So, one of the challenges is committing to places and people in a way that the symbolic doesn’t. AP: Community is important to you. How do you know when your work is contributing to an intended community? TG: Well, the work that I’m doing is less about people and more about what happens when you engage a place so that the local fertile ground might grow. What happens when you make space? As a result of intervening in space you start to develop relationships. And you therefore have to remain consistent about a project. Sometimes a building or site is so contested that this task is impossible, and the kind of intervention needed is not from an artist or from me. If I come in with a hard context and a solution, saying we need jobs or we need better schools, my $10,000 can’t solve those problems.

So even sometimes within the real you have to create these symbolic gestures that aid the possibility of doing the bigger work. There definitely have been times where the work starts out symbolic, continues in a symbolic way that points to the real, and then ends up doing something that created access to real impact. AP: So much of what is written about your work talks about the importance of providing skills training and jobs, but it sounds as though that’s secondary to your intentions. TG: Absolutely. This is what’s really interesting. The focus has been all wrong; people focus on the finished building or the fact that I’ve hired some artists when, in fact, the real work was all the negotiation: to get the building, identify the partners who can use the space, even building a relationship so that some kid would want to help me out. I’m not doing some community a favor—I really need help. I’m not going around like Santa Claus passing out jobs. I think there are ways in which we want to create this altruistic layer to art practices like mine, but I think the work that I’m engaged in is actually constantly negotiating with real people whose labor has value. AP: An article by artists Steve Lambert and Stephen Duncombe said, “The point of political art is not to represent the world but to act within it.” They added, “Political artists, if they want to change the world, need to think about what they want their work to do.” What do you want your work to do? Is yours a “political art”? TG: I don’t think so. It’s a whole art—an art that can’t separate work that happens in the studio from work that happens on the block. For some artists, their training is about the studio—about materiality and a limited set of things. My training is to think about cities

Th PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS

CONVERSATIONS

Anne Pas

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Theaster Gates PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA POOLEY, COURTESY OF KAVI GUPTA

and economies. It’s bigger than the studio. The world that I occupy, the artistic problem that I have, is bigger than the artistic problem of art history. I’m not just trying to trump Donald Judd or respond to Joseph Beuys; I’m also trying to figure out whether there is a creative way to think about the housing crisis. AP: There’s another narrative, too, about class and economics. For you, it could go something like this: You care about poor, black, inner-city neighborhoods that have been screwed by systemic racism in this country. You buy properties in these neighborhoods, reuse local materials, some of which are loaded with racial associations, to create sculptures—and then you sell that art to primarily rich white collectors. With those funds, you repeat the process. TG: I believe in the place where I’m from; I no longer have the burden of psychological racism upon me. I’m operating within a system of extreme wealth disparity, and I have the right to access all aspects of the system that I live within. I will engage in that system so that my principal agendas are carried out, and those include creating beautiful places where poor people live and believing that culture has the right to live wherever I live. Before I was engaged

in Dorchester, which is both your home and a cultural space. TG: I was surprised to learn that Chicago’s Millennium Park was a private/public partnership. Our most seemingly public space in Chicago can close down for private events, and can kick people out if they have a certain political voice. The fear that I have for public space today is that it’s infringing upon our ability to publicly emote. If I have to ask for a permit to declare my frustration with government, that’s problematic. If I can go to jail in a democracy for voicing my political emotion or opinion, that really scares me. There has been a lack of investment in public space in poor neighborhoods, so it is easier for me to buy the land, create a trust, build a park, and entrust it. And the more that I learn about financial and legal systems of operation, the more I’ll push. In fact, my research these days focuses on legal entities by which one can negotiate spheres of public entitlement. How can I employ those legal tactics as a material for creative intervention in a place? It’s not

“The fear I have for public space today is that it’s infringing upon our ability to publicly emote. If I have to ask for a permit to declare my frustration with government, that’s problematic.” –THEASTER GATES

in the art market, I had other lucrative engagements that allowed me to do the work I wanted. In addition to making objects that cost a lot of money, I make my art free through performance. There should be multiple material, emotional, and physical markets that I push through. AP: At the 2012 Creative Time Summit, Slavoj Žižek spoke of the conflation of private and public spaces, and made a powerful call for the defense of the public realm. What are your thoughts about the current erasure of private/public and its impact on public space? It’s really interesting how that’s evidenced

just about wood and metal and clay and mortar; it’s about legal systems and superstructures and accountants and marketing. That’s why archives—collections of knowledge that go unacknowledged—are really important to me, and the parts of my practice that people don’t see have to do with this constant negotiation. AP: Most artists stay away from this kind of direct engagement, as it’s complex and difficult. Do you think it’s too easy for artists to hide behind the privilege and safety of the art world and disassociate themselves from the real, and from the ethics of their own practices?

TG: Like anybody else, artists have the right to decide how out they are about their political beliefs. Those who understand the value of political emotion and choose to enact it are the ones who help move the needle. But not every artist is engaged in a practice that is about change. And I think that’s OK, Anne. I came to the work that I do quite earnestly. The thing I’m constantly saying to people is, do what you believe. If that is found in the studio painting, goddamn it, do it. But if it includes having a strong political voice, don’t back down from it. Engage that part of yourself. In my case, I feel like I’m in cahoots with the most powerful people in the art world, and some have very different political beliefs than mine. A billionaire art collector may have the same political or religious beliefs as my aunt, but I’m not gonna back down from my aunt—so I’m not gonna back down from the billionaire, right? I wouldn’t say all artists need to be engaged in a political investigation, like I wouldn’t say all artists need to be engaged in a racial or ethnic cultural representational burden. It just happens that I can’t escape the political and the representational. ABMB

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Mari

CONVERSATIONS

MARIA BAIBAKOVA (MBA): Matthew, when are you getting a coffee table finally? This is an interview question. I want it on record. MATTHEW BRANNON (MBR): I had too much furniture. At one time the studio was like a living room. Did you ever come by when it was carpeted in that room and it was just full of couches? It was very intimidating but useless. MBA: I think I may have. The first time I came to your studio in New York was January 2009, before we did the show together in Moscow at the Baibakov Art Projects called “FIVE,” which featured you, Wade Guyton,

Kelley Walker, Sterling Ruby, and Walead Beshty. You are a young artist, but you’ve already done a lot. MBR: I wouldn’t say I’m young anymore—I’m 41. It’s just that I’ve worked many different directions. I’d like to say I’m interested in all of art’s complications, but maybe I’ve just complicated things. MBA: What are the key directions for you? Is the print work the most important? MBR: Yes, but one medium only encourages another for me. MBA: You work in sculpture, painting, and print? MBR: The letterpress was the most exciting for me initially—the simple pairing of image and text, and the irresolvable tension between the two. I see a lot of what I’ve done since as having started from that. Even the sculpture comes out of these prints. MBA: I have a letterpress work in my collection. It’s of a woman’s shoe with text that reads—I’ll paraphrase: “Dear ex, I hope you’re reading this because I wrote this for you. And when you walk by the bookstore, I hope you’ll notice, and then you’ll know how you let me down. And when I ran out of the apartment and grabbed the laptop instead of the cat, it wasn’t my worst mistake.” That actually hangs in my bedroom in Moscow. MBR: That’s one of my favorite ones. That’s an incredible… that’s… I don’t know, sorry. I used the adjective incredible when talking about my work. MBA: It is incredible! MBR: I mean, just how text allows in such a physically small space to have such a large world. MBA: Do you consider yourself a writer as well— because you work with text?

MBR: The only reason I don’t call myself a writer is so I don’t offend other writers. It’s very easy for a visual artist to receive praise in another creative field. Putting writing into a visual context is what I’ve been doing, and I’d say I’ve been getting away with murder. MBA: When you talk about this, I’m thinking about two works we had in Russia. There was a stack of books where you wrote, but we weren’t allowed, as curators or viewers, to read the text. So you have writing in your work, which is visual art like an installation, but no one can access it. MBR: I’m about to open that up a bit. Initially, the subject of that work was access. If the director’s chairs were a kind of clichéd bookmark for power, the text element would’ve then been the most vulnerable part of the work. But I intentionally kept them out of reach. I spent a lot of time writing those texts, and I have to ask myself whether my not allowing anyone to read them was just a defensive strategy or whether…. MBA: Whether it was necessary in the context of the work at the time? MBR: I think it created a stress—an irritant—and that’s something I find very productive in visual art. I want the art I make to go down smooth and then sort of disturb, with a delayed reaction. I’m attracted to the subject of tact, not the reverse, where shock is followed by apathy. MBA: That’s very interesting because that’s the central problem that contemporary art faces today. If the shock factor is so strong in the beginning, most viewers will be so intellectually alienated that they won’t be able to get outside their own comfort zone and actually access the work; they dismiss it, and that’s a really big problem that institutions face when they’re trying to figure out what goes on display or gets bought into collections. But you have productive tension. In a simplistic way, that’s what differentiates art from kitsch, right? Kitsch

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WONGE BERGMANN

Collector Maria Baibakova drops by artist Matthew Brannon’s studio to discuss his consumption, neuroses, and favorite books.

Matthew

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aria Baibakova is something chewed down for you and you have no reaction afterward except for a happy, good feeling and a desire to go to McDonald’s. Whereas with something that’s art, you need to have a remnant—a disturbance— that carries you forward and stays with you somehow. It leaves a question unanswered and opens a new door. MBR: I believe that. We live in a very anxious time. The economic meltdown has the planet in a panic. What will this all cost? It’s understandable that people feel very anxious. What role can art provide? I’m not so sure. MBA: What’s interesting for me about this anxiety in the world is that it’s bred by consumption. You walk into a store and there are too many choices. There are too many newspapers, too many news channels, too many outlets and products. And somehow your work deals with that, too—with advertising. Can you talk a little more about that and its relationship with consumption? MBR: I think that the print Masturbating a Lot directly

ways, I feel like advertising has always remained exciting for me. There’s a lot going on within something that’s trying to steer you to the thing in itself. MBA: When you were growing up, were you watching films? Was that a cultural outlet? MBR: Yes. I was born in ’71, so it was different then. Our access to films was hard earned. You had to wait for it to come to the theater; there was maybe one art house in any town. Or we’d beg, borrow, steal, and swap copied VHS tapes and pass them on. It was always very delayed, so our enthusiasm was almost overwhelming before you received the thing. Again with the disappointment. MBA: Yes, the speed of consumption has really changed in our time. MBR: That’s a very particular thing, like how we

“I want the art I make to go down smooth and then sort of disturb, with a delayed reaction. I’m attracted to the subject of tact, not the reverse, where shock is followed by apathy.” PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG LOTUS

—MATTHEW BRANNON

comments on that distracted attention span or insatiable desire we have. MBA: What is the relationship between film, representation, and advertising, and how does it feed into your work? MBR: I always avoid the autobiographical, but my father was a forest ranger. I grew up in very remote areas in the Northwest, and I had no access to culture except through advertising. When I finally had access to it and was living in New York… I don’t want to say I was disappointed, but I recognized that it didn’t diminish my attraction to the advertising itself. In some

appreciate something. I talk to young people who say that as soon as they’ve seen something it triggers their expectation of posting it in some form. MBA: They have a desire to share it. Every choice we make visually or culturally, we push it out to the public via Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. It then becomes part of our personal identity, which is constructed in this Internet sphere, so people have records of this. MBR: I’m making a list right now of my favorite novels because a few friends have done it, and I thought that it’s such a self-conscious endeavor to do something like that. You find yourself chiseling out who you’re

supposed to be from these titles. What you’re supposed to like, plus a few guilty pleasures, and then you have to look smart and be well-read and very well-rounded. There have to be as many women as men. I used to say Pale Fire was my favorite novel. MBA: Pale Fire? MBR: And now I think, how pretentious or obvious is that? I just had a whole vision of the kind of person whose favorite novel that would be. MBA: One of my favorite novels is Atlas Shrugged, which of course today is so politically charged. People think it’s a complete contradiction. It’s really funny how I have been criticized and been told, “Don’t say that’s your favorite novel because everyone will assume that you’re a Republican.” So there is this anxiety that I suffer. MBR: I think Americans in general have a lot of anxiety about our intelligence—and I certainly suffer from this. I get very insecure if I’m around somebody who I believe is more articulate or better read or more educated than I. ABMB

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José O

CONVERSATIONS

Márcia Fortes: Is there such a thing as “Brazilian art”? José Olympio Pereira: My view is that there is no Brazilian art in the sense that there are no Brazilspecific issues that are guiding artists right now, and all the works that I see in Brazil deal with issues that are not necessarily Brazilian—they are global issues. We live in a global world. Brazil is completely integrated with the rest of the world, and so are our artists. MF: I think there is always the specific local influence in everything that happens anywhere. I agree with

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you that there is a common denominator—it speaks the language everybody talks today, which is very international. But in terms of the art tradition here, it does have a particular sense of formalism, this concrete/ neoconcrete trait you see in the young art here today, somehow lurking underneath. In that sense, there is something very particular, although it doesn’t mean there is a movement that could be called Brazilian art. JOP: Yes, the influence of Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica is present in the current generation. But I think that may drive other artists as well. I saw Mexican works in last year’s FIAC, which were a clear Metaesquema [Oiticica’s iconic work that includes more than 350 small paintings in primary colors inspired by abstract art], so I was glad to see that Hélio Oiticica’s reach goes beyond Brazil. MF: There’s also Armando Andrade Tudela, who made a series of Bichos by Lygia Clark using LP covers by Caetano and the Tropicália guys, and then the work referring to Lina Bo Bardi. JOP: I agree with you that formalism is a big thing in our art, but I love the way they deal with it. There are great works exploring form and these issues. If you think about Brazilian art, that is a great aspect of it. And at the same time, we have the likes of Cildo Meireles and Paulo Bruscky, who are a lot more conceptual than formal. We have that angle as well. MF: So, how do you see the banner that the auction houses make, separating the contemporary art auctions and the Latin American art auctions? In the upcoming contemporary auctions you have works by

Adriana Varejão and Beatriz Milhazes, then in the Latin American catalogue, you have again works by Adriana Varejão and Ernesto Neto. There’s no logic. Even the auction houses are defeated by such banners. How did you feel when Phillips borrowed the BRIC concept from global economics and applied it to the art world? JOP: I think the Latin American banner doesn’t quite represent us. We don’t even have a Hispanic colonization. BRIC countries even less. So I think it’s a very ill-conceived idea, quite frankly—pardon me, Phillips, for my candor. There is no BRIC art. As a matter of fact, there’s no BRIC economy. And I’ve been making the point, as an investment banker, that Brazil is a very distinct country from the other BRICs as a destination for investments and as an economy. MF: In light of your work in the finance world, how do you see this sudden interest in Brazil? JOP: I think there are two things that we need to identify. First, there’s an interest from the galleries in our upand-coming upper class and its money, and there is a general interest in collecting art. This is something new. We’ve seen in the latest ArtRio and in the SP-Arte fairs many of the large foreign galleries coming here looking for clients, including the beacon for all: Gagosian’s presence in ArtRio. MF: It’s easy to imagine Gagosian flying to Rio, because Gagosian is so widespread. But when you think of Hauser & Wirth, David Zwirner, Neugerriemschneider… JOP: Yes, Hauser & Wirth, when they fly to Rio, they are recognizing that there’s a lot of money in Brazil. They’re not tapping that market, and they have excellent art that they want to show to local collectors.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDUARDO ORTEGA; COURTESY OF GALERIA FORTES VILAÇA

Brazilian dealer Márcia Fortes, of Galeria Fortes Vilaça, sits down with legendary Brazilian collector José Olympio Pereira to discuss the arts climate in Brazil and its importance to the rest of the world.

