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Thousands of people work in the wine industry but few end up on the bottle. At Yalumba, we’ve been making wine since 1849. One thing we’ve learnt over the years is that you can’t do much with a bunch of good grapes unless you have already picked a bunch of great people. With this in mind, in 1962, we decided to honour the great people who have made an outstanding contribution to life and tradition at Yalumba by crafting ‘The Signature’. Each release of this iconic Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz blend bears the signature of the person honoured. With the 55th Signature, we salute Andrew Murphy. Murph started his working life in the cellar where he quickly rose to Cellar Manager, qualified as a Winemaker, was promoted to Operations Manager and is today our Director of Wine. So he doesn’t need anybody to tell him that the wine which now bears his name is one of the finest Signatures we have crafted yet. In fact, he’d probably say the wine he’s ended up on is the one he’d most like to upend.

One family. Many stories.

Judy Argent 2008

Clive Weston 2009

Jane Ferrari 2010

Robert Hill-Smith 2012

Andrew Murphy 2013


MODERN + CONTEMPORARY ART Lots 1 – 96

IMPORTANT FINE ART AUCTION • MELBOURNE • 13 JUNE 2018

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MELBOURNE • AUCTION + VIEWING 105 commercial road, south yarra, victoria, 3141 telephone: 03 9865 6333 • facsimile: 03 9865 6344 info@deutscherandhackett.com

SYDNEY • VIEWING 16 goodhope street, paddington, new south wales, 2021 telephone: 02 9287 0600 • facsimile: 02 9287 0611 info@deutscherandhackett.com

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melbourne auction

sydney viewing melbourne viewing

absentee/telephone bids live online bidding

LOTS 1 – 96 WEDNESDAY 13 JUNE 7:00pm 105 commercial road south yarra, victoria, 3141 telephone: 03 9865 6333 THURSDAY 31 MAY – SUNDAY 3 JUNE 16 goodhope street paddington, new south wales, 2021 telephone: 02 9287 0600 11:00am – 6:00pm THURSDAY 7 – TUESDAY 12 JUNE 105 commercial road south yarra, victoria, 3141 telephone: 03 9865 6333 11:00am – 6:00pm email bids to: info@deutscherandhackett.com fax: 03 9865 6344 telephone: 03 9865 6333 telephone bid form – p. 171 absentee bid form – p. 172 www.deutscherandhackett.com/watch-live-auction

www.deutscherandhackett.com • info@deutscherandhackett.com

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specialists CHRIS DEUTSCHER executive director — melbourne Chris is a graduate of Melbourne University and has over 40 years art dealing, auction and valuation experience as Director of Deutscher Fine Art and more recently, as co-founder and Executive Director of Deutscher~Menzies. He has extensively advised private, corporate and museum art collections and been responsible for numerous Australian art publications and landmark exhibitions. He is also an approved valuer under the Cultural Gifts Program.

DAMIAN HACKETT executive director — sydney Damian has over 25 years experience in public and commercial galleries, and the fine art auction market. He completed a BA (Visual Arts) at the University of New England, was Assistant Director of the Gold Coast City Art Gallery, and in 1993 joined Rex Irwin Art Dealer, a leading commercial gallery in Sydney. In 2001 Damian moved into the fine art auction market as Head of Australian and International art for Phillips de Pury and Luxembourg, and from 2002 – 2006 was National Director of Deutscher~Menzies.

HENRY MULHOLLAND senior art specialist Henry Mulholland is a graduate of the National Art School in Sydney, and has had a successful career as an exhibiting artist. Since 2000, Henry has also been a regular art critic on ABC Radio 702. He was artistic advisor to the Sydney Cricket Ground Trust Basil Sellers Sculpture Project, and since 2007 a regular feature of Sculpture by the Sea, leading tours for corporate stakeholders and conducting artist talks in Sydney, Tasmania and New Zealand. Prior to joining Deutscher & Hackett, Henry’s fine art consultancy provided a range of services, with a particular focus on collection management and acquiring artworks for clients on the secondary market.

CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE head of aboriginal art and senior art specialist Crispin holds a Bachelor of Arts (Visual Arts and History) from Monash University. In 1995, he began working for Sotheby’s Australia, where he became the representative for Aboriginal art in Melbourne. In 2006 Crispin joined Joel Fine Art as head of Aboriginal and Contemporary Art and later was appointed head of the Sydney office. He possesses extensive knowledge of Aboriginal art and has over 15 years experience in the Australian fine art auction market.

MARA SISON registrar Mara has a Bachelor of Arts (Humanities) from the University of Asia and the Pacific, Philippines and a Master of Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies from Deakin University. She gained her experience in the private and not-for-profit sectors as a Gallery Manager and Exhibitions Coordinator for MiFA Asian Contemporary Art and Melbourne Fine Art Galleries and as an Administration Officer for Australia China Art Foundation.

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ROGER McILROY head auctioneer Roger was the Chairman, Managing Director and auctioneer for Christie’s Australia and Asia from 1989 to 2006, having joined the firm in London in 1977. He presided over many significant auctions, including Alan Bond’s Dallhold Collection (1992) and The Harold E. Mertz Collection of Australian Art (2000). Since 2006, Roger has built a highly distinguished art consultancy in Australian and International works of art. Roger will continue to independently operate his privately-owned art dealing and consultancy business alongside his role at Deutscher and Hackett.

SCOTT LIVESEY auctioneer Scott Livesey began his career in fine art with Leonard Joel Auctions from 1988 to 1994 before moving to Sotheby’s Australia in 1994, as auctioneer and specialist in Australian Art. Scott founded his eponymous gallery in 2000, which represents both emerging and established contemporary Australian artists, and includes a regular exhibition program of indigenous Art. Along with running his contemporary art gallery, Scott has been an auctioneer for Deutscher and Hackett since 2010.

ALEX CRESWICK head of finance With a Bachelor of Business Accounting at RMIT, Alex has almost 15 years experience within financial management roles. He has spent much of his early years within the corporate sector with companies such as IBM, Macquarie Bank and ANZ. With a strong passion for the arts more recently he was the Financial Controller for Ross Mollison Group, a leading provider of marketing services to the performing arts. Alex is currently completing his CPA.

LUCIE REEVES-SMITH gallery manager – sydney Lucie completed her studies in Belgium, obtaining Masters of Arts in Art History (Modern and Contemporary Art), together with a Bachelors of Art History, Archaeology and Musicology from the Université Catholique de Louvain. Since returning to Australia in 2014, she has gained sound experience in cataloguing, research and arts writing through various roles with the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre and with private art advisory firms Tutela Capital and LoveArt International.

MELISSA HELLARD head of marketing and client services Melissa has a Bachelor of Communication (Media) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from The University of Melbourne. Melissa gained experience in the corporate sector assisting companies such as NAB, AFL and Fiat Chrysler Group in a variety of fields including marketing, events and sponsorship. With an enduring passion for the visual arts, Melissa was more recently the Finance and Administration Assistant for Deutscher and Hackett.

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specialists for this auction

ART SPECIALISTS Chris Deutscher 0411 350 150 Damian Hackett 0422 811 034 Henry Mulholland 0424 487 738 Crispin Gutteridge 0411 883 052 AUCTIONEERS Scott Livesey ADMINISTRATION AND ACCOUNTS Alex Creswick (Melbourne) 03 9865 6333 Lucie Reeves-Smith (Sydney) 02 9287 0600 ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE BIDS Claire Kurzmann 03 9865 6333 please complete the absentee bid form (p. 172) or telephone bid form (p. 171) SHIPPING Mara Sison 03 9865 6333 CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS Claire Kurzmann 03 9865 6333 catalogue $40 at the gallery $45 by mail $55 international (including G.S.T. and postage)

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contents lots 1 — 96

page 12

prospective buyers and sellers guide

page 164

conditions of auction and sale

page 166

catalogue subscription form

page 169

attendee pre-registration form

page 170

telephone bid form

page 171

absentee bid form

page 172

index

page 183

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

CULTURAL HERITAGE PERMITS

Some imagery on bark and early western desert paintings in this catalogue may be deemed unsuitable for viewing by women, children or uninitiated men. We sug gest ar t co - ordinators at Aboriginal communities show this catalogue to community elders for approval before distributing the catalogue for general viewing. Co-ordinators may wish to mask or remove certain images prior to circulation. The English spelling of aboriginal names has evolved over the years. In this catalogue every effort has been made to use the current linguistic form. However original information from certificates has been transcribed as written with the result that there are different spellings of the same name, title, language group and story.

Under the provisions of the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act, 1986, buyers may be required to obtain an export permit for certain categories of items in this sale from the Cultural Property Section: Department of Communications and the Arts GPO Box 2154 Canberra ACT 2601 Email: movable.heritage@arts.gov.au Phone: 1800 819 461 Under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), permits are required for the movement of wildlife, wildlife specimens and products made or derived from wildlife. This includes species on the endangered species list. Buyers may be required to obtain an export permit for certain categories of items offered at auction. Permits must be obtained from: Wildlife Trade Regulation Section Environment Australia GPO Box 787 Canberra ACT 2601 Email: wildlifetrade@environment.gov.au Phone: (02) 6274 1900 Under the provisions of the Wildlife and Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act, 1982, buyers may be required to obtain an export permit for certain categories of items offered at auction (including plant or animal products derived from an Australian native species such as: ivory, tortoise shell, feathers, etc). Permits must be obtained from the Wildlife Protection Section, Environment Australia-Biodiversity Group at the address above, prior to items being export from Australia.

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IMPORTANT MODERN WORKS OF ART TO BE SOLD ON BEHALF OF ARTBANK, SYDNEY funds raised from the sale of these works will go towards supporting australian artists Lots 1 – 3

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IMPORTANT MODERN WORKS • ARTBANK, SYDNEY • LOTS 1 – 3

JUSTIN O’BRIEN 1 (1917 – 1996) STILL LIFE AGAINST A WINDOW, 1981 oil on canvas 121.0 x 78.0 cm signed upper right: O’BRIEN estimate :

$100,000 – 140,000

PROVENANCE Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Artbank, Sydney

interested in the way representations of looking out from a room enable you to convey a feeling of three-dimensional space … I’m absorbed in painting domestic life’. 2

EXHIBITED Justin O’Brien: recent paintings from Rome, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 28 September – 16 October 1982, cat. 1

What distinguishes this Still Life against a Window is its pictorial richness and the way it appeals to all of our senses. The tone and texture of the scene are carefully observed and faithfully transcribed as O’Brien conveys the coolness of the marble window sill, the flickering reflections on window panes, soft and velvety fruits and feathery blooms. In comparison to its closest related work, Window 2, 1978, which features the same window, this painting is warmer and more complex, counterbalanced compositionally through the placement of a table in the foreground, laden with fresh earthly offerings.

LITERATURE Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 19, no. 4, winter 1982, p. 380 (illus., as ‘Still Life Against Window’) Grishin, S., ‘An Australian Painter in Rome: Justin O’Brien’, Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 21, no. 4, Winter 1984, pp. 495 (illus., as ‘Still Life Against Window’), 496 RELATED WORK Window No. 2, 1978, oil on canvas, 93.0 x 67.5 cm, private collection, illus. in France, C., Justin O’Brien: Image and Icon, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1987, pl. 22, p. 77 (illus.)

Resplendent in its varied colour, texture and detail, Still Life against a Window, 1981 captures amongst its fibres and layers the heavy stillness of a late Italian summer. Ambitious in both scale and level of detail, this painting is undoubtedly a work that stands apart from the mass of O’Brien’s late still lives. Having recently returned to Rome after months of travelling through Turkey, the summer months of 1981 would mark a time of renewed inspiration and invigorated artistic practice for the Australian expatriate painter.1 While O’Brien rose to critical acclaim with narrative paintings depicting biblical episodes, his later years were characterised by a more pronounced naturalism and subject matter that was more prosaic and bucolic. Landscapes and still life subjects remained touchstones throughout the artist’s career – translating the divine power that he recognised in the everyday, particularly whilst living in Greece and Italy. Many of O’Brien’s compositions from the late 1970s onwards featured opened windows and doorways, playing with the Renaissance idea of the canvas as a window into an alternate reality. Explaining his rationale in a conversation with Desmond O’Grady in 1986 O’Brien said: ’I am

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Considering the religious nature of much of O’Brien’s oeuvre, one realises that even his more prosaic compositions are endowed with a spiritual subtext. Concealing religious architectural forms within this domestic composition, from the marble sill and wooden table as altar, the shutters and window panes as the outermost panels of an altarpiece, O’Brien transforms this corner of his Roman apartment a humble place of worship. This is further emphasised through the placement of a simple string of Skyrian bells hanging from the window frame. Sasha Grishin, Emeritus professor of Art History at the Australian National University, travelled to Rome to interview Justin O’Brien a few years after this painting was executed. In the article subsequently published in Art and Australia, Grishin wrote: ‘In the early 1980s, he painted a series of still life compositions that must rate amongst his best work. These include his Still Life Against The Window, 1981 [sic.]. Light now permeates every surface as the whole starts to glow with colour. The symbolism, which in some of his earlier work appeared as somewhat heavy handed, has now vanished and is replaced by inner radiance of colour expressed in terms of vibrating, glowing fields’. 3 1. See Pearce, B., and Wilson, N., Justin O’Brien. The Sacred Music of Colour, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2011, p. 168 2. The artist in conversation with Desmond O’Grady, Rome, 1986, quoted in ibid., p. 169 3. Grishin, S., ‘An Australian Artist in Rome’, Art and Australia, vol. 21, no. 4, winter 1984, p. 496. The work in question illustrated on p. 495, as ‘Still Life Against Window’

LUCIE REEVES-SMITH


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IMPORTANT MODERN WORKS • ARTBANK, SYDNEY • LOTS 1 – 3

JEFFREY SMART 2 (1921 – 2013) FIUMICINO BYPASS, 1966 oil on canvas 58.5 x 76.5 cm signed and dated lower right: JEFFREY SMART 66 inscribed with title verso: FIUMICINO BYPASS estimate :

$300,000 – 400,000

PROVENANCE South Yarra Gallery, Melbourne The Osborne Art Gallery, Adelaide Artarmon Gallery (Artlovers), Sydney (label attached verso) Artbank, Sydney

ahead. Curiously, it is challenged by a confrontational bull bearing the words ‘COGNAC/VETERANO/OSBORNE’, the logo for a much-admired Spanish brandy. Other billboards variously worded – ‘Westinghouse Radio Borne’ broadcasting around the world – maintain the international touch. Characteristically, each offers its own tantalising riddle, with the ubiquitous arrow pointing to a stop sign.

EXHIBITED Jeffrey Smart, South Yarra Gallery, Melbourne, 19 April 1966, cat. 17 (as ‘Fiumincina [sic] Bypass’)

Fiumicino Bypass, 1966 is classic Smart. Realism, flirting with the intrigue of surrealism, is spiced with the enigmatic and a marvellous sense of the theatrical, especially through the dramatic use of light. The sky is filled with a strange light of expectation. The isolation is spellbinding. Its building was a favourite, appearing, with variations, in several of Smart’s works of the time. In a note to his watercolour, The Owner, 1964 – 65 (private collection), Smart noted: ‘The building is still standing in a sort of wasteland between Roma and EUR, on the main road. It was also used for Outskirts, Athens, 1965 …, and various other works’.1 The early significance of the building for Smart is confirmed by a haunting familiarity in Self Portrait, 1964 – 65 (private collection) – window shutters open, revealing nothing but darkness. Our painting is rich in such Smart features which have become favourites over time. His fascination with the curves and sweep of roads had an early blossoming in Approaching Storm by Railway, 1955 (private collection), reaching an early peak in the masterly The Cahill Expressway, 1962 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne). The fields of grass, blown by a wind while all else remains still, frequent other paintings such as The Listeners of 1965 (Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria) or later The Dome, 1977 (TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria). For the ever articulate Smart, all is redolent with the sounds of silence, so in keeping with its time. 2 And finally there is Smart’s singular mastery of composition based on his own concept of perfection achieved through what he called ‘crystallisation’: ‘That’s how I work – by crystallising emotion’. 3 The mid sixties were vintage years for Smart, highlighted in his South Yarra exhibition of 1966 in which Fiumicino Bypass was joined by the already mentioned Antibes, 1965 in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, and The Listeners, 1965, in Blair Ritchie’s bequest to the Art Gallery of Ballarat.

LITERATURE McCulloch, A., ‘Perfection in Paint’, Herald, Melbourne, April 1966 Quartermaine, P., Jeffrey Smart, Gryphon Books, Melbourne, 1983, cat. 475, p. 110 (dated as 1965) RELATED WORK First Study for Fiumicino Bypass, 1966, gouache on paper, 25.0 x 39.0 cm, listed in Quartermaine, P., Jeffrey Smart, Gryphon Books, Melbourne, 1983, cat.473 Second Study for Fiumicino Bypass, 1966, oil on canvas, listed in Quartermaine, P., Jeffrey Smart, Gryphon Books, Melbourne, 1983, cat.474 We are grateful to Stephen Rogers, Archivist for the Estate of Jeffrey Smart, for his assistance in cataloguing this work.

Jeffrey Smart, the inveterate traveller, invariably filled his paintings with images of and allusions to movement – trucks, autostrada, road signs – all attired in the paradox of stillness. Smart had returned to Europe in 1964, living in Rome before embarking on his many travels the following year, which were to become annual affairs. In April 1965, he held his first solo exhibition in Italy at Rome’s Galleria 88, before leaving for Paris and a lengthy stay in Spain. When he exhibited Fiumicino Bypass, 1966 in his show at Melbourne’s South Yarra Gallery in April the following year, he included paintings from many diverse locations – Madrid Airport, The Steps, Parma and Antibes. As Rome’s international airport is at Fiumicino, the bypass in our painting perhaps suggests his return home, cautioned by the ‘30’ speed sign with care in handling the sharp bend in the road and what lay beyond the precipitous horizon

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1. See Jeffrey Smart: Drawings and Studies 1942 – 2001, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 2001, with commentary by Smart, pp. 74, 70. 2. Paul Simon wrote the song ‘The Sounds of Silence’ in 1964. When rereleased by Simon and Garfunkel in late 1965, it became an international hit. 3. Smart, J., referring to Madrid Airport, 1965 in Capon, E., Jeffrey Smart Retrospective, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1999, p. 103

DAVID THOMAS


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IMPORTANT MODERN WORKS • ARTBANK, SYDNEY • LOTS 1 – 3

MARGARET OLLEY 3 (1923 – 2011) LUPINS AND LEMONS, 1980 oil on composition board 68.0 x 91.5 cm signed lower left: Olley bears inscription verso: 5 estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Artbank, Sydney EXHIBITED Margaret Olley, Holdsworth Galleries, Sydney, 18 October – 6 November 1980, cat. 22 Margaret Olley, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 11 September – 3 October 1981, cat. 11

Unswayed by the tide of late Modernism, Margaret Olley was forever steadfastly devoted to the humble still life. As observed by her dear friend Edmund Capon, ’Still-lifes and interiors are her métier, and Margaret Olley is a part of that tradition, from Vermeer in the seventeenth century to Morandi in the twentieth century – two of her most admired artists – which finds inspiration, beauty and a rich spirit of humanity in the most familiar of subject matter’.1 Painted just before the artist left for a sojourn to Asia, United States and the United Kingdom in 1981, during which she eagerly attended exhibitions by Henri Matisse and Giorgio Morandi, Lupins and Lemons, 1980 is a prime example of Olley’s masterful manipulation of light and space. Lupins and Lemons features a bunch of effervescent blue lupins in a stoneware jug, balanced with deep red apples and ripening lemons upon a striped blue and white tablecloth. The composition is nonchalant, with a lemon casually resting beside its bowl as though it had toppled only moments before. However, this ambience conceals a carefully considered orchestration of space. Arranged and rearranged like props in a theatre set, the objects in Olley’s paintings were meticulously placed

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and, in time, became as acquainted to viewers as they were to the artist herself. The blue and white fruit bowl, jug and striped tablecloth are all recurring ‘characters’ on her stage, imbued with the stories and memories of her colourful life. The lush arrangement of lupins against the familiar pink backdrop of Olley’s home pay homage to her beloved European tradition of nature morte painting in a delicately constructed mise en scène. As Barry Pearce elucidates in the Art Gallery of New South Wales retrospective publication, there is more to Olley’s paintings than a mere still-life – we are invited into her personal domain: ’Darkness and light, fertility and decay, space and time, tragedy and comedy, solitude, camaraderie; all the things we know and imagine about life and humanity can be gathered at her table within the rooms of her world.’ 2 The artist endlessly found magic in the unremarkable, revelling in the beauty and warmth of her Paddington terrace home. The balance and harmony found in Lupins and Lemons reflects the very essence of the artist’s own domestic existence. As her close friend, Barry Humphries poeticised: The rugs, the jugs, congealing cups of tea The Chinese screen and old Matisse’s prints, Cosier and richer than the QVB Is Olley’s kitchen with its glows and glints. 3 1. Capon, E., quoted in Pearce, B., Margaret Olley, The Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1996, p. 7.b 2. Pearce, B., Margaret Olley, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1997, p. 21 3. Humphries, B., ‘Ode to Olley’ in Alderton, S., Margaret Olley: Home, Museum of Sydney, Sydney, 2012, p. 17

MELISSA HELLARD


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS VENDORS

JOHN BRACK 4 (1920 – 1999) STILL LIFE WITH SLICING MACHINE, 1955 oil on canvas 63.5 x 76.5 cm signed and dated lower right: John Brack 55 inscribed on frame verso: John Brack Meat slicing Machine estimate :

$200,000 – 300,000

PROVENANCE Australian Galleries, Melbourne Miss D. Rachor, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 14 February 1958 Leonard Joel, Melbourne, 24 July 1986, lot 1195 Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 10 August 1998, lot 133 (as ‘Meat Slicing Machine’) Private collection, Melbourne Christie’s, Melbourne, 1 May 2000, lot 292 Private collection, Brisbane Bonhams & Goodman, Melbourne, 6 May 2009, lot 48 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED John Brack, Peter Bray Gallery, Melbourne, 19 – 29 March 1956, cat. 7 Contemporary Australian Painters, shown at eight Canadian public galleries, 1957 – 8 Australian and Australia-Related Art: 1830 – 1970s, Deutscher Fine Art, Melbourne, 25 November 1987, cat. 161 (illus. in exhibition catalogue) John Brack: A Retrospective Exhibition, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 10 December 1987 – 31 January 1988, cat. 31 (label attached verso) John Brack Retrospective, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 24 April – 9 August 2009; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 2 October 2009 – 31 January 2010

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LITERATURE Millar, R., John Brack, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1971, p. 106 Lindsay, R., McCaughey, P., and Hoff, U., John Brack: A Retrospective Exhibition, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1987, pp. 117, 119 Rooney, R., ‘Brack’s no need for Ballyhoo’, Weekend Australian, 19 – 20 December 1987, p. 10 Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, cat. o49, vol. 1, pp. 51, 59, 187, vol. 2, p. 97 (illus.) Dedman, R., ‘Market Profile: John Brack’, Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 44, no. 2, Summer 2006, p. 295 (as ‘Slicing Machine’) Grant, K. (et al.), John Brack, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, pp. 42 (illus.), 215


