Integral Group 2020 Corporate Social & Environmental Responsibility Report

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Corporate Social + Environmental Responsibility (CSER) Our Annual Commitment to Our People + Our Planet

2020


2020 CSER Report | Welcome My intentions in joining Integral Group back in January of 2020 were to deliver on world class performance across our global business. We had no idea what was in store for the industry at-large, including but not limited to a global pandemic, economic recession, social unrest, and the stress it placed on everyone’s physical and mental health. At my previous company, Ross & Baruzzini, a fellow member under the Dar Group, we too were all about “People First” and “Do Good Things, Good Things Happen.” In joining Integral, I’ve noticed how the added layer of our “deep green” mission has been an important point which is new to me. Therefore, this past year has been one of expansion with respect to learning in many ways.

CONTENTS

Our values of Trust, Nurture, and Inspire continue to ring true and we recommit to these every day, including finding new ways to nurture our staff in changing times. One thing is for sure - 2020 was a year to re-imagine how we deliver on our mission. Although we are a privately-funded company, we see our CSER commitment in alignment with the growth of the ESG movement. It is a mechanism to identify risk and provide direction for corrective action. We are excited to share our 2020 CSER report with a re-imagined process which leverages an outcomes-based approach that bridges our internal operations (footprint) with the positive impact we make on the world through the great work we do (handprint).

PAGE

01 Welcome + CSER Introduction

03

02 Environmental Footprint

10

03 Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion

15

04 Health + Well-being

20

• • •

05 Education + Impact

25

06 Safety + Resilience

30

07 Conclusion

35

08 Appendix

40

- Bill Overturf | President & CEO

Company Name* Elementa Consulting Elementa Engineering DPC Integral Consulting Engineering

Office Location

New York, NY, USA Atlanta, GA, USA

Austin, TX, USA

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Oxford, UK

Brisbane, QLD, Australia Calgary, AB, Canada Edmonton, AB, Canada Los Angeles, CA USA Melbourne, VIC, Australia Oakland, CA, USA Richmond, VA, USA San Diego, CA, USA San Jose, CA, USA Seattle, WA, USA Sydney, NSW, Australia Toronto, ON, Canada Vancouver, BC, Canada Victoria, BC, Canada Washington D.C., USA

• • •

• • •

United States

• • •

London , UK

Belgrade, Serbia

Integral Group

Australia

Regions for Reporting Canada Europe

*Companies fall under a single deep green umbrella: Integral Group Holdings LLC

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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Welcome | A Year to Re-Imagine Kevin Hydes becomes Chair of USGBC

Integral’s Impact (Handprint)

Integral’s Journey (Footprint)

2005

Kevin Hydes becomes Chair of WorldGBC

2008

2009

Integral helps launch the WELL Building Standard Integral signs as Global Founder of One Planet Living

2010

2012

Integral become Fitwel Champions + creates the London Energy Transformation Initiative (LETI)

Integral becomes founding member of EcoDistricts

2014

2015 2016

2017

2018

2019

2021

Launch of Integral Engaged employee-led CSER initiatives

2013 |Integral 1st engineering firm with JUST® Label (ILFI) + Los Angeles, Calgary offices 2014 | Integral wins ASHRAE Award of Engineering Excellence + Atlanta, Victoria offices 2015 | JUST® Label recertified + Austin, Seattle offices Integral marks 50 Net Zero Energy designed projects

2017 | 1st Global engineering firm with JUST® Label IG London - 1st Fitwel certified workplace in Europe 1st Fresh Voices Retreat + Sydney office Elementa win CIBSE Building Performance Consultancy of the Year(2017-2020) 2018 | Integral publish first CSER Report 2019 | + Mission Green (Calgary) + Umow Lai (Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane) + New York, Belgrade offices 2020 | Integral welcomes Bill Overturf as CEO Kevin Hydes becomes Chair of Integral Integral launches IG | Vision global knowledge sharing Integral achieves Net Zero Carbon Emissions (Scope 1 + 2)

Contributing sponsors to WorldGBC Health & Wellbeing Framework

2021 |Integral publish Anti-Racism Action Plan Global JUST® 2.0 Label recertified

CIBSE + Elementa Consulting release TM65 on Whole Life Carbon of MEP Systems

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

2012 | + Elementa Consulting (London, Oxford) IG Oakland achieves world’s highest LEED CI Score

2016 | + JM Bean (Vancouver)

2020 Integral are founding signatories of WorldGBC Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

2009 | + Rumsey Engineers (Oakland) 2011 | + Cobalt (Vancouver, Toronto) + IDeAs (San Jose)

2011

2013

2008 | Integral Group founded by Kevin Hydes

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Executive Summary | A Year to Re-Imagine THE PANDEMIC CURVEBALL

ANTI-RACISM TASK FORCE

While the COVID-19 Pandemic is a shared lived experience, the ways in which individuals were impacted was drastically different. We must acknowledge the uncertainty, burden, and trauma 2020 brought to individuals, communities, organizations, and services alike. One thing is for certain, we will not be returning to exactly the way things were before. As we re-emerge into the world and think about the future of work, and the future of building design, this is an opportunity to innovate, re-imagine and rebuild with intention.

In response to the tragic murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and so many other Black lives - we made a commitment to pause, listen, and learn in our Black Lives Matter Statement within the 2019 CSER Report. What followed that statement was a commitment to action through the formation of Integral’s Anti-Racism Task Force (ARTF). The ARTF, comprised of 48 self-selected employees from around the world, came together to discuss their experiences with racism, discrimination, prejudice, bigotry, and bias toward all underrepresented minority groups. The Task Force formulated an Action Plan using an outcomes-based approach that spans across four-time horizons: Then, Now, Next, and Future.

The transition to working from home gave rise to important conversations about business resilience and continuity. Our leadership team had completed an organizational PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal, and Environmental) analysis in 2018 to identify potential risks to the business. While a global health pandemic was not something we anticipated, the activity of doing a risk analysis, coupled with some early planning, supported our ability to pivot quickly. This year brought forward opportunities to build awareness, as well as develop new levels of flexibility for future resilience. Issues such as the climate and mental health crisis's, a global economic recession, and the spotlight on social injustice all drove our organization to listen more, learn a lot, and make meaningful commitments that are backed by action. Within our firm, it gave rise to our Anti-Racism Task Force (ARTF) and their published ARTF Action Plan, meeting our Net Zero Carbon Buildings commitment 10 years early, launching employee-led initiatives such as the Diversity Council, Zero Carbon Ops Team, Employee Resource Groups, the Wellness Council, and Integral Gives which focuses on community outreach and volunteering. The CSER initiative has been re-imagined, influenced and inspired by this notion of bridging the gap between who we are as an organization (our footprint) and the projects which we serve (our handprint). Through the Network Effect, and propelled by the power of partnerships, we believe now more than ever, that we can achieve our desired outcomes. We asked our people… ‘What changes did you make in 2020 in connection to our CSER goals while adapting to working from home?’ We’ve highlighted some of their responses which you will find in the “Initiatives + Achievements” pages of the report. As we enter 2021, we are amidst our Return-to-Office (RTO) planning, which addresses how the office environment can better support new ways of working, as well as our more expanded ways of thinking, connecting, and growing.

The Action Plan was developed through open dialogue sessions and workshops with staff and a recommitment to our firm’s values of Trust, Nurture, and Inspire. The Action Plan recognizes that these values are meaningless if they are not aligned with embedded actions. Proactive and meaningful steps must be taken to ensure a just and inclusive workplace. Integral Group must use its significant influence within our industry to create pathways of mobility and access for those who have been marginalized, under-resourced, and underrepresented. Click here to read our Anti-Racism Action Plan.

ZERO CARBON OPERATIONS After three years of data collection, meticulous analysis and research, Integral Group has successfully achieved net zero carbon emissions for Scopes 1 and 2, ten years ahead of the requirement of the World GBC’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings commitment (2030). We are also committed to going above and beyond the Commitment to include net zero Scope 3 emissions, including business travel, employee commute, water and operational waste by 2030, with accelerated targets of 2025. Once every mitigation effort was considered and implemented, we were able to reduce total emissions per person by 20%, which equates to a reduction of operational EUI by 12%, and operational energy consumption per person by 25% between 2018 (our baseline year) and 2020 (current performance). As these mitigation efforts alone are not sufficient for achieving zero carbon for scopes 1 and 2, we were tasked with evaluating the myriad carbon offset programs for the final push towards meeting our zero target. Our CSER team developed a set of criteria to thoroughly examine and vet available offset options in the marketplace that not only helped us to achieve zero Scope 1 and 2 targets but also offsets that aligned with our vision to be an equity and impact-centered firm. Learn more about our Race to Zero here.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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01


01

Executive Summary PERFORMANCE AT A GLANCE We track CSER performance across five categories, establish key performance indicators (KPIs), and set targets for 2020, 2025 and 2030. The following are our top takeaways from the 2020 calendar year: Environmental Footprint • Net zero scope 1 + 2 carbon emissions (via reductions + offsets) • 34% less Scope 3 carbon emissions compared to benchmark • 20% reduction in total emissions per person and 25% less operational energy consumption per person compared to 2018 (baseline) Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion (JEDI) • Meeting our 2020 targets for global workforce + leadership made up of underrepresented groups and underrepresented minority groups (see definitions to right) • Although targets for female representation in leadership roles at the top level increased, we saw declines in % of female associates Health + Well-being • Satisfaction score has declined; we notice a trend of more satisfaction in smaller offices compared to that in larger offices • While we recognize that 2020 created new mental health challenges, we also acknowledge that mental health was and will continue to be a priority area when it comes to the wellbeing of our employees • The data is consistent with an increase in self-identified invisible disabilities (e.g. anxiety, neurological disorders, chronic pain) Education + Impact • Record levels of external-facing articles, research papers, and awards • Creating of our global webinar series, IG | Vision, which has helped us reach so many more clients, partners and other stakeholders than we have ever connected with before Safety + Resilience • Swift upgrades made to our IT infrastructure to pivot to a successful Work From Home (WFH) model • Pandemic “Playbooks” based on best practice released within 2 months of forced closures INTERACTIVE DASHBOARD | This year we created an online dashboard which allows the user to examine our data more closely, with year-on-year trending, and other more granular data breakdowns and comparison capabilities. Access our CSER Performance Dashboard here.