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Olympio Pereira That’s one side of the phenomenon, which is in line with the 150 IPOs we’ve had in the last eight years, the creation of a large number of billionaires, and lots of interest in art. On the flip side of all this is another factor: Brazilian artists are becoming more and more well known to the rest of the world. Fortunately we have very good artistic production. MF: Which is special. JOP: As Brazil inserts itself into the global arena as an emerging power and people are interested in our economy, they pay attention to our art, and they discover that we have great artists producing very interesting things. MF: There has been incredible local interest in art, even though that’s not in our tradition. JOP:. If you are very wealthy and you are buying your fifth Ferrari, your friends will look down on you. But if you’re buying your 10th Gerhard Richter, they will think you’re great. There are good aspects to this phenomenon because many of these people are initially buying brands; then they get acquainted with what’s behind the brand, becoming more interested in art and thereby more knowledgeable. However, there

enjoyable consequence of my collecting activity, but the paradox is I didn’t do it for that reason. You develop an eye and go after the very best. You try to buy the right things at the right value, because obviously you can’t afford everything, and then you end up with something that has—fortunately— increased in value because the world, wealth, and interest have all grown. That’s a fortuitous consequence to collecting. MF: Do you think Brazilians are ready for international art? As a local gallery, we feel that we play an important role in attracting global artists. JO: I’m very pleased that you’re representing Simon Evans, an artist I very much like. I think you’re doing a great job for him here. And Jim Cohan didn’t have to come here to bring him because you’re performing that role. It’s more natural for the Brazilian galleries to work this way, just as Sean Kelly or Sikkema Jenkins & Co. or Tanya Bonakdar in New York represent our artists there. I don’t think they need to come here to sell their artists—you should be

“I hope that this new interest in art will also mean that these new collectors and people who are interested will join institutions and support them.” –JOSÉ OLYMPIO PEREIRA

are a number of people who’ve made a speculative game out of art—an investment game. I hate when young guys come to me and ask what’s the new flavor of the day, what’s going up in value. Unfortunately, art has become… MF: An asset. Once you gave me a quote that I love repeating: “Art is something you buy for pleasure. But there’s a small risk of a big increase in value.” JOP: People sometimes come to me and ask, “How could you say that art is not a good investment? You’ve been buying art, and obviously your collection went up in value multiple times.” I can’t say that’s not an

the ones to do that because we deal with you or your counterparts already. MF: What could we do to improve our structure for creating a healthy local environment for contemporary art on a government level? We recognize there’s public interest in it, but then when it comes to the entities that govern us, they have not reached this conclusion yet. In order to make a Simon Evans exhibition or simply bring into the country works by Brazilian artists living abroad, the process and cost of importing the works are just absurd. JOP: If you import art into the US, it costs you

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nothing. In Brazil if you import, taxes are around 50 percent. This is something that needs to be addressed with the Brazilian tax authorities to improve this cultural exchange. The tax exemptions that happened during the art fairs here were a good start. MF: The government thinks art is an elitist commodity. It fails to understand that the richer the cultural patrimony in your country is, the richer your country is. It may be in private hands today, but some of that will certainly end up in public institutions. JOP: We need to work on strengthening our cultural institutions. We’re still in the infancy of building strong museums or public galleries that can rival the stature of MoMA in New York, Tate Modern in London, or Centre Pompidou in France. I hope that this new interest in art will also mean that these new collectors and people that are interested will join institutions and support them. MF: We still need to understand the meaning of philanthropy. JOP: Philanthropy in Brazil is, unfortunately, at its infancy, but there are very good signs that it’s growing. The recent group that was put together to buy works for Pinacoteca—that was a great initiative. ABMB

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Marianne Goebl, director of Design Miami, speaks with Sebastian Cwilich, president and COO of Art.sy, about the relationship between art and design, and their new joint venture. Sebastian Cwilich: When did you first realize that you were interested in design—that you loved design and wanted to devote yourself to it? Marianne Goebl: Like all children, I just loved things and wanted to understand how things were made. As a teenager, I discovered my love for contemporary art. I worked in art galleries and museums, did some internships, and I thought I would end up in these realms. Then some designer friends took me to the Milan furniture fair when I was in my early 20s, and there I discovered this whole other world. I saw there was a world of functional objects that also had a strong cultural meaning.

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SC: You were growing up in Vienna, right? MG: Yes, and in Milan was this world of objects that had a cultural meaning, which were beautiful but also tangible. And that’s the field I wanted to work in. SC: Was it that aspect, the kind of functionality— maybe that accessibility—of design that attracted you? MG: Yes, definitely the accessibility. I was never a creative mind in the sense of an artist or designer myself; I knew I was going to work in communications or in a curatorial capacity. I understood that for me, my personal interests, and my values, it would be much more interesting to do that in a field where things were more accessible and tangible. SC: For us at Art.sy, that was one of the main motivators for establishing this partnership with Design Miami: our belief that—and this is nothing terribly novel—there is a lot of crossover between art and design. The accessibility of design is aligned with our broader vision of making art accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. And the idea that design can be more accessible, perhaps from a price point, but as importantly from a kind of functional standpoint—that this is a table, and, yes, it’s a collectible design object, but also that everyone has a table in their home, so they can relate to it more. MG: I think it’s this first approach that’s made much easier in design than in the fine arts. Yes, it has function, it’s a table, but then you dive into the stories behind it and it can get very complex. SC: Absolutely. So how much of a distinction do you think still exists between art and design? Historically, there have been many traditions, such as Bauhaus, in which art and design have being quite interconnected. To what extent does that distinction still exist?

Ma

MG: For me, it mainly exists in the intention and procedures behind a piece of art or design. There are people who easily move between disciplines and just excel. They certainly exist, and I admire them. But ultimately I think an artist is somebody who works autonomously and who asks himself a question, defines a strategy and an aesthetic vocabulary to express his answers to the questions he’s asked himself. A designer is a problem-solver who expresses a solution to a user. It can be a fictional user or himself. It’s a dialogue. SC: It seems to me that it’s a spectrum because you have some works that operate in a very abstract realm and others that are clearly more responsive to something external—purpose or objective might be too strong a word, but closer to that realm, which in turn would be closer to design. So I wonder if in fact it’s not quite as binary. MG: Ultimately I don’t believe in black and white; there is always a gray, and this gray zone can be very interesting. But I still think it’s a mind-set that’s also defined by education. And this difference does exist; people start from different places and take it wherever they want to go. That’s what happens nowadays. You’re not obliged to stay in your field. SC: What has proved most influential about your previous role at Vitra—where you collaborated with many important designers like Ron Arad, Konstantin Grcic, and Jasper Morrison—for running Design Miami? MG: Working for Vitra was formative on many levels, thanks to the collaboration with exceptional design talents. I developed a deep respect for the complexity of design and the intense dialogue between the many different parties involved. From a business perspective, I understood that culture and commerce do not contradict each other. On the contrary: If you strive for high cultural standards in whatever you do,

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SOPHIE ELGORT (CWILICH); RICHARD PATTERSON/DESIGN MIAMI (GOEBL)

CONVERSATIONS

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Marianne Goebl there can ultimately be a commercial success. But that shouldn’t be the first and foremost goal. SC: What was the impetus for choosing to partner with Art.sy, and what do you see as the advantages, the benefit to the viewers and the exhibitors at the fair? MG: Design Miami is a physical experience. It’s an event that takes place two times per year for a week where we act as a forum and we bring people together who share an interest and passion for design. We were thinking about how to extend this two-week experience into something more, and add another layer of community-building to this. The digital realm comes as a good way to do that. When we started speaking with Art.sy, we quickly understood that there are shared values in the sense that Art.sy and Design Miami are both platforms—curated marketplaces for connoisseurs and amateurs alike. They give a variety of protagonists the opportunities to contribute to the exchange. I also feel that Art.sy’s mission of giving everybody with Internet access to art really lowers the threshold, but at the same time you keep up the quality of work and respect intellectual property. As a design

will probably have an answer. If you ask them who their favorite artist is or favorite designer, they will say Warhol and Picasso. And really there’s nothing intrinsically inaccessible about art, but I think because of a lack of education, a lack of access for many people, a certain intimidation, there is not the same engagement with art. I think there is actually appreciation. Most people, if you ask whether they like art, they say yes; but people are not regularly engaging with art, and we hope that a platform like Art.sy can take everyone—from sophisticated collectors to someone who is just starting out—to that initial discovery experience. Turning back to this year’s fair, what are you most excited about? MG: I’m really excited about the fact that we’ve developed every aspect of our program: content, presentation, and education. We have a gallery program that will grow by 25 percent, and we will show a

“Most people, if you ask whether they like art, they say yes; but most people are not regularly engaging with art, and we hope that a platform like Art.sy can take everyone to that initial discovery experience.” —SEBASTIAN CWILICH

fair, we obviously appreciate the site’s architecture and design. We were particularly interested in the Genome Project—how you could develop a novel way to categorize design work, which will lead to unexpected combinations and story angles. And we were also interested in this encyclopedic approach. This makes me wonder: Do you have an ideal target user? When you say everyone who has Internet access, do you really see it that broadly? SC: I think it needs to be broad because it’s really at the core of our vision that art should be as accessible as music. The idea is that if you stop someone on the street and you ask them who their favorite musician is, they

larger spectrum of positions. We have great site-specific commissions, for example, by the interdisciplinary studio Snarkitecture, which is creating a pavilion of inflated tubes, a landscape of stalactites that you walk into. We’ve also partnered with the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, which will provide curated tours at the fair. And I should add Art.sy’s collaboration, so it really feels like it’s going to be a very mature fair without losing its edge. SC: It’s interesting, that idea of not losing the edge. How do you balance the new, the contemporary, the more emerging, with the classic and the modern? MG: We constantly develop the gallery program, and

on the historic side, we clearly defined the additional periods we would like to cover. Our historic program represents about 50 percent of the exhibitors. In the contemporary field, you can’t be as systematic in the sense that it is happening now... It’s more moving than the historic part. We also have a specific exhibition format for contemporary design, which we call Design On/Site. It’s a solo show format to discover in depth the work of individual designers. This was introduced three years ago and has proved very successful. SC: There are clearly people who exhibit at both fairs, right? MG: Yes, a few. You have fine artists who take an interest in creating functional objects. At Design Miami, you could find Donald Judd’s coffee tables, and I am referring to furniture and not sculptures. We have artist jewelry by Calder, Picasso, and many more, which were created as wearable sculpture. We also had Jonathan Monk with his take on Enzo Mari’s Autoprogettazione Chair, a series of chairs. ABMB

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Artist Andy Freeberg has spent the past few years making clever, observational photographs at several of the large art fairs, featuring the living dioramas that gallery booths have increasingly become.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDY FREEBERG, COURTESY OF PAUL KOPEIKIN GALLERY

ART FARE Photography by Andy Freeberg

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I

Marlborough, Art Basel, 2010. Paintings by Ad Reinhardt

f you’re here in Miami right now, you know it’s no secret that art fairs have helped transform the business of contemporary art and are progressively redefining the art world of the 21st century. Photographer Andy Freeberg became intrigued by this phenomenon and has created a series of witty photographs, appropriately titled Art Fare, examining the myriad interactions—the schmoozing, the deals, the boredom, the camaraderie, the history—that occur in the dealers’ booths. Represented by Culver City–based Kopeikin Gallery (which is exhibiting the work at Miami Project this week), Freeberg’s images actually

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make us want to slow down and take a long look at these temporary, unparalleled artist communities. “Gallery owners and their staffs are usually hidden behind large entry desks and closed office doors,” Freeberg says. “But at the major art fairs I’ve visited, like Art Basel Miami Beach and Art Basel in Switzerland, they’re in plain view in their booths, as if onstage. You can see art dealers meeting with collectors, selling and negotiating, talking on cell phones, working on laptops, and manipulating touch-screens in 21st-century postures newly adapted for the latest electronic devices. I found the lighting, costumes, and set design excellent for photographing these stages, where the art world plays itself.”

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Chuck Close with an Andy Warhol print at Gagosian Galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s booth, Art Basel Miami Beach, 2009.

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Andrea Rosen booth, Art Basel Miami Beach, 2010, featuring work by Wolfgang Tillmans.

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Sean Kelly booth, Art Basel Miami Beach, 2010. Painting by Kehinde Wiley.

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Blum & Poe booth, Art Basel Miami Beach, 2010, with work by Alex Katz.

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Spinello Projects booth, Pulse New York, 2010, with a painting by Zachari Logan.

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ARTIST OF THE YEAR

TravelingMind Globe-trotting artist Richard Tuttle, who opens this year’s Art Basel Conversations series, waxes philosophical on all sources of beauty, and how it inspires his work. By Carol Kino

R

ichard Tuttle, on the phone from a hotel room in London late at night, is talking about the many places he’s visited and worked over the preceding few weeks. His odyssey had begun in Los Angeles, where he is currently Artist in Residence for The Getty Research Institute’s annual Scholars Program. Then, travelling with a suitcase full of artworks, he and his wife, poet Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, had flown to Germany to install a show at the Kunstverein München. After that, they had relocated to London. The following weeks held a similarly dizzying number of shows and projects, including one at the Bergen Kunsthmuseene, Tuttle’s first solo exhibition in Norway, and another

at Munich’s Pinakothek der Moderne. Tuttle seems a bit bemused by the Pinakothek show, which turns out to be drawn from private collections throughout Munich. “I don’t think there’s a name for it,” he ruminates. “Why don’t I know that? Because I don’t care, I guess. I just want to make art as well as I can.” Then he talks about the Kunstverein show, “Hello, The Roses,” on which he collaborated with his wife, who read four poems aloud as he created and installed works. “It was on the one hand based on the idea of talking to plants,” Tuttle says. “And on the other hand, it was about love—how one can get love into something, whether it’s a fruit bowl or a life.”

“Did I hear you say ‘fruit bowl?’” I ask. “I’m just looking at a bowl that came from Munich, so that came to mind,” Tuttle says. “But I think how we find love is always an ingredient. It doesn’t often get into things, but everything’s always better when it does.” Then he confesses, “I’m a hugely abstract person, you know, and you’ve got to keep me concrete.” That’s the sort of discourse—at once rambling, philosophical, and also extremely genial—that visitors should probably expect when Tuttle is honored at the Premiere Artist Talk at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach. The event that opens the annual Art Basel Conversations series features a discussion between an artist whose work seems ideally suited

PHOTOGRAPHY © RICHARD TUTTLE, COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY (SYSTEMS); GARY MANKUS, COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY (TUTTLE)

The

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Systems, VIII–XII, 2012.

Richard Tuttle

to the times and a curator or critic who has worked with that person closely. Previous groupings have included Ai Weiwei talking with Philip Tinari, and Vik Muniz and Chuck Close in conversation with Richard Flood. Tuttle’s conversation—sure to be entertaining— will be with Chris Dercon, the director of Tate Modern, with whom he is planning a grand, multivenue project in London for 2014. As Tuttle explains it, the plan will include various sites that will each be involved in the organization of complementary shows. “This is a real vision,” Tuttle says. “And we’re all terrified. Everything has to be done so perfectly.” But London probably doesn’t need to worry: Since Tuttle arrived on the art scene in the early 1960s, perfection has been his byword. So has the idea of using minimal materials to create pieces that don’t really fit conventional categories (such as drawing, sculpture, or collage), while also

expanding into something much larger than the sum of their parts. In his life, as well, Tuttle has also been adept at taking the materials available and making them into something completely unexpected and new. Raised in Roselle, New Jersey, he attended Trinity

College because his parents wouldn’t let him go to art school; instead he worked on the yearbook and is now known for his interest in book design. After moving to New York, where he studied briefly at The Cooper Union, he eventually got a job at the Betty Parsons Gallery, known for showing work by Pollock and Rothko. Within a year, Tuttle, who was making tiny paper cubes that must have been about as far from Abstract Expressionism as you could get, had convinced Parsons to show him, too. For his first show in 1965, called “Constructed Paintings,” Tuttle used canvas stretched over plywood—and sometimes just the plywood itself— together with many layers of carefully mixed paint, to build artworks that lay somewhere between drawing, painting and sculpture. Stuart Preston, in his New York Times review, called the pieces so “dovelike and gentle in color, and so explicit that they cry out to be recognized as signs ordering us to do this or that.” Gordon Washburn, who wrote

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ARTIST OF THE YEAR

the gallery brochure, noted that “the subtlety of their modulations [gives] them the air of faintly breathing… like tender living things.” That’s exactly the way people continue to talk about Tuttle’s enormously influential work nearly a half-century later, now that he has expanded his range of media to include mundane and ephemeral materials, such as Styrofoam, twigs, bubble wrap, string, dyed cloth, rope, wire, or plastic bags (among many other things). At 71, he has also worked in many different scales, including the pencil-length piece of painted wood that he showed at the 1976 Venice Biennale; the matchbook-sized constructions and drawings that he hung just above the floor at Mary Boone Gallery in Soho in 1992; and the much larger sculptural assemblages, one measuring 17 feet, 6 inches in length, that he showed at the Pace Gallery in Chelsea this past fall. The poet Bob Holman, Tuttle’s longtime friend, calls his work “off-hand and totally conscious,” and notes its eternal “sense of happenstance and ‘has to be.’” Madeleine Grynsztejn, Pritzker, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, says, “They have a kind of life of their own, these works. They kind of live and breathe in the same air and space that we do.” Grynsztejn curated Tuttle’s 2005 retrospective, “The Art of Richard Tuttle,” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (which later travelled to the Whitney, as well as four more institutions). Even when he’s reinstalling a piece, she says, “He finds a way to make it come as alive as it moves from context to context.”

To make the works at Pace Gallery, Tuttle arrived several months before the show with elements of each, and spent a long time in the warehouse working on the relationships between them. Then, just before the show, he reassembled each work in the gallery, making careful adjustments, adding a circle of Kraft paper to an Arp-like construction involving a doormat, a piece of lumber, and a piece of twine; or changing the angle of a construction made from burlap, wood, and signpost-like concrete signpost that suggests a New Guinea tribal mask. Arne Glimcher, the founder and chairman of Pace Gallery, points out that Tuttle’s process is completely intuitive. “You can intellectualize the art all you want afterward, but that’s not what it’s about,” Glimcher says. “It’s very akin to Agnes Martin. It’s all about finding beauty.” But try to get Tuttle to talk about how he finds that beauty and he’s likely to veer off onto other subjects, such as the cycles of the Mayan calendar (“Some of us subtle types are trying to get prepared for the new period,” he says); or his love of Velázquez drawings, one of which he has just spent a long time looking at in a show at The British Library (“You’re really asked to look at the back end of this horse!” he marvels). He finally admits that Velázquez fascinates him because he was the first European painter to hit “a true vertical” in his compositions. Then there is Tuttle’s even more surprising passion for German Romanticism. In the spring of 2012, for an exhibition of artists’ collections at the International Print Center New York in Chelsea, he

lent prints by artists like Christian Wilhelm Ernst Dietrich and Ludwig Emil Grimm (of Grimm’s Fairy Tales fame). Earlier this year, he contributed an essay to the catalogue for the Hamburger Kunsthalle’s show on the landscape painter Johann Christian Reinhart, at the request of Neue Pinakothek, chief curator Dr. Herbert Rott, will contribute a text to an upcoming exhibition of the portraitist Anselm Feuerbach scheduled for the museum next year. Tuttle is fascinated by the period because, like the American and French Revolutions, the German Unification movement was “really concerned with the same problem—the social structure,” he says, which in a sense is what underpins his own work. Plus, “I’m wired to show people beautiful things,” he adds, whether it be the color of the sky or a work in a museum. Tuttle is reticent to discuss the work in the Pace show—or any other show, for that matter. He finally divulges that sometimes inspiration for works will come to him while walking around his local Lowe’s hardware store. “You walk into this huge room that’s a bigger space than you’ve ever seen before,” Tuttle says, “and it’s kind of like a metaphor of the world. Everything is available there. Nothing’s about art. It’s about not art.” But if you enter with “just art on your brain,” and you wait till something clicks, that’s how you proceed. “It’s kind of corny, but when you go out into the world you’re doing something similar,” Tuttle says. “Art isn’t just for museum walls or galleries or art fairs. It’s a living thing.” ABMB

ALL ARTWORK © RICHARD TUTTLE, COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY

Systems, IX, 2012.