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JOHN BRACK 4 (1920 – 1999) STILL LIFE WITH SLICING MACHINE, 1955

Upon his discharge from the army in 1946 John Brack resolved to pursue a career as a professional artist. Further studies at the National Gallery School under the Commonwealth Reconstruction Training Scheme provided him with technical knowledge and practical skills, as well as a community of like-minded artists including Sam Fullbrook and Fred Williams. In his mid-twenties, Brack had emerged from the army with what his wife, Helen Brack, described as ‘a personal maturity … authority … a kind of endurance [and] discipline that made him a force to be reckoned with’.1 His experiences had also equipped him with a strong personal philosophy and clear vision of the kind of artist he wanted to be. In addition to being actively engaged with the world around him, Brack believed that grand statements were no longer relevant and instead, encouraged by the example of favoured literary figures such as Henry James and Rainer Maria Rilke, chose to focus on subjects that were local and familiar. From the glowing interior and smiling mannequins of Men’s Wear, 1953 (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra) to the ordered domesticity of The New House, 1953 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney) and everyday routine of Collins St, 5p.m., 1955 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne), major paintings of the early 1950s depicted subjects that viewers recognised from their own lives in the city and suburbs and established Brack’s reputation as an acute observer of contemporary Australian life. Critics typically found them funny and characterised Brack’s approach as primarily satirical, missing the deliberate irony and layers of allusion and meaning embedded in his compositions. As Brack later said, his paintings were ‘part of a metaphorical system … intended to operate on numerous levels of meaning (and) … to have some reference to the complexity of life’. 2

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Still life with Slicing Machine, 1955 and the closely related work, The Slicing Machine Shop, 1955 (private collection) were made in response to Brack’s encounter with a shop at the top of Bourke Street, in the centre of Melbourne, which sold commercial kitchen equipment. The larger view of the shop depicts a conglomeration of measuring scales, giant mixers and slicers with gleaming blades and spikes that together, assume frightening anthropomorphic qualities. In this picture the view has been pared back to focus on the slicing machine alone, its shiny silver surfaces contrasting with the rich burgundy red of its frame. The machine almost completely fills the picture’s space but its placement is slightly off-centre, leading the eye towards a doorway to the right which appears as a dark and potentially menacing void. Precursors to Brack’s well known series of shop window paintings of the early 1960s which, through the depiction of surgical instruments and prosthetic aids enabled him to comment about human life without depicting the figure, these earlier paintings also alluded to meanings beyond the surface. As Helen Brack recalled, ‘While students, we were half aware of double images [and realised] … that visual analogy is part of the language of art. In the early 1950s the reality of the Holocaust was felt here in Melbourne, it was past understanding or imagination, and John was compelled to comment because it had happened in our time … The Block, 1954, is the first of these visual essays, followed by The Lift, 1954, then the two slicing-machine pictures, Self-portrait, The Sewing Machine, The Fish Shop, all from 1955 … and perhaps the final one is The bird lady, 1958’. 3

1. Brack, H., ‘A tribute to John’, speech delivered at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 16 February 1999, transcript, National Gallery of Australia Research Library, Canberra, p. 2 2. Brack, J., interview, Australian Contemporary Art Archive, no. 1, Deakin University Media Production, 1980, transcript, p. 3 3. Brack, H., ‘This Oeuvre – The Work Itself’ in Grant, K., et al., John Brack, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2009, p. 12

KIRSTY GRANT

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FRED WILLIAMS 5 (1927 – 1982) PONDS, LYSTERFIELD, 1966 oil on canvas 86.0 x 71.0 cm signed lower right: Fred Williams estimate :

$280,000 – 340,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Victoria, acquired directly from the artist Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 30 November 2011, lot 9 Private collection, Sydney RELATED WORK Ponds, Lysterfield, 1965 – 66, etching and aquatint, in Mollison, J., Fred Williams: Etchings, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1968, cat. 225, p. 129 (illus. Fig. 252) We are grateful to Lyn Williams for her assistance in cataloguing this work.

The paintings that Fred Williams exchanged with fellow artists were always special, invariably among his best. This is certainly so with Ponds, Lysterfield, 1966, which raises invention and subtlety of vision to a level of singularity that led us to see the Australian landscape with different eyes. As James Gleeson wrote of Williams’s sell-out exhibition of 1966 at Rudy Komon’s Gallery in Sydney – ‘It has been clear for some time that Williams was a landscapist of rare distinction, but this exhibition places him in that thinly populated category of painters who have helped to shape the vision a country has of itself’.1 Part of the miracle of Williams’s art is its transformation of the subject, especially its scrubbiness and monotony, into paintings elegant, rich in colour, textural variation and imagination. Lysterfield Landscape I, 1965 – 66, collection of Rupert Murdoch, was one of the highlights of the 1966 exhibition. The largest among the many fine Lysterfield paintings is Lysterfield Triptych, 1967 – 68, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Williams frequently visited the Lysterfield region from the winter of 1965 onwards. It was not very far from his then home at Upwey. He painted there over a number of years into the 1970s, major works such as in Hillside at Lysterfield I and II of 1967 (private collections), capturing the changing light and colours of the seasons. With its predominance of cool tones, Ponds, Lysterfield evokes winter. The scrubby but empty countryside is created by a few impastoed strokes of the brush across a smooth field of velvety greys. These expressionist textures also contrast against the balance achieved through the accent on verticals and horizontals, and the classical association they give to the composition. A masterpiece of minimalism, the absence of a horizon line achieves greater harmony, earth and sky are one, supported by the multi-viewpoint and its combination of motifs seen from above and in profile. His art is ‘both intimate and remote’ wrote Elwyn Lynn in The Bulletin of Williams’s 1966 exhibition’. 2 Williams’s remote intimacy is almost Chinese in its mixture of immediate gesture, of spontaneous notation, with contemplation and serenity’, he continued. In Ponds, Lysterfield the landscape provided Williams with the inspiration for a singular, lyrical essay on the Australian scene in all its casual formality. It is a painting of ineffable beauty. 1. Gleeson, J., ‘Williams is at His Best’, Sun, Sydney, 12 October 1966 2. Lynn, E., ‘Poetic Bushland’, Bulletin, Sydney, 22 October 1966, p. 54

DAVID THOMAS

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ROGER KEMP 6 (1908 – 1987) SEQUENCE EIGHTEEN, 1973 – 75

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ROGER KEMP 6 (1908 – 1987) SEQUENCE EIGHTEEN, 1973 – 75 synthetic polymer paint on paper on canvas 151.0 x 367.5 cm PROVENANCE Estate of the artist, Melbourne Eastgate & Holst Fine Art, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in June 2006 estimate :

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$50,000 – 70,000

EXHIBITED Roger Kemp: Cycles and Directions 1935 – 1975 – Sequences 1968 – 1975, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 5 – 30 September 1978 Roger Kemp, Eastgate & Holst Fine Art, Melbourne, 18 March – 22 April 2006, cat. 26 LITERATURE Roger Kemp: Cycles and Directions 1935 – 1975, Monash University, Melbourne, 1978, cat. 90 (illus., unpaginated) Heathcote, C., A Quest for Enlightenment: The Art of Roger Kemp, Macmillan, Melbourne, 2007, pp. 230 – 231 (illus.)


Sequence Eighteen, 1973 – 75 shows Roger Kemp painting at full concentration. It is the result of an innovative method of contemporary abstraction he developed after two intense years spent overseas. Besides mixing with cultural identities and soaking up art in museums, Kemp was invited by the major British painter Bridget Riley to use a vacant section of her large studio-warehouse. This had enabled Kemp to attempt work on the grand scale of American and European abstractionists. So, upon returning to Melbourne, he rented a similar warehouse off Flinders Street, where he had the space, solitude and vision to paint in an international vein. Sequence Eighteen is a bold, gutsy composition produced in that studio. Roger Kemp unfurled and fixed a wide roll of French art paper along his studio wall, then painted upon it a compositional structure of circles and bars using thinned acrylic. There was a serious point to his abstract geometry. The artist wished to suggest the perceptions of physicists and scientists who talk of implicit rational systems behind the seemingly haphazard world. Indeed, Kemp’s big theme in Sequence Eighteen is the grand pattern evident behind the restless turmoil of an ever-changing universe. Mind you, Sequence Eighteen is a long way from a physics diagram. The artist has not plotted out scientific ideas with compasses, rulers or numbered ratios. Instead, cosmic order is implied in a semi-visionary composition that owes much to that tradition followed by European masters like Wassily Kandinsky and František Kupka, as well as Kemp’s New York contemporaries, the celebrated Abstract Expressionists.

Having defined his design basis the artist then set to work on Sequence Eighteen with full bodied American acrylics, sometimes interchanging broad brushes with imported paint rollers. Kemp used these sponge rollers – which were unknown in Australia – as a way to avoid resorting to ‘fill’. They allowed him to apply acrylic as an irreducible rectangle. Forms were not coloured in, he would say, they denoted elementary units as in physics. We can see Sequence Eighteen also involved a creative process of distribution and then layering. In early stages of the painting, Kemp distributed small coloured blocks and devices, balancing them across the overall composition. They were intended to sit beneath a final surface configuration. This is why, behind those strong white bands and arcs, we can make out a subtle secondary order of shapes in tan, reds, blues and purple structured in a different alignment. When explaining what was intended by doing this, Kemp would switch from scientific talk and refer to how in symphonic music strings or woodwind have assigned passages, their own melodic units, but these all ultimately merge in a dominant musical structure. And, much as a composer must weave the separate parts played by different instruments into a cohesive symphony, so too was Kemp striving to orchestrate subsidiary forms into a grand unity. Sequence Eighteen is a mighty work of art. Exhibited at the National Gallery of Victoria soon after completion, it signals this pioneering creator moving to the forefront of modern Australian painting. DR CHRISTOPHER HEATHCOTE

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KEN WHISSON 7 born 1927 BUSH SUBURBAN, 1990 oil on canvas 100.0 x 120.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed verso: Ken Whisson / Perugia / 7/5/90 / + 11/8/90 / + A Summer Evening /+/ “Bush Suburban” / 7/5/90 / +11/8/90 estimate :

$28,000 – 36,000

PROVENANCE Watters Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Ken Whisson – Paintings, Watters Gallery, ydney, 2 – 19 November 1991, cat. 10 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)

Ken Whisson, an itinerant painter himself, takes his viewers on a journey through time and space, teetering through the fragmented and kaleidoscopic nature of his unique visual imagery. Bush Suburban, 1990, is a key example of Whisson’s haptic and intuitive translation of our interaction with the ’real world’ and of his philosophical musings on an individual’s role in modern society. Strewn across the picture plane, Whisson’s linear brushstrokes crystallise into a wide range of motifs from his personal lexicon: an assortment of quasi aerial views of architectural structures, stylised trees and cars and totemic figures reminiscent of Albert Tucker’s moralising caricatures of the 1940s. Although the gestural quality of Whisson’s line and composition lead the viewer to believe that this painting was executed in an immediate and spontaneous manner – it is in fact a cumulative construction, the fruit of a long gestation. Painted over at least two distinct episodes in 1990 (faithfully documented, as is his convention, on the reverse of the canvas) Bush Suburban bears all the hallmarks of an Italian Whisson landscape painting. Painted on canvas, with a pure white ground, it is multiperspectival, with a high horizon line and features a reduction of form and shape in favour of colour and line. Having moved away from the horror vacui of his early works, Whisson let his Perugian landscapes breathe by leaving visible areas of the white ground, generating in turn a strong sense of push-and-pull between the painting’s foreground and background. Bush Suburban juxtaposes irregular and gestural planes of colour representing distant memories of Australian eucalypts with thin angular lines tracing the edges of human figures and their man-made constructions. These elements symbolise our civilisation and successive attempts to tame the natural world. The resulting meandering view is one of poetic distortion, mimicking the splintered nature of the artist’s own visual recollection.

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A student of Vassilieff and Nolan, Whisson paints his meditations on human civilisation in a faux-naif style, a contrived painterly construction concealing the artist’s conceptual and technical sophistication. In a 1994 lecture to art students Whisson explained this process, a means of liberating his creative impulse, as one of ‘eliminating all kinds of cleverness and skill’.1 Remarkably committed to his enigmatic visual syntax, Whisson stayed true to this unique style without conceding to mass appeal, eventually reaching a cult-like status, a painter for collectors with refined palates. Bush Suburban is engrossing, with a commanding presence that will dictate a long period of visual interaction and appreciation. Now in his ninth decade, Whisson has always been a true avant-garde painter – his works are idiosyncratic, his considered style distilled to its truest form over thirty years of sustained and dedicated artistic production, irrespective of its public reception. To quote the artist’s own understanding of the avant garde, Whisson’s art ‘resists and transforms the modern world, and its technologies and clichés’. 2 1. The artist, 1994, quoted in Ken Whisson Paintings 1947 – 1999, Niagara Publishing, Melbourne, 2001, p. 142 2. The artist, 1997, quoted ibid., p. 147

LUCIE REEVES-SMITH


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BRETT WHITELEY 8 (1939 – 1992) TOWARDS SCULPTURE 2, 1977 lithograph 76.0 x 49.0 cm edition: 1/50 signed and inscribed with title and numbered below image artist’s stamp below image PROVENANCE Private collection, Queensland Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 8 September 2004, lot 10 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Brett Whiteley: The Graphics 1961 – 1992, Deutscher Fine Art, Melbourne, 1992, p. 111, cat. 29 (illus. p. 39, another example) estimate :

$14,000 – 18,000

TONY TUCKSON 9 (1921 – 1973) SEATED NUDE (TD1611), c.1952 – 56 gouache and pencil on paper 76.5 x 51.0 cm PROVENANCE Watters Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Art Galleries Schubert, Queensland (label attached verso) Company collection, Queensland Deutscher~Menzies, Sydney, 18 March 2008, lot 1 (as ‘TP1611’) Private collection, Sydney estimate :

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$7,000 – 9,000


ROBERT KLIPPEL 10 (1920 – 2001) NO. 455 (B), 1982 cast 1983 bronze 71.0 x 27.0 x 10.5 cm edition: AP (unique cast) signed with initials, dated and numbered on base: RK No. 455 ‘82 AP’. Meridian foundry mark stamped on base PROVENANCE The artist (donated to raise funds for the Foundation of the New England Regional Art Museum) Christie’s, Melbourne, 8 May 2001, lot 68 Private collection, Sydney Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 6 May 2015, lot 32 Private collection, Sydney LITERATURE Edwards, D., Robert Klippel: Catalogue Raisonné of Sculptures, (CD-ROM) Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2002, No. 455 (illus.) estimate :

$15,000 – 20,000

Robert Klippel lived and worked in Sydney SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales British Museum, London, England Federal Court of Australia, Canberra Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales La Trobe University Collection, Melbourne Macquarie University, Sydney Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Parliament House, Canberra Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart University of Sydney, Sydney Wollongong Art Gallery, New South Wales Yale University, Connecticut, USA REPRESENTED BY Annette Larkin Fine Art, Sydney Galerie Gmurzynska, Zurich

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GARRY SHEAD 11 born 1942 CENTRE STAGE, 1996 oil on composition board 91.0 x 121.5 cm signed lower right: Garry Shead signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: CENTRE STAGE/ Garry Shead / Garry Shead/ CROWN LAND 1996 / ROYAL estimate :

$80,000 – 120,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist RELATED WORK Final Curtain, 1996, oil on canvas, 122.0 x 153.0 cm, illus. in Grishin, S., Garry Shead and the Erotic Muse, Craftsman House, Sydney, 2001, p. 142

On 5 February 1954, when Garry Shead was just twelve years old, his school travelled to the Sydney showground to welcome Queen Elizabeth II, the first reigning monarch to visit Australia. A symbolic watershed in the country’s nationhood, the royal visit to Sydney was the largest public event in that city’s history since the opening of the Harbour Bridge almost two decades earlier and for a whole generation, the occasion became part of the collective conscious memory. As Shead vividly recounts more than forty years later, ‘I remember seeing her and feeling the eye contact as she passed. I also remember dreaming about her (sometimes sexual dreams) – there was possibly nothing sexy about her, she was like a Walt Disney Cinderella, but I encountered her at the dawning of my own pubescence. There was something unearthly and untouchable in her beauty, a sort of “Noli Me Tangere” so that even a prime minister could not touch her elbow. She passed like an incarnate spirit...’1 Unlike his acclaimed D.H. Lawrence series which was loosely based upon the novel Kangaroo, the ‘Royal Suite’ paintings exemplified by Centre Stage, 1996 do not engage a pre-existing narrative, nor do they document specific events or episodes from the royal visit. Rather, each image – dramatic and unexpected – presents a palimpsest through which one may perceive echoes of the royal progress, the republican debate, personal sexual fantasies and yearnings, as well as other biographies and autobiographies. Imbued with feelings of tenderness, melancholy and even alienation, the paintings invariably feature Bob Menzies’ revered ‘white goddess’ 2 and her royal consort moving incongruously among their subjects – Blinky Bill koalas, kangaroos, cockatoos, emus

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and occasionally, the ‘token’ Aborigine in full corroboree attire, here portrayed drawing the plush red theatre curtain to reveal the stage set. Yet if the backdrop here is unmistakably the harsh Australian outback with Ayers Rock looming in the distance, the identity of the two chief protagonists remains deliberately ambiguous – Prince Philip’s facial features are strikingly reminiscent of the artist, while Queen Elizabeth II bears more than a passing resemblance to a youthful image of Shead’s own mother. With a myriad of visual clues richly interwoven in his iconography, the interpretation of paintings such as the present is thus ultimately left to the viewer, as Sasha Grishin observes, ‘…Garry Shead’s ‘Royal Suite’ series invites readings on different levels. The series can be interpreted as a historical recreation of a specific royal tour in 1954 as seen through the distorting mirrors of memory and the eyes of a young boy. It is about a young and sexually desirable monarch who floats in the air or walks on red carpet. Crowns hover over her head and her subjects, accompanied by local fauna and flora, assemble to worship her. The series can also be interpreted as an allegory, an expression of naive belief in a white goddess. One who was seen as supernatural, who could not be touched or experienced, but could only be worshipped. She came from a remote place and appeared to her subjects in the form of a celestial apparition. Simultaneously subverting this interpretation was a growing awareness of the sordid reality that surrounded her; a faithless consort and the growing impotence of imperial power. Perhaps on the simplest level, the series is about the quest for a new Holy Grail. It is a tale about the gradual process of disillusionment where realisations of reality gradually dissolve the illusions of the absurd.’ 3 1. Grishin, S., Garry Shead: Encounters with Royalty, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998, pp. 11 – 12 2. Keneally, T., Our Republic, William Heinemann Australia, Melbourne, p. 35 3. op. cit., p. 27

VERONICA ANGELATOS


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JOHN OLSEN 12 born 1928 DESERT AND ORANGE CHATS, 1993 watercolour and pastel on paper 95.5 x 99.5 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title lower left: Desert & / Orange Chats / John Olsen 93 estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Private collection Sotheby’s, Sydney, 25 August 2002, lot 57 Private collection, Sydney

Upon the invitation of film-makers Ken Duncan and Robert Raymond, and esteemed naturalist Vince Serventy, John Olsen first ventured to the Australian interior in the early 1970s to participate in the ‘Wild Australia’ film series commissioned by the Australian Broadcasting Commission. Immediately awestruck by the incredible diversity of the various ecosystems he encountered during the journey, Olsen thus began his enduring fascination with observing and painting the teeming life of wetlands, estuaries and lily ponds – stimulated not only by individual species, but a sense of the whole, seething mass, ‘a carnival of life’. Indeed, the artist’s sheer wonderment at the miracle of mother nature and her life-affirming properties is especially palpable in his reflections upon travelling to Lake Eyre in 1974 where he witnessed the arid, saltencrusted plains of the South Australian desert erupting into life following the extraordinary floods of 1973 (only the second such occurrence since white settlement); ‘… I draw studies of insects, animals and birds that will eventually be realised as prints and watercolours. My devotion to Chinese art and philosophy finds a fulfilment in this experience. Nothing too small or too strange should escape my attention – an insect’s wing, the leap of a frog, the flight pattern of dragonflies. They all induce poetic rapture’.1

Over the subsequent two decades, Olsen would continue this devotion to the Australian outback with repeated visits to Lake Eyre and North Queensland providing the impetus for some of his most lyrical insights into the natural environment. With its liquid floating fields of golden colour and pulsating calligraphic line, Desert and Orange Chats, 1993 represents a particularly charming example of Olsen’s interpretations from this period. Depicting a party of bright Orange Chats (also known as ‘Saltbush Canaries’) commonly found in semi-arid areas within the interior, the work resonates with a vitalistic energy – betraying a sense of not only keen observation but joyful celebration derived from the artist’s spiritual immersion in the landscape as well. For Olsen indeed, the wild reaches of the Australian outback offered more than mere external phenomena to be accurately recorded. More fundamentally perhaps, the experience became the catalyst for a myriad of ideas and metaphorical connections that would permeate Olsen’s art for decades to come, reaffirming his Taoist belief in the total interconnectedness of all living forms and thus, heralding a new spirituality in his art. As Olsen himself poignantly muses, ‘…The enigma of it all. It is a desert and it can be full. After the rains, it is so incredibly abundant; so what you are looking at in one place, as if through an act of the Dao, becomes full … It has an effect on you when you are there because all the time it is impossible for you to accept fully the sense of impermanence and transitoriness. Somehow it affects you - you realise that you are looking at an illusion really. I don’t think that there is anything more Buddhist than that’. 2 1. The artist quoted in Olsen, J., Drawn from Life, Duffy and Snellgrove, Sydney, 1997, p. 116 2. The artist quoted in Hart, D., John Olsen, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1991, p. 135

VERONICA ANGELATOS

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TIM STORRIER 13 born 1949 CONSTELLATIONS (OVER THE NIGHT ROAD), 2014 synthetic polymer paint on linen 102.0 x 244.0 cm signed lower right: STORRIER signed, dated and inscribed with title on stretcher bar verso: ‘CONSTELLATIONS (OVER THE NIGHT ROAD) / Storrier / 2014 ‘ estimate :