Firm-wide GHG Emissions (kg CO2e) by Type 1,000,000

SCOPE 1

SCOPE 2

SCOPE 3

Our 2020 GHG (CO2e) Emissions:

ZERO

800,000

600,000

SCOPE 1 + 2

400,000

+

34% less

200,000

SCOPE 3

0 Gas Baseline

Steam Benchmark

Electricity

Employee Commute

2020 Performance

Current

2020 Goal

2030 Goal

50.7%

50%

70%

Business Travel

2020 Offset emissions

How satisfied are you with your organization?

% of our global workforce made up of Underrepresented Groups (Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinos, Mixed-race, Multiethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans (Military Status).

20.8%

20%

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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3

4

5

6

1 Very Dissatisfied

0

7 8

2

30%

% of our global workforce made up of Underrepresented Minority Groups (as defined by country per www.minorityrights.org)

Compared to Benchmark

7.33 2020 result

9 10

Very Satisfied


01

About Integral Group

ABOUT INTEGRAL GROUP

DEEP GREEN ENGINEERING + CONSULTING

MISSION, VISION, VALUES

Integral Group is an international network of engineers + consultants collaborating under a single “deep green” umbrella.

Integral Group are the ‘go to’ experts advising government, organizations, portfolios and projects on their pathways to sustainability.

We enable every client to protect the health of our planet, by taking a regenerative approach to the design, performance and function of buildings, communities, districts, and cities.

Integral’s world-leading sustainability services combine creative problem solving, thoughtful engagement, and comprehensive qualitative research - all with the technical rigor expected of a best-in-class engineering firm.

Integral’s founder and chair of the board, Kevin Hydes, started the company back in 2008 with a clear set of mission, vision, and value statements which still ring true to this day:

We provide a full range of building and district systems engineering, analysis and sustainability consulting services, delivered by staff widely regarded as innovative leaders in their fields.

We share our insights through expert-led advisory, design analytics, assurance, and performance consulting services, that are complementary to each other and to our engineering services.

Our People | Our People combine passion with purpose. They are diverse, ready, willing and able. They are committed to innovation, quality and to providing our clients with the best possible service.

Our work spans the globe, delivered from our offices in Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United States.

Our work spans all scales, from the development of international standards for net zero carbon development, to the optimization of individual building components and minimizing their whole life carbon impact.

Our Values | We are guided by three core values - trust, nurture and inspire.

Our projects are located in over 30 countries - more than 100 of those projects are net zero energy buildings.

Click here to learn more about our Sustainability Services.

Integral Group are proud to be founding signatories of the World Green Building Council’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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Our Mission | To be the top quality Deep Green engineering and consulting firm with global reach.

Our Pillars | Our work is structured around four pillars - imagine, perform, accelerate, and sustain.


01

Leadership | Representation Matters Integral Group is led by Bill Overturf, President and CEO; with Kevin Hydes, Founder and Chairman. We also recognize Dominic Lai, Vice President, Australia.

Executive Leadership | Andrew Jolly – Global Digital Engineering Director, Doug Kerr - Chief Risk Officer, Marcel Tabor – Director, Information Technology, Megan White - Chief Sustainability Officer, Rodney Roberts Chief Financial Officer, Tiffany Elston - People Director. Regional Leadership | Andrew Mather - Asia Pacific; Andrew Oxley – Australia; Brian Goldsmith – Europe; Chris Piche - US East; Gerry Faubert - US West; Jason Nelson – Alberta + Ontario, Canada; Stuart Hood - British Columbia, Canada. Office Leadership | Andrea Traber - Oakland, CA; Andrew Jenkinson Brisbane, QLD; Andy Chong - Victoria, BC; Andy Reilman – Austin, TX + Los Angeles, CA; Calina Ferraro - San Diego, CA; Chris Doel - Vancouver, BC; David Green - Edmonton, AB; Matt Grace - Calgary, AB; Paul Jacobsen Sydney, NSW; Rachel Lieberman - Toronto, ON; Shreshth Nagpal - NYC, NY; Simon Umow - Melbourne, VIC; Stanton Stafford – Atlanta, GA; Tom Simpson - Richmond, VA + Washington, DC; Zoran Stojkovic - Belgrade, Serbia. Leadership at the office level are further supported by Senior Principals, practice area leaders, Principals, Associate Principals, and Associates. For further information visit: www.integralgroup.com/people Representation Matters | As part of our Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion (JEDI) goals, we are committed to disclosing the makeup of our leadership team annually. We understand that representation at the leadership level matters and that those from underrepresented groups must have a seat at the table. Our leadership group was surveyed to record the proportion who identify with the following underrepresented groups: Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinx, Mixed-race, Multi-ethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans. The table below is the current status of underrepresented groups, as well as graphs to the right are the results of different JEDI categories.

Race + Ethnicity

Gender Identification

LGBTQIA+ Representation

100%

100%

100%

10.7%

17.6%

17.9%

80%

80%

80%

60%

60%

60%

40%

88.2%

89.3%

20%

40%

82.4%

82.1%

20%

0% Non-White

2020

7.1%

97.1%

92.9%

40%

0% 2019

White

2.9%

20%

0% 2019

Female

2020

2019

Male

LGBTQIA+

2020 Heterosexual

Disability Status

Transgender Representation

Military Service / Veterans

100%

100%

100%

14.7%

14.3%

80%

80%

80%

60%

60%

60%

2019

2020

2030 target

40%

44.1%

46.4%

60.0%

20%

% of our Leadership made up of Underrepresented Groups: Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinos, Mixed-race, Multiethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans (Military Service).

11.8%

85.3%

85.7%

0%

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

100.0%

100.0%

40%

40%

20%

20%

0% 2019 Disability

2020 None/ Prefer not to disclose

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8.8%

10.7%

91.2%

89.3%

0% 2019 Yes

2020 No

2019 Yes

2020 No


01

Partnerships + Collaboration | The Network Effect THE NETWORK EFFECT As referenced by the United Nations in the 17th Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of “Partnerships for the Goals” – we truly believe in the power of coming together through collaboration and strategic partnerships in order to solve complex problems. The following are a highlighted list of 2020 partnerships that raised the bar.

COMMUNITIES | Our mission of a Deep Green built environment is accelerated through partnership projects with cities, boroughs, and municipalities on climate & equity action plans and policy work. We would like to thank and applaud the following community partners for their commitment to a deep green future: • Cities: Alexandria, Virginia, USA; Austin, Texas, USA; Burnaby, BC, Canada; Calgary, BC, Canada; Canada Bay, NSW, Australia; Edmonton, AB, Canada; Irvine, California, USA; London, UK; Medicine Hat, BC, Canada; Nanaimo, BC, Canada; North Vancouver, BC, Canada; Oakland, California, USA; Port Coqulitam, BC, Canada; Port Moody, BC, Canada; Powell River, BC, Canada; Richmond, BC, Canada; Santa Clara, California, USA; Sydney, NSW, Australia; Vancouver, BC, Canada; Vernon, BC, Canada; Victoria, BC, Canada • Boroughs: Tower Hamlets, London, UK; Merton, London, UK; Riverside County, California, USA ADVANCING THE CAUSE | We choose our partners carefully – we not only want to work with the best, but we also value ease of collaboration and alignment in the end goals. The following organizations helped us make progress towards our CSER goals and commitments in 2020: • World Green Building Council (WGBC) and regional chapters • International Living Futures Institute (ILFI), JUST 2.0 program • Bonneville Environmental Fund (BEF) Renewable Energy Credits and Offsets • Schneider Electric Renewable Energy Credits • Mates in Mind (Think, Talk, Together)

PRODUCTS / MANUFACTURERS (Green-Tech) | Meeting ambitious targets such as Net Positive on projects of all scales and typologies will only be achievable through technology advancements, storytelling, and creating authentic value proposition. In 2020, we were excited to partner with the following product manufacturers: • Radiant Master • Clark Pacific

ACADEMIA

GLOBAL NETWORK

ACADEMIA / NGO RESEARCH | Real innovation occurs where industry and academia intersect. When forming close bonds with NGOs and Academia, we strengthen our knowledge and are better able to support our clients in future projects when backed with science-based data. This past year we worked closely on important research projects with the following groups: • Emory + Yale Schools of Public Health • London Energy Transition Initiative (LETI) • Building Transparency (EC3) + Carbon Leadership Forum • Center for the Built Environment (CBE) DAR GROUP | Integral Group is a proud member of Dar Group, whose mission is to provide “the best engineering and design combined, delivered together globally”. Dar Group is a leading, privately-owned professional services group with a diverse history and global presence. The group includes world-class planning, design, engineering, and project management firms who are dedicated to achieving our clients’ ambitions and supporting sustainable communities worldwide. We would like to acknowledge our brother & sister companies, as partners in the built environment: • Dar Al-Handasah (Shair and Partners) • Perkins&Will • T.Y. Lin International • Currie & Brown • Penspen • Landrum & Brown • Ross & Baruzzini, Inc. • GPO Group • Maffeis Engineering Spa For further information visit: www.dargroup.com

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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INDUSTRY LOCAL DELIVERY

PROJECT USERS + COMMUNITIES

THE RADIANT WHOLE LIFE CARBON STUDY WITH CLARK PACIFIC

CLIENTS + PROJECT TEAM PARTNERS

COVID19 + WORKPLACE WELLNESS | IG | VISION SERIES WITH SENTINEL AND WILL + PARTNERS


01

CSER Approach WHY CSER?

INTEGRAL ENGAGED | EMPLOYEE-LED INITIATIVES

Our commitment to Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER) is guided our Deep Green mission, our desire to be an organization that does good in the world and our intention to leave a legacy of positive contribution. This becomes our sense of identity and what brings our people together. As a professional services entity we lead by example to support our clients moving towards a more sustainable and just built environment. Through both our footprint (internal) and our handprint (projects), we aim to improve the lives of our employees and the communities in which we live and work.

We are committed to generating an annual report, which incorporates input from initiatives, employee-led activities, and lessons learned from the previous years. Part of our approach to CSER includes staff engagement, tracking our performance, introducing or improving upon policies, and reporting on our progress. Learn more about our Integral Engaged initiatives in each category of the report, as well as in the conclusion section.

OUTCOMES BASED APPROACH We use an Outcomes-based approach which includes 3 key steps: 1. What are the desired OUTCOMES? 2. What are the key performance INDICATORS that demonstrate the outcomes have manifested? How will we measure success? 3. What ACTIONS need to be taken to align with desired outcomes? How do we work our way to that reality? Actions follow our Now, Next, Future timeline and we measure our success annually. This helps our team calibrate our roadmap and prioritization by identifying areas we are excelling, as well as any gaps. • NOW | Actions which are top priority to be taken in 2020-2021. • NEXT | Targets which will occur on a timeline between 2022-2025, which require some additional coordination and planning. • FUTURE | We currently have identified 2030 Targets and understand that actions on this timeline will need to be reassessed in the future.