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7th Wood Slat, 1974.

Two or More XIII, 1984. 26th Line Piece, 1990.

The artist in his studio in Rome in the 1980s.

“I’m wired to show people beautiful things.”

Ten.D., 2000.

—RICHARD TUTTLE

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY

This year, we sit down with a group of visionaries who reveal how they are reframing the contemporary art world and recontextualizing the creative process.

Put My Guns in the Ground, by Kon Trubkovich, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK);

Influencers

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INFLUENCERS

Art Lovers

For power couple Melva Bucksbaum and Ray Learsy, collecting is a bonding experience— with artists and each other. By Julie L. Belcove

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elva Bucksbaum was born with the collecting gene. As a child she amassed storybook dolls and glass animals. “Then I wanted to be an artist, but the hand never did what my head wanted it to,” she says. “I spent hours at the Smithsonian and The National Gallery just looking and looking.” Once she was able to afford to buy art, in the 1970s, “that was the end of my doodling.” Meanwhile, Raymond Learsy would leave the stiff environs of the Wharton School in the 1950s to come to New York City and hang out at the Cedar Tavern, the preferred watering hole of the Abstract Expressionists. “I would drink in the fumes of these great artists,” he recalls. Once he began making money as a commodities trader, collecting contemporary art became his pass into the “cathedral,” as he puts it. Both Bucksbaum and Learsy were already seasoned collectors when they Collectors Melva met as board members at the Whitney Museum of American Art in the late ’90s. Bucksbaum and Ray Learsy. But it wasn’t until they ran into each other one night at the opening of a Stephan Balkenhol exhibition at Gladstone Gallery in 2000 that sparks about blue chips. As Bucksbaum notes, “Our first hanging at The flew. “[Balkenhol] did a sculpture of a giraffe,” Learsy says. Granary was titled ‘Not on Your List,’ which gives you an idea about “Melva and I were… admiring it, and started talking to each the collection.” other seriously about the giraffe. The rest is history.” Learsy “They’re always open to fresh work by people they don’t pauses, then adds, “That giraffe is now in our collection.” know,” says Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Bucksbaum and Learsy joined forces—legally and artwise—the Director. “They buy with their eyes and their experience—not following year when they married. “Our tastes are very similar,” with their ears.” says Learsy. “But that doesn’t mean we buy by committee. If one Bucksbaum and Learsy are known for their generosity of us feels very strong about a work, that’s fine.” toward up-and-coming younger artists and buying paintings or It was a formidable match: They have since become one of photographs when others aren’t. Learsy says it makes him feel the most respected couples in the art world. They are widely —ADAM D. WEINBERG useful. “I don’t view collecting as philanthropy,” he says, “but known for the Bucksbaum Award, a prize that Melva created in there’s no question that collecting artists, especially at a given 2000. Past recipients of the $100,000 grant, which goes to an artist in the Whitney Biennial, include Irit Batsry and Raymond Pettibon; this year’s point in their careers, is helpful.” Their methods are refreshingly old-school in their simplicity. “If you’re really a prize went to choreographer Sarah Michelson. Bucksbaum and Learsy maintain a private gallery at their home in Sharon, serious collector and you want to keep your collection reflective of the moment, Connecticut, and take turns curating exhibitions in the space, which they call The the most valuable tool you have,” Learsy says, “is shoe leather. I can’t tell you how Granary. Learsy recently installed “Seen But Not Present,” featuring works without many times I have had the goal of going to Gallery A and then Gallery B, and I stop visible figures, including an Anselm Kiefer abstraction and a Richard Prince car in Gallery F—and shazam!” To be sure, Weinberg volunteers, “On any given Saturday, I can be in the most hood. Bucksbaum, meanwhile, has been organizing a femalecentric show. Learsy obscure gallery and bump into Melva and Ray—or see their names in the book.” jokes, “I have been virtually banned from the premises.” No JPEGs of artworks will suffice for this couple. Says Learsy, “You’ve got to see The couple, loathe to bruise any egos, is discreet about which artists they collect most comprehensively. Some of the big names who either one or both hit on early, them. You’ve got to feel them. You’ve got to be there. Going to galleries is the sine though, include Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, and Sigmar Polke. But it’s not all qua non of collecting in your time.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS

“They buy with their eyes and their experience— not with their ears.”

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INFLUENCERS

Playing with Fire Known for his gunpowder works, Cai GuoQiang defines the line between artistry and explosive entertainment. By Julie L. Belcove

“I really enjoy the spontaneity. It creates a disturbance, a certain kind of chaos.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSHUA WHITE/JWPICTURES.COM; COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES

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lenty of artists frequent the foundry, the fabricator, or the printer to produce their works, but only Cai Guo-Qiang makes visits to Fireworks by Grucci, the Long Island–based pyrotechnics company. There, he creates his beguiling gunpowder drawings, which use the ancient Chinese invention to create everything from abstract images to more representational drawings of tigers, crocodiles, peonies, and—beginning in 2009—the human figure. Cai, who was born under the fire element, has presented his precisely choreographed, site-specific explosion events to museums around the globe and mesmerized nearly a third of the world’s population with the opening and closing ceremonies of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, for which he served as director of visual and special effects. He won the prestigious Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale in 1999, and his artworks are highly coveted by collectors. Yet the iconoclast eschews gallery representation and has always handled his business affairs from his East Village studio. “I’m like a daughter too old to be married off,” he says through a translator and laughs. Cai Guo-Qiang in On a chilly afternoon in his studio, Cai also pokes fun at himself for not speaking front of an outdoor gunpowder drawing English after living in New York for 17 years. Over lunch in the kitchen, where he from a Mystery Circle Explosion Event in 2012. eats with his staff every day, he announces that he has decided to learn the language when he turns 65—in 10 years—as a way of staving off senility. He believer in Communism, emerged unscathed. Cai’s art-history studtried when he first arrived, but two bad omens (he believes in the ies were spotty—schools taught da Vinci, bypassed Impressionism— supernatural) brought his studies to a halt. First, his backpack conbut he realized that “art allows you to forget about rules.” taining his English textbook was stolen. Then the private tutor he He began experimenting with gunpowder in the early 1980s by and his wife hired fell down the stairs of his fifth-floor walk-up and ripping open firecrackers, pouring the powder on a painting, and broke her leg after their first lesson. lighting a fuse. He thought it was safe until heat set the bowl of exploLanguage barriers notwithstanding, Cai seeks to be a truly intersives—and the tips of his hair—ablaze. “Now we’re careful,” he assures. national artist. Reminiscent of Robert Rauschenberg, he has taken Cai spent nine years in Japan gaining international notice before his gunpowder extravaganza from Qatar to Denmark, choosing to embarking in 1995 for New York, where he immediately felt at make his enormous drawings on site with scores of local volunteers home because of the large Chinese immigrant population: “New assisting his team. Yes, the volunteers are not all formally trained, —CAI GUO-QUIANG York allows you so much freedom.” but that’s part of the point. “I really enjoy this spontaneity,” Cai says. As more and more fans tried to gain access to his explosions, Cai decided to open “Volunteers create a disturbance, a certain kind of chaos that I wouldn’t have.” Locals also help Cai transcend his Chineseness. “We’re like tourists absorbing their them to the public, not as performances per se but out of the belief that “it shouldn’t information,” he says. In Ukraine, for instance, art students trained in socialist realism be so exclusive.” The onetime theatrical design student admits, though, to being contook part in a portrait series of miners in the heroic Soviet tradition. In Qatar, women cerned that the “wow” factor could tip art like his into the realm of entertainment. “It is a problem,” Cai says. “People are expecting the bang, the big flash. That helped Cai lay out abayas for a politically charged drawing that captured their silhouettes—the cloaklike dresses worn in the Arabian peninsula serve as stand-ins for is becoming a bit of a distraction.” Still, he says that the excitement of waiting for the human body, images of which are taboo in the Muslim world. “It’s a gray area, a something great while also not knowing whether everything will go as planned keeps the medium of his art interesting and challenging. “Everyone has this innate sensitive area,” Cai says. “You have to tread with care.” Having come of age in China during the Cultural Revolution, Cai is acutely aware enthusiasm for destruction.” Fortunately in Cai’s case, destruction is the source of of political obstacles, though his father, an amateur painter and calligrapher and a true his creation. ABMB

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INFLUENCERS

Modern Man

At Sweden’s Moderna Museet, Daniel Birnbaum is redefining the role of director—and the role of the museum itself. Michael B. Dougherty

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n the fall of 2010, when it was announced that Daniel Birnbaum had been recruited as the new director of Stockholm’s Moderna Museet—the first staterun museum for modern art—Swedish minister for culture and sport Lena Adelsohn Liljeroth described the former academic and writer as “one of the world’s leading figures on the international art scene.” “I’m not sure what it really means,” says the 49-year-old Birnbaum, sounding equally humbled and embarrassed. Birnbaum goes on to explain that he knows what makes a leading critic and a curator, as he’s been both, but that, “If you’re too present as a leader, or whatever you want to call it, it’s not the most positive thing for the art. For me, it’s strange to be the director of a national institution. I never longed for such a thing; I always wanted to be where interesting things were happening, intellectually and artistically.” He may shy away from the approbation, but there’s no denying that after a career spent contributing to leading art publications such as Artforum and Frieze, and serving as a scholar and administrator at Frankfurt’s highly regarded Städelschule Moderna Museet Director art academy, Birnbaum deserves both the praise and the new role. Daniel Birnbaum. Educated both in Europe and New York (Birnbaum holds a doctorate in philosophy), Birnbaum’s approach to curation is decidedly global in its focus and often groundbreaking in its execution. For Immediately Birnbaum set out to alter Moderna Museet’s many in the contemporary art scene, the 2003 Venice Biennale perspective on its collection and the recent history of art itself marked their first exposure to Birnbaum, who was asked by with an experimental eye toward programming. Birnbaum took Francesco Bonami to join a cadre of other curators in breaking down the museum’s collection of Matisses and Picassos to hang up the exhibition into a number of smaller shows—or what its entire photography collection instead (and again replaced Birnbaum now describes as a formal attempt “to exhausting all the those works with early films). He’s also altered the museum itself, possibilities [of the Biennale] at once.” He would be invited back transforming it from a visual experience to an auditory one with in 2009, this time as the event’s artistic director, for a decidedly Swedish musician Carl Michael von Hausswolff’s sound and light international exhibition that helped elevate the profile of several installation. He’s also put a newfound emphasis on female artists. young artists, including Argentina’s Tomás Saraceno. “It’s not just a feminist thing,” Birnbaum explains. “Many of the “My approach is to put artists at the center and give them as —DANIEL BIRNBAUM artists who are very interesting—but not getting quite as much much support as possible,” says Birnbaum of his curatorial style, attention as our male heroes—tend to be women.” which he feels developed as an outgrowth of being a writer. “I came Right now it’s an obscure female artist, Hilma af Klint, that’s captured Birnbaum’s to the art world as a writer and a teacher rather than as a museum professional.” But a museum professional is exactly the role in which he has ended up. excitement as he prepares for an upcoming exhibition of her work. “I think it’s going Moderna Museet, based in Birnbaum’s hometown of Stockholm, is recognized to change a little bit the very understanding of the very early years of abstraction,” for its holdings of key works by Marcel Duchamp and one of the best collections he says. Why dedicate a nation’s modern art space to a relatively unknown of American Pop outside of the US. When administrators first began to court artist? Birnbaum feels that he has the answer: “I do think it’s very important that Birnbaum, he saw it as an opportunity to bring an outsider sensibility to a more museums can have an experimental side as well. One expects a biennial [to be] an experimental place, where you try out new modes of curtaining, new ideas about traditional organization. “For me it was a challenge to try something else after 10 years of teaching and juxtapositions, and new histories. And that’s what you expect from a school, too— curating biennials and exhibitions,” Birnbaum says. “It was a role I never had, and new productions and new generations of artists. But I think a museum should be that as well.” ABMB a chance I never had before.”

“My approach is to put artists at the center and give them as much support as possible.”

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INFLUENCERS

Power Couple

The husband-and-wife team of Patricia Ortiz Monasterio and Jaime Riestra bring Mexican art to the forefront. By James Servin

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atricia Ortiz Monasterio, director and co-owner of OMR, one of Mexico City’s preeminent galleries, feels that the impact of Mexican painters, sculptors, and photographers can be diluted under the category of Latin American art. “Mexico has a very specific history, a very heavy cultural background. Your history is your history; you cannot just delete it,” she says. “Mexico is closer to Europe than to Argentina. It takes us 13 hours to get to Buenos Aires, 12 to São Paulo.” Before she and husband Jaime Riestra opened OMR (the title combines the initials of their last names) in 1982, Ortiz Monasterio had served in a number of prestigious art-world positions in Mexico, including head of the international exhibitions department for Mexico’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and coordinator of exhibitions traveling abroad for the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City. She met Riestra, then a documentary filmmaker, on home turf in 1976, having flown to Mexico City on a research mission from Sweden, where she had been working for the Swedish exhibition agency Riksutställningar. “I’d forgotten how nice Mexican men are,” the globe-trotting gallerist recalls. Gallerists Patricia Ortiz Monasterio Following the birth of their elder son in 1980 (Mateo is 32 and Cristobal is 29), the and Jaime Riestra. couple began to regroup professionally. A desire to settle down in Mexico City and raise their family, combined with their extensive network of artist Ortiz Monasterio liaisons with museums, curators, and customs. In friends, gave them the impetus to open a tiny gallery in a space addition to his work with art production, installation, and framing, just below their townhouse in the residential district of Lomas de their son Cristobal, who joined with his parents professionally in Chapultepec. Their first show, a group photo exhibit, packed a 2008, after finishing his master’s in contemporary art studies, is the crowd of 300 into an approximately 200-square-meter room. In director of OMR and its sister gallery, el52, where younger artists 1983, the upwardly mobile gallery found a new home in a mansion Theo Michael, Pia Camil, and David Moreno are shown. “I see in the Colonia Roma district, offering an abundance of installation Cristobal working very seriously, with discipline, and most of all with options to such artists as Jose Dávila, Jorge Méndez Blake, Candida the same passion we have had over the years for our job that has Höfer, and Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, among others in their highly brought us a wonderful life,” says Riestra. regarded stable. Maintaining a presence at Art Basel Miami Beach, which they “We lived in an apartment behind it when it was a residence for have participated in since the show’s inception, is integral to the —JAIME RIESTRA girls from the provinces, run by nuns,” Ortiz Monasterio recalls. “It future of OMR, says Ortiz Monasterio. “People are headed toward was beautiful and old—6,000 square meters, completely rundown, with an incredible doing fewer solo shows in the galleries and more in spaces internationally. That is patio and big 100-year-old palms, a marble staircase, and marble columns. The where the market is, where you meet the curators of biennales and museum curators. landlord wanted us to take it. Jaime was thrilled and wanted to move right away. I Collectors we work with—such as Eugenio López, Agustín and Isabel Coppel, the kept saying, ‘You’re crazy. What are we going to do with that space?’ He’s always very Rubells, Ella Fontanals-Cisneros, Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, and Jerry Speyer—are forward-thinking in these things. He had this incredible vision.” going to the fairs, coming back to Mexico, and buying more.” Riestra vividly recalls that defining moment in the history of OMR: “When the At Art Basel Miami Beach, the same neighbors adjoin OMR’s booth year after space at Plaza Rio de Janeiro was offered to us, I saw an opportunity for expanding as year. “Shaun Caley Regen is on our left, a Brazilian gallery (Galeria Fortes Vilaça) well as for taking a space that was a goal in itself and a statement. Patricia and I have is in front of us,” notes Ortiz Monasterio. The 30-year gallery veterans may party grown quite naturally as a team. We work together very closely on selecting the artists less as the show becomes more of an institution, but otherwise the groove they have we want to work with, but have always had a clear division of the responsibilities established remains the same. “We arrive on Sunday, have two or three meetings, needed to run a gallery.” and then we always go and have lunch at Joe’s Stone Crab. It’s a ritual,” Oritz Riestra now oversees gallery installations, administration, and accounting, while Monsaterio says. “And then it’s work, work, work.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF OMR, MEXICO

“Patricia and I have grown quite naturally as a team. We work together very closely.”