$120,000 – 160,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist

‘My affinity for the Australian landscape has to do with a sense of place, which is both physical and emotional, and the fact that l always know where I am ...’1 Paradoxically one of the country’s most popular yet simultaneously elusive artists, Tim Storrier first captured the imagination of the art world during the eighties with his signature images of burning ropes and logs set against expansive parched desert plains and vast skies powerfully evoking the essence of the Australian landscape. Drawing inspiration from the great Romantic painters of the nineteenth century such as JMW Turner and Caspar David Friedrich, his landscapes not only contemplated the insignificance of humankind when compared with the awesome magnitude of the natural world, but inevitably encouraged darker, more pessimistic readings with his abandoned campsites and smoldering embers suggesting themes of displacement, isolation and decay. While continuing this interest in the four elements and the power of life which they embody, Constellation Over Night Road, 2015 nevertheless reveals a significant shift in the artist’s vision during the opening decades of the new millennium. Where previously his interpretations had been

literal and direct, now his treatment is more subdued, reflective and abstract, with fire (the burning log positioned lower right) occupying an almost secondary role to the dazzling celestial sky and billowing, voluminous clouds that cast long shadows upon the water below. Elegant and minimalist, indeed the nocturnal scene offers an arguably more sophisticated exploration of the emotive, melancholic mood that has always pervaded Storrier’s oeuvre, drawing upon the symbolism of the fading light of day as a metaphor for change or the fin de siècle, end of an era. Similarly, the juxtaposition of fire with an entirely different great vastness here (infinite celestial skies and untraversed bodies of water), no doubt suggests further allusions to evolution, the passing of time and the grandeur of decay in the same vein as the traditional vanitas still life; as Storrier himself muses, ‘... there is a relationship between fecundity and mortality, between something that is wet and something that is burning. These are primal poetic qualities that do not change in terms of the human spirit’. 2 Like the finest of Storrier’s achievements, Constellation Over Night Road encompasses the subtlety of nature’s fugitive diurnal moods, its mysterious silently unfolding rituals and vast droning presence. Longcontemplated narratives inspired by the artist’s own experience of the landscape, such works feature among the most recognisable images in contemporary art today – evoking a sense of place that is inextricably Australian. As Edmund Capon, a former director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales elucidates, ‘…they could not I believe have come from any country other than Australia’. 3 1. Storrier quote in Van Nunen, L., Point to Point: The Art of Tim Storrier, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1987 2. Storrier cited in Tim Storrier: The Burning Gifts, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 1989, p. 11 3. Capon, E., cited in Lumby, C., Tim Storrier: The Art of the Outsider, Craftsman House, Sydney, 2000, p.8

VERONICA ANGELATOS

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CLEMENT MEADMORE 14 (1929 – 2005) WALL FOR BOJANGLES, 1987 bronze 45.0 x 111.0 x 35.0 cm edition: 1/6 signed, dated and numbered at base: Meadmore / 1/6 1987 stamped with Tallix foundry mark at base estimate :

$60,000 – 80,000

PROVENANCE Joshua Strychalski American Paintings, New York Mary Evangelista, New York Christie’s, New York, 1 March 2018, lot 44 Private collection, Sydney LITERATURE Gibson, E., The Sculpture of Clement Meadmore, Hudson Hills Press, New York, 1994, p. 128 (illus. another example)

During the late 1980s, Clement Meadmore created a group works in which the wall was a common theme. Jericho, 1986, Wall Flower, 1989, Wall for Bojangles, 1987 and Wall King, 1988, make up the group. Each of the works appear to have begun with a solid rectangular form, the artist then proceeding to divide and shape portions of the block in his characteristic manner, slicing and shaping in a series of short gestures. Each of the wall sculptures wrestles gently with gravity as it contrasts the weight of the mass against the lightness evoked by the curves and point where it rests. The titles Meadmore chose offer a direct insight into the artist’s thinking and the challenges he set himself as a sculptor. In this group of sculptures he investigates how a delicate action, such as a curve or a cut, can alter the weight and feel of a larger, dominant form. Wall for Bojangles takes its title from a character of the same name in the 1968 American folk song. Inspired by the tap dancer Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson

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(1878 – 1949) and written by Jeff Walker, the song was popularised by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and the many cover versions which followed. Bojangles is in some ways akin to Australia’s swagman, a light footed, hapless hobo, surviving on his wits and opportunity as it presents. In the song we meet him in a prison cell in New Orleans as ’he talks of life’ with his cellmate. He tells his story of life on the road where he made his way as a tap dancer ’for those in minstrel shows and county fares throughout the south’. For all he lacks in worldly possessions, Bojangles could be the happiest man alive, apart from the death of his dog which ’up and dies, and after twenty years he still grieves’. It is easy to look at this work and see the connection between the dancer and his moves. The lyrics of the song trip along to a three-four beat and describe in detail Mr Bojangles’ appearance as he clicks and kicks his heels. It is the rhythms of his ’ragged shirt and baggy pants, the old soft shoe’, along with the celebration of movement, where Meadmore gets closest to the ideas he takes from the character. These wall sculptures communicate a shared sense of movement and with each work presenting as a nonchalant response to the formality of the core sculpture, they march, stride and posture, and in the case of Bojangles – dance. By dividing and twisting the forms Meadmore spreads the weight away from the mass which in this case results in a mood of joie de vivre, in some ways reflecting Mr Bojangles freewheeling life on the road. HENRY MULHOLLAND


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PETER BOOTH 15 born 1940 UNTITLED, 1970 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 156.0 x 455.0 cm signed and dated twice verso: PETER BOOTH / 1970 inscribed verso: FOR MAGDA / 1983 estimate :

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$150,000 – 200,000

PROVENANCE Powell Street Gallery, Melbourne Chris Deutscher, Melbourne, acquired from the above c.1988 Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Opening exhibition, Pinacotheca Gallery, Melbourne, 1970 Peter Booth, Pinacotheca Gallery, Melbourne, 25 August – 5 September 1970 Bluechip XVI: The Collector’s Exhibition, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 4 – 29 March 2014, cat. 8 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)


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PETER BOOTH 15 born 1940 UNTITLED, 1970

Writing about Peter Booth’s solo exhibition at Pinacotheca, Melbourne, in September 1970, Anne Galbally stated, ‘Booth reduces picture-making to the basic activity of setting color [sic] blocks of varying intensity and size on to uniformly black rectangles and squares. In doing so, he is making a serious attempt to understand the basic elements of structure. The shiny black reads as vast space and establishes the cream, brown, and red blocks as physical forces. Colors [sic] are not related to one another but are established by outline and density as separate entities, constantly testing and opposing one another’.1 One of five large-scale paintings and five related drawings included in the exhibition, Untitled, 1970 is a monumental expression of the power of abstraction. Painted two years after the National Gallery of Victoria opened its new premises on St Kilda Road with The Field, an exhibition that featured the work of young artists – including Booth – influenced by the various streams of contemporary American abstraction (including colour field, hardedge minimalism and op art), it juxtaposes three coloured rectangular forms against a dense black ground, creating stark tonal contrasts that establish a spatial tension which reverberates across the canvas. These simple geometric shapes echo architectural forms and followed on from an earlier series of paintings that drew on Booth’s experience of working in various factories, describing the pattern of steel sheets and slabs on the factory floor. 2

While at first glance, this painting looks like a typical example of hardedge geometric abstraction of the late 1960s and early 70s, closer inspection reveals that just like Booth’s contribution to The Field, its ‘hand-painted edges are not hard and [its] surfaces are far from the carefully applied, gesture-free paint of minimalism’. 3 Unlike many of his peers whose work was characterised by flat surfaces, crisp edges and bright colour, from the outset Booth’s painting showed a tendency towards painterly expression and atmospheric moodiness that would become more apparent in later years when he made the transition from abstraction to figuration, and would ultimately be recognised as one of the defining features of his oeuvre. In these paintings from 1970, other examples of which are held by the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and Monash University Museum of Art, Booth used a gloss acrylic paint which both captured and reflected light in a particular way. In addition to bringing the viewer into the picture, this textured sheen adds to the movement and ‘life’ of the surface of an otherwise minimalist composition. Booth has said that black is ‘strong and beautiful – the colour of the universe … The abstract paintings reflected my state of mind then. Whether a picture is abstract or figurative is not the issue – it’s what the painting says about the human condition’.4 The cool isolation of hardedge minimalism totally removed from human experience and emotion was not for him and instead, Booth developed a uniquely personal variation within the familiar language of geometric abstraction to produce paintings that are as bold as they are quietly nuanced and which, in Ann Galbally’s words, demand absorption, but reward reflection. 5 1. Galbally, A., ‘A reward from the minimum’ in The Age, Melbourne, 2 September 1970 2. Lindsay, R., ‘Hard Rain: The Iconography of Peter Booth’ in Smith, J., Peter Booth: Human/ Nature, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2003, pp. 18 – 19 3. McPhee, J., ‘Peter Booth: Human/Nature’ in Art Collector, issue 26, October – December 2003, accessed online 13 May 2018. 4. The artist quoted in Smith, op. cit., p. 77 5. Galbally, op. cit.

KIRSTY GRANT

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Peter Booth lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2006 Five Decades, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria 2006 White Mantle – The Winter Landscape in Australian Art, Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria 2003 Peter Booth: Human / Nature, retrospective exhibition, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2002 Fieldwork: Australian Art 1968 – 2002, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2002 It’s a Beautiful Day: New Painting in Australia 2, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2002 – 2003 SELECTED LITERATURE Smith, J. (ed.), Peter Booth: Human / Nature, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2003 Fieldwork: Australian Art 1968 – 2002, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2002 Lindsay, R., Peter Booth: Recent Paintings, exhibition catalogue, Deutscher Brunswick Street, Melbourne, 1990 Catalano, G., Australia: Venice Biennale 1982: Works by Peter Booth and Rosalie Gascoigne, exhibition catalogue, Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, Sydney, 1982

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria Centro Cultural / Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City, Mexico Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Queensland Gallery of Art / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, USA TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart University of New South Wales, Sydney Wollongong City Art Gallery, Victoria

REPRESENTED BY Chris Deutscher, Melbourne

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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV Lots 16 – 28

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The Gene and Brian Sherman collection of contemporary art from Australia and the Asia Pacific mutates constantly – branching out recently into South Asia and the African continent. In keeping with the collectors’ desire to refresh and refine this body of work, which still comprises pieces inherited from their parents, this fourth Deutscher and Hackett Capsule gathers together works that individually and collectively give expression to the contemporary. Landscapes (Philip Wolfhagen) and references to country (Prince of Wales) speak to our need to respect and retain precious wilderness as urban populations expand exponentially worldwide; war, an ancient and sadly ongoing contemporary condition is evoked in eX de Medici’s helmet references to the USA and Vietnam; our present day focus on individuality and the (oft unsettled) body finds a voice in photo media work by Petrina Hicks, whilst the Latvian and Maori backgrounds of art stars, Imants Tillers and Shane Cotton, signal the multifaceted reality of Australasia and the globalised world. Of the moment topics include the complexity of sexuality (Juan Davila) and extreme individualism (Gareth Samson). GENE & BRIAN SHERMAN

In summary, this mini collection of Australian artists visually explores a range of topics that take the temperature of our times. Each work, thoughtfully acquired and cared for appropriately, has played a role in a carefully curated half century of collecting. It is time now for us to let go, to say farewell to these special works – and to move into new explorations of contemporaneity. Change is life’s constant and keeps us curious, young in spirit and connected to current realities. GENE SHERMAN AM, MAY 2018

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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

PHILIP WOLFHAGEN 16 born 1963 SWEEP, 2002 oil and beeswax on linen diptych 214.0 x 273.0 cm (overall) right panel: signed with initial and artist’s stamp, dated and inscribed with title lower right: W JANUARY / 2002 / “sweep” each panel signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: Philip Wolfhagen / “sweep” 2002 / … estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000 (2)

PROVENANCE Sherman Galleries, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED PHILIP WOLFHAGEN: high ground, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 7 – 29 June 2002, cat. 2 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue) Philip Wolfhagen lives and works in Longford, Tasmania SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Transformations: the art of Philip Wolfhagen, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston 2017 Strange Trees, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart 2016 Panorama, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria 2015 When the Ocean Turns to Dust, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney 2014 The Skullbone Experiment: A Paradigm of Art and Nature, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston; COFA Galleries, Sydney 2014 Sublime Point: Landscape in Painting, Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre, New South Wales 2013 Australia, Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK 2013 Illumination; the art of Philip Wolfhagen, Newcastle Art Gallery, NSW; Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Hobart; Drill Hall Gallery ANU, Canberra; Cairns Regional Gallery, Queensland; Tweed River Art Gallery, NSW; Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria 2007 Vapour Trails, The Australian Embassy in Washington DC, USA 2003 Archipelago, Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery, Launceston 1997 Australian Perspecta: Between Art and Nature, Temple of Earth Memories, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney

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SELECTED LITERATURE Illumination: The art of Philip Wolfhagen, Newcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle, 2013 Timms, P., Philip Wolfhagen, Craftsman House, Melbourne, 2005 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria Burnie Regional Art Gallery, Tasmania Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Castlemaine Art Gallery, Victoria Devonport Regional Gallery, Tasmania Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria National Museum, Warsaw, Poland National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale Museum of Applied Art & Sciences, Sydney Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY Bett Gallery, Hobart Dominik Mersch Gallery, Sydney Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Karen Woodbury Fine Art, Melbourne


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

IMANTS TILLERS 17 born 1950 OUTBACK: F, 2005 FROM OUTBACK SERIES synthetic polymer paint and gouache on 54 canvas boards 229.0 x 213.0 cm (overall) each panel numbered sequentially with stencil verso: 76438 – 76491 estimate :

$20,000 – 30,000 (54)

PROVENANCE Sherman Galleries, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Land Beyond Goodbye, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 20 October – 12 November 2005, cat. 7 Imants Tillers lives and works in Cooma, New South Wales SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2018 Journey to Nowhere, Latvian National Museum of Art, Riga, Latvia 2017 Today Tomorrow Yesterday, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2017 Meeting Place – Michael Nelson Jagamarra & Imants Tillers, Parliament House, Canberra 2016 Signs and symbols to live by, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2015 Seen from elsewhere, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamãki, New Zealand 2013 Australia, Royal Academy of Arts, London 2012 The Loaded Ground: Michael Nelson Jagamarra and Imants Tillers, Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Art Gallery, Canberra 2009 The Long Poem, Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, University of Western Australia, Perth 2006 Imants Tillers: one world many visions, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2004 Transmissions: From here and there, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne 1998 Imants Tillers 1997 Lowenstein Sharp Arts 21 Fellow, Museum of Modern Art at Heide, Victoria 1986 42nd Venice Biennale: Imants Tillers, Corderie at the Arsenale, Venice, Italy

SELECTED LITERATURE Ansone, E., and Ledbury, M., (eds), Journey to Nowhere, Latvian National Museum of Art, Riga and Power Publications, Sydney, 2018 (forthcoming) Hart, D., Imants Tillers: one world many visions, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2006 Coulter-Smith, G., The postmodern art of Imants Tillers: appropriation ‘en abyme’ 1971 – 2001, Fine Art Research Centre, Southampton Institute and Paul Holberton Publishing, London 2002 Curnow, W., Imants Tillers and the ‘Book of Power’, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamãki, New Zealand Australian War Memorial, Canberra Bridgestone Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan Canberra Museum and Gallery, Canberra Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Christchurch, New Zealand Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum of Art, Riga, Latvia Pori Art Museum, Finland Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Sakai City Collection, Osaka, Japan REPRESENTED BY ARC ONE Gallery, Melbourne Bett Gallery, Hobart Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

SHANE COTTON 18 born 1964, New Zealand OUTLOOK (WHITE), 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 180.0 x 160.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title lower right: OUTLOOK (WHITE) S. COTTON 2007 signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: OUTLOOK (WHITE) / Shane L. Cotton / 2007 estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Sherman Galleries, Sydney (stamped verso) Gene and Brian Sherman, Sydney EXHIBITED Shane Cotton, Red Shift, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 28 June – 14 July 2007, cat. 7 Shane Cotton, The Hanging Sky, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, Christchurch, 15 June – 6 October 2012; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 8 December 2012 – 2 March 2013; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney, 23 March – 19 May 2013 LITERATURE Paton, J., (et al.) Shane Cotton: The Hanging Sky, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013 Shane Cotton lives and works in Palmerston North, New Zealand SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Black Hole, Kronenberg Wright, Sydney and Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne 2016 Exploded Worlds, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, New Zealand 2014 Baseland, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand 2012 The Hanging Sky, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane and touring 2012 WHAKAWHITI ARIA: TRANSMISSION, Te Manawa Museum of Art, Science and History, Palmerston North, New Zealand 2010 17th Biennale of Sydney: The Beauty of Distance, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2009 Art in the Contemporary Pacific, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan 2004 Shane Cotton Survey 1993 – 2003, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamãki; City Gallery Wellington, New Zealand

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SELECTED LITERATURE Shane Cotton: The Hanging Sky, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013 Shane Cotton, City Gallery Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, 2004 Tyler, L., Shane Cotton, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, 1998 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamãki, Auckland, New Zealand Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Christchurch, New Zealand Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, New Zealand Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, New Zealand Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand Wellington City Council, Wellington, New Zealand

REPRESENTED BY Hamish McKay, Wellington Michael Lett Gallery, Auckland Rossi & Rossi, London / Hong Kong


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

GORDON BENNETT 19 (1955 – 2014) CAMOUFLAGE #2, 2003 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 182.5 x 152.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: G Bennett 23-2-2003 / “CAMOUFLAGE #2” / … estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Sherman Galleries, Sydney (stamped verso) Gene and Brian Sherman, Sydney EXHIBITED Figure / Ground (Zero), Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 17 July – 9 August 2003, cat. 2 (illus. in exhibition catalogue) Disobedience, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 8 September – 15 October 2005 Gordon Bennett, a survey, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 6 September 2007 – 16 January 2008 and touring Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 10 May – 3 August 2008, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 20 December 2008 – 22 March 2009 (label attached verso) LITERATURE Hill, P., ‘Zero Hour’, Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, 2 August 2003 McLean, I., ‘Camouflage’, Figure / Ground (Zero) exhibition catalogue, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 17 July – 9 August 2003 Murray-Cree, L. (ed.), Twenty. Sherman Galleries 1986 – 2006, Craftsman House, Sydney, 2006, p. 122 (illus. installation) Gellatly, K., Gordon Bennett: A Survey, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2007, pl. 63, n.p. (illus.) RELATED WORK Camouflage #7, 2003, acrylic on linen, 182.5 x 152.0 cm, in the collection of the Australian National University, Canberra Camouflage #8, 2003, acrylic on linen, 182.5 x 152.0 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Gordon Bennett lived and worked in Brisbane SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2016-18 Be Polite. Gordon Bennett, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Perth; Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada; McMaster Museum of Art, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 2017 The National 2017, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2014 8th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, Museen Dahlem, Berlin, Germany 2012 Documenta 13, Kassel, Germany 2008 16th Biennale of Sydney: Revolutions – forms that turn, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

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2007

Gordon Bennett: A Survey, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and touring to Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth 2005 International Biennale of Contemporary Art in Prague, National Gallery in Prague, Czech Republic 2004-05 Three Colours, Gordon Bennett and Peter Robinson, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, touring exhibition 1999 History and Memory in the Art of Gordon Bennett, Brisbane City Gallery, Brisbane and touring in UK and Norway 1995 Transculture, Palazzo Giustinian Lolin, Venice Biennale, Italy touring to Naoshima Contemporary Art Museum, Japan 1992 9th Biennale of Sydney: The Boundary Rider, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 1989 Perspecta, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney SELECTED LITERATURE Hughes, H., (et al.) Be Polite, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane and Sternberg Press, Berlin, 2017 Smith, T., History and Memory in the Art of Gordon Bennett, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham and Henie-Onstad Kunstsenter, Olso, 1999 McLean, I., and Bennett, G., The Art of Gordon Bennett, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1996 Butler, R., Gordon Bennett: paintings 1987 – 1991, Epernay Cedex, France, 1992 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian National Gallery, Canberra Australian War Memorial, Canberra Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart TATE Modern, London, United Kingdom REPRESENTED BY Sutton Gallery, Melbourne Milani Gallery, Brisbane


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

eX de MEDICI 20 born 1959 USA (GO AWAY) VIETNAM, 2010 watercolour on paper 57.0 x 76.0 cm inscribed with title lower left: USA (go away) Vietnam. estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

PROVENANCE Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney

2008

EXHIBITED Need Head, Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney, 3 – 21 May 2011, cat. 18

2003 1997

RELATED WORK Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), Aust Flag, 2010, watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), veg pattern, 2007, watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), digicam, 2010, watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Cure for Pain, watercolour on paper, 114.0 x 415.0 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

SELECTED LITERATURE Cold Blooded, exhibition catalogue, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2013 Gellatly, K., Soft Steel eX de Medici: Recent Works, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2003

eX de Medici lives and works in Canberra SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Romancing the Skull, Art Gallery of Ballarat, Ballarat, Victoria 2015 Guarding the Home Front, Casula Powerhouse, Sydney 2014 Conflict: Contemporary Responses to War, University of Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane 2014 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Dark Heart, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2013 Cold Blooded: eX de Medici, Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University, Canberra 2013 eX de Medici, Urima Univeristy, Iran 2010 eX de Medici / Vexed Generation, Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, London, UK 2010 Perspectives: Jon Cattapan and eX de Medici, Australian War Memorial, Canberra and touring 2008 Cruel and Unusual Punishment: Art and Violence, La Trobe University Museum, Melbourne

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2004

Neo-Goth: back in black, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane eX de Medici@MPRG, Mornington Peninsula Art Gallery, Mornington, Victoria Soft Steel, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Indelible, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian High Commission, Beijing, China Australian War Memorial, Canberra Canberra Museum and Gallery, Canberra Griffith University Art Gallery, Brisbane Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Shepparton Regional Art Gallery University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney / Singapore


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

eX de MEDICI 21 born 1959 #11 USA VIETNAM / PACIFIC WWII JESSE WHYTE COLLECTION, 2010 watercolour on paper 57.0 x 76.0 cm inscribed with title lower left: #11 / USA. Vietnam/ Pacific. WWII Jesse Whyte Collection estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

PROVENANCE Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney

2008

EXHIBITED Need Head, Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney, 3 – 21 May 2011, cat. 17 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue)

2003 1997

RELATED WORK Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), Aust Flag, 2010, watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), veg pattern, 2007, 2010 watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of Australian War Memorial, Canberra Australia, Special Forces (everywhere, current), digicam, 2010, watercolour and gold leaf on paper, 57.2 x 76.4 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra Cure for Pain, watercolour on paper, 114.0 x 415.0 cm, in the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

SELECTED LITERATURE Cold Blooded, exhibition catalogue, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2013 Gellatly, K., Soft Steel eX de Medici: Recent Works, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2003

eX de Medici lives and works in Canberra SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Romancing the Skull, Art Gallery of Ballarat, Ballarat, Victoria 2015 Guarding the Home Front, Casula Powerhouse, Sydney 2014 Conflict: Contemporary Responses to War, University of Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane 2014 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Dark Heart, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2013 Cold Blooded: eX de Medici, Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University, Canberra 2013 eX de Medici, Urima Univeristy, Iran 2010 eX de Medici / Vexed Generation, Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, London, UK 2010 Perspectives: Jon Cattapan and eX de Medici, Australian War Memorial, Canberra and touring 2008 Cruel and Unusual Punishment: Art and Violence, La Trobe University Museum, Melbourne

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2004

Neo-Goth: back in black, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane eX de Medici@MPRG, Mornington Peninsula Art Gallery, Mornington, Victoria Soft Steel, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Indelible, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian High Commission, Beijing, China Australian War Memorial, Canberra Canberra Museum and Gallery, Canberra Griffith University Art Gallery, Brisbane Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Shepparton Regional Art Gallery University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney / Singapore


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

JUAN DAVILA 22 born 1946, Chilean/Australian NOTHING, 1987 oil on canvas, fourteen panels 241.0 x 251.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: “NOTHING” / JUAN DAVILA 1987 estimate :

$30,000 – 50,000 (14)