OUR PROCESS | CIRCLE OF TRUST At Integral we have developed a 5-step process for rolling out new initiatives called The Circle of Trust. We have applied this to our CSER process, as well as to the Integral Engaged initiatives. It includes the following key steps: • COMMUNICATION | Annual virtual roadshows & workshops • EMPOWERED ENGAGEMENT | Employee-led Initiatives (Integral Engaged) • WORKFLOW | Data collection at global & local levels • CONSISTENCY + ACCOUNTABILITY | Peer reviews and initiative sponsors • REPLICABLE DOCUMENTATION | Annual CSER report + performance dashboards

SUSTAINABILITY | TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE • PLANET | Impactful + Actionable; Data-Driven; Science Based; Replicable; Accelerates the Market • PEOPLE | Safe + Inclusive; Place to Thrive + Feel Supported; Culture of Accountability; Work-Life Integration • PROFIT | Equitable + Socially Just; Resilient Business Model; Real Impact on Relative Economic Environment; Circular Economy

THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SDGs) The United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a global call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity, with targets to achieve by 2030. Through our work for clients and in our own operations we directly address 14 of the 17 UN SDGs. You will see progress towards these goals within the “Action Plan” pages of this report.

FOOTPRINT VS. HANDPRINT Within this report you will notice two icons: a footprint and a handprint. The footprint refers to our internal practices and performance as a firm. Most notably this includes our company’s carbon footprint, but also in the legacy and culture we create for our people. The handprint refers to the impact we make through the projects we touch. An example of our company’s handprint can be seen in the published book, entitled “Integral Impact.”

Our Footprint (internal)

We acknowledge that when we are walking the talk (footprint) in alignment with our mission (handprint), there is a positive acceleration process that occurs on our projects and within the industry at large. The two are inextricably linked.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

INTEGRAL IMPACT | Published in 2018, and still relevant, the book was a celebration of our ten year anniversary of providing deep green engineering and consulting services with a global reach. Impact tells the story of Integral Group through the projects, people, and endeavors that most encapsulate our ethos and influence.

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Our Handprint (projects)


Environmental Footprint Zero Waste Office In early 2021, Integral Group is moving into a new design studio within the TELUS Sky building with the goal to design the greenest office fit-out in Calgary. The final design will achieve LEED Platinum and Fitwel Certifications.

Through the design we have aimed to reduce, reuse and re-purpose as much as possible showcasing Integral Groups commitment to supporting a more sustainable workplace. The new design studio exemplifies many features aimed at promoting sustainability, wellness and energy efficiency including occupancy and daylighting sensors, displacement ventilation and low flow fixtures. Integral’s Calgary Design Studio will divert construction and demolition waste from landfills by sorting waste into multiple streams on the construction site and sending waste to appropriate facilities for recycling or re-use. The project will divert 100% (by weight) of all waste generated during demolition and construction activities through several material streams. To learn more about the zero-waste TELUS Sky tower in Calgary click here

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02

Environmental Footprint | Action Plan OVERVIEW

In May of 2021, we announced our achievement of net zero carbon emissions for Scopes 1 and 2, meeting the requirements of the World Green Building Council (WGBC)’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment. The Commitment challenges businesses, cities, and regions to take advanced climate action by setting lofty targets to eliminate operational carbon emissions from their building portfolios by 2030, starting with Scope 1 (direct emissions) and Scope 2 (indirect emissions). As a founding signatory, we committed to meet the requirements ten years early, as early adopters to influence others to join us on the journey. We are dedicated to going above and beyond the WGBC Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment by including zero Scope 3 emissions (business travel, employee commute, and operational waste) by 2030, with accelerated targets for 2025. Once every energy efficiency mitigation effort was considered and implemented, we were able to reduce our total emissions per person by 20% since our baseline year, 2018. These reductions alone are not sufficient to eliminate Scopes 1 and 2 emissions, so our Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER) team was tasked with evaluating the myriad of carbon offset programs for getting to zero. However, not all carbon offset programs are created equal, and not all credits are distributed equitably. We define a good carbon offset as one that has:

Global Performance Desired Outcomes

Zero Carbon Operations (energy, commute, flights, waste)

• ADDITIONALITY | Ensures offset projects would not have happened without the offsets being purchased • PERMANENCE | Provides long-lasting solutions • VERIFIABILITY | Assures that the project will yield expected results • SOCIAL IMPACT | Prioritizes and supports environmental justice and social value for the most marginalized groups, investing in places that have been historically under-resourced. Using these criteria, the CSER team thoroughly vetted RECs and Offset options in the marketplace that not only helped them achieve Scope 1 and 2 targets but also aligned with the vision to be an equity and impact-centered firm. Click here to learn about our journey becoming a zero carbon company. ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT DASHBOARD | In 2020, we have created an online dashboard which allows visitors to examine our data more closely, with year-on-year trending, emissions by office and region, and other data breakdowns. Click here to access our Environmental Footprint dashboard.

Resource Reduction as part of a responsible purchasing that ultimately support a Circular Economy

Integral Operations positively impact and influence staff's personal choices

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Unit of Measurement

11.6 and 12.2

Total combined gas and electricity emissions* per person (pre-offset)

3.9 and 11.2

2019

2020

Kg CO2e

830.07

885.45

949.12

14.34%

27.05%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

Total commute emissions per person

Kg CO2e

735.59

956.56

836.96

-12.50% (since 2019)

-2.78%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

3.9 and 11.6

Total flight emissions tonnes per person

Kg CO2e

1,033.00

1,251.46

286.18

-72.30%

n/a

Global travel agency to track

100% 10% Offset Reduction Flight from 2025 Emissions

12.3, 12.3 and 12.5

Total waste emissions per person

Kg CO2e

14.00

4.62

Not measured

No baseline set

n/a

Set Audit Process + Policy (2021)

25% 50% Reduction Reduction

11.6 and 12.2

Total emissions for waste, energy*, business travel, and employee commute per person (pre-offset)

Kg CO2e

2.58

2.99

2.07

-19.89%

-10.99%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

7.3

Average energy use intensity (EUI) (normalized averages to m2)

kWh / m2

186.20

173.82

152.80

-17.94%

-8.82%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

7.3

Total Energy Consumption per person

kWh

2318.38

2603.96

2532.85

+9.25%

-21.39%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

6.4 and 12.2

Total water consumption per person

m3

13.18

12.20

11.88

-9.86%

-0.15%

10% 20% 30% Reduction Reduction Reduction

12.8

How much does the Integral mission influence employee choices to live in an eco-friendly way? (All-Staff Survey)

Score (out of 10)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

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Gap to Target (2020)

Global Targets

2018

* Emissions have been offset through Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and Carbon Offsets.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Delta (+/-) Progress since baseline

2020 NOW

Create Survey Question (2021)

2025 NEXT

Establish Targets / Tracking

2030 FUTURE

TBD


02

Environmental Footprint | Results OUR PERFORMANCE

We track and disclose our key performance indicators in this category in alignment with the World Resource Institute’s (WRI) GHG emissions protocols.

GHG Emissions in KgCO2e by Region (Average Headcount) 800,000.00

This year, our working behaviors changed significantly as the world moved to a Working From Home (WFH) model. As such, we expected to see greater reductions in our energy consumption than were observed. We attribute this to being a 100% tenant-based operation where for many of our spaces, we are not in direct control of our consumption, or rely heavily on whole building data for disclosure. This has helped us understand more about how our buildings consume energy, and we will put these findings into use while shaping our Zero Carbon Operations Action Plan – due to be published later in 2021.

700,000.00

Total Energy Consumption per Capita | While understanding the Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of our design studios offers us a standardized way of looking at our energy consumption, it may not tell the full story. If we have used benchmarking proxy, or whole building data to do our analysis, it assumes that all space in a building is used exactly the same way. Looking at the energy consumption levels per capita (per person) allows us to identify whether the space we inhabit are operating efficiently. We noticed a 9.25% increase in Energy Consumption (kWh) per person when compared between 2018 (baseline) and our 2020 performance.

300,000.00

Business Travel (flights) | The pandemic had a huge impact on our business flights in 2020. From Q2 onwards, international travel became rare, and even in-country air travel was drastically reduced or eliminated. Last year has proven that business flights are often a luxury, and not a necessity for our operations. As we look to 2021 and beyond, we will work to resist the tendency to return to past travel habits. Employee Commute | Our annual All-Staff Survey pivoted to capture ways the pandemic has affected staff’s daily commuting habits. To our surprise, we noticed an increase in employee commute emissions when compared between 2019 and 2020. As reflected in survey data, this increase is due to a shift in the mode of transportation for employees commuting into the office, from public transit to personal vehicles, during the pandemic.

Offset emissions Electricity

600,000.00

Steam

500,000.00

Gas

400,000.00

Employee Commute Busines Travel

200,000.00 100,000.00 Benchmark

2020 Performance

Benchmark

Australia Australia (125) (125)

2020 Performance

Benchmark

Canada Canada (241) (241)

2020 Performance

Europe Europe (107) (107)

Work From Home (WFH) | Shifting to a temporary WFH model, some operational emissions have been displaced to employees homes. As there is no simple and standardized methodology to capture this data, this was not part of our environmental footprint analysis for 2020. However, our team of engineers + consultants have been evaluating data for clients to consider in new RTO hybrid models and we hope to include in our future reporting.

-

Total GHG Emissions for Integral Group in 2020 (Pre-Offset)

Waste | No waste audits were completed in the offices in 2020.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

2020 2019 2020 Performance Performance Performance

United States (120) US (120)

1,370,228 592,403 kgCO2e

Benchmark

777,825

kgCO2e

169

kgCO2e

= GHG Emissions Offset through RECs + Carbon Offsets in 2020

Corporate (70)

passenger vehicles

= Total GHG Emissions for Integral Group in 2020 (Post-Offset)

Driven for one year

GHG equivalencies calculated using the EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator

PAGE 12


02

Environmental Footprint | Initiatives + Achievements Integral Engaged | Zero Carbon Operations (ZCO)

“We set family goals to reduce the amount of food waste we generate, started a green garden plan by composting food waste, and we use reusable bags for shopping.”