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INFLUENCERS

Builder of Mysteries

Through the ephemeral materiality of her works, sculptor Diana Al-Hadid explores inspiration, illusions, and process. By Julie L. Belcove

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traddling the divides of figuration and abstraction, massiveness and delicacy, and history and modernity, artist Diana Al-Hadid’s sculptures defy classical constraints. Antonym, her hollow cast of a woman, headless and fractured in places, reclines onto a soft-seeming pedestal, which in turn splinters into in gravity-defying fragments; striations of pigment drip down the figure and form a puddle at her feet. Divided Line, an architectural piece, pierces a wall with scores of mysteriously irregular and narrow slits, allowing a veiled glimpse through to the other side. A room-size sculpture in Al-Hadid’s signature pale palette is an off-kilter amalgam of oversize body parts sinking into a set of steps—a baroquely elaborate chunk flowing like a waterfall, with negative space serving as the intricate foundation. Diana Al-Hadid Walking through her recent exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, where these and other works attracted a Al-Hadid laughs and replies, “Because I’m not good at painting, new fan base for the artist this fall, Al-Hadid says she seeks to create maybe.” “moments of confusion.” Born in Saudi Arabia, where she lived until emigrating with her Indeed, as Al-Hadid, 31, describes her process, a visitor politely family at age 5, Al-Hadid grew up in Canton, Ohio, and moved to approaches and asks with some astonishment, “How did you New York soon after graduate school. For a while, she stayed with get these in?” Smiling, the dark-eyed Al-Hadid explains that she her brother between hopping around to various artist residencies. designed the pieces to assemble and disassemble without leaving “I was couch-surfing for a year and a half,” she says, and working any telltale seams. “That’s what occupies my mind: How do I build out of a small studio that had no natural light and barely any heat. it? How do I get it in? I find that stuff fun.” —DIANA AL-HADID Somehow, though, whenever she was most desperate, a sale or a But installation nuts and bolts are only one of several how-didgrant would come through as if by kismet. Such was the case with a she-do-that questions that arise from viewing her work. Many of her pieces appear to challenge the laws of physics, with heavier elements held up by frag- $50,000 USA Fellowship, which enabled her to complete work on her 2010 solo exhiile drips of plaster and polymer. There’s an openness and lightness to her structures. bition at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. One critic there wrote of her sprawling Water Thief piece: “Its diffuse chaos has its own curious beauty.” “I need as much transparency as possible,” she says. Like her sculptures, Al-Hadid’s drawings are built with transparent layers. Much of her inspiration comes from paintings. Painters, she says with some envy, have far more freedom to create imagined space. Her references, though, are not Drawing, though, provides a welcome counterbalance to sculpting: “[The drawings] necessarily meant as allusions. She based the aforementioned waterfall-like element are quick and they’re immediate.” She uses mylar because it doesn’t absorb materials in Suspended After Image, for instance, on a photo she snapped of a painting at the such as charcoal and pastel; instead, it allows the materials to “float on the surface.” Prado museum in Madrid. “I didn’t know who had painted it,” she admits. “I took And she favors her eraser as a drawing implement. “I make really hard marks, then the picture on my phone.” It wasn’t even the whole canvas that caught her eye, but a erase them and make soft marks.” Of late, Al-Hadid has recently finished a series of bronze busts, parts of which cloak on a figure—and more specifically, an ornament on that cloak. As if zooming in with a camera, she slowly blew up the detail to many times its original size and created she says she fashioned while blindfolded, forcing herself to feel rather than look. “I wanted to offer myself a different set of decisions and have a more intimate experia 3-D model of it to work from. Asked why she doesn’t paint, since she is clearly besotted with the medium, ence,” she says. The upshot: “They look really weird, kind of like monsters.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARAH TRIGG

“That’s what occupies my mind: How do I build it? I find that stuff fun.”

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INFLUENCERS

The Unorthodox Dealer

In an era when art has reached unprecedented commercial success, Gavin Brown is breaking paradigms to breathe new life into the cultural community. By Jennifer Stockman

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he arms race that other galleries are getting into is unsustainable, stupid, boring, and pointless,” says Gavin Brown of Gavin Brown’s Enterprises. This is not a surprising statement given his apocalyptic view of things to come in an unstable world. “Collective insanity,” Brown asserts, can be the only explanation for why the art market hasn’t been affected yet. “I see many dealers aping the conventions so they can join the bandwagon of all this success, but someone needs to be willing to trash all of that.” The only protection against dangerous times, in Brown’s view, is being able to let go of material goods. Yet even he admits that this is an odd statement for a dealer and collector of art objects. Brown is recognized wherever he goes by his signature head and face of hair. His similarly bearded mutt, Dotti, follows him around his spacious and unorthodox gallery on Greenwich Street, which takes up a full block in an offbeat section of the West Village of New York City, away from the Chelsea scene. He’s more interested in making life a priority than being a servant to a complicated global gallery structure. Gavin Brown This could have something to do with his three kids, two dogs, and recent marriage to the talented and stylish artist Hope Atherton, whose hand-worked ceramic bowls are strategically strewn throughout his gallery. As a former artist himself, Brown philosophizes that only art is Discovering Rirkrit Tiravanija’s stack of beer bottles was sustainable, and that it truly survives in the long run. “We put our Brown’s major inspiration to open a gallery: It led to an epiphany unspoken hopes in art, which is also a way to cheat death, by leaving about what art is, and the role it can play in our lives. Brown thinks something beyond ourselves and freezing time,” he says. Art proves of his job as revealing truth in a work of art, and showing others that we’re a higher species than animals.” As for what differentiates what he sees himself. “I also thought I could make some money,” he his program from all of the others? “I look for confident artists who adds. But Brown is a radical thinker and not just motivated by the are sure of what they want to do, and my job is to create a dialogue commercial, albeit lucrative, end of the business. He believes that and a unique environment in which the work is shown in new we’re on a dangerous path regarding the “economy, population, ways,” Brown says. For example, take Alex Katz, who recently left healthcare, climate…. [We] have our heads in the sand.” And art is Pace to join GBE. “Alex is interested in the conversation and not just —GAVIN BROWN the only way out. career,” Brown offers. “He could have thought about legacy and His stable of artists has grown exponentially since GBE opened in 1994 and, in gone to a gallery with more financial muscle and been up there in the marketplace addition to Tiravanija, includes art stars such as Peter Doig, Elizabeth Peyton, Urs with artists in his generation, like Ellsworth Kelly. But Alex likes rubbing shoulders Fischer, Robert Pruitt, and, most recently, Elaine Sturtevant, the American artist who with the younger generation of artists and learning what they’re thinking about. He has made a career of literally copying other artists’ works. Brown sees his place in the has a fearlessness found in younger, foolish artists.” art world very clearly: “I have a shop and sell things to flesh-and-blood people walkBrown believes that a new paradigm for art dealers is forming—one that just ing through the door.” hasn’t revealed itself yet—and that museums are in an existential crisis that is He recently moved to Harlem because he found a historic five-story townhouse, affecting the way art is viewed and collected. “Everything is up for grabs,” he built in 1899, where he plans to spend the rest of his life and combine everything he adds, describing the currently mysterious and dramatically fluid business of the loves. He literally lives above the shop, with an impressive exhibition space on the first contemporary art world. Brown actually might be the only dealer on a mission floor, where the sculpture of recently deceased artist Hans Josephsohn is on view. “I “to expose the truth” and debunk the overarching concept of the current gallery like the idea of a space to show art where I live. I come home at 11:30 PM, turn the lights system. “There will be a shift back to looking at art again, rather than [focusing on] grandeur and space,” he promises. ABMB on, and just wander in there. It’s incredible.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHANCE YEH / PATRICK MCMULLAN.COM

“We put our unspoken hopes in art, which is also a way to cheat death.”

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DESIGN MIAMI | DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

The People’s

Architect Design Miami honors 2012 Designer of the Year Vito Acconci. By Fred A. Bernstein

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lone in his studio in Brooklyn’s Dumbo neighborhood—which he helped colonize more than 30 years ago—Vito Acconci is making coffee, answering the phone, and struggling to operate a bulky laptop. But that’s not the main reason he is eager for his staff to arrive. Until they do, he says, he’ll have nobody to argue with. And arguments, according to Acconci, who remains an enfant terrible at 72, have led to some of his most memorable designs—projects that have rivaled the most successful installation art in their ingenuity and devotion to ideas.

Blown-Up Baby Doll, a four-color screen print by Vito Acconci, 1993.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARI GOODFRIEND (ACCONCI); COURTESY OF CARL SOLWAY GALLERY (DOLL)

Vito Acconci in his Brooklyn studio.

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DESIGN MIAMI | DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

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Just don’t call it art around Acconci. “I can’t stand art. I never could,” he says, as if the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s—decades in which he was a much-admired conceptual artist—were a lost weekend. In case he hasn’t made the point clearly enough, he says, his voice soft but forceful: “I haven’t done art in 30 years. It wasn’t right for me.” Those at Design Miami, though, feel that Acconci has been doing something very right—and to pay homage to his long and storied career, the organization has named him 2012 Designer of the Year. As far as output, Acconci wanted to reach the broader public. “This many people go to galleries,” he says, holding two index fingers close together, “and this many people experience architecture”—he stretches his arms out wide. He also wanted to create works that people could interact with. The result was Acconci Studio, founded by him in Brooklyn in 1988, and which is responsible for everything from a man-made island in the Mur River in Graz, Austria—completed to great acclaim in 2003, when that city was Europe’s capital of culture—to glass walls packed with layers of sediment that turn a community arts center in Colorado into a kind of geological formation. One of the latest projects can be found in Toronto, where he helped enliven a development called WaterParkCity by teasing strands of steel into canopies, windscreens, and seating. As one Toronto critic observed after seeing the piece, “Several hundred black steel ribbons have just taken my heart.” Now, Acconci is working on projects for an apartment building in Washington, DC, an airport passageway in Austin, and a parking garage tunnel in Indianapolis. In Washington, the assignment was to create a timepiece for a hovel hollowed out of a building: Figuring people didn’t need an actual clock face in the iPhone age, Acconci imagined a group of circular waterfalls, one flowing at a drop per second, another at a drop per minute, and one more at a drop per hour—while a waterfall on the façade rises slowly to cover the wall once a day. And in Indianapolis, he is working on a project in which a passageway is illuminated by LEDs that seem to follow visitors around. “If another person is walking toward you, it’ll be like a swarm of fireflies,” Acconci says, adding that his goal is to create “an architecture of pixels and particles.” When Acconci shows photos of his work, the shots invariably have people in them—it’s the users who inspire him. (And he insists that every project be attributed not to him alone, but to the Acconci Studio.) That focus on collaboration is surprising for a man who once seemed destined to fly solo. Born in the Bronx, he attended Catholic schools and then made his way to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He emerged in the mid-1960s as an experimental poet; from there, it was an easy transition into conceptual art, much of it dependent on words. Acconci’s most infamous piece, Seedbed, took place in 1972 at the Sonnabend Gallery, where, beneath a sloping floor, he spoke of sexual fantasies while performing what The New York Times politely called “self-stimulation.” But it wasn’t long before he began seeking to do work that didn’t come with DO NOT TOUCH signs. Some of his first designs were furniturelike pieces (such as a ladder that folded into a chaise lounge). In a gallery for the blind at Hartford’s Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, he created a furniture labyrinth called Maze Table, but used clear glass so that the sighted wouldn’t be at a significant advantage. In 1992, he and Steven Holl, then a relatively little-known architect, collaborated on what is still one of Acconci’s most visible projects, the façade of the Storefront for Art and Architecture on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. “Not surprisingly, Steven wanted to do art and I wanted to do architecture,” Acconci remembers. What they came up with was a series of hinged panels cut into the façade. A kind of vertical Maze

When Acconci shows photos of his work, they invariably have people in them. It’s the users who inspire him.

Klein Bottle Playground, 2000.

Acconci’s Lobbyfor-the-Time-Being installation at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.

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DESIGN MIAMI | DESIGNER OF THE YEAR Roof Like a Liquid Flung Over the Plaza, Memphis, Tennessee, 2004.

Name Calling Chair, 1990.

Some of Acconci’s biggest successes are in Europe, where the competition process makes it possible for radical design ideas to get their due.

Table, it is a standout example of Acconci blurring the lines between architecture and furniture, the indoors and outdoors, the permanent and the temporary. Since then, he has done many other pieces in New York, from a plaza at Queens College—where large concrete balls (derived from the campus’s neoclassical details) become street furniture—and a subway station at Coney Island that suggests waves or the famous Cyclone roller coaster. In 2000, he designed a Greenwich Village gallery for the collector Kenny Schachter, installing a multifaceted Möbius maze of doors, walls, seating, shelving, and work surfaces. Like most of his creations, it was joyful and a bit nerdy, as if Frederick Kiesler had come back to design a playground. Acconci has been around long enough to be asked to revisit some of his projects. In 2006, when the Storefront façade had become badly weathered and was in need of reconstruction, Acconci toyed with proposing something entirely new. He eventually agreed to a restoration of what had become a beloved part of the cityscape. Now the government of Graz would like to put a roof over his

amphitheater, which Acconci says would spoil his original concept—so instead, he has proposed a plane-system resembling “clouds” that will remain on shore, to be lifted onto the island with cables when needed. Graz officials are seriously considering the proposal, and why wouldn’t they? It was Acconci’s building that helped put Graz on the cultural map. It’s no surprise that Acconci has had some of his biggest successes in Europe, where the competition process makes it possible for radical design ideas to get their due. Back in the US, his clients tend to be developers, who in many cases are required to set aside roughly “1 percent for art” (that is, 1 or 2 percent of their construction budgets). Acconci accepts the commissions, though he doesn’t make things easier for himself by insisting that he isn’t doing art. (The clients probably don’t believe him. Schachter doesn’t, commenting, “Duchamp said the same thing for decades.”) Thanks to the “1 percent for art” commissions, Acconci often finds himself improving the work of more established, but almost certainly less talented, designers. In a just world, Acconci would design the 99 percent. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER BALLAMY (ACCONCI)

Vito Acconci in 1985.

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GROUNDBREAKING

Photography’s Day in the Sun

It’s no longer a camera-club medium. By Marina Cashdan

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND METRO PICTURES

Untitled #96, by Cindy Sherman, 1981.

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nfluential French critic and poet Baudelaire was one of photography’s harshest critics, writing in his review of the Salon of 1859: “I am convinced that the illapplied developments of photography, like all other purely material developments of progress, have contributed much to the impoverishment of the French artistic genius, which is already so scarce.… It is time, then, for [photography] to return to its true duty, which is to be the servant of the sciences and arts—but the very humble servant, like printing or shorthand, which have neither created nor supplemented literature.” Like Baudelaire, the art world for a long time scoffed at photography, considering it a lesser stepsibling to the more traditional media of painting and sculpture—until recently. Since its advent in 1839, photography has fought an uphill battle. Soft-focused Pictorialist photography, which dominated the medium for more than 50 years, from the late 19th century to early 20th, was the first manipulated style that sought to negate the perception that photography was only a tool with which to scientifically

document reality. But it was Modernist photography—emphasizing sharp focus and the camera as an artist’s tool—that would continue to expand artistic techniques and capabilities in photography, setting it apart as an independent art form. Photographers like Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, and Edward Weston would lead this new and influential style of photography. And so this “new” artistic medium would finally (and retroactively) begin to carve out a place in the fine art discourse. In the 1970s, American photographers including William Eggleston, Joel Sternfeld, Stephen Shore, and Richard Misrach would further this inclusion, pushing the boundaries of photography by capturing mundane contemporary life in bold, saturated colors—becoming predecessors to contemporary artists working in photography, like Cindy Sherman or Jeff Wall, and students of Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, including Thomas Struth, Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, and Thomas Ruff. Come the 1980s and ’90s—with photographers using not only bold colors but also printing in larger sizes—the art world started to embrace the

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GROUNDBREAKING

Edwynn Houk, founder and director of his eponymous Chelsea gallery, which specializes in contemporary photography, agrees that Sherman and Gursky have been “pivotal figures” in fine art photography. “It’s because of the respect of their work and representation of it in collections, [as well as] the commercial success of it, that they’ve come to do away with the prejudice against photography,” he says. “Also, photographers like Sally Mann have had an influence outside the area of photography or people just working with the camera.” He maintains that the careers of artists like Robert Mapplethorpe and Stephen Shore have received a boost and are more well-known names in part because of Gursky’s immense success in the greater contemporary art world. Houk adds, “There’s the perception that a lot of the most talented artists of the last 25 years also happen to be people who work with a camera some of the time, if not all of the time.” In the catalogue for Sherman’s 1987 exhibition at the Vultures, by Robin Whitney Museum of American Art, Rhodes, 2012. the show’s curator, Lisa Phillips, wrote that Sherman “accomplished what photographers have been pursuing for a century—true parity with the other arts.” Though perhaps a bit premature at the time, at least to the broader public, Sherman and Gursky certainly pushed photography to this equal stature over the last decade; and both conceptual and more traditional photographers following these two have continued to break open the glass ceiling. SFMOMA was among the first Momme Silhouettes, by LaToya Ruby Frazier, 2010. institutions to collect photography, actively buying since its inception in 1935, and now possesses among the biggest photography collections of mixed-media institutions. But Phillips acknowledges that photography has become a more accepted medium only recently and museums have medium, with artists like Sherman and Gursky setting record prices responded to this in their acquisitions, and effectually encouraging collectors to look at photography anew. despite the skyrocketing prices of photographs. “It is no longer a camera-club Janelle Reiring, cofounder and director of pioneering photography gallery Metro medium,” she says. “We have photography shown regularly in galleries and museums Pictures in New York says that it is because these two specific artists work only in and collected by both specialist collectors and general contemporary or modern art the photographic medium and on a scale and scope that “definitely compares to collectors internationally now. The issue is not whether or not it is acceptable, but the painting; their critical and commercial success matches artists working in more pricing, which is still very difficult for most photography departments to work with. traditional mediums.” Here at SFMOMA we are doing some creative purchasing cross-departmentally, andra Phillips, curator of photography for the San Francisco Museum of and I can only see that increasing.” Similarly, other institutions are finding ways to be more flexible (or creative) with Modern Art (SFMOMA), adds, “The early Becher students—in particular departmental budgets in order to acquire photography. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ruff, Gursky, and Struth—were considered conceptual artists rather than the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Metropolitan Museum of photographers, even though they were well-versed in the craft and history Art (which only developed an independent photography department in 1992), the of the photographic medium, and quite soon their work was being shown as Museum of Modern Art, and the Norton Museum, among many others, have made Conceptual art (as indeed the work of the Bechers was also considered Conceptual major photography acquisitions over the past 10 years. However, this reflects not only art). Concomitant with this, theoretical change was a technological one—photographs the museums’ interest in photography, but their viewers’ interest in the medium—the could suddenly be made much bigger than the smaller pictures we had considered turnout at blockbuster photography shows this year alone, from Cindy Sherman’s suitable for exhibitions, both in galleries and museums.”