PROVENANCE Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Holmes à Court Collection, Perth Company collection, Sydney Deutscher~Menzies, Sydney, 10 March 2003, lot 12 Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED The Australian Bicentennial Perspecta, Art Gallery New South Wales, Sydney, 14 October – 29 November 1987; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 5 – 17 April 1988; Wurttembergische Kurstverein, Stuttgart, Germany, March – April 1989 Juan Davila, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 9 September – 12 November 2006; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 30 November 2006 – 4 February 2007 LITERATURE Brett, G., and Benjamin, R., Juan Davila, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne in association with Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006, pl. 35, pp. 54, 112 (illus.), 253

SELECTED LITERATURE Briggs, K., Juan Davila : the moral meaning of wilderness, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2010 Brett, G., and Benjamin, R., Juan Davila, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne in association with Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006 Juan Davila : works 1988 – 2002, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2002 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Museo Extremeño e Iberoamericano de Arte Contemporáneo, Spain Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

Juan Davila lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2015 Green Room. Juan Davila, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 2013 Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2007 Andy and Oz: Parallel Visions, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, USA 2007 Documenta 12, Kassel, Germany 2006 Juan Davila Retrospective, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2002 Juan Davila: Works 1988 – 2002, Australian National University Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra 2002 Fieldwork, Australian Art 1968 – 2002, National Gallery of Victoria

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REPRESENTED BY Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art, Melbourne


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

GARETH SANSOM 23 born 1939 RETIREMENT, 1993 oil on canvas 214.0 x 153.0 cm signed and dated verso: Sansom ‘ 93 estimate :

$10,000 – 15,000

PROVENANCE Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist in 1994 EXHIBITED 1st Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT1), Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 17 September – 5 December 1993 LITERATURE Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1993, p. 109 (illus.) Gareth Sansom lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Gareth Sansom: Transformer, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2016 Today Tomorrow Yesterday, Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia 2016 Painting. More Painting, ACCA, Melbourne 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Magic Object, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2014 POP to Popism, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2013 Mix Tape 1980s: Appropriation, Subculture, Critical Style, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2013 Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2012 Alternative Persona, Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, Victoria 2012 The Naked Face, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2011 Forever Young: 30 Years of the Heide Collection, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2007 Cross Currents: Focus on Australian art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2005 Gareth Sansom: Welcome to my mind, a Study of Selected Works 1964 – 2005, The Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne 1991 Seventh Triennale, New Delhi, India and touring Australia

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1986 1978

Gareth Sansom: Paintings 1956 – 1986, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Gareth Sansom, Survey Exhibition, 1964 – 1978, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne

SELECTED LITERATURE Crawford, A., Smee, S., and Wallis, P., Gareth Sansom: Transformer, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2017 Gareth Sansom, Alternative Persona, Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, Victoria, 2012 Starr, B., Welcome to my mind: Gareth Sansom: a study of selected works 1964 – 2005, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2005 Gareth Sansom, paintings 1956 – 1986, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 1986 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian National Gallery, Canberra Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Museum of Contemporary Art, Brisbane Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney National Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY Milani Gallery, Brisbane Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Station Gallery, Melbourne


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

PETRINA HICKS 24 born 1972 EYE CANDY, 2008 (FROM ‘THE DESCENDANTS’ SERIES) Lightjet print 90.0 x 90.0 cm (sheet) edition: 2/8 PROVENANCE Stills Gallery, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Petrina Hicks. The Descendants, Stills Gallery, Sydney, 19 June – 19 July 2008 (another example) LITERATURE Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 46, no. 2, summer 2008, p. 178 (illus. and illus. on cover) estimate :

$3,000 – 5,000

PETRINA HICKS 25 born 1972 ZARA 2, 2005 Lightjet print 80.0 x 108.0 cm edition: 6/8 signed, dated and numbered verso: P. Hicks / 6/8 2005 PROVENANCE Stills Gallery, Sydney Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Untitled, 2005, Stills Gallery, Sydney, 1 April – 1 May 2005 (another example) Untitled, 2005, THIS IS NO FANTASY, Melbourne, 1 – 30 August 2005 (another example) In Cold Light, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 17 March – 6 May 2008 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue, another example) C Photo Magazine, Phillips de Pury & Co, New York, USA, 6 – 26 September 2007 (another example) LITERATURE Keys, M., In Cold Light, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 2006 estimate :

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$4,500 – 6,500

Petrina Hicks lives and works in Sydney SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2014 New Passports New Photography, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth 2014 In the Flesh, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra 2012 Hijacked III, Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Perth, Australia and touring 2011 London Australia Film Festival, Barbican, London 2010 Present Tense, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra 2010 Timelines, NGV International, Melbourne, 2010 Pingyao International Photography Festival, China 2010 Approaches, Centro Cultural Caja Puerta Real, Granada, Spain 2010 XIV Biennial of Photography, Mexico 2007 Flawless, Museum of Brisbane, Brisbane 2006 Truth and Likeness, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra 2006 Light Sensitive: Contemporary Australian Photography from the Loti Smorgon Fund, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne SELECTED COLLECTIONS Albury City Gallery, Albury, New South Wales Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney City of Monash Collection, Melbourne Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland La Trobe University, Victoria National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tweed River Art Gallery, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Michael Reid Gallery, Sydney / Murrurundi / Berlin THIS IS NO FANTASY + Dianne Tanzer Gallery, Melbourne


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THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL) 26 (c.1935 – 2002) BODY MARKS (KB 0887), 2002 synthetic polymer paint on linen 80.0 x 50.0 cm bears inscription verso: date, title, size and Karen Brown Gallery cat. KB0087 PROVENANCE Karen Brown Gallery, Darwin Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney estimate :

$3,000 – 5,000

PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL) 27 (c.1935 – 2002) BODY MARKS (KB 0886), 2002 synthetic polymer paint on linen 80.0 x 50.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, title, size and Karen Brown Gallery cat. KB0886 PROVENANCE Karen Brown Gallery, Darwin Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney estimate :

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$3,000 – 5,000


THE GENE AND BRIAN SHERMAN CAPSULE COLLECTION IV • LOTS 16 – 28

PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL) 28 (c.1935 – 2002) BODY MARKS (KB 1180), 2002 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 91.0 x 76.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date and Karen Brown Gallery cat. KB1180 PROVENANCE Karen Brown Gallery, Darwin Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney Prince of Wales (Midpul) lived and worked in Darwin language group: Larrakia estimate :

$5,000 – 7,000

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2015 No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting, Nevada Museum of Art, Nevada, USA; Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, USA, Pérez Art Museum, Miami, Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, Detroit, USA; Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, New York, USA 2003 Emerge, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin 2001 Winner, 18th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin 1997 Prince of Wales: Body Marks, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Wollongong Art Gallery, New South Wales

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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS VENDORS

DEL KATHRYN BARTON 29 born 1972 FROM HER NEST IN THE HOLM-OAK TREE THE NIGHTINGALE HEARD HIM, 2011 synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and ink on polyester canvas 173.0 x 153.0 cm signed and dated lower left: del kathryn barton 2011 estimate :

$140,000 – 180,000

PROVENANCE Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Del Kathryn Barton, satellite fade-out, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 14 July – 6 August 2011, cat. 3 Del Kathryn Barton: The Nightingale and The Rose, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 10 November – 9 December 2012; Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales, 15 December 2012 – 17 February 2013 LITERATURE Wilde, O., & Barton, D. K., The Nightingale and the Rose, Art and Australia, Sydney, 2012, pp. 2 (illus. detail), 5 (illus.), 54 (illus.) Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014, p. 70 (illus.)

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‘There is a way, answered the tree; but it is so terrible that l dare not tell it to you.’ ‘Tell it to me’, said the Nightingale, ‘l am not afraid.’ Awarded the prestigious Archibald Prize in 2008 for You are what is most beautiful about me, a tender self-portrait with her two children Kell and Arella, and again in 2013 for her pensive portrayal of actor Hugo Weaving, Del Kathryn Barton is undoubtedly one of the most critically acclaimed, eagerly sought-after figures in Australian contemporary art. Attesting to the extraordinary success of her enchanting signature style are the numerous collaborations across the arts in which she has been invited to participate – including most significantly, the commission by publishing house Art and Australia in 2010 to create a series of works reimagining Oscar Wilde’s poignant fairytale, The Nightingale and the Rose (1888). Given her predilection for themes of fantasy and metamorphosis, together with her enduring commitment to the power of the narrative, it is perhaps unsurprising that Barton had long been an avid enthusiast of Oscar Wilde’s prose. As an artist, moreover, Barton acknowledges that she has always felt a particular affinity for the vulnerable yet courageous character of the nightingale who selflessly undertakes to find the student a rare red rose for his lover, and in the greatest gesture of sacrificial love, gives her life entirely to its creation. Fatally piercing her breast against the thorns of the rose bush, she dramatically surrenders her lifeblood to stain the white rose petals crimson – all the while continuing to passionately recite her sweet song in the moonlight. At once naïve and wise, young and old, bold and sentimental, Wilde’s timeless heroine thus embodies for Barton a ‘true artist who gives completely of her deepest essence.’1 As she elucidates, ‘… l’m always surprised actually, that people look at her story of self-sacrifice with a quality of religiosity. Because, for me, I feel that she lives the most fulfilled life – for better or for worse, or from an informed place or not, but from her heart she makes a choice she believes in … She gives everything from that place and for me that’s a paradigm to live by. There is an element of tragedy, but I connect to the story as one of transcendence and ecstasy through commitment to one’s beliefs.’ 2


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DEL KATHRYN BARTON 29 born 1972 FROM HER NEST IN THE HOLM-OAK TREE THE NIGHTINGALE HEARD HIM, 2011

With its captivating beauty, deep sonorous palette and obsessively patterned background (which perfectly evokes the late nineteenth century Aesthetic Movement encapsulated by Wilde), from her nest in the holm-oak tree the nightingale heard him, 2011 offers an impressive example of Barton’s exquisite ‘Nightingale’ suite. Pervaded by a wild and lovely melancholy, the composition is at once emotionally direct and clearly also sumptuously staged, illustrating the dramatic moment when the nightingale overhears a young student express his fears about losing the young woman he loves forever – the Professor’s daughter who has threatened to abandon him unless he presents her with a red rose. Thus, the small bird proceeds to ponder deeply the mystery of love, reminding us that ‘Life is very dear to all’, yet ultimately concluding that ‘love is better than life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?’ If tragically such pure and exemplary love is met with petulant selfishness in Wilde’s tale, for Barton the true subject – as elsewhere in her oeuvre – is the possibility of communication between animals and humans. As Julie Ewington astutely notes, ‘… here it seems that the little nightingale better understood the hearts of the humans, or at least one human, than they did themselves.’ 3 Comprising eight major paintings and four smaller watercolours, Barton’s hauntingly beautiful ‘Nightingale’ suite today remains universally admired among her finest achievements. Indeed, such was the success of the lavish hardcover publication by Art and Australia that in 2012, Barton joined forces with acclaimed Australian film-maker Brendan Fletcher to translate her Nightingale paintings into film – an intense and stunningly ethereal interpretation of Wilde’s earnest tale for which the duo subsequently won an Australian Directors Guild Award for Best Direction in an Animation in 2016. 1. Barton cited in Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, 2014, p. 73 2. Barton cited in Stephens, A., ‘Del Kathryn Barton’s The Nightingale and the Rose Comes to ACMI’, Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, 14 June 2016 3. Ewington, op. cit.

VERONICA ANGELATOS

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INSTALLATION VIEW, ‘DEL KATHRYN BARTON: THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE ROSE’, HEIDE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, MELBOURNE, 2012, PHOTOGRAPH: JOHN BRASH

Del Kathryn Barton lives and works in Sydney

2009

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2016 Del Kathryn Barton: The Nightingale and The Rose, Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne, and touring to various public and regional galleries throughout Australia, 2017 – 2020 2014 Express Yourself: Romance Was Born for Kids, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2014 Dark Heart, Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2013 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2013 Australia: Contemporary Voices, Fine Arts Society, London 2012 Louise Bourgeois and Australian Artists, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2012 The Nightingale and The Rose, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria and touring to Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales, 2012 – 2013 2012 Lightness and Gravity, Queensland Gallery of Art / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane 2011 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2010 Feminism Never Happened, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane

2007

The Wynne Prize for Landscape, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Del Kathryn Barton, Penrith Regional Gallery, New South Wales

SELECTED LITERATURE Del Kaythryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2017 Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014 Wilde, O., & Barton, D., The Nightingale and the Rose, Dott Publishing, Art and Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney, 2012 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Rockhampton Art Gallery, Queensland University of New South Wales Galleries, Sydney University of Sydney, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Albertz Benda, New York

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CRESSIDA CAMPBELL 30 born 1960 ANGOPHORA, 1997 watercolour on incised woodblock 63.0 x 54.0 cm signed with initials lower left: C.C. estimate :

$45,000 – 65,000

PROVENANCE Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney Michael Reid, Sydney Private collection, Sydney

SELECTED LITERATURE Crayford, P., (ed.), The Woodblock Painting of Cressida Campbell, Public Pictures, Sydney, 2008

EXHIBITED Cressida Campbell, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, October – November 1997, cat. 4 (as ‘Angophera’ [sic])

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney British Museum, London, United Kingdom National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Museum, Kraków, Poland State Library of New South Wales, Sydney

LITERATURE Crayford, P., (ed.), The Woodblock Painting of Cressida Campbell, Public Pictures, Sydney, 2008, cat. W9702, pp. 182 – 183 (illus., incorrectly captioned), 351

REPRESENTED BY Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne Simon Lee Gallery, London / Hong Kong / New York

Cressida Campbell lives and works in Sydney SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2015 Destination Sydney, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney 2009 TIMELESS: The Art of Cressida Campbell, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney 2007 Cuisine and Country: A Gastronomic Venture in Australian Art, Orange Regional Gallery, Orange, NSW and touring regionally 2006 Sydney Prints: 45 years of Sydney Printmakers, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney 2005 Fireworks: tracing the incendiary in Australian art, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane 1999 Still Lives from the Collection, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 1999 The Artist and the Northern Beaches, Manly Art Gallery & Museum, Sydney 1994 Everyday Life: Prints & Drawings, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 1989 Historical and Contemporary Australian Woodcuts, Penrith Regional Art Gallery, Penrith, NSW 1986 Cressida Campbell, Griffith University, Gold Coast

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CRESSIDA CAMPBELL 31 born 1960 SHELL TERMINAL, 1990 – 2000 watercolour on incised woodblock 53.0 x 59.5 cm signed with initials lower left: C.C. estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Nevill Keating Pictures, London Private collection Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in October 2008 EXHIBITED Cressida Campbell, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 14 November – 9 December 2000, cat. 6 (as ‘Industrial Landscape’) (illus. in exhibition catalogue) Cressida Campbell, Recent paintings, Nevill Keating Pictures, London (in association with Philip Bacon Galleries), 6 – 27 July 2001 (as ‘Shell Terminal’) RELATED WORK Shipping Terminal, Gore Bay, 1990, woodblock print, Winner, ACTA Maritime Art Award, 1990,illus. in Crayford, P., (ed.), The Woodblock Painting of Cressida Campbell, Public Pictures Pty Ltd, Sydney, 2008, cat. P9012, pp. 290 – 91 (illus.), 343 Cressida Campbell lives and works in Sydney

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SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney British Museum, London, UK Griffith University, Brisbane Ipswich City Art Gallery, Queensland Macquarie Bank, Sydney Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria Mosman Council, Mosman National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Museum, Kracow, Poland Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale New Parliament House, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane State Library of New South Wales, Sydney University of New South Wales, Sydney University of Western Sydney, Sydney Warrnambool Art Gallery, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne Simon Lee Gallery, London / Hong Kong / New York


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DEL KATHRYN BARTON 32

born 1972 GIRL #11, 2004 synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and pen on canvas 120.0 x 86.0 cm signed and dated lower left: del kathryn barton 2004 signed, dated and inscribed with title on stretcher verso: “girl # eleven” / del kathryn barton / 2004 estimate :

$65,000 – 85,000

PROVENANCE Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Sydney Shapiro, Sydney, 9 September 2011, lot 161 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Del Kathryn Barton, girl, Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney, 6 November – 1 December 2004 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue) LITERATURE Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014, p. 8 (illus.) Del Kathryn Barton lives and works in Sydney SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2016 Del Kathryn Barton: The Nightingale and The Rose, Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne, and touring to various public and regional galleries throughout Australia, 2017 – 2020 2014 Express Yourself: Romance Was Born for Kids, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2014 Dark Heart, Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2013 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2013 Australia: Contemporary Voices, Fine Arts Society, London 2012 Louise Bourgeois and Australian Artists, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2012 The Nightingale and The Rose, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria and touring to Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales, 2012 – 2013 2012 Lightness and Gravity, Queensland Gallery of Art / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane 2011 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

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2010 2009 2007

Feminism Never Happened, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane The Wynne Prize for Landscape, Art Gallery of New South Wales Del Kathryn Barton, Penrith Regional Gallery, New South Wales

SELECTED LITERATURE Del Kaythryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2017 Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014 Wilde, O., & Barton, D., The Nightingale and the Rose, Dott Publishing, Art and Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney, 2012 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Rockhampton Art Gallery, Queensland University of New South Wales Galleries, Sydney University of Sydney, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Albertz Benda, New York


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PATRICIA PICCININI 33 born 1965 DETERMINED BY RELATIVE MOTION, 2012 silicone on linen over board 90.0 × 120.0 cm signed and dated verso: Patricia Piccinini / 2013 [sic] estimate :

$12,000 – 16,000

PROVENANCE Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Patricia Piccinini – I have spread my dreams under your feet, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 7 – 30 March 2013, cat. 7 Patricia Piccinini lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2018 Curious Affection, Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane 2016 Patricia Piccinini: Bodyscape, Yu-Hsiu Museum of Art, Caotun, Taiwan 2015 Another Life, University of Quebec Art Museum, Montreal, Canada 2015 ComCiencia, Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, São Paulo, Brazil 2014 Like Us, Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales 2013 Structures of Support, Canberra Museum and Gallery, Canberra 2011 Once Upon A Time, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2010 Relativity, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth 2009 Evolution, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart 2006 In Another Life, Wellington City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand 2003 We are Family, Australian Pavilion, 50th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy

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SELECTED LITERATURE Creed, B., Stray: Human/Animal Ethics in the Anthropocene, Power Publications, Sydney, 2016 Dantas, M., ComCiencia, exhibition catalogue, Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, Brazil, 2015 Sasse, J.R., Blurred Boundaries: A History of Hybrid Beings and the Work of Patricia P., University of Arizona Press, Arizona, 2014 McDonald, H., Nearly Beloved, Patricia Piccinini, Piper Press, Sydney, 2011 Engberg, J., Relativity, exhibition catalogue, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 2010 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria Griffith University, Queensland Middelheim Museum, Antwerp, Belgium Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington DC, USA Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona, USA Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane University of Melbourne, Victoria Weatherspoon Art Museum, North Carolina, USA REPRESENTED BY Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA


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DAVID NOONAN 34 born 1969 UNTITLED (FIGURE 1), 2008 screen printed jute on plywood and steel base 168.0 x 77.0 x 5.5 cm edition: 1/2 estimate :

$12,000 – 16,000

PROVENANCE Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Scenes – David Noonan, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 15 August – 27 September 2009; Chisenhale, London, 12 September 2008 – 26 October 2008; Albert Baronian, Brussels, Belgium, 6 November 2008 – 22 December 2008 (another example) Tableaux, Magasin (Centre National d’Art Contemporain), Paris, France, 29 May – 4 September 2011 David Noonan, Contemporary Art Museum St Louis, USA, 9 September – 30 December 2011 (another example) Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery at Art Cologne, Cologne, Germany, 18 – 22 April 2012 (another example) Out Of Focus: Photography, Saatchi Gallery, London, 25 April – 22 July 2012 (another example) LITERATURE David Noonan: Scenes, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2009, n.p. (illus., detail) Goh, L., ‘David Noonan Scenes’, Eyeline, issue 70, Summer 2009 – 2010, p. 82 (illus., installation) Baran, J., ‘Review. David Noonan. St Louis’, Art in America, November 2011 (illus., installation) Engberg, J., ‘It’s a long way to the top’, Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 50, no. 4, winter 2013, pp. 620 – 621 (illus., installation, another example) David Noonan lives and works in Melbourne and London, United Kingdom

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SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth British Council, United Kingdom Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, USA Galerie de l’UQAM, Montreal, Canada Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, USA Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York University of Ballarat Art Collection, Victoria Whitney Museum, New York, USA REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Modern Art Gallery, London, UK Xavier Hufkens, Brussels, Belgium David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, USA


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MICHAEL COOK 35 born 1968 CIVILISED, 2012 suite of fourteen inkjet prints on archival Hahnemühle cotton paper 100.0 x 87.5 cm each edition: AP aside from an edition of 8 estimate :

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$40,000 – 60,000 (14)


This body of work looks at the four European countries that visited Australia before and in the early stages of colonialisation: The Netherlands, Spain, England and France. It asks ‘what makes a person civilised?’ and suggests what a different historical settlement may have been like if those Europeans had arrived in Australia and realised that the Indigenous Peoples were indeed civilised. MICHAEL COOK

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MICHAEL COOK 35 born 1968 CIVILISED, 2012 suite of fourteen inkjet prints on archival Hahnemühle cotton paper 100.0 x 87.5 cm each edition: AP aside from an edition of 8 estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000 (14)

PROVENANCE Andrew Baker Art Dealer, Brisbane Private collection, Brisbane EXHIBITED Michael Cook. Civilised, Andrew Baker Art Dealer, Brisbane, 9 – 22 December 2012 (#11 illus. on exhibition invitation) Seventh Asia-Pacific Triennial APT7, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 8 December 2012 – 14 April 2013 (another example) Michael Cook : hear no... see no... speak no..., Queensland Centre for Photography at The Depot Gallery, Sydney, 14 May – 25 May 2013 (#13 illus. on exhibition invitation, another example) My Country, I Still Call Australia Home: Contemporary Art from Black Australia, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 1 June – 7 October 2013 (another example) Episodes: Australia Photography Now, 13th DongGang International Photo Festival, Yeongwol, South Korea, 18 July – 21 September 2014 (this example) Michael Cook – Civilised, The Cat Street Gallery, Hong Kong, 5 – 28 February 2015 (another example) Mapping Australia: Country Cartography, Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands, 4 October 2015 – 15 January 2016 (another example) All Dressed Up, Hawkesbury Regional Gallery, New South Wales, 9 December 2016 – 5 February 2017 (another example) LITERATURE APT7, the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2012, pp. 5 – 6 (illus.), 27 (illus.), 80 (illus.), 104, 105 (illus.), 299 Watson, B., ‘Public Works’, The Australian, 31 August – 1 September 2013 (#13 illus., another example) Emmerich, D., ‘Michael Cook’s ‘What-If’ Retake on Australia’s History’, Write About Art – Eyeline Contemporary Visual Arts, Queensland, issue 5, 2015 Arcilla, M., ‘Michael Cook. The Skins We Live In’, Vault, Issue 13, February 2016, p. 49 (illus., another example)

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RELATED WORK Other editions of this suite are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane and the University of Technology Art Collection, Sydney (on long-term loan from the Corrigan Collection) Michael Cook lives and works in Brisbane, Bidjara people of South-West Queensland SELECTED COLLECTIONS AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney Australian War Memorial, Canberra British Museum, London, United Kingdom Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum of Australia, Canberra Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY THIS IS NO FANTASY + Dianne Tanzer Gallery, Melbourne


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TRACEY MOFFATT 36 born 1960 SOMETHING MORE #8, 1989 Cibachrome photograph 96.0 x 126.0 cm edition: 16/30 signed, dated and numbered verso: T. Moffatt ’89 16/30 estimate :

$22,000 – 32,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, New York Dr. Jordan Gutterman, Houston Private collection, USA Christie’s, New York, 14 January 2008, lot 6 Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Other examples of this image have been exhibited and published widely including: Something More, Australian Centre for Photography, Australia, and touring through regional galleries, 1989 (illus. in exhibition catalogue, p. 9) Tracey Moffatt, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, 10 April – 7 June 1998 and travelling throughout Europe Tracey Moffatt, Institute of Modern Arts, Brisbane and Asia Link, Melbourne, 1999 Tracey Moffatt, Nassau County Museum of Art, New York, February – April 2001 Tracey Moffatt, City Gallery, Wellington, 2002 (illus. in exhibition catalogue, p. 24) Tracey Moffatt, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 17 December 2003 – 29 February 2004 (illus. in exhibition catalogue, p. 3) Tracey Moffatt. Between Dreams and Reality, Spazio Oberdan, Milan, 28 June – 1 October 2006 Tracey Moffatt, Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, 13 March – 25 April 2009 LITERATURE Newton, G., Tracey Moffatt: Fever Pitch, Piper Press, Sydney, 1995, pp. 52, 53 (illus.), 57 (illus.) Hentschel, M. (et al.), Tracey Moffatt, Cantz, Ostfildern-Ruit / New York, 1998, pp. 11 (illus.), 62 (illus.) Maggia, F. (ed.), Tracey Moffatt. Between Dreams and Reality, Skira Editions, Italy, 2006, p. 127 (illus.) Reinhardt, B. (et al.), Tracey Moffatt: Laudanum, Ostfildern, 1999, p. 8 (illus. another example) Summerhayes, C., The Moving Images of Tracey Moffatt, Edizioni Charta, Milan, 2007, pp. 77 – 78 (illus.)