The ZCO team are creating an action plan of Integral's Zero Carbon Journey, which expands on the CSER Roadmap to Zero, taking us to 2030 and beyond. In 2020 the team: • Disclosed baseline data to the World Green Building Council • Created a “Getting to Zero” decision-making matrix for leased assets • Began drafting our Zero Carbon Operations Action Plan

Grassroots Events at the Local Level: • Bike-to-Work Day/ Week/ Month and or encouraging cycling as an alternative form of transportation all year (Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria)

NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat

• Performing design markups virtually vs. on paper drawings (Victoria)

”I’ve saved power [at home] by layering up instead of turning on the heat.”

• Imperfect Produce deliveries (San Diego) • Tracking and reporting on printing and electricity usage (Brisbane) • Introduced new soft plastics recycling bin (Sydney) • WFH work equipment recycling policy implemented (London) • Growing air purifying plants and using eco bags in the office (Belgrade)

“We switched to a Zero Waste grocery delivery program during the pandemic - won't go back! Saving money too (not paying for plastic packaging)!”

Bikes at the Office

Earth Day Appreciation London

• Daylight hour was celebrated by turning out our lights (Global) • Office lighting was eliminated in 60% of office due to WFH (Edmonton)

• Internal Challenge: 31 Days of Sustainability (Vancouver) • NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat created in backyard (Atlanta) • Oxford office reduced leased office space to lower their footprint

“I've become a lot more conscious of the amount of waste I'm producing and have made some considerable effort to further improve my footprint by trying to reduce single use products as much as possible and where not possible we've tried to find recyclable alternatives or utilize vendors that do.”

• Many employees from across our offices reported making positive changes to their power usage at home, with a few even installing solar panels on their home

Integral Group Honorable Mentions: • CANBIM Design + Engineering Award: Embodied Carbon in MEP Design • CIBSE ANZ Seminar Presentation: Delivering Net Zero on the Grid by Richard Palmer •

Climate Change Mitigation Podcast: Step 1 with Louise Hamot

• Publication: Decarbonization of Roads by Richard Palmer in Austroads • Earth Day IG | Vision Event hosted by CSO, Megan White AJ100 Sustainability Champion of the Year

31 Days of Sustainability Challenge INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 13

Belgrade Environmental Engagement


02

Environmental Handprint | Relevant Project Triple Victory: UK's 1st Passive House Plus School, Net-Zero Energy & A+EPC Recycling Heat from summer to winter!

Help the UK Grid! 25% PV Electricity Exported

An exemplar eco-school which utilizes ground source energy for heating, cooling and hot water. This intersessional heat transfer leads the way in decarbonizing the heat and helps to maintain comfortable classroom temperatures to provide the best learning and teaching environment throughout the year.

100% Heating & Cooling Demand met via Ground Source Heat Pumps

Fabric First & Energy Efficient Design • Orientation optimized for passive solar gain in winter • Use of external shading (canopy, brise soleil and vertical shading fins) to reduce overheating in summer • Internal Blinds for glare control • Good levels of insulation with minimal thermal bridges • Excellent level of airtightness • Triple glazed windows • LED lighting (100 lamp lumens per circuit watt) • Daylight and PIR sensors • Mixed mode ventilation via central AHU with heat recovery

Construction details are important to achieve air tightness and minimise thermal bridging

Achievements • Compliance with Passive House Summer Overheating 10% hours > 25°C • Compliance with BB101 Summer Overheating, Winter Cold Draughts and Air Quality Criteria • Net Zero Carbon (Regulated + Unregulated) • Net exporter of electricity (520 sqm Photovoltaics installed on roof, 25% electricity is exported) • Green Roof • 100% Heating & Cooling from GSHPs • Free cooling via PHE and AHU – recharges ground temperatures • Reduced operational costs • Timber structure, recycled materials and high efficiency envelope • Ground floor is made from 70% recycled GGBS concrete • Sweet chestnut is used for cladding, which is a fast- growing hardwood with a long lifespan, therefore reducing replacement costs. • Embodied carbon assessed on structure and architecture

Lessons Learned Sourcing skilled installers is a tough ask Air test is one of the main reasons of failure in Passive House buildings Minimising ventilation volumes whilst maintaining comfort Recovering heat from kitchen exhaust AHU commissioning to meet Passive House Calculation of embodied carbon of MEP systems, data not usually available • Use of natural materials has a positive nurturing impact on children • • • • • •

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 14

Net Zero Energy & Zero Carbon 120000 100000 80000 60000 40000 20000 0 -20000

Target Building Target Building

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Measures Measures

Energy Consumption (kWh)

Client | London Borough of Sutton Architect | Architype Location | London UK Size: 1,850 sqm Cost | £10M Contractor| Lakehouse Building : New build primary school for 420 pupils aged 5-11

Renewables (GSHP & PV) Renewables (GSHP & PV)

Carbon Emissions (Kg CO2e)


Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion (JEDI) Environmental Justice Elementa Engineering DPC is a New York based professional services consulting engineering firm focused on positively impacting the built environment. Through a relationship with Integral Group LLC, we are creating a new realm of possibilities by combining our diversified leadership and common visionary approach to green buildings. Collectively championing the use of the most innovative and sustainable systems, the Elementa NYC staff give life to high performance buildings and communities that both respect and enrich the Earth and provides our clients with global expertise in step with a local presence. Our NYC office offers speciality services including “Design Analytics” as seen in the images here to help combat environmental justice disparities at Sunset Park, Brooklyn (see page 19 to learn more).

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 15


03

JEDI| Action Plan OVERVIEW Integral is committed to providing a workplace in which our employees thrive. We believe our ability to innovate and the resiliency of our business is underpinned by a diverse and inclusive employee community, rich with a wide array of perspectives. Our goal is to continue to push for fair and inclusive representation at all employee levels and disciplines throughout our organization. Our data highlights the need to focus on providing clear and consistent pathways to leadership as a key strategy for encouraging underrepresented groups and underrepresented minority groups to both enter and stay in the industry. We are on a journey to improve representation across all levels of leadership and are driven to continue to create positive change. We believe that presenting the data transparently will improve awareness and accountability while supporting conversations around unconscious bias. Race + Ethnicity | It is important to us that our workforce represents the racial and ethnic make-up of the communities in which we work. When reflecting on the racial and ethnic make-up of our offices, we notice a significant increase in underrepresented minority group numbers globally. However, the way in which we collected data on this KPI changed between 2019 and 2020, defining minorities per country's definition utilizing learnings from http://minorityrights.org/, which resulted in a >13% increase and data that more accurately represents regional differences. Office Leadership Promotions | In 2020 we proudly announced that Rachel Lieberman from our Toronto office became the first woman to take the position of Managing Principal in Canada. She joins Andrea Traber in Oakland, and Calina Ferraro in San Diego in moving us towards a more equitable future for women in office leadership roles at Integral. JUST 2.0 Label – Diversity + Inclusion + Equity | We celebrate the transparency and external benchmarking obtained from our recertification with the JUST™ 2.0 label, using data collected in 2020. We observe that our scores support the message our annual metrics have been displaying in that we must continue to push for greater representation of underrepresented groups, mainly women and underrepresented minority groups, especially in positions of leadership. JEDI DASHBOARD | In 2020, we have created an online JEDI dashboard which allows the user to examine our data more closely, with year on year trending, gender distribution by leadership level and by region, and other data breakdowns. Click here to access our JEDI dashboard.

Global Performance Desired Outcomes

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Unit of Measurement

Integral strives to achieve pay equity across all position classifications, including intersections of gender, race/ ethnicity.

5.1, 5.a and 8.5

Gender Pay Equity evaluation

4.5 and 5.c 5.5 5.c Integral is a safe and inclusive workplace where staff feel that they can show up, are celebrated and supported as their authentic selves.

10.2

10.2 10.2, 16.7 and 16.b 10.3

Integral's leadership includes representation from underrepresented and minority groups, which reflect the local communities in which we work, including active mentorship within the organization to create pathways for mobility.

5.5 and 16.7

10.2 and 16.7

10.2 Integral is committed to social equity which is reflected through our partnerships and projects. We are recognized as a leader within the AEC industry as a Deep Green + Equitable Engineering firm.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Gender distribution of all staff Gender Diversity JUST Label Score Gender distribution of all technical staff % of Workforce made up of Underrepresented Groups % of Workforce made up of Underrepresented Minority Groups Inclusion JUST Label Score Ethnic Diversity JUST Label Score Gender distribution of Associates Gender distribution of Associate Principals Gender distribution of Principals Gender distribution of Office Leadership Gender distribution of Senior Management % of Leadership made up of Underrepresented Groups % of Leadership made up of Underrepresented Minority Groups % of IG Awards Submissions that positively represent JEDI category

Delta (+/-) Progress Gap to since Target baseline

Global Targets 2020 NOW

2030 FUTURE

2019

2020

% Variance (men: women)

In Process

In Process

+6.09% (Internal analysis)

n/a

n/a

% Female

32.90%

31.96%

32.34%

-0.56%

-7.66%

40%

45%

50%

Score (out of 4)

Level 0 (2017)

-

Level 1

+ 1 level

0

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

% Female

28.90%

25.36%

26.90%

-2.00%

-3.10%

30%

40%

50%

50.68%

Process Determined

47.61%

50.68%

+3.07%

0.68%

50%

60%

70%

%

not collected

6.96%

20.75%

13.79%

0.75%

20%

25%

30%

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 1

-

n/a

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Score (out of 4)

Level 2 (2017)

-

Level 1

-

-

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

% Female

34.78%

24.39%

17.81%

-16.97%

-12.19%

30%

40%

50%

% Female

10.00%

19.05%

20.45%

10.45%

0.45%

20%

35%

50%

% Female

4.88%

15.87%

14.00%

9.12%

-1.00%

15%

30%

50%

% Female

9.09%

11.76%

22.20%

13.11%

12.20%

10%

30%

50%

% Female

28.60%

23.08%

14.29%

-14.31%

-5.71%

20%

30%

50%

% underrepresented

not collected

44.10%

46.40%

11.10%

+6.4%

40%

50%

60%

% underrepresented minority

not collected

11.76%

10.71%

-1.05%

+0.71%

10%

15%

20%

% JEDI submissions

not collected

not collected

7.8%

Baseline set

n/a

Record Metric

10%

25%

Program in Development Program in Development

min. 1/ region annually

100%

100%

Third Party Third Party Third Party Analysis Analysis Analysis

-

# of BIPOC-centred job fairs we attend

#

N/a

N/a

N/a

n/a

n/a

N/a

-

# of BIPOC AEC organizations we are members of

#

N/a

N/a

N/a

n/a

n/a

N/a

5.1 and 10.2

% Complete on unconscious bias training

% of staff

95%

Baseline set

n/a

Program In Development

PAGE 16

2025 NEXT

2018

not collected not collected

min. 1/ region


03

JEDI| Results SELF-REPORTED IDENTITY

RACE / ETHNICITY

For 2020, we continued to refine our All-Staff Survey to ensure the language used and response options provided, enable the diversity of our employees to be recognized. These questions focus on individual identifiers and bring visibility to those who are a part of underrepresented or minority groups. LGBTQIA+ Community | Creating a safer and more inclusive workplace for those who identify as LGBTQIA+ helps us to grow stronger relationships between employees, with our clients and within our community. We are pleased that our employees are comfortable self-identifying their: • Gender Identity – reporting beyond binary gender • Sexual Orientation – being accepting to all sexual preferences • Transgender Status – expanding the conversation on trans-inclusivity Disabilities | In 2020, we again expanded our definition of disability to be more inclusive of the varying forms of disabilities, including but not limited to invisible disabilities. The new categories were taken from the disability classifications explained by disabled-world.com. The 2020 results included an increase in the self-reported disabilities from 12.04% (2019) to 15.85% (2020). Military Status | Understanding our demographics on employees currently serving as reservists, or previously serving in the military helps us create a workplace which welcomes & supports veterans and active military personnel.