Sherman and Gursky pushed photography to equal stature with other arts over the last decade.

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND LEHMAN MAUPIN GALLERY, NEW YORK AND HONG KONG (RHODE); OPPOSITE PAGE: © ANDREAS GURSKY, VG BILD-KUNST BONN 2010, COURTESY OF GAGOSIAN GALLERY (GURSKY)

Dead Troops Talk, by Jeff Wall, 1992.

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touring retrospective, and major exhibitions of Rineke Dijkstra, and Herb Ritts. Daido Moriyama + William Klein have been impressive, if not unprecedented. At SFMOMA, an exhibition by the Dutch Dijkstra brought in nearly as many visitors as the simultaneous show by painter and mixed media artist Mark Bradford.

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hese days, the contemporary artists working in photography also round out the roster at contemporary art galleries; even once-editorial photographers, such as David LaChapelle or Juergen Teller, are recognized within the art world (represented by Paul Kasmin Gallery and Lehmann Maupin, respectively) and embraced by contemporary art collectors alongside the work of more conceptual artists who work with photography, such as Robin Rhode (also represented by Lehmann Maupin), or iconic photographers, such as Tseng Kwong Chi (represented by Kasmin). In 2011, Michel Rein, of his eponymous gallery in Paris, took on performance and photographic artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, only his second artist in the gallery to work primarily with photography. Though Rein says he did not take on Frazier because of the medium she works in, he sees photography as much more viable to sell to collectors now than it was when he opened his gallery 20 years ago. “When I started my gallery, it was really difficult to explain photography to collectors—they were unsure whether buying one of an edition was a safe process, even if you had a certificate. Now people understand that

editions are very well controlled by the artist and the dealer—if you buy an edition of five, it’s really an edition of five, etc.” At ABMB’s Art Positions, Galerie Michel Rein’s booth is dedicated to Frazier’s work, black-and-white photographs of her family and hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania, showing three series: Momme Silhouettes (2010), Home Body Series (2010), and The Grey Area series (2011). Meanwhile in the ABMB Kabinett section, Greenberg Van Doren Gallery will present a body of work by the Los Angeles–based photographer Judy Fiiskin; Lehmann Maupin will focus on the multidisciplinary work of artist Robin Rhode; and Two Palms will exhibit a selection of Woodburytypes by Chuck Close In a 2010 symposium, SFMOMA asked 13 critics and artists: “Is Photography Over?” Vince Aletti, former art editor and photography critic at the Village Voice answered: “What’s over is the narrow view of photography—the idea that the camera is a recording device, not a creative tool, and that its product is strictly representational— not manipulated, not fabricated, not abstract. But surely that notion died long ago, along with the idea that there was an important distinction to be made between pictures made by ‘artists’ and everyone else with a camera. Thanks to pioneering curators and collectors… more serious attention has been focused on the broad range of anonymous, vernacular, and commercial work, opening up the field and enlivening the discussion. Photography over? More often these days, it feels like it’s only just begun.” ABMB

An exhibition by the Dutch Dijkstra brought in nearly as many visitors as the simultaneous show by painter Mark Bradford.

Ocean 1, by Andreas Gursky, 2010.

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GROUNDBREAKING Designed by Richard Meier, Howard and Cindy Rachofsky’s home showcases a museumquality collection.

Shaping Modern Art

Allan Schwartzman helps prospective art buyers build collections.

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t’s a philanthropic rite of passage: A lover of art bequeaths his or her private collection to a museum, and the public benefits from a windfall of passionately collected works that took a lifetime to assemble. Two private collections in Dallas that are still works in progress, however, are already committed to the public, and their unique, collaborative formation puts the city at its heart. Allan Schwartzman, a New York–based curator and art advisor, has helped build the collections of Howard and Cindy Rachofsky as well as Deedie and Rusty Rose, as the public learns along with them. “I work with collectors to define and articulate their goals to form a collection that makes sense to them,” says Schwartzman. “For some, the personal aspect is already formed; for others, it hasn’t coalesced. I help them develop that.” For the Rachofskys, this development spans many continents, periods, and styles, with commonalities

that they are discovering along with Schwartzman. A major catalyst for this collection is their house, a minimalist glassand-steel structure designed by architect Richard Meier. The Rachofskys commissioned the residence in the early 1990s and have promised the home (completed in 1996), along with their art collection, to the Dallas Museum of Art. Howard Rachofsky calls the house an unlikely “muse” for the collection. “When I began working with Howard, I encountered some challenges,” Schwartzman says. “We took advantage of the fact that [the collection] would be shown to the public in a residential environment. Art can look great there, but it’s also limiting. So we prioritized art for this particular environment.” The collection encompasses works spanning everything from American minimalist to Italian Arte Povera and, most recently, acquisitions from the Japanese Gutai

and Mono-ha school of midcentury artists. “Allan likes to say that two strands run through the collection,” Rachofsky offers. “One resonates with the house’s minimalist aesthetic, and [the other is] the postmodern notion of identity, both social and psychological.” The Rachofskys’ interest in Mono-ha art—best described as art created during the late 1960s to the early ’70s that juxtaposed natural and manmade materials in an unarranged manner, intended to challenge

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY BENSON (SCHWARTZMAN)

As a gift to the city of Dallas, Allan Schwartzman curates two private collections for public display. By Jordan Hruska

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY RUSSELL KAYE; COURTESY OF MATTHEW MARKS GALLERY (GOBER)

preexisting perceptions about the items and space surrounding them—became cemented on a five-day whirlwind trip to Japan with Schwartzman and Deedie Rose, who often travel together. Schwartzman understands each family’s art inclinations, but sometimes they merge. “Deedie’s interests lie in works that are material and process-oriented,” Rachofsky says. And although they might both own works by Gerhard Richter, the Richter in the Rose collection is very different from the one in the Rachofskys’. Schwartzman respects how these families privilege collaboration over competition. Recently, the Roses and Rachofskys have jointly acquired works. The emphasis on sharDeedie and Rusty Rose ing has brought the public into the equation, an entity that ultimately benefits from their Untitled by Rober Gover, 2003–05. joint purchases, which at times includes a third participant, Marguerite Hoffman. In this A caption can go in this space here tk. way, these collectors evolve their knowledge not only about their own shared works, but also in the interests of their peers. “There’s a Robert Gober piece that we bought together,” says Deedie Rose. Howard and “Howard saw it at Matthew Marks Gallery in Cindy Rachofsky New York, called me, and said that it would be a great addition to both our collections. And it was.” Schwartzman’s involvement with her collection has sparked a spirit of discovery, according to Rose. “Allan took me to Houston to see the work of Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica,” says Rose. “There were certain —ALLAN SCHWARTZMAN pieces there that just killed me.” He was able to eventually acquire an Oiticica sculpture for Rose, a feat that she admits she would never have features a rotating assortment of the collection that and Rose commissioned an installation for the thebeen able to do without his tenacious involvement as Schwartzman curates for public view. He also rein- ater, and now “we have a lovely room with [work by] stalls the Rose collection in their Dallas home once Jim Hodges.” Having spent so much time in Dallas, an advisor. Having already committed her collection to the a year so that students and the public may view it Schwartzman’s acute awareness of other private collecDallas Museum of Art, on which Rose sits as a board by appointment. “Together, my works tell a story. tions, as well as those of the DMA and other museums, member, the public is able to share in this discovery, [Schwartzman] knows the kind of story that I want to informs his decision-making process as an advisor to the as well. “Oftentimes museums miss opportunities [to tell with my collection, and I think people can also see Rachofskys and Roses. “He knows the community and collections so well that sometimes we’ve considered puracquire works] because they cannot move fast enough the narrative in that,” says Rose. Rose has been instrumental in advocating and fos- chasing something, and he’ll respond that a similar work within the market,” Schwartzman says. “There’s a rather small window to transact. In Dallas, you have a tering a Dallas arts district where the city’s institutions already exists in the city,” says Rose. By building living, small and devoted team of collectors that are already have been able to find a collective home, making it evolving collections that outlive the walls of a residence, offering their works to these institutions. We’re always easier to share resources and collaborate. “When the Schwartzman, the Roses, and the Rachofskys are helpWyly Theatre was being built, we wanted to figure out ing to shape the legacy of modern and contemporary art in dialogue.” As a part of the DMA, the Rachofsky House how we could work art into it,” Rose says. Schwartzman in Dallas. ABMB

“I work with collectors to articulate their goals to form a collection that makes sense to them.”

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GROUNDBREAKING

Looking to AMERICA Design Miami exposes the growing shift among collectors toward American design. By Raul Barreneche

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his year’s edition of Design Miami, titled Satisfy Your Curiosity, puts the spotlight firmly onto American design—and not just work from the well-known (and overexposed) midcentury modern period. From the studio craft movement of the 20th century to emerging practitioners of truly multidisciplinary design, Design Miami’s eighth and largest installment (on view December 5–9) promises a remarkable range of work by both legendary and up-and-coming US-based designers. This preponderance of American work coincides with what dealers and gallery owners note is an increasing interest in American design, especially among collectors abroad. Robert Aibel, owner and director

of Philadelphia’s Moderne Gallery, a first-time Design Miami exhibitor this year, has recently sold a number of works by Wendell Castle and George Nakashima, a specialty of the gallery, to buyers in London and the Middle East. “I think people are starting to realize there’s a history to American design beyond the contemporary work coming out today, and [they’re] wanting to learn more about the whole period after the midcentury,” Aibel says. His Moderne Gallery will be exhibiting several blue-chip Nakashima pieces, as well as rare and important furniture and sculptures by the lesser-known Pennsylvania artist and woodworker Wharton Esherick, a pioneer of the studio craft movement, and sumptuously sculptural wood pieces by

Split, cast marble, 2012.

David Ebner, Robert Worth, and Sam Maloof. Zesty Meyers, a partner in New York’s R 20th Century gallery, agrees that there’s growing worldwide interest in collecting American design. “In Europe, which controlled the decorative arts for hundreds of years, designers were trained to make drawings that were then

RENDERING COURTESY OF SNARKITECTURE (TOP); PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF VOLUME GALLERY

Snarkitecture’s Drift Pavilion for Design Miami 2012.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHERRY GRIFFIN/COURTESY OF R 20TH CENTURY (LOW TABLE)

Conoid Bench, American black walnut, by George Nakashima, 1964.

given to fabricators, whereas Americans typically work with their hands. That’s something that is emerging globally—a focus on the handmade,” Meyers explains. At Design Miami, R 20th Century will be showcasing the work of Castle, who many consider the godfather of the American studio furniture movement. It’s a banner year for the designer, who turned 80 in November and is still going strong. Solo shows of Castle’s work are currently on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft in Louisville, while concurrent shows at Friedman Benda and Barry Friedman Ltd. in New York will present new one-off and limited-edition furniture pieces. There’s also a just-released book by Alistair Gordon and a 500-page catalogue raisonné of more than 1,700 works to be published this spring by The Artist Book Foundation. R 20th Century’s booth will showcase Castle’s great talent “not as a furniture-maker, but as a sculptor who makes furniture,” as Meyers suggests, visible in his robust, curvaceous seating and lighting designed between 1960 and 1975. As a counterpoint, the gallery will also feature a great talent of the next generation of American designer-craftsmen: 31-year-old Los Angeles-based David Wiseman, whose delicate, lighting, furniture, and tabletop objects in metal and porcelain exhibit more literal organic motifs: flowers, birds, and branches. As you might expect from a venue dedicated to contemporary American design, Chicago’s fledgling Volume Gallery is focusing its exhibit at Design Miami on the work of a cutting-edge US-based talent: the Brooklyn-based collective Snarkitecture. Coincidentally, Snarkitecture is also designing the fair’s entry pavilion, a commission given in recent years to young talents such as Aranda\Lasch and David Adjaye. This year’s pavilion is titled Drift, and it comprises an undulating landscape of inflatable tubes suspended above built-in seating areas. Snarkitecture, founded by Alex Mustonen and Miami-born Daniel Arsham, collaborates with artists, choreographers, fashion designers, and architects, and also creates works of its own. “I think they’re building a very interesting arc in American design,” says Volume Gallery cofounder and codirector Claire Warner, who points out that her gallery also functions as an atelier, producing works by its stable of designers. “It’s a myth that there’s not a great wealth of design talent in this country. The shortage is in the systems for manufacturing their work.” The Snarkitecture-designed furniture and lighting Warner and partner Sam Vinz are showing at Design Miami are heavy on concept, with some of the

“It’s a myth that there’s not a great wealth of design talent in this country.” —CLAIRE WARNER

Low table in stack-laminated walnut. Designed and made by Wendell Castle, 1972.

Pizzicato (rosewood and alumimum sculpture, oak light box, and walnut cabinet), by Wharton Esherick, 1931.

tough, iconoclastic spirit of the 1970s projects by architect James Wine and his seminal firm, SITE. One of the floor lamps in a piece, titled Lean, looks as if it’s about to fall—its cast glass globe appearing to drip like runny icing; the polished hand-carved marble seat of a stool, Pour, looks like a pool of viscous white liquid about to run over the wood

frame. “Their work captures impossible moments,’” suggests Warner. One thing is for sure: As Design Miami demonstrates, it’s a great moment for American design. Design Miami, Meridian Avenue at 19th Street, adjoining the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach; design miami.com ABMB

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personalities

Protest Against Forgetting The day an itinerant curator stopped moving long enough to describe the Serpentine Gallery’s annual Memory Marathon. By Hans Ulrich Obrist

“Memory is an apparition, an epiphany, the same as art,” said the Romanian artist Geta Brătescu. Our Memory Marathon is a protest against forgetting… and remembering to forget!

12 st 1

th

I remember the Serpentine Gallery’s Memory Marathon from the

12

th year of the

of the

7

2

nd decade of the

Serpentine marathons have taken place to date.

I remember starting the marathon format in

14

3

day to the

century of the

2005

in Stuttgart. I remember beginning the collaboration with Julia Peyton-Jones in

th

10

day of the

rd

month

millennium.

5

2006. The marathon is part knowledge

festival and part happening, but it is also a group exhibition where participants are given time instead of space.

14

Tarek Atoui performed La Suite, a wasla piece, uninterrupted, which brought together

1

th

musicians.

message from Ai Weiwei, who still has not been given back his passport by the Chinese government and

hours

could not travel to London. “Memory is what we think the past should be,” he said, “rather than what the past was. After everything that happens to us fades away, our memory remains. Without memory, what will we have? We move so fast that memory is something we can only try to grasp.” Images from the book Vienne, featuring images of dolls created by Gisèle.

109

40

Portraits were presented by Dennis Cooper and Gisèle

is the age of pianist, Holocaust survivor, and Franz Kafka’s family friend Alice Herz-Sommer, who came and described her life via video interview.

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I remember when Siah Armajani told us about his different memories of when he came to the West from Iran. In Iran everything was memory; in the West, he experienced amnesia. I remember John Berger discussing Ways of Listening, a film he made in collaboration with Tilda Swinton and directed by Colin MacCabe. I remember Daniel Buren’s memory of exhibitions—the afterlife of exhibitions—and the different formats of how these memories can be kept alive (an example is his photo souvenirs). I remember Ed Cooke combining neuroscience and mnemonics to boost the speed and ease of learning. I remember Ed taking us on a walk around Kensington Gardens to explore memory as a special form of perception. I remember Michael Craig-Martin revisiting a recently rediscovered archive of early 3-D images taken by his grandfather in China in 1910. I remember Amos Gitai showing us filmic fragments of the war film Kippur, and, together with Herzog & de Meuron, reintroducing the theme of utopia into the Memory Marathon. I remember Gilbert & George’s memory of the living sculpture in which they made themselves the object… I remember them telling us about the past, the present, and the future, believing that art should be all three things. I remember the artistic duo reading a new list of their Brussels Alphabet. I remember John Hull introducing us to the dark city of blindness, and how, in deep blindness, visual memories disappear after a couple of years; memories of faces fade away. I remember Richard Wentworth presenting “Rear view mirror (La voie périphérique),” connecting his family album to Walker Evans and August Sander, and the China of the 1920s. I remember Viktor Mayer-Schönberger presenting his research about digital storage and the identities on the Internet that we can’t leave behind—and emphasizing the virtues of forgetting. I remember China Miéville and Evan Calder Williams reciting their manifesto Salvagepunk, Yet Again Redux, Reduced, Rubble, evoking postapocalyptic garbage worlds and junkyards. I remember JeanYves Tadié talking about involuntary memory in Marcel Proust and the way Proust had anticipated the way we understand memory today. I remember eating The Modern Pantry’s scones, whose menu was inspired by Proust’s In Search of Lost Time. I remember the best Marathon Team ever. To be continued…. To see the marathon, please visit thespace.org and serpentinegallery.org.

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PERSONALITIES

I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar E

very year this magazine has the distinct honor of recognizing the immense contributions of a few women who are helping to change the landscape of the contemporary art world. With the generous support of the Brazilian fashion label Osklen, we celebrate the leadership of these six extraordinary innovators at our annual luncheon on December 7.