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RELATED WORK Other examples of this edition are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Murray Art Museum Albury, Albury-Wodonga, and Artbank, Sydney. Tracey Moffatt lives and works in Sydney and New York, United States of America SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian National Gallery, Canberra Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Munich, Germany Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, USA Centre national des arts plastiques, France Guggenheim Museum, New York, USA Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA Louisiana Museum of Contemporary Art, Humlebæk, Denmark Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden Museet for Samtidskunst, Oslo, Norway Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, USA Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney Museum of Contemporary Photography, Tokyo, Japan Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Boston, USA Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Library of Australia, Canberra National Museum of Photography, Copenhagen, Denmark National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Parliament House Collection, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tate Gallery, London, UK Museum Ulm, Ulm, Germany REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York


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EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE 37 (c.1910 – 1996) ENDUNGA, 1989 synthetic polymer paint on linen 148.0 x 117.5 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Delmore Gallery cat. D131 estimate :

$90,000 – 120,000

PROVENANCE Commissioned by Delmore Gallery, via Alice Springs in November 1989 Coventry Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Sydney Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Emily Kngwarreye, Coventry Gallery, Sydney, 8 May – 2 June 1990 (illus. front cover of exhibition brochure) RELATED WORK Awelye, 1989 – 90, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 140.0 x 72.0 cm, in the Holmes à Court collection, Perth, illus. in Carrigan, B., Utopia: Ancient Cultures New Forms, Heytesbury Pty Ltd and The Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1999, p. 40 Endunga, 1989 – 90, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 121.5 x 90.0 cm, in the collection of Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, illus. in Carrigan, B., Utopia: Ancient Cultures New Forms, Heytesbury Pty Ltd and The Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1999 p. 41 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Delmore Gallery, via Alice Springs.

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EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE 37 (c.1910 – 1996) ENDUNGA, 1989

The exhibition, A Summer Project; Utopia Women’s Paintings (The First Works on Canvas-1988-89) was held at the S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney in April 1989. Coordinated by the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) in Alice Springs, the exhibition was the culmination of the second special project initiated the previous year when eightyone canvases of the same size were supplied to the artists of Utopia. By the time the exhibition took place, all works had been acquired by the Holmes à Court Collection in Perth. The exhibition featured Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s earliest paintings on canvas that were made during the summer of 1988 – 89 and her painting, Emu Woman, 1988 – 89, appeared on the cover of the exhibition catalogue. Endunga, 1989 was painted on Delmore Downs Station in November 1989 and was included in the artist’s solo exhibition held at Coventry Gallery, Sydney in 1990. In many ways, Endunga echoes Emu Woman in style and subject. It features an underlying meandering linear pattern which is based on the underground growth of yam roots, together with stylised emu tracks that are infilled and over-painted with patterns of dotting that represents the fruit, seeds (Ntang) and reedy strands of the Endunga grass. The related story tells how the Old man Emu, whose tracks underpin this painting, shepherds his chicks to rich feeding areas where they feast on the flowers, grasses and seeds of the Endunga. As their father who sat on the eggs, he has a close relationship with the young and is responsible for the vulnerable hatchlings, keeping them close by for many months and protecting them from falling prey to predators.1

EMILY KNGWARREYE EXHIBITION BROCHURE FEATURING ‘ENDUNGA’, COVENTRY GALLERY, SYDNEY, MAY 1990

Emily Kame Kngwarreye spent a lifetime making art, whether for ceremony, painting the bodies of women in her role as a ceremonial leader, as a prominent member of the Utopia Women’s batik movement or in the later years of her life, satisfying the unprecedented demand for her paintings following the successes of her early exhibitions. She is undoubtedly one of Australia’s greatest painters of the twentieth century. 1. Taken from information included in the accompanying certificate from Delmore Gallery

CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE

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Emily Kame Kngwarreye lived and worked in Utopia, Northern Territory language group: Anmatyerre / Alyawarr SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2008 Utopia: The Genius of Emily Kame Kngwarreye, National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan; National Art Centre, Tokyo, Japan; National Museum of Australia, Canberra 1998 Emily Kame Kngwarreye: Alhalkere, Paintings from Utopia, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 1997 Fluent – Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Yvonne Koolmatrie, Judy Watson – XLVII Esposizione Internationale D’Arte, 47th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy 1996 The Eye of the Storm: Eight Contemporary Indigenous Australian Artists, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 1995 Stories: A Journey Around Big Things: Work by 11 Aboriginal Artists, The Holmes à Court Collection, Sprengel Museum, Hanover, Germany; Museum für Völkerkunde zu Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany; Ludwig-Forum für Internationale Kunst, Aachen, Germany 1993 Tjukurrpa: Desert Dreamings: Aboriginal Art from Central Australia (1971 – 1993), Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth 1993 Aratjara: Art of the First Australians, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf, Germany; Hayward Gallery, London, UK; Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, USA 1992 Crossroads – Toward a New Reality: Aboriginal Art from Australia, The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan; The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan 1989 A Summer Project: Utopia Women’s Paintings, S.H Ervin Gallery, Sydney; and touring regionally

SELECTED LITERATURE Neale M. (ed.),Utopia; The Genius of Emily Kame Kngwarreye, National Museum of Australia and The National Museum of Art, Osaka, 2007 Neale M., Emily Kame Kngwarreye: Alhalkere, Paintings from Utopia, Macmillan Publishers, Melbourne, 1998 Isaacs, J., Smith, T., Ryan, J., Holt, D., and Holt,J., Emily Kame Kngwarreye Paintings, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998 Perkins, H., (et al.), Fluent – Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Yvonne Koolmatrie, Judy Watson – 47th Venice Biennial, The Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1997 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Auckland City Art Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Museum of Victoria, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane The Vatican Collection, Rome, Italy

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ROVER THOMAS (JOOLAMA) 38 (c.1926 – 1998) KUNUNURRA BRIDGE, 1987 natural earth pigments and natural binders on composition board 61.0 x 91.5 cm bears inscription verso: Mary Macha cat. PT4687 and iRRRR estimate :

$100,000 – 150,000

PROVENANCE Commissioned by Mary Macha, Perth Private collection, Perth Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Blue Chip X: The Collector’s Exhibition, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 4 March – 5 April 2008, cat. 18 (label attached verso) RELATED WORK Railway Bridge, Katherine, 1984, earth pigments and natural binder on composition board, 59.8 x 122.1 cm, in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, illus. in Ryan, J. and Akerman, K., Images of Power: Aboriginal Art of the Kimberley, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, pp. 58 – 59 This work has been granted an Australian Cultural Heritage Export Permit allowing it to be exported permanently from Australia. Rover Thomas (Joolama) lived and worked in Warmun, Western Australia language group: Kukatja/Wangkajunga SELECTED COLLECTIONS AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian War Memorial, Canberra Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

Rover Thomas functioned as an illustrator and storyteller and saw his paintings as landscapes, not static records but rather living portraits of land incorporating the physical, historical and metaphysical; the present and the past. His subject matter was not limited to his homeland and as Mary Macha remembered ‘He’d paint what he wanted to paint; his country, the East Kimberley, Perth, Katherine, Broome country, all over the place’.1 Similar to the artist’s other depictions of man-made landmarks such as Kununurra Turnoff, 1986, Railway Bridge, Katherine, 1984, Kimberley Crossroads, 1990 or Swan River, 1991, Kununurra Bridge, 1987 is minimal in composition yet complex in meaning – here history, geography, mythology, knowledge and the lived experience that underpin much Aboriginal art are simultaneously represented. As curator Hetti Perkins has noted, ‘nowhere has the merging of the past and present, the spiritual and physical been more clearly realised than in Thomas’s paintings’. 2 Thomas used his deeply personal vision to redefine the pictorial conventions of the region and Kununurra Bridge, where an aerial planar view depicts the road bridge as flattened country, typifies the distinctive characteristics of his painting. However, in this image the curvilinear lines found in much of his work give way to a more angular composition, reflecting the man-made character of building and construction. Painted on the textured side of a sheet of Masonite with a black charcoal ground, the palette is derived from the deep brown and red ochre of the Kimberley landscape. Rover Thomas began to paint in the early 1980s after working for more than thirty years as a stockman and labourer in his home country of the Great Sandy and Gibson Deserts. By the mid-1980s his work had been represented in many group exhibitions and he was increasingly recognised as an accomplished and distinguished artist. In 1990 Rover Thomas, together with Trevor Nickolls, represented Australia at the Venice Biennale, (the first two Indigenous artists selected to do so) and he has since been the subject of two important solo exhibitions, Roads Cross: The Paintings of Rover Thomas, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra in 1994 and I Want to Paint, a travelling exhibition touring nationally from 2003 to 2005. 1. Mary Macha and Don McLeod interviewed by Peppercorn, D., March 2003 in Rover Thomas; I Want to Paint, exhibition catalogue, Heytesbury Pty Ltd, Perth, 2003, p. 51 2. Perkins, H. Traditions Today; Indigenous Art in Australia, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2004, p. 134 CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE

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91


BILL WHISKEY TJAPALTJARRI 39 (c.1920 – 2008) ROCKHOLES NEAR OLGAS, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on linen 135.0 x 180.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, title, size and Watiyawanu Artists cat. 0307370 estimate :

PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrungu, Mt Liebig, Northern Territory Japingka Gallery, Fremantle Private collection, Perth Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri lived and worked in Mt Liebig / Haasts Bluff, Northern Territory language group: Pitjantjatjara SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2008 Masterpieces from the Western Desert, Peta O’Brien Contemporary Art, COSA, London 2008 Desert Mob, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs 2007 Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri, John Gordon Gallery, Queensland 2007 Desert Mob, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs 2006 Desert Mob, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs 2006 Colliding Worlds, National Aboriginal Art and Cultural Institute – Tandaya, Adelaide 2006 Finalist, 23rd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin 2005 Finalist, 22nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin SELECTED LITERATURE McGregor, K., and Zimmer, J.,Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri, Macmillan Publishers, Melbourne, 2009 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Kerry Stokes Collection, Perth National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, USA

92

$30,000 – 40,000


93


KITTY KANTILLA 40 (c.1928 – 2003) UNTITLED, 2001 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 77.5 x 105.5 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, skin group: Fire / Dance: Rain and Jilamara Arts cat. 625-01 estimate :

$18,000 – 25,000

PROVENANCE Jilamara Arts and Crafts, Milikapiti, Northern Territory (stamped verso) Redback Art Gallery, Brisbane Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in November 2001 EXHIBITED Tiwi Art, Redback Art Gallery, Brisbane, 12 October – 3 November 2001 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Jilamara Arts and Crafts, Milikapiti. Kitty Kantilla lived and worked on Melville Island, Northern Territory language group: Tiwi SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2007 Kitty Kantilla, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2006 Dreaming Their Way: Australian Aboriginal Women Painters, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington DC, USA; Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2005 Land Marks, The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2002 Meridian: Focus on Australian Contemporary Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2000 Beyond the Pale: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Adelaide Biennial of Art, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 1994 Power of the Land: Masterpieces of Aboriginal Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 1988 Carved Wooden Sculptures by Tiwi Women from Paru, Aboriginal Artists Gallery, Sydney

94

SELECTED LITERATURE Ryan, J., Kitty Kantilla, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2007 ‘Kutuwalumi (Kitty Kantilla)’ in Contemporary Territory, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, 1994 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth British Museum, London, UK Musée du quai Branly, Paris, France Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Museum Victoria, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Maritime Museum, Sydney Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane


95


DANIE MELLOR 41 born 1971 A MOST FAVOURED ASPECT (ON THE PERIPHERY), 2009 pencil, pastel, glitter, Swarovski crystal and wash on paper housed in the artist’s exhibition frame 28.0 x 38.0 cm (sheet) signed and dated lower right: Danie Mellor / 2009 inscribed with title lower left: A most/ favoured / aspect (on / the periphery) estimate :

PROVENANCE Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Danie Mellor: New World, New Order, A Complex Vision, Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane, 1 – 16 May 2009 Danie Mellor lives and works in New South Wales SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian Museum, Sydney Australian National University, Canberra Cairns Regional Gallery, Queensland Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Canberra Museum and Gallery, Canberra Flinders University, Adelaide Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museums Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Shepparton Regional Gallery, Victoria University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne

96

$8,000 – 12,000


97


DEL KATHRYN BARTON 42 born 1972 DAWN, 2009 synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and pen and ink on canvas 85.5 x 63.5 cm signed lower left: del kathryn barton dated and inscribed upper left: T.M 09 inscribed with title lower right: - dawn estimate :

$20,000 – 30,000

PROVENANCE Kaliman Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney

2010

EXHIBITED Del Kathryn Barton, the stars eat your body, Kaliman Gallery, Sydney, 27 November – 19 December 2009

2007

LITERATURE Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014, p. 67 (illus.) Del Kathryn Barton lives and works in Sydney SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2016 Del Kathryn Barton: The Nightingale and The Rose, Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne, and touring to various public and regional galleries throughout Australia, 2017 – 2020 2014 Express Yourself: Romance Was Born for Kids, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2014 Dark Heart, Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2013 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2013 Australia: Contemporary Voices, Fine Arts Society, London 2012 Louise Bourgeois and Australian Artists, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2012 The Nightingale and The Rose, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria and touring to Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales, 2012 – 2013 2012 Lightness and Gravity, Queensland Gallery of Art / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane 2011 The Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

98

2009

Feminism Never Happened, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane The Wynne Prize for Landscape, Art Gallery of New South Wales Del Kathryn Barton, Penrith Regional Gallery, New South Wales

SELECTED LITERATURE Del Kaythryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2017 Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014 Wilde, O., & Barton, D., The Nightingale and the Rose, Dott Publishing, Art and Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney, 2012 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Rockhampton Art Gallery, Queensland University of New South Wales Galleries, Sydney University of Sydney, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Albertz Benda, New York


99


EUAN MACLEOD 43 born 1956 WARDROBE LANDSCAPES (WITH LIGHTHOUSE), 2001 oil on canvas diptych 240.5 x 84.0 cm (overall) top panel: signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: WARDROBE LANDSCAPES / (WITH LIGHTHOUSE) / EUAN MACLEOD / 2001 bottom panel: signed verso: EUAN MACLEOD estimate :

$18,000 – 24,000 (2)

PROVENANCE Watters Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Queensland Joel Fine Art, Melbourne, 30 October 2011, lot 65 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Euan Macleod. Recent Paintings, Watters Gallery, Sydney, 24 July – 18 August 2001, cat. 2 (as ‘Wardrobe Landscape (With Lighthouse)’) Euan Macleod lives and works in Sydney SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Australian Museum, Sydney Australian War Memorial, Canberra Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales Centre for Contemporary Art, Christchurch, New Zealand Chartwell Collection, Auckland, New Zealand Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Museum of Brisbane, Brisbane Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Parliament House, Canberra Rockhampton Art Gallery, Queensland Wagga Wagga Art Gallery, New South Wales Wollongong Art Gallery, New South Wales

100

REPRESENTED BY Watters Gallery, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Victor Mace Fine Art Gallery, Brisbane Bowen Galleries, Wellington, New Zealand


101


PHILIP WOLFHAGEN 44 born 1963 A PAINTER’S LANDSCAPE III, 2010 oil and beeswax on linen 97.0 x 103.5 cm signed with initial, dated and inscribed with title lower right: W AUGUST / 2010 / A Painters [sic] / Landscape / III artist’s stamp lower right signed, dated, and inscribed with title verso: PHILIP WOLFHAGEN / “A Painter’s Landscape III” 2010 / … estimate :

$20,000 – 30,000

PROVENANCE Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED A Painter’s Landscape, Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne, 22 September – 16 October 2010 Philip Wolfhagen lives and works in Longford, Tasmania SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Transformations: the art of Philip Wolfhagen, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston 2017 Strange Trees, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart 2016 Panorama, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria 2015 When the Ocean Turns to Dust, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney 2014 The Skullbone Experiment: A Paradigm of Art and Nature, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston; COFA Galleries, Sydney 2014 Sublime Point: Landscape in Painting, Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre, New South Wales 2013 Australia, Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK 2013 Illumination; the art of Philip Wolfhagen, Newcastle Art Gallery, NSW; Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Hobart; Drill Hall Gallery ANU, Canberra; Cairns Regional Gallery, Queensland; Tweed River Art Gallery, NSW; Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria 2007 Vapour Trails, The Australian Embassy in Washington DC, USA 2003 Archipelago, Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery, Launceston 1997 Australian Perspecta: Between Art and Nature, Temple of Earth Memories, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney

102

SELECTED LITERATURE Illumination: The art of Philip Wolfhagen, Newcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle, 2013 Timms, P., Philip Wolfhagen, Craftsman House, Melbourne, 2005 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria Burnie Regional Art Gallery, Tasmania Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Castlemaine Art Gallery, Victoria Devonport Regional Gallery, Tasmania Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria National Museum, Warsaw, Poland National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale Museum of Applied Art & Sciences, Sydney Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY Bett Gallery, Hobart Dominik Mersch Gallery, Sydney Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Karen Woodbury Fine Art, Melbourne


103


RICK AMOR 45 born 1948 LANDSCAPE WITH A CAR, 2000 oil on canvas 53.5 x 65.0 cm signed and dated lower right: RICK AMOR ‘00 inscribed with date and title verso: MAR 00/ Landscape with/ a Car / … estimate :

$25,000 – 35,000

PROVENANCE Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 29 August 2007, lot 54 Private collection, Sydney

SELECTED LITERATURE Rick Amor: A single mind, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2008 Fry, G., Rick Amor, The Beagle Press, New South Wales, 2006 Lindsay, R., Rick Amor: standing in the shadows, McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park, Victoria, 2005

Rick Amor lives and works in Melbourne

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Australian War Memorial, Canberra Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales La Trobe Collection, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Rick Amor: Contemporary Romantic, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2015 Rick Amor: 21 Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra 2015 Five Centuries of Melancholia, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane 2014 The Piranesi Effect, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne 2011 Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas, British Museum, London 2008 Rick Amor: A Single Mind, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2005 Rick Amor: Standing in the Shadows, McClelland Gallery+Sculpture Park, Melbourne 2002 Rick Amor & Sculpture, Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria 2000 Rick Amor: Official Artist in East Timor, Australian War Memorial, Canberra

104

REPRESENTED BY Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane


105


RICK AMOR 46 born 1948 STUDY FOR SILENT WORLD, 2003 oil on linen 97.0 x 130.0 cm dated and inscribed with title verso: Study for Silent World / Feb 03 estimate :

$45,000 – 65,000

PROVENANCE Niagara Galleries, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Rick Amor Paintings 2003, Commemorating 20 Years with Niagara Galleries, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 2 – 27 September 2003, cat. 5 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue) LITERATURE Beck, C., ‘Master works’, The Age, Melbourne, 26 July 2003 (illus.) RELATED WORK Silent World, 2003, oil on canvas, 116.0 x 176.0 cm, private collection

SELECTED LITERATURE Rick Amor: A single mind, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2008 Fry, G., Rick Amor, The Beagle Press, New South Wales, 2006 Lindsay, R., Rick Amor: standing in the shadows, McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park, Victoria, 2005 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Australian War Memorial, Canberra Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales La Trobe Collection, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart

Rick Amor lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017 Rick Amor: Contemporary Romantic, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide 2015 Rick Amor: 21 Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra 2015 Five Centuries of Melancholia, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane 2014 The Piranesi Effect, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne 2011 Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas, British Museum, London 2008 Rick Amor: A Single Mind, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria 2005 Rick Amor: Standing in the Shadows, McClelland Gallery+Sculpture Park, Melbourne 2002 Rick Amor & Sculpture, Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria 2000 Rick Amor: Official Artist in East Timor, Australian War Memorial, Canberra

106

REPRESENTED BY Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane


107


JOHN KELLY 47 born 1965 AERIAL VIEW I, 1993 oil on plywood 119.5 x 120.5 cm signed and dated upper centre left: Klly 93 [sic] bears inscription verso: W 253 estimate :

$40,000 – 60,000

PROVENANCE Access Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above Sotheby’s, Sydney, 25 August 2002, lot 24 Private collection, Sydney John Kelly lives and works in Cork, Ireland SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2016 Fleurieu Art Prize, Anne and Gordon Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide 2011 Göteborg International Biennial for Contemporary Art, Göteborg, Sweden 2010 At The Crossroads, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei, Taiwan 2009 Self-Portrait from Afar, third project from Kelly’s Garden curated series, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart 2007 Cow Up A Tree, Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice, France 2006 Deconstructing Australia, McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park, Victoria SELECTED LITERATURE Doggett-Williams, J., Deconstructing John Kelly (film documentary), Fine Eye Productions, Melbourne, 2008 Self-Portrait From Afar, exhibition catalogue, Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney, 2008 Lindsay, R., Deconstructing Australia, exhibition catalogue, McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park, Melbourne, 2006

108

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria Deakin University Art Collection, Victoria Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland Guangdong Museum of Art, Guangzhou, China La Trobe University Collection, Victoria McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery, Victoria Musée Municipal Alphonse-Georges-Poulain, Vernon, France Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Sports Museum, Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Tasmania Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tasmania Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart Trinity College Collection, University of Melbourne, Melbourne REPRESENTED BY Australian Galleries, Melbourne Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney Redfern Gallery, London