GENDER DISTRIBUTION

Data on global gender distribution is collected as part of our onboarding procedures where employees are asked to specify their legal gender. This allows us to examine gender distribution connected to career levels. While we celebrate positive progress made on gender equality within some leadership levels, we acknowledge that we have not reached our targets in all our genderbased KPIs - we have more work to do. We recognize that a person’s legal gender may not represent their true gender, therefore we also collect gender identification through the All-Staff Survey where employees can report beyond binary gender categories anonymously. Female Male

70.00%

66.94%

68.04%

67.66%

30.00%

33.06%

31.96%

32.34%

2017

2018

2019

2020

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (0.40%) Asian (12.52%)

Black, African, African American, Black British, or of any other Black/African background (2.58%)

Middle Eastern or North African (4.97%)

South Asian (5.77%)

Hispanic or Latinx (3.38%)

Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (0.60%)

Two or more races (2.78%)

Prefer not to say (1.79%)

White (65.21%)

GENDER IDENTITY

Androgyne (0.21%)

Genderqueer / Gender fluid (0.62%)

Prefer not to say (1.44%)

Woman (33.4%)

Man (64.33%)

SEXUAL ORIENTATION

Gay – Homosexual (1.26%)

Bisexual (2.31%)

Questioning or Unsure (0.63%)

Pansexual (0.21%)

Prefer to not say (3.15%)

Lesbian (1.26%)

Queer (0.84%)

Asexual (1.26%)

Undefined (0.21%)

Straight – Heterosexual (88.87%)

Cognitive / Learning (2.85%)

Hearing (0.81%)

Mobility / Physical Impairments (1.02%)

Spinal Cord Disability (0.41%)

None (84.15%)

Head Injuries (0.20%)

Invisible (9.35%)

Psychological Disorders (0.81%)

Vision (0.41%)

TRANSGENDER

Yes (0.42%)

No (99.58%)

DISABILITIES

MILITARY / VETERAN STATUS

Yes (4.73%)

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

No Response (0.57%)

PAGE 17

Prefer not to say (1.32%)

No (93.38%)


03

JEDI| Initiatives + Achievements Integral Engaged | Diversity Council

“I have taken time to educate myself through reading books by non-white authors and expanded my sphere of influence on social media so that I see different perspectives more regularly.”

Aimed at creating a safe and inclusive work environment. The Diversity Council’s focus is to provide opportunity and support to employees of all races, ethnicities, religions, genders, sexual orientations, gender identifications, abilities, incomes, marital statuses, ages, geographic locations, philosophies, and military status. In 2020 the Diversity Council: • Created the framework for Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) • Helped in the planning and facilitation of our Anti-Racism Task Force and #WeAreIntegral Month

Grassroots Events at the Local Level: • Anti-Racism Task Force was created and open to all employees • Anti-Racism Resource List created and promoted within offices (Global) • Celebrated International Women’s Day throughout all offices prepandemic/WFH (industry lunches, social media campaigns, office gatherings, and more!) • Firmwide celebration of International Women in Engineering Day (Global)

#WeAreIntegral Month Calendar of Events

• Workplace Gender Equality Act (WGEA) reporting (Australia) • Domestic Violence Policy created (Australia) • #WeAreIntegral Month supported anti-racism focused charities – Reconciliation Australia, Black Women in Motion, Show Racism the Red Card and NAACP Legal Defence Fund (Global)

“I have endeavoured to improve my knowledge of First Nations Peoples, and what I can do to help the reconciliation process.”

• Indigenous and Australian themed trivia to increase awareness and kick-off NAIDOC week (Sydney) • Annual Pink Shirt Day in support of Anti-Bullying (Vancouver + Toronto)

Integral Group Honorable Mentions: • Consult Australia – Champions of Change representative (Australia) • Participated in CDC Emory-Yale study ‘Comprehensively Profiling Social Mixing Patterns in Workplace Settings to Model Pandemic COVID-19 and Influenza Transmission and Control’

“We started a Diversity Council in Australia and participated in the Champions of Change.”

• Andrea Traber featured on Women in Sustainability: Design the Future Podcast • CaGBC Building Lasting Change 2020: Women in Green Sponsor IWD 2021 INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 18

Indigenous Trivia Learning


03

JEDI Handprint| Relevant Project Combating Environmental Justice Disparities at Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Efficiency + Demand Response

We share our innovations and thought leadership as part of our IG | Vision series which connects us to our clients, partners, and colleagues all over the world.

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

Click here to learn more about this project and the role that the built environment plays in social equity, community wellness, and climate resilience..

DEC

Efficiency + Demand Response + PV Generation + Battery Storage

The Solution | Integral created an hourly resolution urban-scale energy

model to evaluate the impact of various DER strategies on peak demand in the study area. The process involved characterizing the building stock into discrete typologies, creating building-level energy models for each typology, aggregating the data, and calibrating the results against NYSERDA’s Community Energy Use Data and ConEd’s hourly load projections. This model was subsequently used to identify the main drivers of energy use in the study area, and measure the impact of distributed generation, storage, demand response, energy efficiency, and building electrification.

Peaker plants, used to generate electricity to meet peak demand, are a significant source of pollution in under-resourced communities in New York City. Integral worked with a coalition of community partners to find sustainable alternatives to these facilities. JAN

Overview | Peaker plants are more carbon intensive than baseload

facilities, leading to an immense source of point pollution that exposes residents to harmful contaminants and poor air quality. Sunset Park is home to many marginalized racial and ethnic minority groups in low socioeconomic positions. This challenge of increased energy use and diminished air quality presents the perfect example of environmental justice disparities faced by many communities globally.

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

The Impact | We found that a combination of energy efficiency, demand

DEC

Client | New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Location | Brooklyn, NY USA

Efficiency + Demand Response + PV Generation + Battery Storage + Electrification

response, PV covering 8% of rooftop area, and battery capacity of 30 MW would achieve 38% savings on peak demand. While not enough to completely eliminate the two peaker plants in Sunset Park, these strategies would set an example for other communities in the area and would significantly improve the quality of life for residents in New York’s most under-resourced and marginalized communities.

The Challenge | The scope of our study is to explore the possibilities of

eliminating peaker plants through distributed energy efficiency, generation, and storage (DER) strategies.

JAN

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

PAGE 19

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV


Health + Well-being

R U OK? Day R U OK? Day is run annually by an Australia based organization, R U OK?, whose mission is to create connection, lend support and provide resources and inspiration on the topics of mental health and suicide prevention. Our Australian offices have started a tradition celebrating R U OK? Day which has caught on by some of our offices across the globe, utilizing resources provided to start conversations, check in on one another and start making conversations around mental health normal. The mental health of employees has and will continue to be a major focus for the firm during the pandemic and beyond. Our global Wellness Council continues to refine their action plan and research ways to create a sense of connection, well-being, belonging and support across the firm.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 20


04

Health + Well-being| Action Plan OVERVIEW As health and well-being increasingly becomes a focal point in the work we do for our clients, we also recognize that it is an essential focus within our own offices and plays a key role as part of our corporate culture. As a firm filled with environmental activists, we acknowledge that our work puts our employees in direct relationships with an additional stressor - ecoanxiety, a growing phenomenon that is a result of the climate crisis. Natural disasters from fires, floods, heat waves and droughts have already affected our employees directly. We look at our employee health + wellbeing with a holistic approach, taking into account all facets of health + wellness: physical, occupational, spiritual, emotional, intellectual, social, environmental and financial. We aim to help our people create balance for themselves and support employees by creating a workplace that reinforces individuals living their best lives as their most authentic selves. Within this category, we focus on the following topics and acknowledge that we have room for improvement when it comes to the results: • • • • • •

Workplace satisfaction Workstation satisfaction Employee turn-over Employee Engagement Physical Health Employee Well-being

We look forward to the time that our offices re-open and we can build back a greater sense of community. We believe that the offices are a place for social interaction, mentorship, and a breeding ground for growth.

Global Performance Desired Outcomes

Integral is recognized as an organization on the global list of "best places to work"

Integral provides superior offices and work environments (WFH, remote) that support our people that improves productivity and cognitive function.

WELLNESS DASHBOARD | Our online wellness dashboard allows users to examine our health & well-being data more closely, with year-on-year trending, comparing results between regions and offices where appropriate, and other data breakdowns. Access our Wellness dashboard by clicking here.

Our benefits and activities around health + well-being within the organisation support and encourage employees to make positive progress in their physical, emotional, mental well-being in all aspects of their lives.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Global Targets

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Unit of Measurement

2018

2019

2020

Progress since baseline

Gap to Target

-

Average Organization Satisfaction

Score (out of 10)

7.97

7.64

7.33

-0.64

n/a

-

Employee Engagement Just Label Score

Score (out of 4)

Level 2

-

Level 4

+2 Levels

at target

Level 4

Level 4

Level 4

-

Average Work Station Satisfaction (e.g. desk, seat)

Average Score of 7 Questions (out of 10)

7.69

7.50

7.32

-0.37

n/a

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

-

Average Workplace Environment Satisfaction (e.g. office as a whole)

Average Score of 8 Questions (out of 10)

7.47

7.43

7.20

-0.27

n/a

Data Collected

-

Total number of staff social events

Number

209

240

186

-23

n/a

16.7

Manager Incorporates Feedback (all-staff survey)

Score (out of 10)

-

-

7.66

Baseline set

n/a

Record Metric

8.00

8.20

3.4

Physical Health JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 2

Baseline set

Achieved

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

3.4

Well-being JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 2

Baseline set

Achieved

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

A culture that celebrates connection with self, others, the communities in which we work, achievements, and nature.