BETH RUDIN DEWOODY: A voracious collector and philanthropist, DeWoody is universally beloved by artists, institutions, curators, and dealers alike. She sits on the boards of the Whitney Museum of American Art, Creative Time, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Her varied collection includes works by Nick Cave, Tom Sachs, and Nan Goldin, filling homes in New York City and Palm Beach. Recently she tried her hand at curating, receiving rave reviews for two distinct shows, “What’s your Hobby?” and “House Is Not a Home.” Best known for: a sly sense of humor. One needs look no further than DeWoody’s clever collection, which features pieces like Iván Navarro’s You Sit, You Die chair, fashioned from lit fluorescent tubes, or Porta-Party, an iPod-like Porta Potty by Nick Rodrigues.

Eden, which she cowrote with Micky Wolfson Jr. Best known for: style savvy—Doner favors ethereal, monochromatic (always black or white) custommade ensembles.

Aspen Institute, to name but a few. Best known for: never slowing down. Seriously, this woman does not sleep. Also known for her intense loyalty, Southern drawl, and a love of fine tequila.

PATRICIA FOSSATI DRUCK: This understated Brazilian collector should prepare for a much higher profile in 2013, when she will serve as the president of the Ninth Fundação Bienal do Mercosul, one of Brazil’s most comprehensive and important cultural events dedicated to contemporary Latin American art. The biennial opens on September 13 and will feature 90 visionary artists of the past, present, and future. A tireless advocate of Brazilian art, Druck sits on the board of the Latin American Acquisitions Committee of the Tate and Centre Pompidou, and has a slew of

TOBY DEVAN LEWIS: Few women are as revered in the contemporary art world as Toby Lewis. Renowned for her collecting acumen and dedicated philanthropy, Lewis famously created the Progressive Insurance Art Collection, amassing works by artists such as John Baldessari, Gregory Crewdson, David Hockney, and Robert Rauschenberg (many before they were household names). She has made major gifts to the New Museum, where she is an active trustee, and Prospect 1 New Orleans; and she serves on the boards of the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art, ArtPace, and Performa. Best known for: nurturing young and emerging artists (most recently by creating the Toby Fund, providing grants to MFA students), and her fearless attitude in never shying away from controversial works.

The contributions of a few women are helping change the landscape of the contemporary art world.

MICHELE OKA DONER: Artist Doner and her work are both, simply put, forces of nature. The work, in materials like driftwood and mother-of-pearl, is heavily influenced by her upbringing in Miami Beach (where her father served as mayor in the 1950s and ’60s). Her oceanic inspiration is most evident in the iconic work A Walk on the Beach, made of granite and cast-bronze inlay featuring marine imagery, which runs nearly a full mile through the floors of the Miami International Airport. Other projects include three US courthouses; a luxury superstore in Doha, Qatar; and numerous books, such as Miami Beach: Blueprint of an

degrees from institutions such as Harvard University, INSEAD, and Boston University. Best known for: passion, determination, drive, and a lifelong commitment to arts scholarship. VIRGINIA LEBERMANN: This Texas renaissance woman is an indefatigable supporter of the arts and a legendary multitasker. In 2003, she cofounded Ballroom Marfa, the funky cultural hub in that highdesert West Texas town that Donald Judd famously put on the map. A contemporary arts foundation housed in a former dance hall, Ballroom has a fierce independent streak (much like Lebermann), and is known for cutting-edge programming. Lebermann also happens to sit on the board of Dia, the Chinati Foundation, ArtLies, National Public Radio, and the

JENNIFER STOCKMAN: As the first female president of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation board, Jennifer Stockman has not only been instrumental in recalibrating the strategic direction of the institution, but has helped lead the development of several international projects, including the muchanticipated Frank Gehry–designed Abu Dhabi outpost. As longtime collectors, she and husband David own works by stalwarts such as Gerhard Richter, Anish Kapoor, Sigmar Polke, Willem de Kooning, and Richard Prince, and are committed to making their collection as public as possible through frequent exhibition lending and curatorial tours. Best known for: infinite grace and steadfast championship of women’s issues, particularly the protection of reproductive rights. ABMB

OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY PATRICK/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (DEWOODY, STOCKMAN); CRISTIANO SANT’ANNA (DRUCK); ANDRES OVERGAARD (DONER); ABE FRAJNDLICH (LEWIS); DENISE PRINCE (LEBERMANN)

At Art Basel Miami Beach Magazine’s Women in the Arts luncheon, we salute six superstars. By Sue Hostetler

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Patricia Fossati Druck

Beth Rudin DeWoody

Michele Oka Doner

Toby Devan Lewis

Jennifer Stockman

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Virginia Lebermann

11/16/12 7:59 PM


SPONSORS

Kiki Smith at work on Chorus (2012), an homage to Josephine Baker.

Colorful Synergy

UBS, artist Kiki Smith, and Art Production Fund team up to bring stained glass to life for local high school students. By Phoebe Hoban

of UBS during the fair,” says Peter Dillon, UBS’s executive director of global sponsorship. “We’ve had celebrations around that milestone all year long, and this is the culminating event, which we think is significant.” Having partnered with Art Basel since 1994 and with Art Basel Miami Beach since its inception in 2002, UBS is committed to collaborating with local organizations and to giving clients “access to building their collections and experiencing an important

moment in the art world,” Dillon says, adding, “It’s a very happy coincidence to be able to work with Art Production Fund, to give students a chance to engage in the art-making process and to experience what it’s like to be an artist. Kiki’s piece is an interesting subject and it’s also an intriguing material, and this workshop will bring that to life for these students. All of those things came together in a nice way around Art Basel Miami Beach.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES EWING PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY OF ART PRODUCTION FUND

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very year, Art Basel Miami Beach’s main sponsor, UBS, selects a work from the company’s art collection and features it in the corporation’s private client lounge at the Miami Beach Convention Center. This year the American multimedia artist Kiki Smith—who already has a number of pieces in UBS’s permanent collection—was chosen. The specific piece on view, Chorus (2012), just acquired by UBS, is a series of star-shaped stained-glass sculptures honoring the great burlesque star Josephine Baker. The freestanding work was produced in collaboration with Art Production Fund and displayed earlier this year in Times Square. The aesthetic synergy between UBS, Art Production Fund, and Smith doesn’t end there: Local high school students who participated in ArtWorks, a UBSsupported summer arts internship pilot program, will be able to take part in a one-day workshop at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach, sponsored by UBS and organized by Art Production Fund. “UBS conceived of this workshop as a means to further impact people through art,” says Yvonne Force Villareal, cofounder and a board member of Art Production Fund. “In this case, participants will see glass as through the eyes of Kiki Smith, and a world of magic will be opened to them.” Having worked with stained glass for decades, creating diverse pieces including a rose window for the Eldridge Street Synagogue in Manhattan, Smith has a fondness for working in the medium. “It is such a historically rich visual language, and it’s a pleasure to see the transformation of paint on glass to create it,” says Smith. “I think it’s a material that affords a very unique experience.” That medium is also a unique means through which UBS can celebrate an important anniversary. “This year in Miami there is a very exciting confluence of events for us, [as] we’re celebrating the 150th birthday

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SPONSORS

A Different Rhythm

A rendering of Güiro 2012, an art bar installation in Los Carpinteros in collaboation with Absolut Art Bureau.

Absolut partners with Cuban collaborative Los Carpinteros to create a playful installation on the sands of Miami Beach. By Stacey Goergen

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hen the Absolut Art Bureau approached the Havana-based collaborative Los Carpinteros about partnering on an art bar during Art Basel Miami Beach, the vodka company gave the artists full creative license. Los Carpinteros, made up of the duo Dagoberto Rodríguez Sánchez and Marco Antonio Castillo Valdés, conceived of a fully immersive environment: a bar in the form of a güiro—a common Latin American percussion instrument made from a hard, dried shell—on an oceanfront platform in Collins Park, accompanied by an extensive performance program. Los Carpinteros are internationally celebrated for their architectural installations and structures that explore the intersection of the functional and the nonfunctional, drawing on sociopolitical issues. The decision to work as a collective, rejecting individual ownership, refers to the guild tradition of artisans (Los Carpinteros translates to “the carpenters” in English). Transforming everyday objects, they address perceptions of form and use. Here, the giant güiro is an oval-shaped structure approximately 38 by 15 feet, made from machine-cut, fireproofed pieces of plywood. “This comes from a series where we transform architectural shapes into libraries,” explains Valdés.

“We have created different reading rooms, but they are always very related to architecture.” The wall niches will be used as bookshelves, and viewers can look through the shelves from the outside or from inside the construction. Installed on a platform with tables and chairs, visitors will be able to enter the structure where chief bartender Andres Leon (along with the artists) will develop special cocktails for the güiro. “He’s traveling all the way from Madrid to create a special drink for this event,” Sánchez says. The artists explain that güiro has several meanings. It is the instrument essential to their native music, and in Cuban slang it connotes a party. “We come from a culture where music, folklore, and politics are very mixed together,” Valdés says. “They really flirt. They create these threads [woven into] a strong cable that is our culture, and this is how we structured our idea.” Absolut has an impressive history supporting the arts, and its Art Bureau division is responsible for the company’s international initiatives within the contemporary art world. Vadim Grigorian, global project leader for Absolut Art Bureau, explains: “It is important to highlight that Absolut was born from art.” He is referring to the artist collaborations that

put Absolut on the global map. In 1986, the company commissioned Andy Warhol to create an advertisement using the distinctive shape of the Absolut bottle. The design was an immediate success, and between 1986 and 2004, Absolut commissioned 850 artworks by more than 500 artists, including such greats as Keith Haring, Ed Ruscha, Douglas Gordon, Vik Muniz, Nam June Paik, and Sylvie Fleury. “In the current context we wanted to move toward a more ephemeral creation,” says Grigorian of their forthcoming three-year collaboration with Art Basel. “Something that is nonmaterial, something that will exist only in the memory of the spectators.” He emphasizes Absolut’s interest in dialogue and ideas; in addition to its partnership with Art Basel, it is the presenting partner of Art Basel Conversations. The artist bar is a natural outgrowth of this conceptual approach. Over the five-day period, Los Carpinteros have programmed readings, music, and poetry. The bar will be open from 5 PM until midnight, and entry is free. Distinguished Spanish composer Joan Valent has developed a music program, including an opening and closing composition. “He is making a translation of the functionality of a bar,” notes Sánchez, “and the music you can make with this object.” ABMB

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SPONSORS

Louis Uluru by Luis Gispert, 2012.

Making Connections

Amulet (Red Akrep) by Angelo Filomeno, 2011.

More than just a welcome to Art Basel Miami Beach, the NetJets Collectors Cocktail opens doors for arts enthusiasts and artists.

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reparing and installing an exhibition that has only a three-hour life is just as much work as organizing one with a longer run—but that did not deter curator Micaela Giovannotti from planning a group show at The Bath Club for the NetJets Collectors Cocktail, a reception to welcome the company’s owners and VIP guests to Art Basel Miami Beach. NetJets is also celebrating its 11th consecutive year sponsoring the event. Working with NetJets and Artspace, Giovannotti included six artists: Dzine, Angelo Filomeno, Luis Gispert, Wangechi Mutu, Angel Otero, and Emilio Perez. Constructed in 1926, The Bath Club has long been a fashionable retreat for the moneyed class. Through the years it has hosted celebrities, politicians, and presidents who were drawn to the beach location and luxurious accommodations. “It’s really an experience for collectors and guests to interact with the art in a different context,” Giovannotti says of the company’s choice of venue. Responding to the architecture and locale, the curator selected work that is loosely based—aesthetically and conceptually—on Baroque style. She defines this as “excessiveness, complexity

of design or process, corporeal embellishment, lavishness, and absurdity.” The exhibition spans a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and video. Angelo Filomeno employs embroidery and crystals on silk stretched over linen in , 2011. Here, the extravagant, glittery materials show insects spilling from a center spine. Luis Gispert’s (2012) depicts the interior of a BMW upholstered in Louis Vuitton’s signature leather presented in front of the monolith in Australia. Otero and Dzine are creating new work for the installation, and Perez will exhibit pieces that have not yet been seen in this country. Luckily for the artists and curator, the reception will draw more than 500 collectors, curators, and art enthusiasts. Giovannotti sees this as a way to make connections for the artists, as well as give them exposure. The partnership with Artspace allows the show to live beyond its short installation. With artist studio visits and interviews available on the website, the curator notes cheerfully: “It provides a platform for a preview and follow-up of the show.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND RHONA HOFFMAN GALLERY (GISPERT); MICHAEL BODYCOMB (FILOMENO)

By Stacey Goergen

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SPONSORS

Davidoff’s Art Basel Miami Beach lounge.

Cultural Craftsmanship

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or many brands, Art Basel Miami Beach is an opportunity to annually spotlight ongoing collaborative programs with artists, or is simply an effective way to reach out to art-loving clients, both current and potential. For Davidoff, it represents the ideal place to unveil an extensive, multitiered art initiative that will roll out over the next few years. Davidoff has been an associate sponsor of the Art Basel shows since June, and the company is using Art Basel Miami Beach to launch its new program to support and promote artists, with a particular focus on those from the Caribbean and the Dominican Republic, where its legendary cigars are handmade and hand-rolled. “Davidoff comes from a culture of craftsmanship, and the art of craftsmanship—the art of blending, the art of growing—extends into the notion of [contemporary] art,” says Hans-Kristian Hoejsgaard, the president and CEO of Oettinger Davidoff Group. “Of course, we also know a large part of our customers are extremely interested and involved with the world of art. And the fact that it is a show that originated in the

same town as us [Geneva], where we have been since 1875, and with the same strategic priority in terms of Asia and America, it just made a perfect partnership. So it just makes a lot of sense on many different levels.” A key focus of Davidoff’s wide-reaching initiative is a residency program for artists to come to the Dominican Republic, where the company has factories at which its famous cigars are hand-rolled. “It is for artists around the world who can come there to develop and fine-tune their skills, and hopefully mentor and coach the local artists’ community,” explains Hoejsgaard. Since it will take some time for the initial artists to be chosen and commence work—the first participating artists will join in 2014—Davidoff will, in the meantime, offer outbound residencies for specially selected Caribbean artists to five programs located in different countries, with each artist heading to a different location. In addition, beginning in 2013, Davidoff will be giving small art grants to art organizations in the Caribbean, again with a specific concentration in the Dominican Republic to strengthen local arts groups

Hans-Kristian Hoejsgaard

and help build an infrastructure to nurture and train young artists. Eventually, the initiative will also include special-edition cigars and possibly accessories like humidors, with a charitable component; proceeds will support either the arts program or artists commissioned to design the products. In its 65 global boutiques—some with an inviting lounge—Davidoff will be establishing a conversation series focusing on art starting next year. Stores will also begin to display artwork created by artists participating in the residency program or its special editions. To announce the new arts initiative, Davidoff will be hosting an event for select guests during Art Basel Miami Beach. And to spotlight the artisan skill of cigar making, the company will also be set up inside the Art Collectors Lounge in the Miami Beach Convention Center, with a craftsman from the Dominican Republic hand-rolling cigars. But if you want to actually enjoy one of those creations, the company is making that easy, too: Davidoff is creating a special outdoor cigar lounge at the Miami Beach Botanical Garden, just across the street from the Convention Center. ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF DAVIDOFF

With various art-oriented initiatives, Davidoff solidifies its commitment to the continued expansion of Caribbean influence in the world. By Rachel Felder

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SPONSORS

Centuries of Artistry

Ruinart honors its longtime ties to the art world in a big way. By Rachel Felder

Ruinart Champagne and Miroir ice bucket.

Art Car Jenny Holzer, BMW V12 LMR, Marquette, 1999.