109


TIM MAGUIRE 48 born 1958 UNTITLED 20050405, 2005 oil on canvas 148.0 x 118.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: Maguire ’05 / Untitled 20050405 / … estimate :

$25,000 – 35,000

PROVENANCE Von Lintel Gallery, New York (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Tim Maguire, Von Lintel Gallery, New York, USA, 5 May – 4 June 2005 Tim Maguire lives and works in Sydney and London, United Kingdom SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2017-18 Everything Changes: Tim Maguire 2002 – 2017, Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales 2016 Flora Australis, Bega Regional Gallery, New South Wales 2015 Light Play: Ideas, Optics and Atmosphere, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane 2012 All the Flowers, Benalla Art Gallery, Victoria 2011 Boundary Line, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria 2003 Tim Maguire: Colour Separation Paintings, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria 2002 Tim Maguire, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney 2001 Tim Maguire, John Curtin Gallery, Curtin University, Perth SELECTED LITERATURE Godfrey, T. & Watkins, J., Tim Maguire, Piper Press, Sydney, 2007 Lakin, S., Painting Under Duress: Tim Maguire’s Colour Separations 1998 – 2003, exhibition catalogue, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria, 2003 Biernoff, S., Tim Maguire, exhibition catalogue, John Curtain Gallery, Curtain University, Perth, 2001

110

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Academisch Ziekenhuis, Leiden, Netherlands Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria British Museum, London, England Deakin University, Melbourne Derwent Collection, Tasmania Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria Kunsthalle Nürnberg, Nuremberg, Germany McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park, Victoria Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Orange Regional Gallery, New South Wales Parliament House Collection, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart University of Melbourne, Melbourne University of Sydney, Sydney University of Tasmania, Launceston REPRESENTED BY Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Von Lintel Gallery, New York, USA Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, England Galerie Andreas Binder, Munich, Germany Studio Franck Bordas, Paris, France


111


NICHOLAS HARDING 49 born 1956 SUMMER HILL, 1996 oil on board 153.0 x 116.0 cm (irreg.) signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: SUMMER HILL / 1996 / Nicholas Harding estimate :

$18,000 – 24,000

PROVENANCE Theo Waddington Fine Art, London (label attached verso) Private collection, London Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 29 August 2012, lot 91 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Nicholas Harding, Theo Waddington Fine Art, London, 6 February – 4 March 1997 Nicholas Harding lives and works in Sydney SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales Maitland Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Tweed Regional Gallery, New South Wales University of New South Wales, Sydney REPRESENTED BY Olsen Gallery, Sydney Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne Hill Smith Gallery, Adelaide

112


113


XUE SONG 50 born 1965, Chinese RIGADOON, 2009 mixed media and collage on canvas 140.0 x 200.0 cm signed in Pinyin lower right: Xue Song signed and dated in Pinyin and English verso: … / Xue Song / 2009 estimate :

$25,000 – 35,000

PROVENANCE Red Gate Gallery, Beijing Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 2011 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Red Gate Gallery signed by the artist. Xue Song lives and works in Shanghai, China SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2013 The Fragment Time, Xi’an Art Museum, Xi’an, China 2013 Xue Song, New Shanghai Style Paintings, Museum of Contemporary Art, Singapore 2011 Xue Song: Piercing Through History and the Fashion, A Retrospective from 1988 – 2011, Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China 2010 A Fashion, Or the History?, The Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo, Japan 2009 Looking Back: Deconstruction Classics, Xue Song Portfolio, Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China 2008 The World of Other’s: A Contemporary Art Exhibition, Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai, China 2007 Xue Song Solo Exhibition, ArtChina, Hamburg, Germany 2007 Chinese Contemporary SOCART, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia 2005 Mahjong – Contemporary Chinese Art from the Sigg Collection, Kunstmuseum Bern, Bern, Switzerland 1996 China IM Aufbruch, Museum of Modern Art, Bonn, Germany 1996 Xue Song Solo Exhibition, Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China

114

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Chan Liu Art Museum, Taiwan How Art Museum, Shanghai, China Juming Museum, New Taipei City, Taiwan Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany Long Museum, Shanghai, China M+Collection, Hong Kong National Art Museum of China, Beijing, China Sammlung Goetz, Munich, Germany Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIFANG Art Museum, Nanjing, China Tokyo Ginza Art Museum, Japan Xi’an Art Museum, Xi’an, China REPRESENTED BY SHANGHART, Beijing, China Nou Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan Walsh Gallery, Chicago, USA


115


GONKAR GYATSO 51 born 1961, Tibetan/British SHAMBALA OF THE MODERN TIMES, 2009 silkscreen print in four parts 98.0 x 107.0 cm (overall) edition: 48/50 signed, dated, numbered and inscribed with title below image estimate :

$20,000 – 30,000

PROVENANCE China Arts Project, Beijing Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 2010 EXHIBITED Tibet Art Now: on the threshold of a new future, Tibet Art Gallery, Temple, Amsterdam, 3 June – 6 July 2009 (another example) Mapping Identity, Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, Philadelphia, USA, 19 March – 30 April 2010 (another example, illus. in exhibition catalogue, p. 17) Three Realms, The University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, 25 February – 29 April 2012 (another example) Seeking Shambala, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA, 6 March – 21 October 2012 (another example) LITERATURE Smee, S., ‘In MFA Exhibit, Seeking Shambala, Everything is Illuminated’, The Boston Globe, Boston, 30 March 2012 (illus., another example) ‘Urban Legend’, Art & Antiques Magazine, Wilmington, USA, May 2012 (illus., another example) RELATED WORK The Shambala in Modern Times, 2008, collage, pencil and ink on paper, 200.0 x 200.0 cm, exhibited in Making Worlds, 53rd Venice Biennale, Venice, 7 June – 22 November 2009 Gonkar Gyatso lives and works in London, United Kingdom SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2015 Janela, Migrating Forms and Migrating Gods, Kochi-Muziris Biennial, India 2014 Tibet India, New Beginnings, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA 2013 Freedom, just another word..., Mass Museum of Contemporary Art, Massachusetts, USA 2013 The Weight of History, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore 2012 Shambala, Museum of Fine Art Boston, Boston, USA 2012 Three Realms, Institute of Modern Art and Griffith University, Brisbane

116

2010 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 1999 1989

Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond, Rubin Museum of Art, New York, USA The 6th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Making Worlds, 53rd Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy A Question of Evidence, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria Thermocline of new Art Asian Waves, ZKM / Museum of Contemporary Art, Karlsruhe, Germany Tibet, Wereld Museum Rotterdam, Netherlands Limbers Due Tibet, Lyon City Gallery, France The National Avant-Garde Fine Art Exhibition – 89, The National Art Gallery, Beijing, China

SELECTED LITERATURE Wright, S. P., THREE REALMS: Gonkar Gyatso, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2011 Gyatso, N., Gonkar Gyatso : la peinture tibétaine en quête de sa propre modernité, Harmattan, Paris, 2005 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Immigration and Diversity Museum, London, UK Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Boston, USA Newark Museum, New York, USA New York Public Library, New York, USA Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, United Kingdom Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Wereldmuseum, Rotterdam, Netherlands REPRESENTED BY Pearl Lam Galleries, Hong Kong 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Hong Kong TAG Fine Arts, London


117


DETAIL

GADE 52 born 1971, Tibetan MICKEY, 2007 digital print on cotton mounted on traditional Chinese silk mount 247.0 x 50.0 cm edition: 3/10 artist’s stamp below image numbered verso: 3/10 chop mark verso PROVENANCE Peaceful Wind Gallery, Santa Fe, USA Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED 4 Contemporary Tibetan Masters, Peaceful Wind Gallery, Santa Fe, USA, July – August 2009 (another example) estimate :

118

$8,000 – 10,000

Gade lives and works in Lhasa, Tibet SELECTED COLLECTIONS National Art Museum, Beijing, China White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney World Museum, Liverpool, UK REPRESENTED BY Rossi & Rossi, London / Hong Kong Red Gate Gallery, Beijing


MA YANLING 53 born 1966, Chinese HU DIE, 2008 synthetic polymer paint and Chinese ink on canvas 130.0 x 120.0 cm signed in Pinyin and dated lower right: Ma Yanling 2008 PROVENANCE Dialogue Space Gallery, Beijing Private collection, Melbourne estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

EXHIBITED Nostalgia-Beijing Paris – Dual Exhibition of Ma Yanling and Wang Yu, Dialogue Space Gallery, Beijing, 7 June – 26 July 2009 Ma Yanling lives and works in Beijing, China SELECTED COLLECTIONS White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney REPRESENTED BY Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery, New York Art Beatus, Hong Kong Amy Li Gallery, Beijing

119


GULUMBU YUNUPINGU 54 (c.1945 – 2012) GAN’YU (STARS), 2007 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark 166.0 x 84.0 cm (irreg.) bears inscription verso: artist’s name, Buku-Larrngay Mulka Centre cat. 333F and Alcaston Gallery cat. AK14492 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Sydney, 2 December 2015, lot 87 Private collection, Victoria Gulumbu Yunupingu lived and worked in Yirrkala, Northern Territory language group: Gumatj SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane estimate :

120

$10,000 – 15,000


GULUMBU YUNUPINGU 55 (c.1945 – 2012) GAN’YU (STARS), LARRAKITJ, 2006 natural earth pigments on hollow log 197.0 cm height PROVENANCE Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne (cat. AK12793) Private collection, Sydney Bonhams, Sydney, 7 June 2016, lot 50 Private collection, Victoria EXHIBITED Power and Beauty, Indigenous Art Now, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 17 November 2007 – 10 March 2008 LITERATURE Ryan, J., (et al.), Power and Beauty, Indigenous Art Now, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2007, pp. 48 – 49 (illus.) Gulumbu Yunupingu lived and worked in Yirrkala, Northern Territory language group: Gumatj

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane estimate :

$12,000 – 15,000

121


QUEENIE McKENZIE NAKARRA 56 (c.1925 – 1998) UNTITLED (GIDJA COUNTRY), 1991 natural earth pigments and synthetic binders on canvas 60.0 x 80.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Waringarri Aboriginal Arts cat. AP3580 and S-3370 estimate :

$15,000 – 20,000

PROVENANCE Waringarri Aboriginal Arts, Kununurra, Western Australia Private collection, Canberra Sotheby’s, Sydney, 25 July 2005, lot 42 Private collection, New South Wales Private collection, Melbourne

1994

RELATED WORK Limestone hills near Texas Downs, 1991, earth pigments and natural binder on canvas, 95.0 x 89.8 cm, in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, illus. in Ryan, J. and Akerman, K., Images of Power: Aboriginal Art of the Kimberley, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, p. 55

1993

1994 1993

1992 1991 1991

Queenie McKenzie Nakarra lived and worked in Warmun, Western Australia language group: Gija SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2006 Gifted: Contemporary Aboriginal Art: The Mollie Gowing Acquisition Fund, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 2004 North by North-West: Contemporary Indigenous Art from the Queensland Art Gallery Collection, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane 2004 EXPLAINED, A closer look at Aboriginal art, AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands 2002 Native Title Business – Contemporary Indigenous Art, Queensland Museum, Brisbane and touring nationally 2000 Rover & Queenie, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

122

1991

Australian Heritage Commission National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award Exhibition, Old Parliament House, Canberra Power of the Land, Masterpieces of Aboriginal Art National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Images of Power: Aboriginal Art of the Kimberley, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 10th National Aboriginal Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin 9th National Aboriginal Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Aboriginal Women Painters, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney and touring 8th National Aboriginal Art Award Exhibition, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin Aboriginal Women’s Exhibition, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

SELECTED LITERATURE Field, J.J., Written in the Land: The Life of Queenie McKenzie, Melbourne Books, Melbourne, 2008 SELECTED COLLECTIONS AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth British Museum, London, UK National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane


123


TJUNGKARA KEN 57 born 1969

SANDRA KEN

YARITJI YOUNG

PROVENANCE Tjala Arts, Amata, South Australia Marshall Arts, Adelaide Private collection, Sydney

born c.1968 born c.1956 THREE SISTERS PAINT THE SEVEN SISTERS, 2010 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 197.5 x 120.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s names and Tjala Arts cat. 299 a/b/c - 10 estimate :

124

$8,000 – 12,000

RELATED WORK Three sisters paint the Seven Sisters, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 198.9 x 122.9 cm, in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne REPRESENTED BY Tjala Arts, Amata, South Australia Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney Outstation Gallery, Darwin


MARINGKA BAKER 58 born c.1952 KURU ALA, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on linen 93.0 x 140.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, community, and Tjungu Palya Artists cat. TPMB08036 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya Artists, Nyapari, South Australia Outstation Gallery, Darwin Private collection, Sydney estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

Maringka Baker lives and works at Kapi in the Aangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands, South Australia language group: Pitjantjatjara SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian National University, Canberra National Gallery of Australia, Canberra University of Canberra, Canberra REPRESENTED BY Tjungu Palya Artists, Nyapari, South Australia Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney

125


EUBENA NAMPITJIN 59 (c.1921 – 2013) KINYU, 2005 synthetic polymer paint on linen 150.0 x 100.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Warlayirti Artists cat. 664/05 and AM 2912/05 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, Balgo Hills, Western Australia Private collection, Sydney estimate :

126

$10,000 – 15,000

Eubena Nampitjin lived and worked in Balgo, Western Australia language group: Wangkajunga, Kukatja SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum of Australia, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Singapore Art Museum, Singapore


MIRDIDINGKINGATHI JUWARNDA 60 SALLY GABORI (c.1924 – 2015) HUNTING GROUND, 2006 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 137.0 x 137.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, title, medium and Mornington Island Arts and Crafts cat. 1316/C/SG/0506 PROVENANCE Mornington Island Arts and Crafts, Queensland (stamped verso) Private collection, Sydney estimate :

$5,000 – 7,000

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori lived and worked in Mornington Island, Queensland language group: Kaiadilt SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamãki, Auckland, New Zealand Brisbane Supreme and District Court, Brisbane Corrigan Collection, Sydney Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

127


INYUWA NAMPITJINPA 61 (c.1922 – 1999) WOMEN’S DREAMING AT THE WATER SITE OF PUNKILPIRRI, 1998 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 122.0 x 122.0 cm bears inscription verso, artist’s name and Papunya Tula Artists cat. IN980531 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs Gabrielle Pizzi Collection, Melbourne Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in September 2007 estimate :

128

$7,000 – 9,000

EXHIBITED Mythology and Reality: Contemporary Aboriginal Desert Art from the Gabrielle Pizzi Collection, Palazzo Bricherasio, Turin, Italy, 29 June – 26 August 2001; Aboriginal Art Museum, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 23 February – 23 June 2002; Palazzo Vaj, Monash University at Prato, Prato, Italy, 2 – 30 July 2003; The Jerusalem Centre for the Performing Arts, Jerusalem, Israel, 21 October – 19 December 2003; Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2 October 2004 – 30 January 2005, cat. 27 (label attached verso) LITERATURE Bardon, G., (et al.), Mythology and Reality: Contemporary Australian Aboriginal Desert Art from the Gabrielle Pizzi Collection, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, 2004, p. 28 (illus.) This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.


EXHIBITED Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi at ARCO, Madrid, Spain, 12 – 19 February 2002 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi at the Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne, 2 – 6 October 2002

MAKINTI NAPANANGKA 62 (c.1930 – 2011) ROCKHOLE SITE OF LUPULNGA, 2001 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 122.0 x 122.0 cm bears inscription verso, artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. MN0109121 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in October 2002 estimate :

$12,000 – 18,000

This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs. Makinti Napanangka lived and worked in Kintore, Northern Territory language group: Pintupi SELECTED COLLECTIONS Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, USA

129


PATRICK TJUNGURRAYI 63 (c.1935 – 2017) NGARRU, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 121.0 x 153.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. PT0803074 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Melbourne This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs. estimate :

130

$12,000 – 15,000

Patrick Tjungurrayi lived and worked in Kiwirrkurra, Western Australia language group: Pintupi SELECTED COLLECTIONS AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Sammlung Klein, Stuttgart, Germany


TURKEY TOLSON TJUPURRULA 64 (1942 – 2001) STRAIGHTENING SPEARS AT ILYINGAUGAU, 1996 synthetic polymer paint on linen 149.5 x 182.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. TT9610153 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 1996 estimate :

$20,000 – 30,000

Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula lived and worked in Kintore, Northern Territory language group: Pintupi SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum of Australia, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

131


JANANGOO BUTCHER CHEREL 65 (c.1920 – 2009) YAWOORNA, 2004 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 100.0 x 45.0 cm signed verso: BUTCHER bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Mangkaja Arts cat. PC374/04 estimate :

$10,000 – 15,000

PROVENANCE Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney The Austcorp Group Limited Art Collection, Sydney Sotheby’s, Melbourne, 24 November 2009, lot 97 Private collection, Melbourne This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing.

132

Janangoo Butcher Cherel lived and worked in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia language group: Gooniyandi / Gija SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Department of Aboriginal Affairs, Perth National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra


JANANGOO BUTCHER CHEREL 66 (c.1920 – 2009) GOOJI, 2006 synthetic polymer paint on Velin Arches paper 75.0 x 104.0 cm PROVENANCE Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia Raft Artspace, Alice Springs Private collection, Melbourne LITERATURE Dayman, K., ‘Remembering Butcher Cherel’ in Australian Aboriginal Art, issue 2, June/July/ August 2009, B5 media Sydney, p. 162 (illus.) This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing. estimate :

$8,000 – 10,000

Janangoo Butcher Cherel lived and worked in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia language group: Gooniyandi / Gija SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Department of Aboriginal Affairs, Perth National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra

133


HOSSEIN VALAMANESH 67 born 1949, Iranian/Australian CRAZY PATTERN, 2003 ginko leaves and wax varnish on paper 64.5 x 64.5 cm signed and dated verso: Hossein Valamanesh 2003 PROVENANCE Bett Gallery, Hobart Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in September 2003

EXHIBITED Probably: Colour Studies and Swiss Landscapes, Angela and Hossein Valamanesh, Bett Gallery, Hobart, 5 September – 1 October 2003 estimate :

$5,000 – 8,000

Hossein Valamanesh lives and works in Adelaide SELECTED COLLECTIONS Alice Springs Art Centre, Northern Territory Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Deakin University, Melbourne Edith Cowan University, Perth Kadist Art Foundation, Paris, France Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

134

National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Parliament House, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Sara Hildén Art Museum, Tampere, Finland University of Melbourne, Melbourne University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane University of South Australia, Adelaide University of Western Australia, Perth Wagga Wagga Art Gallery, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Karen Woodbury Fine Art, Melbourne GAGPROJECTS / Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide Rose Issa Projects, London, England Grey Noise, Dubai, United Arab Emirates


LIONEL BAWDEN 68 born 1974 FEELING THE PULSE OF THE EARTH, 2016 coloured Staedtler pencils, epoxy, Incralac, metal 55.0 x 53.0 x 5.0 cm

PROVENANCE Private collection, New South Wales estimate :

$10,000 – 15,000

Lionel Bawden lives and works in New South Wales SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, New Zealand Ipswich Art Gallery, Queensland Macquarie Group Collection, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Wollongong City Gallery, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Karen Woodbury Fine Art, Melbourne Artereal Gallery, Sydney

This is a refinement of Bawden’s sustained exploration of landscape – his most essential point of reference. These works exploit Bawden’s long engagement with his core medium – the sculptural honeycomb of coloured pencils, with an innate logic continuously yielding rich possibilities for the artist. They speak directly of the meandering lines of traversing landscape, the voids and ellipses of mountain pools and rock formations, skirting the edge of waterholes, doubling back around and walking along both sides of a canyon. Bawden synchronously transmits these terrains into pulsating abstractions.