We acknowledge that the return-to-office (RTO) plan is not the end-all solution to the rising issue around mental health, and that addressing burnout as part of our RTO strategy brings forth a new set of opportunities for positive impact.

Delta (+/-)

PAGE 21

2020 NOW

2025 NEXT

Global Best work survey places established local

2030 FUTURE Best work places global

5% 10% ImproveImprovement (7.84) ment (8,20)

Tracking Quarterly Process per Office Established

Quarterly per Office


04

Health + Well-being | Results ALL-STAFF SURVEY The annual All-Staff Survey was expanded this year to ensure we captured key metrics included in the JUST™ 2.0 label. The survey is the biggest opportunity we have to find out what our employees think and feel.

2020 Global Staff Results

Scale

We expanded some questions to allow a pre- and post-COVID response to capture if there was any shift in satisfaction when we transitioned to working from home, and to measure the impact of additional stressors occurring because of the pandemic. The Global Wellness Council submitted a series of optional questions for staff, which will assist the initiative in generating recommendations for incorporation into their forthcoming wellness action plan – expected to be released at the end of 2021.

WORKPLACE SATISFACTION Questions on workplace/ office environment and individual workstations were repeated, despite being away from our offices for the majority of the year, to ensure data was captured for any upcoming Fitwel certifications.

Very Dissatisfied 1

How satisfied are you with your organization? 7.33

WORKING FROM HOME

The results spoke for themselves, and were so impactful that a series of real, open, honest and vulnerable conversations were started at the highest leadership levels to strategize how to support staff during these challenging times and beyond.

3

4

Neutral 5

Satisfied 6

7

Very Satisfied 8

9

10

Scores below are global mean averages from the 2020 All-Staff survey

These datasets are instrumental at the office level, as they help us shape and improve the experience of being at work in every location around the world and will inform the future of work environments. The global pandemic has proven to be far more than just a physical health issue, but a mental health and emotional well-being concern. While some employees thrived from the shift in lifestyle, others did not. The pandemic has also heightened inequalities in areas such as housing, familial care responsibilities, access to green spaces and more. The results of our employee's struggles were confirmed when we analyzed the results to our All-Staff Survey in Q4 of 2020.

2

Dissatisfied

My mental / emotional health is supported. Pre-Covid - 7.25 Post-Covid - 6.90

We acknowledge that we are in the midst of a global mental health crisis, and that the next steps we take to support our employees will be critical to their long-term success and the success of our firm. We are working to break the stigma around mental health, leading by example with vulnerability, and creating safe spaces for open dialogue, including the creation of our “Healthy Heads” employee resource group (ERG) – which launched January 2021.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

I am satisfied with the culture of my workplace. 7.49

Would you recommend your organization as a good place to work? 7.65

The workplace enables and inspires sustainable living. 7.02

PAGE 22

How often do you feel engaged in your work? 7.65

My physical health is supported. Pre-Covid - 7.65 Post-Covid - 7.44

The workplace supports mindfulness. 7.13


04

Health + Well-being | Initiatives + Achievements Integral Engaged | Wellness Council Directed at supporting an engaged and accountable workplace environment that supports all facets of employee health. In 2020 the Wellness Council:

• Focused on breaking the stigma associated with mental health • Taking proactive measures to support and equip employees in maintaining their mental health during the pandemic • Worked closely with the Diversity Council to create a mental health Employee Resource Group (ERG)

RUOK? Day

• Explored partnerships with third party mental health experts

”I am more likely to check in with teammates about happiness in general, not just from a work viewpoint.”

• Began the conversation around mental health within the firm

Grassroots Events at the Local Level: • Virtual Team Building events; happy hours, games nights, weekly wonders, roundtables, team scrums, check-ins, etc. (Global) • Pi Day was celebrated - with pi(e) of course! (Oakland, Vancouver) • Virtual Meditation Monday (Vancouver, Victoria) • Financial Wellbeing seminars for all US Offices • Monthly themed Wellness Calendars (Vancouver, Victoria) • Headspace Challenge (Global) • Bike to Work Week + Movement May fitness challenges (Vancouver) • Halloween Contest (Global)

• Celebrated RUOK? Day (Australia)

Planking Challenge

5 for 5 Challenge

Virtual Holiday Party

“Taking a quick break and stepping away from my desk and work gives me an opportunity to get some fresh air, mentally reset, and get some more sunshine!”

• Various office social events pre-pandemic, such as; ski day, picnics, offsite team building events (Global) • Shared resources for and recognized World Mental Health Day (Global) • Implemented a Mental Health Policy (Australia)

Integral Groups Honorable Mentions: • Elementa Consulting win CIBSE Employer of the Year Award

Virtual Baby Shower

City Run Race

• IG | Vision Event: COVID19 + Workplace Wellness • Released recommendations and guidance on at home workstations • Conducted third party mental health training to 30+ members of the Management Team to ‘Start the Conversation’

”I downloaded Headspace to meditate, walk frequently, exercise when I can, and took part in the ERG Heathy Heads group at IG.”

Wellness Calendar

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 23


Health + Well-being Handprint | Relevant Project Telopea’s 2045 Urban Renewal: Health + Well-being for everyone! Imagine | Redevelopment with social intent. Integral Group has been engaged by Frasers Property to lead the social sustainability ambitions of this urban redevelopment project within the heart of Telopea, NSW, Australia. Inspire | The project is set to be the first WELL Community rated project in NSW and only second in Australia, setting a mayor precedent in the delivery of Health and Wellbeing benefits at scale (35.6 acres of land). In addition to an existing local school, the precinct will be comprised of: • several residential buildings, including commercial housing, affordable housing and community housing; • community and public spaces such as parks and playgrounds; • a church or religious edification; • a community center; and • retail spaces of mixed-use such as commercial amenities and community services.

End users such as residential occupants, owners/ tenants of retails spaces and other mixed-use spaces, the surrounding community, and visitors will benefit from initiatives such as: • smoking bans; • specially designed children's playgrounds, pet friendly facilities and spaces for physical activity; • mass transport connectivity, pedestrian walkability, cycleways; • mixed-use facilities and services within walking distance; • drinking water facilities and promotion; • breastfeeding facilities and programs; • urban agriculture promotion, education and local community gardens; healthy eating marketing and offerings; • extreme weather event warnings and emergency plans (for example for heat waves which are very relevant in Australia); • Legionella control; • among others.

New crosswalks between certification rating systems!

Nurture | Delivering H&W initiatives to disadvantaged and vulnerable populations who characteristically inhabit community housing is an unprecedented governmental commitment to social sustainability. Trust | We are supporting our institutions in establishing trust between the development teams and the local community members. Perform | The strategy is to seek both “Green Star Communities” and “WELL Communities” certification, in addition to 5 Star Green Star Design and As Built certification for buildings within the precinct. Sustain | Creating a platform to support the delivery of H&W outcomes throughout all 3 stages of the project, which spans over a 25 years timeframe and goal of achieving WELL pre-certification initially as a sign of commitment. Accelerate | Drawing unprecedented crosswalks between “Green Star Communities” and “WELL Communities” certifications. WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

ACTIVE TRANSPORT MODES

BIODIVERSITY

URBAN FARMING

20 MINUTES CITIES Client | Frasers Property Architect | Hassel + Plus Architecture + Bates Smart Location | Telopea NSW Australia, Size: 14 Hectares / 35.6 Acres of land Developer| Frasers Property Australia (FPA)

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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04


Education + Impact

Mentorship No matter the style or format of mentorship, whether it be an organic bond created, a formal program, or a skills sharing training session, one thing always remains the same, mentorship is mutually beneficial for both the mentor and mentee. We have a wealth of knowledge and experience within our workforce, in the form of industry experts and thought leaders. In 2021, Integral will be working to build a global mentorship program to ensure we are providing opportunities which will suit the needs of our employees to achieve development and growth at every level. “I’ve mentored a number of Engineers in the UK within our local programme to help them achieve Chartered Engineer Status. I’ve found it to be a highly rewarding experience for myself both personally and giving me a different perspective as a manager. I am very proud of our commitment to growing our own future leaders of the practice.” – Simon Ebbatson, Principal, London INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 25


05

Education + Impact | Action Plan OVERVIEW Education + Impact is about our commitment to internal professional training, development, and employee engagement, as well as external involvement and contributions to our local communities. Our local CSER office champions continued to be our eyes and ears, gathering information on internally hosted trainings and presentations, which occurred throughout the year despite having to learn to present and engage virtually. In this way, our impact is truly a grassroots effort. JEDI Intersections | In 2020, we changed the underlying strategy for our Education + Impact work following the release of our Anti-Racism Task Force Action Plan. To be a deep green and equitable engineering and consultancy firm, we needed to play our part by supporting a talent pipeline of underrepresented groups through our outreach, fundraising and volunteer activities. We began to advocate for environmental justice with our clients and work more closely with Design for Justice consultants. We began to direct efforts on anti-racism education with our employees by sharing resources, encouraging self-learning and starting conversations during our annual #WeAreIntegral Month. JUST 2.0 – Stewardship | One of the ways we continued to make an impact was to recertify our global JUST™ 2.0 label. The JUST program serves like a nutrition label for organizations seeking to become socially just and equitable. It represents our renewed commitment to transparency on charitable giving, as well as giving back to and positively impacting our local communities. Using the JUST label as a benchmark, we have added three (3) new KPIs to this category, as well as to multiple CSER-related action plans. Impact Fund | One of our Founder’s initiatives is linked to ongoing research & development (R&D), known as the Impact Fund. In 2020, we spent time reimaging the future of our R&D program as there were no new funds awarded in 2020 due to the financial realities faced during the pandemic. Some projects from 2019 rolled over and our R&D continued through externally funded sources and grants.

IMPACT DASHBOARD | Our online Impact dashboard allows you to browse our data in the category of Education + Impact in more detail, including year on year trending. Access our Impact dashboard by clicking here.