Spinning Wheels While offering transport to VIPs during Art Basel Miami Beach, BMW also embraces the artistry of life in the fast lane. By Rachel Felder

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rtists like Andy Warhol, Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jeff Koons have more in common than just their place in global museum collections or modern art history textbooks. They’ve all created BMW Art Cars, four of which will be displayed at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach. “They have been the cultural backbone of BMW since 1975,” explains Thomas Girst, who oversees the BMW Art Car program, which has also included vehicles customized by the likes of David Hockney and A.R. Penck. “It’s our responsibility to never water down that amazing trajectory.” To that end, the artists are now chosen to design the car exteriors by a panel of independent museum curators from around the world. Since BMW began the series, just 17 artists have been selected to participate. The cars are essentially a canvas upon which each artist creates his or her work, whether that’s the onslaught of Crayola colors in Jeff Koons’s design from 2010 or, in Jenny Holzer’s case, the words PROTECT ME FROM WHAT I WANT emblazoned in silver paint on a stark, white background. Most of the vehicles are racecars, since the initiative was started by French racecar driver and auctioneer Hervé Poulain. The Jenny Holzer car will be at this year’s show, along with three vehicles created by Robert Rauschenberg, Frank Stella, and Alexander Calder, whose car was the first in the series. Three will be displayed only at the Miami Beach Botanical Garden, directly across the street from the Miami Beach Convention Center, and the other in the Art Collectors Lounge. On Wednesday night, BMW will be hosting an invitation-only party at the Botanical Garden to celebrate both the cars and a unique book, the BMW Art Guide by Independent Collectors, which tracks impactful private collections around the world. Of course, many regular Art Basel Miami Beach attendees have a particular soft spot for BMW, since the company’s VIP shuttles are a marvelous perk during a week when there’s inevitably too much to do and never enough taxis. Last year alone, that amounted to more than 2,000 rides. “Anything that can be done that takes the pressure off your interest in purchasing art is a big treat,” says Girst. “The soft-surround treatment for the VIPs is an important part of the fair. If we have the opportunity to spotlight our cars there, all the better.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BMW AG NUR FÜR PRESSEZWECKE (BMW); ALAIN GELBERGER (RUINART)

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or Ruinart, the world’s oldest Champagne house, supporting the art world is nothing new. “Ruinart has been involved in art since the foundation of the company,” explains Nicolas Ricroque, the company’s US brand director. “It was founded almost three centuries ago. Dom Ruinart was an expert in art, and since that time the Ruinart family has been collecting pieces of art themselves. We celebrate this today by working with the leading art shows to provide exceptional experiences for their visitors.” “Exceptional” seems like the right adjective for what Ruinart has planned for this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach. Inside the Art Collectors Lounge, the company is installing an ice bucket art installation that includes the Miroir ice bucket and coaster, both designed by the artist Hervé Van der Straeten. The lounge has an angular mirrored wall, which mimics the design of the ice bucket. The partnership is the latest offering in an ongoing annual series of collaborations with artists. Van der Straeten’s sleek-lined silver ice bucket was produced in a limited edition of 50 for Ruinart by Christofle in its Haute Orfèvrerie workshop in France. In its third year as Art Basel Miami Beach’s official Champagne, Ruinart doesn’t take working with the art world lightly. “For us, it doesn’t make sense to go to Art Basel just to be there and sell Champagne,” Ricroque says. “We actually want to come with an artistic proposition as well. It’s a very long process. At Ruinart we only want to make things that are relevant and inspiring for the art world, so we make things that are meaningful for the artist, for us, and, in this case, for Art Basel Miami Beach.” Typically, these artist collaborations take up to two years from inception to actualization (Ruinart recently reviewed a proposal for a 2014 collaboration). The Miroir ice bucket is the result of nine months of development, working with Christofle to perfectly capture the sharp edges that the artist had in mind. But this just reinforces the idea that greatness requires time to cultivate. “Ruinart has been connected to the world of art for almost 300 years,” he says. “Taking nine months to produce an artist ice bucket, or two years to work with an artist, feels short. That’s fine.” ABMB

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10/29/2012 12:20:39 PM 10/29/12 10:06 AM


PERSONALITIES Carter Cleveland

Brad Waywell

Kyle DeWoody

H.E. Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani

Young Guns

In the art world, change is constant, and some of the biggest waves today are being made by savvy collectors, curators, and dealers born after 1980.

N

ot to get too media-meta, especially if it’s your first day at the show, but what’s a magazine these days without a pithy list sure to generate some scuttlebutt both for who’s on it and who’s not? To that end, here are 10 people to watch in the art world—all 30 and under. 1. When he couldn’t find art for his dorm-room at Princeton University, CARTER CLEVELAND, 26, got the idea for Art.sy, the free digital platform to help people “discover and contextualize art,” he says, most notably by recommending one artist or artwork after an initial user’s search, then a raft of others with similar traits. Art.sy debuted at Art Basel in 2011 and now counts more than 400 galleries, private collections, foundations, artist estates, and cultural institutions as partners. Backers and advisers include Larry Gagosian, Dasha Zhukova, Rupert Murdoch’s wife, Wendi, Google’s Eric Schmidt, and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey. For Design Miami this year, Art.sy will provide an online inventory of the exhibitors’ wares people can access before and during the fair, Cleveland says, “so people can arrive informed and ready to buy.” 2. Now associate director for New York’s Blain|Di Donna, a secondary market gallery that focuses

Júlia Rebouças

on Impressionist, modern, and contemporary art, 28-year-old BRAD WAYWELL began working for the Swiss Galerie Gmurzynska in college (and after), before joining Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York, where he was responsible for organizing a seminal solo show of artist Adam McEwen’s work. “Brad has a brilliant combination of charm and knowledge,” says Boesky, and “a confidence that inspires trust.” A confidence perhaps learned from mom Lisa Dennison, chairmain of North and South America at Sotheby’s. 3. KYLE DEWOODY, 28, and entrepreneur Manish Vora of Artlog started Grey Area, which curates and commissions objets in that natty nexus between art and design, and sells them at their New York City showroom—and, as of November, in Helmut Lang stores in New York, London, and Los Angeles. For the holidays, she and Vora have invited 30 artists— including Michele Oka Doner, André Saraiva, and the collaborative Snarkitecture—to design ornaments. “I’ve been surrounded by art and artists my whole life,” says DeWoody, “So collaborating with them is a thrill.” Indeed, her dad Jim and brother Carlton are both artists and mom is the curator and collector Beth Rudin DeWoody, who sits on the boards of the Whitney and Creative Time.

4. At 28, Brazilian JÚLIA REBOUÇAS is a curator for Inhotim, mining magnate Bernardo Paz’s contemporary art and botanical garden complex with more than 500 artworks strewn across its almost 5,000 acres in Minas Gerais, Brazil—which has included work by Olafur Eliasson, Pipilotti Rist, Doug Aitken, and Matthew Barney. She’s also on the curatorial team for the Mercosul Biennial in Porto Alegre, known as the most comprehensive event for international contemporary art. Art bit her like a bug one day when, as an undergrad, she wandered into an exhibit in Recife with work by Rivane Neuenschwander and Ernesto Neto: “I was deeply affected by that experience,” she says, her “first one with contemporary art.” 5. Born in 1983, H.E. SHEIKHA AL MAYASSA BINT HAMAD BIN KHALIFA AL-THANI founded the Doha Film Institute and is a chairperson for the Qatar Museums Authority, established in 2005 by her father, the current Emir of Qatar. The QMA oversees the Museum of Islamic Art, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art (with more than 6,000 works of modern Arab art), public art initiatives, and more. Under her leadership, the QMA has been taking it on the road too, sponsoring the

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE SCHILDHORN/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (WAYWELL); PATRICK MCMULLAN/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (DEWOODY); ANDREW H. WALKER/GETTY IMAGES (AL-THANI)

by Laura van Straaten

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Alexandra Chemla

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PATRICK MCMULLAN/ PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (SCHNABEL); CLINT SPAULDING/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (TANZILLI); ANDREW TOTH/ PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (DUNHAM); SUNNY SHOKRAE (CHEMLA)

Vito Schnabel

Takashi Murakami exhibition at Versailles and the Tate Modern’s Damien Hirst show earlier this year. 6. DAN TANZILLI, 30, who began working at the global art PR firm Fitz & Co while completing his art history degree at NYU, is now the company’s director of strategic development, overseeing media and brand-partner relationships for major artists and cultural institutions, including the Art Dealers Association of America Art Show and Lehmann Maupin gallery. “Dan Tan,” as he is sometimes known, was noted among the magazine Modern Painters’s top 50 young collectors this year and treasures works by Angel Otero, Marc Swanson, Klara Kristalova, Alex Da Corte, and Jim Hodges. He has cochaired the Guggenheim’s Young Collectors Council since 2010 and is a member of the New Art Dealers Alliance. 7. His dad, Julian, was already an art-world superstar when curator VITO SCHNABEL was born in 1986. The peripatetic Schnabel fils prefers to stage shows at places like a courtyard in Venice, the W Miami hotel, Bruno Bischofberger’s gallery space in Zurich, Sotheby’s S2 gallery, or Richard Avedon’s former studio in New York. “It’s like a movable feast,” Schnabel says, “By not having a gallery

Dan Tanzilli

Lena Dunham

Andrew Reed

you are not categorized in this ranking system that happens.” He works with artists like Ron Gorchov and Terence Koh, and often with the anonymous art collective The Bruce High Quality Foundation, whose members he met two years after he curated his first show (in a 10,000-square-foot warehouse) well before he was old enough to vote. Earlier this year, his New York exhibition of performance artist Laurie Anderson’s paintings was her first in the city. 8. Months after he aced the SATs last spring, ANDREW REED’s first curated show, at Fredric Snitzer Gallery in his hometown of Miami, opened with works by Kara Walker, Lucas Samaras, and Marilyn Minter. A high-school senior now, he’s an Art Basel baby to the bone, having attended annually from the get-go with mom Stefanie (who handles VIP relations for ABMB and advises private collectors) and dad Evan (who’s on the board of MOCA and the Miami Children’s Museum). He worked Art Basel in Switzerland for a Berlin gallery, but since he collects too, says that “at Art Basel Miami Beach in December, I’ll be on the prowl.” Laugh not: Leon Black, who bought Edvard Munch’s The Scream last summer for almost $120 million, started collecting as a teen, as did Jason Rubell.

9. ALEXANDRA CHEMLA’s planned curatorial career took a turn toward the digital when, as a gallery assistant for Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, the Brown University grad, now 26, was prepping unwieldy art binders to ship to Art Basel: “I realized there should be an app for that!” So was born ArtBinder, a digital application for the then-new iPad to allow dealers much more freedom and facility in showcasing their wares and communicating with collectors. She premiered a prototype for ArtBinder at ABMB in 2010 and now her company has more than 150 clients worldwide, including David Zwirner, Pace Gallery, and Lisson Gallery. 10. To be sure, LENA DUNHAM, 26, is a long shot for this short-list. But with dad painter Carroll Dunham (specializing in super-sexualized pop art) and mom photographer Laurie Simmons (best known for using dolls to create disturbing domestic tableaux), the success of this writer, producer, and director is living proof that art-world progeny can grow up to live happy, creative lives outside of the art world—even if that life is breezily informed by artistic risk-taking. Also, it looks like Dunham’s scripting of the gallerista best friend’s story line on her HBO series Girls may well undo the damage of Bravo’s reality show Gallery Girls. ABMB

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Graphic Details Louis Vuitton tags Miami’s Design District with sophisticated urbanism as it opens its highly anticipated boutique. By Fred Bernstein

D

esign Miami cofounder and principal Craig Robins is transforming this city’s Design District—once focused almost entirely on home décor—into a fashion mecca. Among his recent conquests is Louis Vuitton, which will open a permanent store in the District in 2014; earlier this October, however, the house unveiled a temporary outpost in a plain, white stucco building on Northeast 40th Street. There was no chance Louis Vuitton, renowned for its patterned designs, would leave the façade blank for long. After all, the company needed to make its presence known, and, at the same time, live up to its reputation as a creative catalyst. With decades of collaborations with artists under its belt, Robins explains, “Louis Vuitton has uniquely demonstrated this ability to integrate culture and commerce.” LV’s solution for the Design District was Retna, an artist who grew up in Los Angeles, where he went

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from tagging highway overpasses to creating works for galleries and The temporary outpost of Louis Vuitton, on museums. His trademark is an Northeast 40th Street. alphabet with traces of Incan and Egyptian hieroglyphics, Arabic, Hebrew, and Asian calligraphy, and the graffiti art he Miami Beach Convention Center this week.) In the meantime, the company has been working grew up with. At its best, it resembles the work of Paul Klee, Keith Haring, and the erstwhile LV collaborator with some of the most celebrated designers in the Takashi Murakami, but with its own cultural overlays. world on a collection of foldable furniture named (Retna, born Marquis Lewis, is of African-American, Objets Nomades. It includes a collapsible desk by Christian Liaigre, as well as a stool by Patricia Urquiola Salvadoran, and Cherokee descent.) Anne-Catherine Grimal from LV asked Retna that unfurls like the LV monogram flower. A bench to transform the building’s exterior. Now the words by Jean Couvreur looks like a classic Louis Vuitton trunk—until it’s opened. And Maarten Baas’s beach LOUIS VUITTON appear on the building—but are they the company’s sign, or Retna’s tag? The ambiguity chair masquerades as an LV attaché case. Retna has is tantalizing, as are the questions about exclusivity. also created a foldable piece for Louis Vuitton, a scarf After all, Retna has at least four other murals in Miami, adapted from the Miami installation. The scarves— all on permanent public display. (The artist’s work is which cost $860—are selling out. That bodes well for also on view at dealer Michael Kohn’s booth at the Retna, Vuitton, and the Design District. ABMB

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PERSONALITIES

amfAR’s Inspiration Gala, 2011

Raise Your Glass

T

he Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) has raised more than $5 million from its glam, star-studded “Inspiration” parties in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, and São Paulo. When amfAR decided it was time to host an Inspiration party in Miami, they wanted it “during Art Basel Miami Beach, when there is a critical mass of people in town,” says Cindy Rachofsky, to whom amfAR turned for help. She and her husband Howard are major collectors of contemporary art who have helped raise more than $29 million for amfAR and the Dallas Museum of Art through their annual TWO x TWO dinner in their hometown of Dallas. The popular event honors a different living artist each year—past honorees include Mark Grotjahn, Richard Phillips, and April Gornik—and raises a legendary amount of money, auctioning work by the guest artist as well as work donated by many galleries (a record $4.8 million was raised in 2011). “The Rachofsky’s Dallas TWO x TWO event has

become our largest fundraiser,” says AnnMari Shannahan of amfAR, even though the organization shares the proceeds with the Contemporary Art Acquisitions Fund at the Dallas Museum of Art. As Howard explains, “The idea is to leverage the brand at the most significant art event in the States, which is Art Basel Miami Beach.” The inaugural Inspiration Miami Beach Party on Thursday, December 6, is billed as an invitation-only late-night cocktail party on the oceanfront of Soho Beach House. And since “amfAR’s Inspiration parties are known for being about men’s fashion,” says Cindy, “We thought it would be cool to have the auction be of fashion photographs.” Guests can bid on works from a dozen photographers, including Cindy Sherman, Robert Rauschenberg, and Bert Stern. “Not all will be fashion photographers, but it’s likely the photographers or the works will be linked to fashion somehow,” she says. The auction items will complement the par-

ty’s creative tableaux-style vignettes of men’s fashion. The Rachofskys are regulars at Art Basel Miami Beach and help host a party every year in Dallas to fete the show’s co-directors, Marc Spiegler and Annette Schönholzer, and celebrate the show’s success. Since they know from personal experience that many show attendees have overlapping social and professional events every night, says Cindy, “what we decided to do is let this event be a sort of after-party,” where people can pop by and bid. The silent auction works best, she says, “because the crowd will evolve over the course of the evening.” Already Shannahan and amfAR “are thinking it will become an annual event,” Cindy says. “And I am hoping it will, too.” ABMB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TACHMAN

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TOURS

Local Artist Studio Visits 1

Since 2007, the local artist community has opened its studios during the week of Art Basel Miami Beach. Over the years, the program has grown in scope and attendance. Don’t miss this special opportunity this year. 1. THURSDAY

ARTIST STUDIO VISITS IN DESIGN DISTRICT AND WYNWOOD, 9 AM TO NOON Including visits to the studios of Locust Projects (A), Timothy Buwalda & Michael Vasquez (B), Oliver Sanchez (C), Enrique Martínez Celaya (D), Gean Moreno/ Beatriz Monteavaro/Gavin Perry (E) , Magnus Sigurdarson (F) , and the 70 artist studios of the Bakehouse Art Complex (G). Free public access. Maps available via e-mail request or at Locust Projects, 3852 North Miami Ave., Miami; locustprojcts.com artiststudiovisit2012@gmail.com

2

2. FRIDAY ARTIST STUDIO VISITS IN DOWNTOWN MIAMI, 9 AM TO NOON Including visits to studios of Bas Fisher Invitational (A), Christopher Carter (B), George Sánchez-Calderón (C), Cannonball (formerly LegalArt) Studios of Patricia Margarita Hernandez/Jiae Hwang/Lucas Leyva/Jillian Mayer/Pioneer Winter (D), Bhakti Baxter (E). Free public access. Maps available by request via e-mail request or at Bas Fisher Invitational, 122 NE 11th St., Miami; basfisherinvitational.com. info@basfisherinvi tational.com

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VISIT OF ARTIST STUDIOS, 9 AM TO NOON View the studios of Carlos Betancourt (1), Robert Chambers/ Mette Tommerup (2) , Lynne Golob Gelfman (3) , María Martínez-Cañas (4), Fountainhead Haus: Clifton Childree/Manny Prieres/Cristina Lei Rodriguez/Typoe/Agustina Woodgate (5). Free public access. Maps available by request via e-mail request. artiststudiovisit2012@gmail.com

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Art Basel Miami Beach

Skull, by Donald Baechler, 2009.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TK (TK);

Official Guide

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SCHEDULE

Abre Alas, by Reginaldo Pereira, 2012.

WELCOME RECEPTION 5 PM to 7 PM. Hosted by Art Basel Miami Beach and the City of Miami Beach. Access with Welcome Reception invitation only. The Raleigh, 1775 Collins Ave., Miami Beach DESIGN MIAMI/ COLLECTORS PREVIEW Noon to 6 PM. The global forum for collectible design presents the best international galleries featuring museum-quality historical and contemporary furniture, lighting, and other objets d’art. By invitation only. Access with Design Miami/ Collectors Card or VIP cards. Meridian Avenue and 19th Street, next to the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach, 786-871-4837 DESIGN MIAMI/ VERNISSAGE 6 to 9 PM. By invitation only. Access with Design Miami/ VIP cards, Design Miami/ Vernissage invitation, or Art Basel Miami Beach VIP cards. Meridian Avenue and 19th Street, adjacent to the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach

MOCA RECEPTION 7 to 9 PM. Opening of “Bill Viola: Liber Insularum.” Access with VIP Cards, exhibitor pass, or press pass. MOCA, 770 NE 125th St., North Miami, 305-893-6211

DECEMBER 5

or First Choice invitation. 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach PREVIEW OF ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 3 to 6 PM. Professional preview of the show. By invitation of Art Basel Miami Beach and the show’s exhibiting galleries. Access only with VIP card, Special VIP card, or Preview invitation. Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach

DESIGN MIAMI/ COLLECTORS BREAKFAST 10 to 11:30 AM. Design Miami/ hosts a private breakfast, granting exclusive access to the gallery exhibitions outside regular fair hours. By invitation only. Access with Design Miami/ VIP cards or Art Basel Miami Beach VIP cards. RSVP essential. Meridian Avenue and 19th St., adjacent to the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach, 786-871-4837; rsvp@designmiami.com

VERNISSAGE, ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 6 to 9 PM. Exclusive evening opening. Access only with Art Basel Miami Beach VIP card, Special VIP card, or Vernissage invitation. Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach

FIRST CHOICE, ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 11 AM to 3 PM. Exclusive VIP opening at the Miami Beach Convention Center. By invitation of Art Basel Miami Beach and the show’s exhibiting galleries. Access only with Art Basel Miami Beach VIP Card

BASS MUSEUM OF ART RECEPTION 9 PM to midnight. “The Endless Renaissance—Six Solo Artist Projects”: Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Barry X Ball, Walead Beshty, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ged Quinn, and Araya Radjarmrearnsook. Access with Bass Museum of Art

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF CASA TRIÂNGULO

DECEMBER 4

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invitation, Bass Museum of Art membership card, VIP cards, exhibitor pass, or press pass. 2100 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-7530, ext. 2001

Truss, by Rose Wylie, 2000.