135


Savanhdary Vongpoothorn lives and works in Canberra

SAVANHDARY VONGPOOTHORN 69 born 1971, Laotian/Australian INLAND, 2003 synthetic polymer paint on perforated canvas 60.0 x 60.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: S. Vongpoothorn “Inland” 2003 / … PROVENANCE Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above EXHIBITED Martin Browne at the Yellow House, Sydney, 3 – 21 December 2003, cat. 1 estimate :

136

$4,000 – 6,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Australian National University, Canberra Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Macquarie University, Sydney Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane University of Melbourne, Melbourne University of Western Sydney, Sydney University of Wollongong, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne


Maria Fernanda Cardoso lives and works in Sydney

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO 70 born 1963, Colombian/Australian BUTTERFLY DRAWING, MORPHO DIDIUS (PERU), 2004 synthetic polymer paint, archival butterflies, Perspex, metal 60.0 x 60.0 cm signed and dated verso: MF Cardoso 2004 PROVENANCE GRANTPIRRIE, Sydney Private collection, Sydney,acquired from the above in 2004

EXHIBITED Death became her: the work of Maria Fernanda Cardoso, GRANTPIRRIE, Sydney, 7 October – 4 December 2004 estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango, Bogotá, Colombia Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, USA Daros Latinamerica, Zürich, Switzerland Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland Miami Art Museum, Miami, USA Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Bogotá, Colombia Museo de Arte Moderno de Bogotá, Bogotá, Colombia Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, USA Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA National Gallery of Australia, Canberra San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, USA Tate Modern, London, UK The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, USA REPRESENTED BY Galeria Casas Riegner, Bogotá, Colombia Sicardi Ayers Bacino Gallery, Houston, USA ARC ONE Gallery, Melbourne

137


DEL KATHRYN BARTON 71 born 1972 MY INHABITABLE BODY, 2002 – 05 synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour, ink, embroidery thread and silk on paper 81.0 x 65.0 cm signed lower left: del kathryn barton dated and inscribed with title lower right: - my inhabitable body - 2002-2005 PROVENANCE Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Melbourne estimate :

138

$6,000 – 8,000

EXHIBITED Del Kathryn Barton: thank you for loving me, Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne, 7 September – 1 October 2005, cat. 18 (as ‘my inhabitable body #2’) LITERATURE Ewington, J., Del Kathryn Barton, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014, p. 137 (illus., incorrectly captioned)


Narelle Jubelin lives and works in Madrid, Spain

NARELLE JUBELIN 72 born 1960 1914, 1993 petit point embroidery in carved wood frame 43.0 x 30.0 cm signed, dated, and inscribed with title verso: ‘Narelle Jubelin / 1993 / ‘1914’ / Rendition Irish Linen, Australian Frame’ PROVENANCE Mori Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above c.1993 Christie’s, Sydney, 24 May 2005, lot 8 Private collection, Sydney estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Albertina Print Museum, Vienna, Austria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth CAM Centro de Arte Moderna – Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane University of Wollongong, Wollongong University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY The Commercial, Sydney Marlborough Contemporary, London

139


Aida Tomescu lives and works in Sydney

AIDA TOMESCU 73 born 1955 AMRAS, 1997 oil on board 79.0 x 60.0 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: Aida Tomescu / AMRAS / … / ’97 PROVENANCE Coventry Gallery, Sydney (stamped verso) Corporate collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1997 Christie’s, Sydney, 26 August 2001, lot 63 Private collection Christie’s, Sydney, 24 May 2005, lot 127 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED 1998 Coventry Diary. A Preview of the Year Ahead, Coventry Gallery, Sydney, 3 – 21 February 1998 estimate :

140

$8,000 – 12,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian National University, Canberra Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, Victoria British Museum, London, UK Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum, Bucharest, Romania Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Jensen Gallery, Sydney Fox / Jensen / McCrory, Auckland


Aida Tomescu lives and works in Sydney

AIDA TOMESCU 74 born 1955 AMRAS III, 2004 pastel and ink on paper 121.0 x 80.0 cm signed with initials and dated lower left: ACT ‘ 04 PROVENANCE Martin Browne Fine Art, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Aida Tomescu, New Work on Paper, Martin Browne at Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne, 29 September – 3 October 2004; Martin Browne Fine Art, Sydney, 12 October – 7 November 2004 estimate :

$5,000 – 8,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian National University, Canberra Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, Victoria British Museum, London, UK Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne National Museum, Bucharest, Romania Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Jensen Gallery, Sydney Fox / Jensen / McCrory, Auckland

141


DAVID NOONAN 75 born 1969 OWL, 2006 bronze 31.0 x 21.0 x 18.0 cm edition: AP 3 aside from an edition of 13 signed with initials and numbered at base: DN / AP 3 PROVENANCE Private collection, Melbourne, acquired directly from the artist, c.2008 estimate :

$3,500 – 4,500

David Noonan lives and works in Melbourne and London, United Kingdom SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth British Council, United Kingdom Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, USA Galerie de l’UQAM, Montreal, Canada Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, USA Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne

142

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York University of Ballarat Art Collection, Victoria Whitney Museum, New York, USA REPRESENTED BY Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Modern Art Gallery, London, UK Xavier Hufkens, Brussels, Belgium David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, USA


MICHAEL ZAVROS 76 born 1974 WHITE ONAGADORI, 2007 charcoal on paper 89.5 x 84.5 cm PROVENANCE Johnstone Gallery, Perth Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED The Good Son – Michael Zavros Works on Paper, Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland, 11 July – 23 August 2009 (illus. in exhibition catalogue) estimate :

$9,000 – 14,000

Michael Zavros lives and works in Brisbane SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Australian War Memorial, Canberra Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland Grafton Regional Gallery, New South Wales Griffith University, Brisbane Ipswich Regional Gallery, Queensland Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales National Portrait Gallery, Canberra

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart Tweed Regional Gallery, New South Wales University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Starkwhite, Auckland, New Zealand

143


McLEAN EDWARDS 77 born 1972 ACNE 2, 1998 oil on canvas 90.0 x 60.0 cm signed with initial upper right: M bears inscription verso: 99/04/15 PROVENANCE Legge Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in February 1999 EXHIBITED Mclean Edwards Recent Works, Legge Gallery, Sydney, March – April 1999, cat. 15 estimate :

144

$8,000 – 12,000

McLean Edwards lives and works in Sydney SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Australian War Memorial Museum, Canberra Dubbo Regional Gallery, New South Wales Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland Goulburn Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales Orange Regional Gallery, New South Wales University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Olsen Gallery, Sydney Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne Gallery Ecosse, New South Wales


EUAN MACLEOD 78 born 1956 ONZ, 1999 – 2000 oil on canvas 100.0 x 124.5 cm signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: ‘ONZ’ / EUAN MACLEOD / 9/99 – 1/00 estimate :

$8,000 – 12,000

PROVENANCE Niagara Galleries, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in April 2000 EXHIBITED Euan Macleod, Paintings 1981 – 1999, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, 14 February – 27 March 2000, cat. 1 Euan MacLeod, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 2 May – 3 June 2000, cat. 7

145


NOEL McKENNA 79 born 1956 BICYCLE WITH RIDER ON PATH THROUGH FOREST, 2004 enamel on plywood in artist’s handmade frame 32.0 x 39.0 cm signed and dated lower left: N McKenna 04 signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: “Bicycle with rider on path through Forest” / N. McKenna ‘ 04 / … PROVENANCE GAG Projects, Greenaway Gallery, Adelaide Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in February 2005 EXHIBITED Noel McKenna, Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide, 4 – 27 March 2005 (illus. cover of exhibition catalogue) estimate :

146

$4,000 – 6,000

Noel McKenna lives and works in Sydney SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Chartwell Collection, Auckland, New Zealand Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne New South Wales Parliament House, Sydney Parliament House, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane State Library of Queensland, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide


Noel McKenna lives and works in Sydney

NOEL McKENNA 80 born 1956 PARK AT NIGHT, 2001 enamel on composition board in artist’s handmade frame 42.5 x 65.5 cm signed and dated lower left: N McKENNA 01 PROVENANCE Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in October 2003 estimate :

$6,000 – 8,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Chartwell Collection, Auckland, New Zealand Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne New South Wales Parliament House, Sydney Parliament House, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane State Library of Queensland, Brisbane Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart REPRESENTED BY Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide

147


Louise Hearman lives and works in Melbourne

LOUISE HEARMAN 81 born 1963 HOTPOST #823, 2001 oil on composition board 52.0 x 65.0 cm signed, dated, numbered and inscribed with title verso: #823 / Hearman 01 / “HOTPOST” PROVENANCE Mori Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Sydney estimate :

148

$4,000 – 6,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tarrawarra Museum of Art, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Milani Gallery, Brisbane


LOUISE HEARMAN 82 born 1963 UNTITLED #905, 2002 oil on composition board 56.0 x 56.0 cm signed, dated and numbered verso: #905 / Hearman / 02 PROVENANCE Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 2003 EXHIBITED Louise Hearman, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 16 October – 15 November 2003 estimate :

$4,000 – 6,000

Louise Hearman lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Tarrawarra Museum of Art, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney Milani Gallery, Brisbane

149


Andrew Browne lives and works in Melbourne

ANDREW BROWNE 83 born 1960 HUDSON RIVER: FROM TRAIN, 2004 oil on linen 120.0 x 152.0 cm signed and dated verso: A. BROWNE / 2004 PROVENANCE Gould Galleries, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 2004 EXHIBITED Andrew Browne: Various Places, Gould Galleries, Melbourne, 7 September – 6 October 2004 estimate :

150

$5,000 – 7,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria British Museum, London Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney Edith Cowan University, Western Australia Gippsland Art Gallery, Victoria Grafton Regional Gallery, Queensland Kedumba Collection of Australian Drawings, New South Wales McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park, Victoria Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Parliament House, Canberra Rockhampton Art Gallery, Queensland Swan Hill Regional Art Gallery, Victoria TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Wagga Wagga Art Gallery, New South Wales REPRESENTED BY Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne


Shaun Gladwell lives and works in London

SHAUN GLADWELL 84 born 1972 APPROACH TO MUNDI MUNDI: DAWN, 2007 Duratrans lightbox 44.0 x 64.0 x 10.0 cm edition: 2/3 signed, dated, numbered and inscribed with title verso: Approach to Mundi Mundi: Dawn / 2/3 / Shaun Gladwell 07 PROVENANCE Sherman Galleries, Sydney Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED MADDESTMAXIMVS, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 30 November – 22 December 2007, cat. 6 (another example) Figuring Landscapes, touring 2008 – 09, Tate Modern, London; Showroom, Sheffield; Chapter Arts, Cardiff; Brighton Cinemateque; Bureau, Salford; Dundee Contemporary Arts; Vivid, Birmingham; Hull Short Film Festival; FACT Liverpool; Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (another example) estimate :

$6,000 – 9,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney City of Sydney, New South Wales Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan Museum of Fine Arts, Texas, USA Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Orange County Museum of Art, California, USA University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane University of Sydney, Sydney University of Technology, Sydney Videobrasil, Brazil Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, USA REPRESENTED BY Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne Mark Moore Fine Art, California, USA Double Square Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan Galleria Enrico Astuni, Bologna, Italy

151


CRESSIDA CAMPBELL 85 born 1960 THE VERANDAH, 1987 screenprint in 30 colours 94.0 x 58.5 cm edition: 79/99 signed, dated, numbered and inscribed with title below image estimate :

PROVENANCE Private collection Lawsons, Sydney, 26 October 2017, lot 552 Private collection, Sydney LITERATURE Crayford, P., (ed.) The Woodblock Painting of Cressida Campbell, Public Pictures, Sydney, cat. S8701, p. 355 RELATED WORK The Verandah, 1985, woodblock print, 95.0 x 59.0 cm, illus. in The Woodblock Painting of Cressida Campbell, Public Pictures, Sydney, p. 195 Cressida Campbell lives and works in Sydney

$5,000 – 8,000

SELECTED COLLECTIONS Artbank, Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney British Museum, London, UK Griffith University, Brisbane Ipswich City Art Gallery, Queensland Macquarie Bank, Sydney Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria Mosman Council, Mosman National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Museum, Kraków, Poland Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale New Parliament House, Canberra Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane State Library of New South Wales, Sydney University of New South Wales, Sydney University of Western Sydney, Sydney Warrnambool Art Gallery, Victoria REPRESENTED BY Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne Simon Lee Gallery, London / Hong Kong / New York

152


153


LIN ONUS 86 (1948 – 1996) FISH AND REEDS gouache on card 28.0 x 63.5 cm signed lower right: Lin Onus estimate :

154

$14,000 – 18,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, a gift from the artist’s son Private collection, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne


LENA YARINKURA 87 born 1961 CAMP DOG #2, 2001 cast aluminium 58.0 cm length edition: 1/12 Urban Art Project studio stamp and numbered on base PROVENANCE Maningrida Arts and Culture, Northern Territory and Urban Art Projects, Brisbane Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne Thornquest Gallery, Queensland Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in March 2003 estimate :

$3,500 – 4,500

EXHIBITED Out of the Mould: An exhibition of first works in bronze and aluminium from Maningrida, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in association with Urban Art Projects and Maningrida Arts & Culture, Melbourne, 27 November – 19 December 2001 RELATED WORK Camp Dog, 2001, aluminium, 22.0 x 47.0 x 10.0 cm, in the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney

155


ARTIST UNKNOWN (GROOTE EYLANDT) 88 UNTITLED, c.1950 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark 56.5 x 38.0 cm PROVENANCE David Jones Art Gallery, Sydney Private collection, Adelaide, acquired from the above Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Private collection, New South Wales, acquired 1997 estimate :

$3,500 – 4,500

DAVID (MALANGI) DAYMIRRINGU 89 (1927 – 1999) YATHALAMARRA WATERHOLE (HIS MOTHER’S STORY), 1985 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark 96.0 x 55.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, title, language group, Ramingining Arts cat. 5YAI685 and descriptive notes of the imagery; Dirrpu – water lily, Bulbs, Ginginy – Catfish, Eel PROVENANCE Ramingining Arts, Ramingining, Central Arnhem Land Private collection, Victoria RELATED WORK Yathalamarra Totems, 1970s, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark, 104.0 x 64.0 cm illus. in Jenkins, S., (ed.), No Ordinary Place: the art of David Malangi, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2004, cat. 48, p. 95 estimate :

156

$3,000 – 4,000


JEAN BAPTISTE APUATIMI 90 (1940 – 2013) YIRRIKIRRI – PWAJA, 1999 natural earth pigments on canvas 127.0 x 205.0 cm signed verso: Jean B Apuatimi bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Tiwi Designs cat.233-99 estimate :

$6,000 – 8,000

PROVENANCE Tiwi Designs, Bathurst Island Helen Maxwell Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in November 2002 EXHIBITED Wangatunga Jilamara, Helen Maxwell Gallery, Canberra, 1 – 23 November 2002 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tiwi Designs, Bathurst Island.

157


FREDDIE TIMMS 91 born c.1946 JARLALU COUNTRY, 2001 natural earth pigments and synthetic binder on linen 122.0 x 135.0 cm bears inscription verso: title, CHAPMAN, and Jirrawun Arts cat. FT32001-120 estimate :

158

$8,000 – 12,000

PROVENANCE Jirrawun Arts, Kununurra, Western Australia Chapman Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in December 2001 EXHIBITED Seven Senior Aboriginal Artists, Chapman Gallery, Canberra, 7 – 30 December 2001 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Jirrawun Arts, Kununurra.


BILLY THOMAS JOONGOORRA 92 (c.1920 – 2012) WARLA, 2002 natural earth pigments and synthetic binder on canvas 120.0 x 90.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, size, and Red Rock Art cat. KP1487 estimate :

$3,000 – 4,000

PROVENANCE Red Rock Art, Kununurra, Western Australia (label attached verso) Chapman Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in November 2002 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Red Rock Art, Kununurra.

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SYLVIA KANTJUPAI KEN 93 born 1965 SEVEN SISTERS, 2010 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 197.0 x 120.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist's name, location and Tjala Arts cat. 283 - 11 estimate :

160

$5,000 – 7,000

PROVENANCE Tjala Arts, Amata, South Australia Private collection, Sydney


EILEEN YARITJA STEVENS 94 (c.1930 – 2008) PILTATI, 2006 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 94.0 x 166.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist's name, title, date and Tjungu Palya cat. TPEYS06049 estimate :

$5,000 – 7,000

PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya Artists, Nyapari, South Australia Private collection, Sydney

161


MAGGIE NAPANGARDI WATSON 95 (1921 – 2004) NGALYIPI, 1996 synthetic polymer paint on linen 182.0 x 61.5 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Warlukurlangu Artists cat. 109/96 P PROVENANCE Warlukurlangu Artists, Yuendumu, Northern Territory Chapman Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in March 1997 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Warlukurlangu Artists, Yuendumu. estimate :

162

$8,000 – 12,000

Maggie Napangardi Watson lived and worked in Yuendumu, Northern Territory language group: Warlpiri SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth Musée du quai Branly, Paris, France National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne South Australian Museum, Adelaide


TOMMY SKEEN TJAKAMARRA 96 (c.1930 – 2000) KATU PAYI, 1997 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 75.5 x 51.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Warlayirti Artists cat. 292/97 estimate :

$5,000 – 7,000

PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, Balgo Hills, Western Australia Private collection, Brisbane This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Warlayirti Artists, Balgo Hills.

end of sale 163


1. PRIOR TO AUCTION CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS Catalogues can be obtained at Deutscher and Hackett offices or by subscription (see the Catalogue Subscription Form at the back of this catalogue or online for more information). PRE-SALE ESTIMATES The price range estimated against each lot reflects the opinion of our art specialists as to the hammer price expected for the lot at auction and is informed by realised prices for comparable works as well as the particularities of each lot including condition, quality, provenance and rarity. While presale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers, lots can be sold outside of these ranges. Pre-sale estimates include GST (if any) on a lot but do not include the buyer’s premium or other charges where applicable.

prospective buyers and sellers guide ALL PARTIES ARE STRONGLY URGED TO READ THE CONDITIONS OF AUCTION AND SALE INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOGUE

RESERVES The reserve is the minimum price including GST (if any) that the vendor will accept for a lot and below which the lot will not normally be sold. PRE-AUCTION VIEWINGS In both Sydney and Melbourne pre-auction viewings are scheduled for several days in advance of each auction. Deutscher and Hackett specialists are available to give obligation free advice at viewings or by appointment and prospective buyers are strongly encouraged to thoroughly examine and request condition reports for potential purchases. Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and are free to attend. SYMBOL KEY ▲ Unless ownership is clearly stated in the provenance, this symbol is used where a lot is offered which Deutscher and Hackett owns in whole or in part. In these instances, Deutscher and Hackett has a direct financial interest in the property or means that Deutscher and Hackett has guaranteed a minimum price. ● Used to indicate lots for sale without a reserve. EXPLANATION OF CATALOGUING PRACTICE AND TERMS All information published in Deutscher and Hackett catalogues represent statements of opinion and should not be relied upon as fact. All dimensions are listed in centimetres, height before width and are approximate. All prices are in Australian dollars. ARTIST’S NAMES All reference to artists make use of common and not full names in accordance with the standards outlined in the National Gallery of Australia reference publication Australian Art: Artist’s working names authority list. For instance, John Brack rather than Cecil John Brack; Roy de Maistre rather than Leroy Leveson Laurent De Maistre; Rosalie Gascoigne rather than Rosalie Norah Gascoigne. Terms used in this catalogue have the meanings ascribed to them below: a. NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a work by the artist. b. Attributed to NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, probably a work by the artist, in whole or in part. c. Circle of NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a work showing the influence and style of the artist and of the artist’s period. d. Studio/Workshop of NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a work possibly executed under the supervision of the artist. e. School of NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a work by a follower or student of the artist. f. Manner of NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a work created in the style, but not necessarily in the period, of the artist. g. After NICHOLAS CHEVALIER: in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, a copy of a work by the artist. h. “signed” / “dated” in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, the work has been signed/dated by the artist. i. “bears signature” / “bears date” in the opinion of Deutscher and Hackett, the work has possibly been signed/dated by someone other than the artist.

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PROVENANCE Where appropriate, Deutscher and Hackett will include the known provenance, or history of ownership of lots. Non disclosure may indicate that prior owners are unknown or that the seller wishes to maintain confidentiality. 2. THE AUCTION Auctions are open to the public and are free to attend. Deutscher and Hackett may exclude any person at any time in its discretion. REGISTRATION Bidders must register to bid prior to the commencement of an auction. Deutscher and Hackett may impose other obligations on the registration of bidders in its discretion. CONDUCT OF AUCTION Lots are offered for sale on a consecutive basis. Deutscher and Hackett will determine the conduct of the auction in its absolute discretion, including the regulation of bidding. Consecutive or responsive bids may be placed by the auctioneer on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. ABSENTEE OR COMMISSION BIDS AND TELEPHONE BIDS As a courtesy service, Deutscher and Hackett will make reasonable efforts to place bids for prospective buyers in absentia provided written or verbal instructions (as indicated on absentee bid forms included at the back of this catalogue or online) are received 24 hours prior to auction. Where successful, lots will be purchased at the lowest possible bid and in the event of identical absentee bids, the bid received earliest will take precedence. Deutscher and Hackett accepts no responsibility for errors and omissions in relation to this courtesy service and reserves the right to record telephone bids. RESERVE Unless indicated otherwise, all lots are subject to a confidential reserve price determined by the vendor. Deutscher and Hackett or the auctioneer may place any number of bids on behalf of the vendor below the reserve price and is not obliged to identify that the bids are being placed on behalf of the vendor. BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding usually opens below the listed pre-sale estimate and proceeds in the following increments (the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments at his or her discretion): $500 – 1,000 by $50 $1,000 – 2,000 by $100 $2,000 – 3,000 by $200 $3,000 – 5,000 by $200 / $500 / $800 $5,000 – 10,000 by $500 $10,000 – 20,000 by $1,000 $20,000 – 30,000 by $2,000 $30,000 – 50,000 by $2,000 / $5,000 / $8,000 $50,000 – 100,000 by $5,000 $100,000 – 200,000 by $10,000 $200,000 – 300,000 by $20,000 $300,000 – 500,000 by $20,000 / $50,000 / $80,000 $500,000 – 1,000,000 by $50,000 $1,000,000+ by $100,000 SUCCESSFUL BIDS The fall of the auctioneer’s hammer indicates the final bid and the buyer assumes full responsibility for the lot from this time. UNSOLD LOTS Where a lot is unsold, the auctioneer will announce that the lot is “bought in”, “passed”, “withdrawn” or “returned to owner”.

3. AFTER THE AUCTION PAYMENTS Payment must be made within seven days of the date of sale in Australian dollars by cash, cheque, direct deposit, approved credit cards or electronic funds transfer. If payment is made by credit card the price will increase by any merchant fees payable by Deutscher and Hackett (1.15% (including GST) for Visa and Mastercard and 1.65% (including GST) for American Express). In certain circumstances, extension of payment may be granted at the discretion of Deutscher and Hackett. Cleared funds will be held in an interest bearing trust account by Deutscher and Hackett until remitted to the vendor. Deutscher and Hackett will be entitled to retain any interest earned during this period. Payment by the vendor of any charge to Deutscher and Hackett is to be made within fourteen days of invoice. PURCHASE PRICE AND BUYER’S PREMIUM The purchase price will be the sum of the final bid price (including any GST) plus a buyer’s premium set at 22% (plus GST) of the final bid price. Buyers may be liable for other charges reasonably incurred once ownership has passed. GOODS AND SERVICES TAX Buyers are required to pay a 10% G.S.T which sum is: a. included in the final bid prices where buying from a GST registered vendor; and b. included in any additional fees charged by Deutscher and Hackett; and c. added to the buyer’s premium. Where GST applies to some lots the final bid price will be inclusive of the applicable GST. A list of those lots is set out in the catalogue on page 182. If a buyer is classified as a “non-resident” for the purpose of GST, the buyer may be able to recover GST paid on the final purchase price if certain conditions are met. COLLECTION Lots paid for in full may be collected from Deutscher and Hackett premises the day after the auction occurs but lots paid for by cheque may not be collected until all funds have cleared. Proof of identification is required upon collection and lots not collected within seven days of the sale may incur costs associated with external storage and freight. LOSS OR DAMAGE Risk in the lot, including risk of loss or damage, will pass to the buyer on either the date payment is due, whether or not it has been made, or on collection by the buyer, whichever is earlier. The buyer is therefore encouraged to make arrangements to ensure comprehensive cover is maintained from the payment due date. TRANSPORT AND SHIPPING Deutscher and Hackett directly offers services including storage, hanging and display, appraisals and valuations, collection management and research and in all instances will endeavour to coordinate or advise upon shipping and handling, insurance, transport, framing and conservation at the request and expense of the client. Deutscher and Hackett does not accept liability for the acts or omissions of contracted third parties. EXPORT Prospective bidders are advised to enquire about export licences — including endangered species licences and cultural heritage permits, where relevant — prior to bidding at auction. Telephone the Cultural Property and Gifts Section, Museums Section, Ministry for the Arts, on 1800 819 461 for further information. The delay or denial of such a licence will not be grounds for a rescission of sale. COPYRIGHT The copyright in the images and illustrations contained in this catalogue may be owned by third parties and used under licence by Deutscher and Hackett. As between Deutscher and Hackett and the buyer, Deutscher and Hackett retains all rights in the images and illustrations. Deutscher and Hackett retains copyright in the text contained in this catalogue. The buyer must not reproduce or otherwise use the images, illustrations or text without prior written consent.

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The terms and conditions of business set forth below are subject to amendment by verbal or written notice prior to and during the auction and sale. They constitute the entire contractual agreement with the buyer in respect to any lot offered at auction. By bidding at auction in any manner compliant with bidding procedures, the buyer and all bidders agree to be bound by these terms and conditions and the terms of the prospective buyers and sellers guide contained in this catalogue, as amended. To the extent that an agent acts on behalf of the buyer, liability for obligations arising from these conditions of business will pass to the buyer. Multiple buyers are jointly and severally liable for obligations arising from this agreement. DEFINITIONS 1.

conditions of auction and sale ALL PARTIES ARE STRONGLY URGED TO READ THE CONDITIONS OF AUCTION AND SALE INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOGUE

Definition of terms: a. The ‘buyer’ refers to the party with the highest accepted bid for any lot at auction and/or such party’s principal where bidding as agent. b. The ‘vendor’ refers to the party consigning property for sale and/or such party’s principal where acting as agent. c. ‘Deutscher and Hackett’ refers to Deutscher and Hackett Pty Ltd ACN 123 119 022, its subsidiaries, officers, employees and agents. d. The ‘hammer price’ refers to the final bid price (including any GST) accepted by the auctioneer, or in the case of a post-auction sale, the agreed sale price (including any GST). e. The ‘buyer’s premium’ refers to the 22% charge (plus GST) payable by the buyer calculated as a percentage of the hammer price. f. ‘GST’ refers to the goods and services tax imposed by the A New Tax System (Goods and Services) Act 1999 as amended. g. The ‘lot’ refers to the item(s) described against any lot number in the catalogue. h. The ‘reserve’ refers to the minimum price (including any GST) the consignor will accept for a lot.