Global Performance Desired Outcomes

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Unit of Measurement

Number of company supported volunteer hours (Integral Gives)

Delta (+/-)

Global Targets

2018

2019

2020

Progress since baseline

Gap to Target

No. of hours per employee

-

-

Program in development

-

n/a

Community Volunteering JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 1

Baseline set

n/a

Level 1

Level 2

Level 2

Charitable Giving JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 2

Baseline set

n/a

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Total charitable giving (donation from organization + raised by staff)

$USD

$20,658

$46,568

$15,366

-$5,292

n/a

No Target

No Target

No Target

9.5

Amount awarded for Impact Fund

$USD + % profit

$190,000 (6.7% of profit)

$200,000 (-50.0% of profit)

$11,600 (1.0% of profit)

Baseline set

+0.5%

-

Average annual professional development hours utilized per person

# of hours per person (hrs pp)

-

Tracking process in development

7.7hrs per person

Baseline set

-2.3hrs

-

Training & Education JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

-

-

Level 2

UN SDGs

Integral commits to pro-bono projects and volunteer activities that assist our communities to lift themselves up, with a focus on those who are systemically underresourced.”

2020 NOW

2025 NEXT

2030 FUTURE

Program in 8 hours per 8 hours per Developyear per year per ment employee employee

17.7

Integral actively supports educational organizations to build a talent pipeline that that bolsters our JEDI goals and works towards achieving demographic parity through community outreach and charitable giving (eg, National Society of Black Engineers, Society of Women Engineer, girlswhoengineer.com, etc).

All employees have access to mentors and are provided resources to support their professional and personal development.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 26

Baseline set

n/a

0.5% profit 0.5% profit 0.5% profit

10hrs pp

18 hrs pp

25 hrs pp

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4


05

Education + Impact | Results HANDPRINT + FOOTPRINT The category of Education + Impact is where our staff begin to witness a close correlation between our footprint (internal) and our handprint (external). We focus on education both internally through professional development, as well as externally through industry events, presentations and helping to build a future pipeline of engineers and environmental activists. The following are examples of how we have been making positive impact in the building industry and within our communities over the past year: Integral Awards | Since 2012, we have taken the opportunity to celebrate the most impactful projects through the annual Integral Awards initiative, created by our founder, Kevin Hydes. The awards celebrate technical excellence on projects, as well as innovation through internal initiatives. The awards are externally adjudicated by recognized experts from their respective fields within the industry This year we chose to feature one project per CSER category within this report to demonstrate our handprint. Mission and Values Alignment | We recognize that when we have a sense of purpose and connection to a greater goal, we are more engaged and productive, which leads to creating space for more innovation. This is the reality we aim to create for our employees and is represented within our core values. We hope to see the scores for values alignment increase as our impact grows, as we are better able to measure the positive impact on the planet through our projects.

2020 Global Staff Results

1

Disagree

2

3

Neutral 4

5

Strongly Agree

Agree 6

7

8

9

10

Scores below are global mean averages from the 2020 All-Staff survey

I have a good working relationship with my colleagues. 8.65

My day-to-day work contributes to the company’s mission. 7.60

Working Relationships | We are proud of our culture, and based on the relationship results, are pleased to see that there is a unique sense of kinship and togetherness.

I am inspired to meet my goals at work. 6.95

Career Development | We want to instill a drive and passion in our employees that goes beyond today, and into tomorrow by ensuring that there is a clear career pathway for our employees to continue to grow and achieve within the firm. A more formalized career development programs is a top priority for the coming years. Community Impact | The pandemic also affected our ability to give back to our communities through in-person volunteering events, which had played a big part of our culture in the past. We still managed to run staff fundraiser events and make impactful charitable contributions to global causes, totaling $15,366 USD. IG | Vision | In 2020, we have created IG | Vision, a webinar series to discuss and explore important themes coming up in our work, and showcase innovation and thought leadership from our in-house subject matter experts from across the globe.

Strongly Disagree

Scale

Volunteer Hours WITH COMPANY

PERSONALLY

4.7 hrs

14. 9 hrs

Average amount of time an employee spends per year participating in volunteer activities

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 27

I have a good working relationship with my supervisor. 8.38

I am able to recognize our core values within my day-to-day work. 7.10


05

Education + Impact | Initiatives + Achievements Integral Engaged | Integral Gives

“I’ve learned new visual tools to communicate.”

Integral Gives has developed a global framework formalizing Integral's commitment and approach to giving back - supporting the most vulnerable and under-resourced communities through our technical expertise, time and funds. In 2020 Integral Gives: • Created the framework, policies, procedures and tools for the program • Facilitated #WeAreIntegral Month with a focus on anti-racism, collaborating with the Anti-Racism Task Force (ARTF)

Grassroots Events at the Local Level: • Discipline + Manufacturer virtual Lunch & Learn sessions (200+ Global) • Internal Mechanical + Electrical Academies (British Columbia Offices)

Toronto Food Bank

• Internal technical training, presentations + design series (100+ Global) • IG Talks presentations at local offices highlighting projects and learnings • #WeAreIntegral Month: annual tradition which recognizes our firm’s diverse workforce and commitment to inclusion in a month-long event which supported regional charities who are focused on anti-racism • Local Campaigns + Fundraisers, including but not limited to: Food Drive for Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto) Jeans Day – BC Children’s Hospital (Vancouver) Oxford Homeless Pink Shirt Day – CKNW Kids Fund (Vancouver + Toronto) Power to Be (Victoria) Teenage Cancer Trust, NHS Trust charities + Sant’Egidio (Oxford + London) • Red Bag Appeal + RUOK? (Brisbane) • Movember + WIRES (Sydney + Vancouver) • • • • • •

“I have spent additional time developing personal skills and increased training development.”

Consult Australia Awards

• Global fundraising for the Beirut Disaster Relief Support • Volunteering: Belkin House – Salvation Army, Blood Donations (prepandemic in Vancouver), and Robogals (Sydney)

Belkin House

Integral Groups Honorable Mentions: • Richard Palmer, GBCA Green Star Champion, featured in GBCA Carbon Leaders Series • Kevin Hydes presents at Design-Build Conference & Expo

Movember Campaign

• Elementa Release CPD Programme To read more about awards and conference presentations not listed, head to our website and check our News and Insights.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Bushfire Support Fundraising

“In 2020 I became more inclined to give back (dropped meals and supplies for the homeless every Sunday).”

PAGE 28


05

Education + Impact Handprint | Relevant Project The Meaning of (Whole) Life

Whole life carbon is greenhouse gas emissions, measured in CO2 equivalent, associated with the following lifecycle stages:

Elementa carried out a Whole Life Carbon analysis of a demonstration building for a local council in the UK. This analysis was completed for the whole building including, substructure, superstructure, facades, finishes and building services. We compared the following;

We help our clients design, build, operate, and renew with a clear understanding of whole life environmental impacts, both at the architecture and MEP level.

• Code compliant fabric with a communal gas boiler and heat pump (Baseline) • Ultra-low energy building fabric with a heat pump (Option 1) • Ultra-low energy building fabric with direct electric (Option 2)

Click here to learn more about our Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Whole Life Carbon consulting services.

This analysis included operational energy consumption calculated using PHPP a predictive modelling software. The Whole Life Carbon assessment assumed a decarbonized grid at an average of 54 g CO2/kwh, this is why the proportion of whole life carbon that is associated with operational energy is so small. An in-depth embodied carbon analysis of the different heating system options for each scenario was also carried out. For the development with ultra-low energy building fabric with a heat pump (Option 1), two options were compared:

Two refrigerant leakage scenarios were explored for the scenarios that included heat pumps. Refrigerant leakage has a tiny impact in the low leakage scenario (1% annual leakage and 1% leakage at end of life) but can have a quite significant impact under the high leakage scenario (4% annual leakage & 3% leakage at end of life). CONCLUSIONS | The conclusion of the embodied carbon comparison of this 4 heating options is that under a low refrigerant leakage scenario the heat pump solutions have a broadly similar embodied carbon than the baseline (communal gas boiler and heat pump). The embodied carbon of the direct electric heating system is very low. Both of the ultra-low energy fabric scenarios have less Whole Life Carbon than the baseline (London Plan compliant fabric with a communal gas boiler and heat pump). With the low refrigerant leakage scenario, both ultra-low energy fabric scenarios have similar whole life carbon emissions. However, the direct electric option exceeds the zero-carbon energy budget of 35 kWh/m2. If all buildings are built to this specification, it is less likely that the electricity grid will be able to decarbonize.

Whole building including MEP services life carbon emissions throughout the building lifecycle (A1 – C4) over 60 years (tCO2e): Equivalent Carbon emissions A1- C4 (tCO2e)

• Individual water to water heat pump connected to and ambient loop (Option 1A) • Individual air to water heat pump (Option 1B)

2500

2000

1500

1000

500

Therefore, the ultra-low energy building fabric with a heat pump and low refrigerant leakage rate was the preferred option. INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

0 BASELINE: OPTION 1: London Plan Compliant fabric Ultra Low Energy fabric with with communal gas boiler heat pump and heat pump

PAGE 29

OPTION 2: Ultra Low Energy fabric with direct electric

Client | Local Council; Collaboration: with Etude & Levitt Bernstein Location | London UK


Safety + Resilience

Conscious Face-to-face (F2F) At the start of 2020, the term “social distancing” was an unknown phrase outside the epidemiology, virology and emergency planning communities. But today, it is part of the global lexicon. The concept of distancing from our friends, family and colleagues was unheard of, and the complexities of complying with mandated government orders has changed not only the way we interact, socialize, work and play, but it has changed the focus of how we design buildings, and the systems that keep them operating. Health, resilience & safety have become a bigger focus in our design process. Today, some of the regions in which we work are starting to ‘open up’ after long periods of restrictions, while others remain in strict lockdowns. We continue to be conscious of our personal space, and that of others. When we do meet for long-awaited reunions and Return To Office (RTO), our top priority of health and safety of our employees and their families will endure. INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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06

Safety + Resilience | Action Plan OVERVIEW

Global Performance

The traditional approach to Environmental, Health & Safety (EH&S) ensures that we are meeting code compliance in each office as a foundational minimum expectation. In late 2019, we saw the opportunity to examine “Safety” in a way which encompassed “Resilience” by ensuring comprehensive contingency planning and developing a more resilient business model. We recognize that Integral stepped up to play an important thought leadership role during the global health crisis. With COVID being an air-born disease, our expertise in ventilation and computational-fluid dynamics became even more relevant. We took the opportunity to proactively apply the health resiliency practices from advising our clients to our internal operations where possible. In addition to our emergency COVID-19 response, we focused on the following business resilience protocols in 2020: Anti-Bribery & Corruption | In June 2020, we released a global roll-out of our Anti-Bribery and Anti-Corruption Policy, which was reinforced with supplemental training, deployed to all employees using our new interactive training platform. The training is important for us - we see it as a critical component of maintaining a culture of integrity, and wanted to ensure all employees and suppliers understand the consequences at both the personal and business levels if non-compliance should occur. ISO 9001:2015 + ISO 14001:2015 Management Systems| A number of our offices maintain certification to internationally recognized standards in regions where certification is an expected signal of competency to our clients. Integral enrol in these certifications as they are a powerful tool that helps us manage our business effectively, boosts operational resilience and builds our organizational knowledge for the long term. In regions where ISO certification is not an expectation of our clients, Integral utilize the key aspects of the ISO standards to build business resilience. We have rolled-out policies and procedures at the global level to ensure a consistency of working standards across all our regions.