OPENING ART PUBLIC NIGHT 9 PM to midnight. A special evening of performances by Jason and Alicia Hall Moran, My Barbarian, and Alex Israel together with a late viewing of Art Public. Free public access. Collins Park, Collins Avenue and 21st Street, Miami Beach VALENTINO COCKTAIL PARTY 6 to 8:30 PM. On the rooftop of The Webster. By invitation only. 1220 Collins Ave., Miami Beach

DECEMBER 6

WORLD CLASS BOXING 9 AM to noon. Aaron Angell, hosted by Debra and Dennis Scholl. Free public access. 170 NW 23rd St., Miami, 305-433-9908 ARTIST STUDIO VISITS IN MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT AND WYNWOOD 9 AM to noon, through December 9. Including visits to the studios of Timothy Buwalda, Locust Projects, Enrique Martinez Celaya, Gean Moreno, Beatriz Monteavaro, Gavin Perry, Oliver Sanchez, Magnus Sigurdarson, Michael Vasquez, and the 70 artist studios of The Bakehouse Art Complex. Free public access. Maps of studio locations available via e-mail request or at Locust Projects. 3852 N. Miami Ave., Miami; artiststudiovisit2012@gmail.com CRAIG ROBINS COLLECTION AT DACRA 9 AM to noon. Featuring contemporary art and design. Access with VIP cards. Reservation required. Dacra Headquarters, 3841 NE 2nd Ave., Suite 400, Miami, 305-531-8700; rsvp@dacra.com BREAKFAST AT CASALIN 10 AM to noon. “Out of Site.” Site-specific works that are camouflaged or just barely there, curated by

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSHUA WHITE/JW PICTURES (KRUGER)

Money Makes Money, by Barbara Kruger, 2011.

Art ArtBasel Basel| Miami | MiamiBeach Beach2012 2012233 XX

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SCHEDULE Sitting Couple on Bench, by Lynn Chadwick, 1990.

VIZCAYA MUSEUM AND GARDENS 9 PM to midnight. The Light Club of Vizcaya: A Women’s Picture by Josiah McElheny. Film screenings at 9:30, 10:15, and 11 PM. Access with special invitation, VIP cards, exhibitor pass, or press pass. 3251 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-860-8423

DECEMBER 7

Fredric Snitzer. Hosted by Lin Lougheed and New World School of the Arts. Access with VIP cards. 55 NW 30th St., Miami, 305-237-3649 TOUR OF WYNWOOD WALLS 9 AM to noon. Includes murals created by innovative artists from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Free public access. Limited to 40 people per tour. Tours every hour. To book a tour, please contact Stacey Sequeira. Wynwood Walls,

2528 NW Second Ave., Miami, 305-531-4411; thewynwoodwalls.com; stacey@goldmanproperties.com ART BASEL CONVERSATIONS PREMIERE 10 to 11 AM. The Art Basel Conversations series premiere offers an intimate conversation with the acclaimed artist Richard Tuttle. Free public access. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D. 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach

ART BASEL CONVERSATIONS: RETHINKING THE ENCYCLOPEDIC MUSEUM 10 to 11 AM. Intimate conversations with today’s leading artists, collectors, curators, and museum directors. Speakers will be available for informal discussions after the panel. Free public access. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D. 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach RECEPTION AT THE WOLFSONIANFLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 8 to 11 PM. “Postcards of the Wiener Werkstätte: Selections from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection,” “Esther Shalev-Gerz: Describing Labor,” and “Art and Design in the Modern Age: Selections from The Wolfsonian Collection.” Access only with VIP cards, exhibitor pass, press pass, or Wolfsonian-FIU invitation.

PHOTOGRAPHY © ROBIN RHODE, COURTESY OF LEHMAN MAUPIN (RHODE); LANDAU FINE ART, MONTREAL, CANADA (CHADWICK)

MIAMI ART MUSEUM PRESENTS “PARTY ON THE PLAZA” 8 PM to midnight. Celebrating the opening of the “New Work Miami 2013” exhibition, showcasing newly commissioned works by Miami’s vibrant artistic community. Shuttle provided to and from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Secure garage parking available at 50 NW Second Avenue. Free access with MAM invitation, MAM Contemporaries membership, MAM Contributing ($250) membership, VIP cards, exhibitor pass, or press pass. Miami Art Museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, 305-375-1704

Open Court, by Robin Rhode, 2012.

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1001 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-535-2631 ART FILM, PAINTERS PAINTING (1973) 8 PM. A documentary film directed by Emile de Antonio, selected by Zurich film connoisseur This Brunner, followed by Q&A. Free public access, but seating is limited. Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach ARTNEXUS PARTY 9 PM to midnight. Hosted by Susanne Birbragher and ArtNexus. Limited spaces available. RSVP and confirmation required. artnexusparty@liaisonscorporation.com

DECEMBER 8

PHOTOGRAPHY © LOUISE BOURGEOIS TRUST (BOURGEOIS)

LIGHT BREAKFAST RECEPTION AND CURATED STUDIO VISITS, ARTCENTER/ SOUTH FLORIDA 9 AM to noon. Hosted by Maria Del Valle and Susan Caraballo. Access with special invitation, VIP cards, exhibitor pass, and press pass. RSVP required. ArtCenter/South Florida, 800–810 and 924 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, 305-674-8278, ext. 302; scaraballo@artcentersf.org SAGAMORE THE ART HOTEL BASEL BRUNCH 9 AM to noon. Hosted by Martin and Cricket Taplin and Host Committee Members. Access with VIP Cards and RSVP; confirmation required. Sagamore Hotel, 1671 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-398-7720 ART BASEL CONVERSATIONS, ASIA FOCUS 10 to 11 AM. “Art Basel Miami Beach and South Florida: A Decade of Transformation.” Speakers will be available for informal discussion after the panel. Free public access. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D. 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach

MAM BALL 7 to 11 PM. Annual fundraising gala event for Miami Art Museum. Black-tie dinner in the museum’s gallery space followed by dancing on the outdoor plaza. Advance ticket purchase required. Prices start at $1,000. Miami Art Museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, 305-375-5935 CRASH THE BALL AFTERPARTY 10 PM to 2 AM. Dancing and celebration on the Miami Art Museum’s outdoor plaza. Special musical guests and cocktails. Tickets are $100 presale, $150 at the door. Ticket purchase required for both event and afterparty. Miami Art Museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, 305-375-5935; events@miamiartmuseum.org

Lullaby, by Louise Bourgeois, 2006.

DECEMBER 9

WHERE THE BOYS ARE BREAKFAST 9 AM to noon. Celebrating the exhibition “Warhol and Cars: American Icons.” Also on view: “Pop Art in America: Selections from the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale Collection;” “Elliott Erwitt: Personal Best Selections from the Cricket Taplin Collection;” “A Return to the Ashcan;” “Associations and Inspiration: The CoBrA Movement and the Arts of Africa and New Guinea;” “Shark;” and “Wall Paintings: Installations by Arturo Herrera, Gavin Perry, Jen Stark, Roberto Behar, and Rosario Marquardt.” Access with VIP cards and Museum members at the Director’s Circle level and above. Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale. 1 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, 954-262-0233; rkjelgaard@moafl.org BRUNCH AND TOUR OF THE ADRIENNE ARSHT CENTER 10 AM to noon. Highlighting the new Knight Masterworks Collection, with inaugural artist Donald Sultan and the Miami-Dade Art in Public Places installations by José Bedia, Cundo Bermudez, Gary

Moore, Anna Valentina Murch, and Robert Rahway Zakanitch. Light brunch will be served in the Carnival Studio Theater Lobby inside the Ziff Ballet Opera House. Reservations requested. 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-949-6722; arshtcenter.org/basel PARODI LECTURE IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF ART 11:30 AM. “Currency, Value, Hype.” Miami Art Museum and University of Miami, Department of Philosophy present Martha Buskirk, professor of art history and criticism at Montserrat College of Art, Beverly, Massachusetts. Free public access, with refreshments served after the lecture. Miami Art Museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, 305-375-4073; education@miamiartmuseum.org FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN BRUNCH 9 AM to noon. Art at Fairchild, hosted by Lin Lougheed and Bruce Greer. Access only with VIP cards and

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SCHEDULE

127 Willow Forks (This Is Who I Am), by Robert Kinmont, 2010.

LOWE ART MUSEUM BRUNCH 10 AM. Lecture by Eugenio Lopez, “A Collector’s Art: Highlights from the Jumex Collection,” following the brunch. Hosted by Stella M. Holmes and Brian Dursum. Complimentary admission with VIP cards or exhibitor pass. University of Miami, 1301 Stanford Dr., Coral Gables, 305-284-5587 ART BASEL CONVERSATIONS, ARTISTIC PRACTICE 10 to 11 AM. The Artist as Musician. Informal discussion after the panel. Free public access. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach Untitled, by Adam McEwen, 2012.

exhibitor pass. 10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, 305-667-1651, ext. 3303 FROST ART MUSEUM BREAKFAST IN THE PARK 9:30 AM to noon. Featuring an informal lecture by sculptor Albert Paley, tours of The Sculpture Park, and a light breakfast. Hosted by Carol Damian, director of

LAZY SUNDAY BBQ 2 to 6 PM. Hosted by Sebastian, with The Hole. The Standard Spa, Miami Beach, 40 Island Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-1717

DAILY PROGRAMS, DECEMBER 4–9

THE MARGULIES COLLECTION AT THE WAREHOUSE From 9 AM, through December 9. Featured exhibitions

include sculpture by Anselm Kiefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, and Simryn Gill; installations by Amar Kanwar, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, and Roberto Lange; video by Kader Attia, Nathalie Djurberg, and Leandro Erlich; and photography by Sabelo Mlangeni, Barbara Probst, and Wael Shawky. Admission is a $10 donation to the Lotus House Homeless Shelter. 591 NW 27th St., Miami, 305-576-1051 DE LA CRUZ COLLECTION CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE From 9 AM, through December 9. Featuring a new exhibition from the Collection. In the project room: Pleat Construction by Jim Drain. Free public access. 23 NE 41st St., Miami, 305-576-6112 CIFO From 9 AM to noon, through December 9. “Unsaid/ Spoken.” Selected works from the Ella FontanalsCisneros Collection and The CIFO Collection; curated by Moacir dos Anjos and José Roca. Free public access. Cisneros-Fontanals Art Foundation, 1018 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-455-3343 RUBELL FAMILY COLLECTION From 9 AM, through December 9. “Alone Together.” Free public access. 95 NW 29th St., Miami, 305-573-6090

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON MANDELLA, COURTESY OF ALEXANDER AND BONIN (KINMONT)

The Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU. Free public access. Enter from SW 107th Ave. at SW 16th St., Miami, 305-348-0401

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF CASA TRIÃ&#x201A;NGULO

Obama Lady #6, by Assume Vivid Astro Focus, 2012.

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SCHEDULE

ART VIDEO NIGHTS From 8 PM, through December 9. Art Video features film and video works by today’s most exciting international artists. Art Video will be screened in the SoundSpace Park, on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, as well as within five viewing pods inside the Miami Beach Convention Center. Free public access. 500 17th St., Miami Beach; artbasel.com/video

DAILY PROGRAM, DECEMBER 6–9

ART BASEL CONVERSATIONS 10 to 11 AM. Intimate conversations with today’s leading artists, collectors, curators and museum directors. Free public access. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D, 1901 Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach

Peter Saul vs. Pop Art, by Peter Saul, 2012.

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH Noon to 8 PM, through December 9. The International

Art Show, featuring exhibitions by more than 250 galleries presenting premiere artworks of the 20th and 21st centuries in the Art Galleries, Art Nova, Art Positions, and Art Kabinett sectors. Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach ART SALON 1 to 6 PM. Discussion forum featuring wide-ranging hourly programs of artist talks, book signings, panels, and presentations. General admission to Art Basel Miami Beach includes complimentary access to the Art Salon. Miami Beach Convention Center, in the auditorium adjacent to Entrance D. 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach ART PUBLIC All day. Outdoor sculptures, site-specific installations, and public artworks in Collins Park. Curated by Christine Y. Kim, associate curator of contempary art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and cofounder of Los Angeles Nomadic Division. Guided tours

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY GALERIE LELONG, NEW YORK & PARIS (MEIRELES); MARY BOONE GALLERY, NEW YORK (SAUL)

Canto #1B, by Cildo Meireles, 1967-2011.

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information desk in Info Zone D. Free public access. Collins Park, Collins Avenue and 21st Street, Miami Beach

OTHER ART EVENTS

DESIGN MIAMI/ December 5 to 9, noon to 8 PM. The global forum for collectible design presents the best international galleries exhibiting museum-quality historical and contemporary furniture, lighting, and other objets d’art. Access with Design Miami/ VIP cards, or Art Basel Miami Beach VIP cards. Meridian Avenue and 19th Street, adjacent to the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach, 305-572-0866; info@designmiami.com GÜIRO December 5 to 8, 5 PM to midnight. Join us at Güiro, an artist bar by Los Carpinteros and Absolut. Free Public access, ages 21 and up. The oceanfront at Collins Park, at Collins Avenue and 21st Street, Miami Beach WALLS OF ARTSEEN December 6 to 9, 8 to 10 PM. Presented by New World School of the Arts Visual Artists. Free public access. Contact Maggy Cuesta for information. New World School of the Arts at Artseen, 2215 NW Second Ave., Miami, 305-237-3620; artseenspace.wordpress.com; mcuesta@mdc.edu

Sure You Can, by Jessica Bradley, 2011.

Increment in the Spring, by Yayoi Kusama, 1986.

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THE LAST WORD

Mexico’s Medici Collector Eugenio Lopez chats about Bourgeois, Brancusi, and le scandale of MOCA, LA. By Sue Hostetler

A

s the dashing, jet-setting president of Mexico’s Jumex Foundation/Collection (supported by the Jumex Group), 45-yearold Eugenio Lopez has spent the last two decades establishing himself as the most influential patron of contemporary art in his country. He has not only funded a staggering number of exhibitions, but has also created the largest private collection in Latin America—the 2,500-piece La Colección Jumex—and by buying early and deep, helped cement the careers of artists like Francis Alÿs, Gabriel Orozco and Damián Ortega. I had the pleasure of catching up with the charming and notoriously peripatetic übercollector.

important. For centuries it has had a rich cultural life. It’s a city whose inhabitants are developing ideas, there’s great energy, and a new generation of artists are experimenting in a variety of artistic expressions. After years of being absent from the art world, it now has a vibrant artistic scene. SH: Which historical art-world figure would you most like to have a spirited argument with? EL: Leonardo da Vinci. Artist, scientist, inventor—one of the most brilliant minds in history. SH: Describe the current state of the Latin American

Sue Hostetler: What is your favorite piece ever purchased at Art Basel Miami Beach? Eugenio Lopez: Louise Bourgeois’s Spider! SH: What one work of art would you own if everything were for sale? EL: A piece from Constantin Brancusi’s series “Bird in Space.” SH: Which artist, living or dead, would you most like to go drinking with? EL: Pablo Picasso. SH: Which city gives you the greatest hope for contemporary art’s future and why? EL: Mexico City. Its geographical location is very

—EUGENIO LOPEZ

museum and putting behind the recent controversy? EL: MOCA, Los Angeles will continue. There are moments of difficulties everywhere in the world. Right now at MOCA there have been a series of events; it has not been the best time, but also much of it has been blown out of proportion. MOCA is an institution that will survive; its collection is great, and there are key patrons and board members, including myself. SH: How should the current museum paradigm change and evolve? EL: A museum must be in dialogue, responding to and engaging with its urban context and its city. Museums in New York City, Los Angeles, Bogotá, and Mexico City have distinct contexts, publics, and roles. What makes a museum successful in one city may not work in another. There are various factors that are important in making each museum distinct, such as endowment, direction, mission, and the type of art exhibited. It is difficult to establish a law or set rules that can be applied across the board. Also, in this age, architecture and the quality of shows are equally important. What matters is to have the exterior be architecturally noteworthy and the interior designed in a way to display art of different genres—from painting, drawing, sculpture, and photography to installation, video, and new media—in a quality manner. ABMB

contemporary art market and how Art Basel Miami Beach, with its focus on Latin American artists, collectors, and galleries, has been instrumental in the market’s growth. EL: The current state of the Latin American art market is booming. It’s completely different from what it was just three years ago. The art world in Latin America is a new generation with totally new ideas, and the amount of talent there is so vast it is difficult to keep up. SH: As a Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, trustee, do you look forward to a new chapter for the

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RENEN CASTELAN FOGLIA

“The art world in Latin America is a new generation with totally new ideas.”

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