PRELIMINARY CONDITIONS AND DISCLAIMER 2. Agency: Deutscher and Hackett acts as agent for the vendor and the contract of sale for the lot will be between the buyer and the vendor. 3.

Property is sold ‘as is’: To the extent permitted by law: a. no guarantees, warranties or representations are made (express or implied) by Deutscher and Hackett or the vendor in relation to the nature and condition of any lot; and b. Deutscher and Hackett disclaims liability for any misrepresentations, errors or omissions, whether verbal or in writing, in the catalogue or any supplemental material. All factual information provided by the vendor is merely passed on by Deutscher and Hackett from the vendor or other source. Deutscher and Hackett has made no attempt to verify this information. All additional statements of opinion represent the specialist opinions of Deutscher and Hackett employees and should not be relied upon as statements of fact. 4. Responsibility to inspect: Responsibility remains with the buyer to satisfy its, his or her self by inspection and evaluation prior to purchase as to the nature and condition of any property. CONDITIONS AT AUCTION 5. Registration: Bidders must register to bid and obtain a bidder’s paddle prior to the commencement of the auction. Registration requires that bidders provide proof of identity and Deutscher and Hackett may impose other obligations on the registration of bidders in its discretion. 6. Auctioneer’s discretion: Deutscher and Hackett reserves the right to absolute discretion over the conduct of the auction including the regulation of bidding and its increments. This discretion extends to the challenge or rejection of any bid, the right to withdraw any lot and the right to determine the successful bidder or reoffer a lot in the event of a dispute. The prospective buyers and sellers guide details an indicative process for the conduct of auctions. All parties are strongly urged to read the prospective buyers and sellers guide included in this catalogue.

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7. Bidding: Deutscher and Hackett may sell each lot to the highest bidder at auction provided the reserve price has been met or where the net amount accounted to the vendor is at least equivalent to the net amount that would have been achieved for a sale at the reserve price. The fall of the auctioneer’s hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the vendor and the buyer. Unless otherwise agreed in writing with Deutscher and Hackett, the individual physically present at the auction who signals the bid accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, including the buyer’s premium and all additional fees, taxes and charges. GOODS AND SERVICES TAX 8. Amounts inclusive of GST: Unless otherwise specified, all amounts specified in this section as payable by the buyer, or otherwise used to calculate payment to Deutscher and Hackett, are inclusive of any GST component. Deutscher and Hackett will provide buyers with a tax invoice that meets the requirements of the Australian Taxation Office. 9. Application of GST to buyers: Buyers are required to pay a 10% GST which sum is: a. included in the final bid prices where buying from a GST registered vendor (a list of lots consigned by GST Registered Entities is set out on page 182 of the catalogue); and b. included in any additional fees charged by Deutscher and Hackett; and c. added to the buyer’s premium. If a buyer is classified as a “non-resident” for the purpose of GST, the buyer may be able to recover GST paid on the final purchase price if certain conditions are met. POST-SALE CONDITONS 10. Post auction private sale: Should the lot fail to sell at auction, Deutscher and Hackett is authorised to sell the lot privately for a period of seven days in which event this agreement shall apply to the relevant buyer to the full extent of its provisions. 11. Payment: The buyer will not acquire title until payment has cleared in full. Interest at a rate of 17.5% p.a. will be charged over outstanding accounts where no extension of terms has been granted. Interest will be payable from the payment due date. With respect to each lot purchased, the buyer agrees to make the following payments within seven days from the date of sale: a. The hammer price. b. In exchange for ser vices rendered by Deutscher and Hacket t, a buyer’s premium calculated at 22% (plus GST) of the hammer price. c. Post sale packing, handling, shipping and storage where applicable. d. If payment is made via Visa, Mastercard or American Express, any merchant fees payable by Deutscher and Hackett on the transaction as indicated in the prospective buyers and sellers guide. Payment must be made within seven days of the date of sale in Australian dollars by cash, cheque, direct deposit, approved credit cards or electronic funds transfer using the form and/or trust account details provided at the back of this catalogue. In certain circumstances, extension of payment may be granted at the discretion of Deutscher and Hackett. Once funds have cleared, the proceeds of the sale less the buyer’s Premium, GST and any commission or costs charged as agreed will be remitted to the vendor within thirty-five days of the date of sale provided payment has been received in full. Funds will be held in an interest bearing account by Deutscher and Hackett until remitted to the vendor. Deutscher and Hackett will be entitled to any interest earned during this period. Application for a cultural heritage export licence or any other licence in no way affects the buyer’s obligation to make payment or collection within the periods specified in sections 10 and 13a. 12. Risk and Title: Risk in the lot, including risk of loss or damage, will pass to the buyer on the earlier of: a. the date payment is due, whether or not it has been made; and b. collection by the buyer. The buyer assumes risk for the property in all respects from this date and neither Deutscher and Hackett nor the vendor will be liable for loss or damage occurring after the payment due date. The buyer is encouraged to make arrangements to ensure comprehensive cover is maintained from this date. Title in the lot does not pass to the buyer, even if the lot is released to the buyer, until the buyer has paid all sums owing to Deutscher and Hackett. If a buyer makes a claim against Deutscher and Hackett for damage or loss after sale, the buyer’s premium and the final bid price shall be payable notwithstanding.

13. Freight: a. The buyer may only remove a lot from the Deutscher and Hackett premises once payment has been cleared in full and must be removed no later than seven days after the date of sale. Should items not be removed by this time, storage and insurance costs may be charged to the buyer. If a lot has not been collected within 30 days after the date of sale and alternative arrangements have not been with Deutscher and Hackett, the lot may be re-sold by Deutscher and Hackett without reserve at the next auction and Deutscher and Hackett may set off any amounts owed for storage and insurance costs and its standard commission before remitting the proceeds to the buyer. b. Buyers are required to make their own arrangements for packing, handling, shipping and transit insurance for their property. Deutscher and Hackett does not accept responsibility or liability for the acts or omissions of any third party, such as a shipping agent, whether or not such a party has been recommended or suggested by Deutscher and Hackett. 14. Limited Warranty of Authorship: If a buyer is able to establish that a lot is a forgery in accordance with these conditions for sale within five years of the date of sale, the buyer shall be entitled to rescind the sale and obtain a refund of the hammer price from the vendor. The buyer must return the lot in the state in which it was sold within fourteen days of notifying Deutscher and Hackett of the forgery allegations. For a lot to be established as a forgery, the following conditions must be satisfied: a. the buyer must supply two independent expert testimonies attesting to the forgery. Deutscher and Hackett is entitled to request further expert evidence where it deems the evidence provided to be unsatisfactory; b. there must be no conflict of opinion among accepted experts in the field; and c. the forgery must be able to be proven through means that at the time of publication of the catalogue were commonly employed and that will not damage or otherwise put the lot in jeopardy. The limited warranty and the right to rescind the sale is not assignable and the buyer must have retained title to the lot without disposing of any interest in it up until the buyer notifies Deutscher and Hackett of the forgery allegations. The buyer acknowledges that it has no rights directly against Deutscher and Hackett if a lot is established to be a forgery. 15. Termination, Breach and Legalities: a. Deutscher and Hackett breach: To the extent permitted by law, the sole and maximum remedy to a buyer for breach of warranty is a refund of original purchase price, including buyer’s premium. In such an event the sale contract shall be rescinded and all costs associated with returning the property (in the state in which it was sold) to the premises of Deutscher and Hackett are to be borne by the buyer. Deutscher and Hackett is not liable for any indirect or consequential loss or damage for any matter arising directly or indirectly as a result of the sale. b. Buyer breach: Deutscher and Hackett may, in addition to other remedies available by law, exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies for breach: i. Cancel the sale and retain any payment or property in Deutscher and Hackett custody as collateral or liquidated damages. ii. Charge the buyer interest at the rate of 2% above the rate fixed under section 2 of the Penalty Interest Rates Act 1984 (Vic). iii. Resell the property without reserve at the next auction or privately on five days notice. Any disparity between sale and resale prices, including associated costs such as, but not limited to, legal, storage and sale expenses, will be to the account of the defaulting buyer. iv. Apply any part payment received from the buyer in respect of any lots at its discretion. v. Retain any of the buyer’s property held by Deutscher and Hackett until the buyer has satisfied its obligations to Deutscher and Hackett. vi. Take any other action Deutscher and Hackett deems necessary or appropriate. vii. Refuse to permit the buyer to participate in future auctions. viii. Provide the vendor with the buyer’s details to permit the vendor to take action against the buyer to recover the money. 16. Governing law and jurisdiction: These terms and conditions and any matters concerned with the foregoing fall within the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the state in which the auction is held. 17. Severability: In the event that any provisions of this agreement should be found unenforceable in a court of law, that part shall be discounted and the remaining conditions shall continue in full force and effect to the extent permitted by law.

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COOL CLIMATE ART IN A BOTTLE. With its dramatic, cool climate, the breathtaking Tasmanian landscape is an artist’s dream and a sparkling winemaker’s paradise. This is Méthode Tasmanoise.

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SALE CODE: NIGHTINGALE SALE NO.: 054 MODERN + CONTEMPORARY ART MELBOURNE AUCTION 13 JUNE, 7:00 PM LOTS 1 — 96 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

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169


ATTENDEE PRE-REGISTRATION FORM SALE CODE: NIGHTINGALE SALE NO.: 054 MODERN + CONTEMPORARY ART

(Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss) Name (please print)

Business name

Address

City

Telephone/Mobile

State

Post Code

MELBOURNE AUCTION 13 JUNE, 7:00 PM LOTS 1 — 96 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

Email

please email, post or fax this completed form to: DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

tel: 03 9865 6333 fax: 03 9865 6344 info@deutscherandhackett.com we must receive buyer pre-registration forms at least 24 hours prior to the auction

170


TELEPHONE BID FORM SALE CODE: NIGHTINGALE SALE NO.: 054 MODERN + CONTEMPORARY ART MELBOURNE AUCTION 13 JUNE, 7:00 PM LOTS 1 — 96 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

(Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss) Name (please print)

Billing address (PO Box insufficient)

Address

City

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1. 2. Telephone numbers for auction date in order of preference

Facsimile

Email

Signature (required)

please email, post or fax this completed form to:

LOT NO.

Date

ARTIST/TITLE

COVER BID*

1.

DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

2.

tel: 03 9865 6333 fax: 03 9865 6344

4.

info@deutscherandhackett.com

5.

we must receive buyer pre-registration forms at least 24 hours prior to the auction

6.

3.

7. 8. 9. 10. *Not including buyer’s premium or GST (where applicable). Bids are made in Australian dollars INTERNAL USE ONLY RECEIVED BY

DATE

TIME

Please refer to the Guidelines for Potential Purchasers and Buyer’s Conditions in this catalogue for information regarding sales. By completing this form, I authorise DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT to contact me by telephone on the contact number(s) nominated. I understand it is my responsibility to enquire whether any Sale-Room Notices relate to any lot on which I intend to bid. I also understand that should my bid(s) be successful, a buyer’s premium of 22% (plus GST), as described in the Guide to Potential Purchasers and Buyer’s Conditions printed in this catalogue, will be added to the final hammer price. I accept that DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT provides this complimentary service as a courtesy to its clients, that there are inherent risks to telephone bidding, and I will not hold DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT responsible for any error.

171


ABSENTEE BID FORM SALE CODE: NIGHTINGALE SALE NO.: 054 MODERN + CONTEMPORARY ART

(Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss) Name (please print)

Billing address (PO Box insufficient)

Address

City

State

Telephone

Facsimile

Business/Mobile

Email

Signature (required)

LOT NO.

Post Code

MELBOURNE AUCTION 13 JUNE, 7:00 PM LOTS 1 — 96 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

Date

ARTIST/TITLE

MAXIMUM BID*

1. 2. 3.

please email, post or fax this completed form to: DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT 105 COMMERCIAL ROAD SOUTH YARRA VIC 3141

4.

tel: 03 9865 6333 fax: 03 9865 6344

5.

info@deutscherandhackett.com

6.

we must receive buyer pre-registration forms at least 24 hours prior to the auction

7. 8. 9. 10. *Not including buyer’s premium or GST (where applicable). Bids are made in Australian dollars

INTERNAL USE ONLY

Absentee bids must be received a minimum of twenty-four hours prior to auction. All absentee bids received will be confirmed by phone or fax. In the event that confirmation is not received, please resubmit or contact our office.

RECEIVED BY

Please refer to the Guidelines for Potential Purchasers and Buyer’s Conditions in this catalogue for information regarding sales. By completing this form, absentee bidders request and authorise DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT to place the following bids acting as agent on their behalf up to and including the maximum bid specified. Lots will be bought at the lowest possible bid authorised by a bidder in absentia.

DATE

Should the bid be successful, the buyer will be obliged to pay the final bid price plus buyer’s premium of 22% (plus GST) of the final bid price. DEUTSCHER AND HACKETT provides this complimentary service as a courtesy to clients and does not accept liability for errors and omissions in the execution of absentee bids.

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TIME


consigning now iMpoRTanT finE aRT aUcTion • aUGUST 2018 • SYDnEY for appraisals please contact sydney • 02 9287 0600 melbourne • 03 9865 6333 info@deutscherandhackett.com www.deutscherandhackett.com

JOHN BRACK THE TUMBLERS, 1990 oil on canvas 122.0 x 137.0 cm EST: $550,000 – 750,000 SOLD: $1,024,800 (inc. BP) April 2018, Sydney


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Grant and Mary Featherston, Numero IV, 1973, Collection: Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, purchased 2012, photo: Southa Bourn © Grant Featherston/Licensed by VISCOPY, Australia, 2018


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image detai: Paul Signac, France, 1863—1935, The red buoy, 1895, oil on canvas, 81.2 x 65 cm; Gift of Pierre Hébert, 1957, Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France, photo: © RMN-Grand Palais (Musée d’Orsay)/Hervé Lewandowski


JOHN MAWURNDJUL I AM THE OLD AND THE NEW Sydney

6 July– 23 September Adelaide

26 October– 28 January

mca.com.au |artgallery.sa.gov.au

MCA Exhibition Patrons GRANTPIRRIE Private MCA Government Partners

Presented as part of

Art Gallery of South Australia Partners

John Mawurndjul, Ngalyod, 2012, natural earth pigments on stringybark, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2015 © John Mawurndjul/Licensed by Viscopy, 2018, photograph: Jessica Maurer


ROBERT HUNTER NOW SHOWING UNTIL 26 AUG THE IAN POTTER CENTRE: NGV AUSTRALIA, FED SQUARE FREE ENTRY NGV.MELBOURNE Installation view of Robert Hunter at The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, Fed Square.


9 JUNE 7 OCT 2018

MELBOURNE WINTER MASTERPIECES

130 YEARS OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART FROM THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK

PRESENTED BY

Roy Lichtenstein Drowning girl, 1963. Oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 171.6 x 169.5 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Philip Johnson Fund (by exchange) and gift of Mr. and Mrs. Bagley Wright, 1971. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein / Licensed by Copyright Agency, 2018

NGV PRINCIPAL PARTNER

NGV.MELBOURNE


COPYRIGHT CREDITS Lot 2 Lot 3 Lot 4 Lot 5 Lot 6 Lot 7 Lot 8 Lot 9 Lot 10

Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15 Lot 16 Lot 17 Lot 19 Lot 22 Lot 23 Lot 24 Lot 25 Lot 29 Lot 30 Lot 31 Lot 32 Lot 33 Lot 35

© courtesy of The Estate of Jeffrey Smart © Margaret Olley Trust and The Olley Project © courtesy of Helen Brack © Fred Williams/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Estate of Roger Kemp © Ken Whisson © courtesy of Wendy Whiteley © Tony Tuckson/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Andrew Klippel. Courtesy of The Robert Klippel Estate, represented by Galerie Gmurzynska, Zurich/Licensed by Copyright Agency, 2018 © John Olsen/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of the artist © Meadmore Sculptures, LLC/VAGA. Copyright Agency, 2018 © Peter Booth/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Philip Wolfhagen/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Imants Tillers/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Gordon Bennett, managed by John Citizen Arts Pty Ltd © Juan Davila. Licensed by Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art © Gareth Sansom/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of the artist and Stills Gallery, Sydney © courtesy of the artist and Stills Gallery, Sydney © Del Kathryn Barton © Cressida Campbell/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Cressida Campbell/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Del Kathryn Barton © Patricia Piccinini. Courtesy of Tolarno Galleries © courtesy of the artist and THIS IS NO FANTASY + dianne tanzer gallery

LOTS CONSIGNED BY GST REGISTERED ENTITIES Lot 1 Lot 2 Lot 3 Lot 7 Lot 17 Lot 22 Lot 23 Lot 26 Lot 27 Lot 68

Justin O’brien Jeffrey Smart Margaret Olley Ken Whisson Imants Tillers Juan Davila Gareth Sansom Prince Of Wales (Midpul) Prince Of Wales (Midpul) Lionel Bawden

RESALE ROYALTY Some lots consigned for this sale may be subject to the Resale Royalty Right for Visual Artists Act 2009 (Cth). Any payments due under the obligations of the Act will be paid by the vendor.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Photography: Graham Baring Design: Sevenpoint Design © Published by Deutscher and Hackett Pty Ltd 2018 978-0-9953817-8-0

182

Lot 36 Lot 37 Lot 38 Lot 39 Lot 40 Lot 42 Lot 44 Lot 45 Lot 46 Lot 47 Lot 48

Lot 51 Lot 54 Lot 55 Lot 56 Lot 57 Lot 58 Lot 59 Lot 60 Lot 61 Lot 62 Lot 63 Lot 64 Lot 65 Lot 66

© Tracey Moffatt/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Emily Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Rover Thomas/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Kitty Kantilla/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Del Kathryn Barton © Philip Wolfhagen/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Rick Amor/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Rick Amor/Copyright Agency, 2018 © John Kelly/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of Tim Maguire Tim Maguire is represented by Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney and Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne © Gonkar Gyatso/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of the artist and Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre © courtesy of the artist and Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre © courtesy of The Estate of Queenie McKenzie © Tjungkara Ken/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Maringka Baker/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Eubena Nampitjin/Copyright Agency, 2018. © Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Inyuwa Nampitjinpa/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Makinti Napanangka/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Patrick Tjungarrayi/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Janangoo Butcher Cherel/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Janangoo Butcher Cherel/Copyright Agency, 2018

Lot 67 Lot 69

Lot 70 Lot 71 Lot 73 Lot 74 Lot 76 Lot 77 Lot 79 Lot 80 Lot 83

Lot 84 Lot 85 Lot 86 Lot 87 Lot 89 Lot 90 Lot 91 Lot 92 Lot 93 Lot 94 Lot 95 Lot 96

© Hossein Valamanesh/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of Savanhdary Vongpoothorn Savanhdary Vongpoothorn is represented by Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney © Maria Fernanda Cardoso/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Del Kathryn Barton © Aida Tomescu/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Aida Tomescu/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Michael Zavros © McLean Edwards/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Noel McKenna/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Noel McKenna/Copyright Agency, 2018 © courtesy of the artist Andrew Browne is represented by Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne © Shaun Gladwell. Courtesy the artist & Anna Schwartz Gallery © Cressida Campbell/Copyright Agency, 2018 © The Estate of Lin Onus/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Lena Yarinkura/Copyright Agency, 2018 © David Malangi Daymirringu/ Copyright Agency, 2018 © Jean Baptiste Apuatimi/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Freddie Timms/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Billy Thomas Joongoorra/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Sylvia Kantjupai Ken/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Eileen Yaritja Stevens/Copyright Agency, 2018 © Maggie Napangardi Watson/ Copyright Agency, 2018 © Tommy Skeen Tjakamarra/Copyright Agency, 2018


index A ARTIST UNKNOWN (GROOTE EYLANDT) AMOR, R. APUATIMI, JEAN BAPTISTE B BAKER, MARINGKA BARTON, D.K. BAWDEN, L. BENNETT, G. BOOTH, P. BRACK, J. BROWNE, A. C CAMPBELL, C. CARDOSO, M.F. CHEREL, JANANGOO BUTCHER COOK, M. COTTON, S. D DAVILA, J. DAYMIRRINGU, DAVID (MALANGI) DE MEDICI, E. E EDWARDS, M. G GABORI, MIRDIDINGKINGATHI JUWARNDA SALLY GADE GLADWELL, S. GYATSO, G. H HARDING, N. HEARMAN, L. HICKS, P.

88 45, 46 90

58 29, 32, 42, 71 68 19 15 4 83

30, 31, 85 70 65, 66 35 18

22 89 20, 21

77

60

52 84 51

49 81, 82 24, 25

J JUBELIN, N. K KANTILLA, KITTY KELLY, J. KEMP, R. KEN, SANDRA KEN, SYLVIA KANTJUPAI KEN, TJUNGKARA KLIPPEL, R. KNGWARREYE, EMILY KAME M MA, Y. MACLEOD, E. MAGUIRE, T. McKENNA, N. McKENZIE NAKARRA, QUEENIE MEADMORE, C. MELLOR, D. MOFFATT, T. N NAMPITJIN, EUBENA NAMPITJINPA, INYUWA NAPANANGKA, MAKINTI NAPANGARDI WATSON, MAGGIE NOONAN, D. O O’BRIEN, J. OLLEY, M. OLSEN, J. ONUS, L. P PICCININI, P. PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL)

72

40 47 6 57 93

S SANSOM, G. SHEAD, G. SMART, J. STEVENS, EILEEN YARITJA STORRIER, T.

23 11 2 94 13

14 41 36

T THOMAS (JOOLAMA), ROVER THOMAS JOONGOORRA, BILLY TILLERS, I. TIMMS, FREDDIE TJAKAMARRA, TOMMY SKEEN TJAPALTJARRI, BILL WHISKEY TJUNGURRAYI, PATRICK TJUPURRULA, TURKEY TOLSON TOMESCU, A. TUCKSON, T.

73, 74 9

59 61

V VALAMANESH, H. VONGPOOTHORN, S.

67 69

57 10 37

53 43, 78 48 79, 80 56

62 95 34, 75

1 3 12 86

33 26 – 28

W WHISSON, K. WHITELEY, B. WILLIAMS, F. WOLFHAGEN, P. X XUE, S. Y YARINKURA, LENA YUNUPINGU, GULUMBU YOUNG, YARITJI Z ZAVROS, M.

38 92 17 91 96 39 63 64

7 8 5 16, 44

50

87 54, 55 57

76

183


184


Modern + Contemporary Art  

Deutscher and Hackett

Modern + Contemporary Art  

Deutscher and Hackett