"I am delighted that our employees have engaged in a culture where Safety + Resiliency are paramount to our ongoing success, and look forward to strengthening our approach with new initiatives in the near future.“ - Doug Kerr, Chief Risk Officer, London

Desired Outcomes

Our people feel confident that they are coming to a safe place to work.

Integral's operation processes are flexible and agile in order to sustain across changing times (PESTLE) allowing us to continue our mission of making positive impact on the planet.

Senior and office leadership have second-in-command, to ensure resilient business model as well as support mentorship and mobility pathways.

Integral is recognized and respected as an Ethical & Responsible Business and therefore sought after as a partner of choice within the industry.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Delta (+/-)

Global Targets

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Unit of Measurement

2018

2019

2020

Progress since baseline

Gap to Target

2020 NOW

2025 NEXT

2030 FUTURE

-

% of offices with Health and Safety Representative or Committee

% offices

n/a

n/a

90.9%

Baseline set

n/a

Record Data

70%

100%

-

Number of time-loss claims

#

n/a

n/a

0

Baseline set

0

0

0

0

-

Total work days lost to incidents

# of days

n/a

n/a

1

Baseline set

+1

0

0

0

-

Average number of days lost to incidents (per person)

# days per person

n/a

n/a

0.002

Baseline set

+0.002

0

0

0

13.1

% of offices with formalized Emergency Response Plans

% offices

n/a

n/a

100%

Baseline set

n/a

Record data

70%

100%

13.1

% of formalized IT Disaster Recovery Protocol

% offices

n/a

n/a

10.0%

Baseline set

n/a

Record data

70%

100%

-

Number of senior positions with a succession plan in place

#

n/a

n/a

0.0%

Baseline set

n/a

Record data

75%

100%

-

Number of senior positions with a second in command

#

n/a

n/a

91.7%

Baseline set

n/a

Record data

75%

100%

16.5

ABC Training % complete

% complete

n/a

n/a

98%

Baseline set

-2%

100%

100%

100%

10.1

Living Wage JUST Label Score

Score (out of 4)

Level 1 (2017)

-

Level 3

+2 levels

0

Level 3 Average

Level 2 Minimum

Level 3 Minimum

12.7

% of suppliers returning assessments (minimum 30 per year to be sent)

% returned

n/a

n/a

Under Development

n/a

n/a

Survey Created

Program Released

80%

12.7

% of suppliers with procedures compliant with ISO14001

%

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Survey Created

Program Released

50%

12.7

% of suppliers, contractors, manufacturers and vendors whose practices align with our values

% suppliers

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Program in Development

Program Released

75%

PAGE 31

Under Development

Under Development


06

Safety + Resilience | Results EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS In 2018, the senior management team had undertaken a strategic planning session to re-imagine the firm’s long-term direction and set goals for 2025. As part of this session, our leaders performed a full horizon scan and completed a PESTLE (Political, Economical, Societal, Technological, Environmental and Legislative) analysis. This risk assessment exercise, while failing to predict a global health pandemic, put us in a great position from a resiliency perspective to better anticipate change. We had clarity on where we could pivot if we needed to, and we were well-prepared to accelerate some of the actions that had been planned for the coming 2-3 years. For example, but not limited to: • Leveraging Dar Group support + RTO Planning • The move to Microsoft Teams • Moving IT to the Cloud + transitioning staff to laptops • Backup planning for Accounting

COVID-19 Response The global pandemic caused the world to face a new reality that impacted our personal lives and the way we work. As a firm deeply committed to the health and wellbeing of our employees, we wanted to support our employees in feeling secure and mentally healthy during a time of prolonged separation.

Route to Re-entry Shock

Denial and disbelief

Even now, as we are completing our 2020 report, returning to the office following COVID-19 still feels distant for many of our employees, depending on the region in which they live. The “Playbook” we developed in the early phase of the pandemic to outline the new health and well-being protocols are well-practised, and most of our staff have shown to be resilient in a work from home setting.

Realization Confront the impacts and dynamics

Respond

Shelter in place drive workplace closures

Future-fit resiliency planning

Parallel path to more resilient and adaptive future state

• Next = Supporting employees to return to offices and re-connecting with their colleagues, applying the theory that “we work better together than we do apart”, while at the same time being flexible

Feed, nurture and cultivate - thrive

Implement the new vision

Reimagination Establish a future vision

Long-term re-entry planning

While we don’t know when our all of offices will re-open, we look forward to a safe and successful return to office (RTO) for all employees in the coming months. Our approach continues to rely on the “Now, Next, Future” framework: • Now = Focus on RTO planning, as and when it is safe to do so, guided by regional restrictions, rules and legislation

Flourish

Implementation

Re-imagine workplace of the future

Workplace continuity • • •

Scale remote work program Communication / governance Scenario planning

Interim re-entry Productivity challenge Improve productivity

• Future = Resilient Workplace strategies + Future of Work planning

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

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Prepare for buildings to re-open adapted from JLL © 2020


06

Safety + Resilience | Initiatives + Achievements Grassroots Events at the Local Level:

“We had a very scary fire season in California. We are fully stocked and ready now for earthquakes and fires. Being prepared has helped reduce my anxiety substantially.”

• COVID-19 safety measures taken in applicable offices for return to office including; reduced in-office staff attendance, workstation spacing, desk barrier screens, sanitation stations, attendance trackers, social distancing floor markers to manage traffic flow, increased janitorial sanitation measures and more. • Temporary policies released for safe site visits during the pandemic • 250 employees enrolled in our Headspace program • Safety Committee for the US region was established

Integral Groups Honorable Mentions:

Guide to WFH

Social Distancing Measures

• Comprehensive RTO checklist, manager and employee Playbooks, signage and communication materials developed and released within two months of beginning WFH

• Article written for Intelligent Glass Solutions Magazine by Kevin Hydes and David Barker: COVID and the Commercial Workplace: Now, Next Future • Policy + Planning team released COVID-19 Economic Stimulus Policy Recommendations for Canada • Principals and residential sector leaders David Glossop and Rob Harris offer their insights on what to expect from the industry postCOVID-19: After COVID-19 What’s next for residential developments • Carl McKenzie, Elementa Principal and Chairman of the Professional Development Committee with the Institute of Healthcare Engineering and Estate Management (IHEEM), offers his views on: What Next for Healthcare Estates

Meeting Room Occupancy Guides

“Ensuring my desk is set up properly at home.”

• Internal Company Communications with tips and resources for healthy work from home routines and workspaces: ‘Top Tips for Successful Work from Home Employees’ and ‘Making the Most of your WFH Workspace’ were provided by our long-term Work From Home (WFH) employees • The Integral IT team deserves a monumental kudos for ensuring that a quick transition to cloud-based technology needed for an effective WFH model across the globe was implemented quickly and left our business unhampered by major technical issues or roadblocks

”Implemented more robust scheduling and follow ups to ensure everyone is constantly aware of what should be happening.” Office Sanitation Station

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 33

Desk Barriers


Safety + Resilience Handprint | Relevant Project British Columbia’s (BC) Building Electrification Road Map WHY BUILDING ELECTRIFICATION? Buildings account for nearly 11% of provincial emissions across British Columbia (BC), and 30% to 60% of emissions for many of BC’s municipalities. Therefore, many jurisdictions including the Province of BC, have outlined plans and programs to help support a gradual decarbonization of the building sector. Many of these strategies hinge on the concept of building electrification, which refers to the replacement of fossil fuel-powered building operating systems, (such as heating, domestic hot water, and cooking) with low-carbon electric powered systems. However, while provincial and local governments in BC are exploring means of electrifying the building sector, there is yet to be established a clear pathway that shows the roles, responsibilities and steps that building industry members can and need to play in effecting a shift towards largescale building electrification.

CHARTING THE PATH This is why we helped develop the Building Electrification Road Map – a set of tactical actions, including the right sequence and steps necessary to ensure that BC’s building sector will reap the benefits of a clear and coordinated market transformation. Working for BC Hydro and a Steering Committee made up of key stakeholders, we provided the research, stakeholder engagement, and modelling necessary to chart the pathway to meet the following vision: “By 2030, nearly all new and most replacement domestic hot water and space heating systems in BC’s homes and buildings will be high-efficiency electric, in pursuit of a province-wide shift to low-carbon buildings.”

WORKING TOGETHER We worked in partnership with the New Buildings Institute and our engagement specialist Susanna Haas Lyons over the course of 2020 to ensure a comprehensive and stakeholder-driven road map that would garner the buy-in and consensus necessary to drive emissions reductions. The Road Map represents the views and insights of over 150 stakeholders from across the province and will be carried out over the next 10 years by a dedicated coalition.

Figure 1 - Estimated energy mix change in British between 2050 that is needed achieve 2050 the province's climate goals. The estimated energy mixColumbia change in 2010 BCand between 2010to and needed to

achieve the province’s climate goals shows the importance of switching from fossil fuels to BC’s clean hydroelectricity

Strategy

Objective

Improve Cost Competitiveness

• • • • •

Demonstrate provincial leadership with messaging and market signals Raise levels of consumer awareness about the benefits of electrification Establish GHG performance and climate resilience requirements Require building GHG performance reporting and disclosure Set a minimum energy performance standard for equipment of COP > 1 by 2035 Reduce equipment and whole building capital costs Level the playing field between natural gas and electric operational costs Reduce electricity connection and system upgrade fees Address housing affordability and building electrification Reduce transactional costs for consumers

Address Systemic Barriers

• • • •

Reflect high-efficiency features more accurately in property appraisals Reduce landlords’ legal barriers to undertake electrification retrofits Ensure buildings connected to district energy systems can decarbonize Improve access to capital

• • • •

Expand the electrification sales force Improve building electrification awareness, coordination, and advocacy Build industry knowledge and competence Expand the use of trade certifications, guidelines and streamlined permitting Support growth in the number of people in the building electrification trades sector

Create Market Demand

Expand Industry Capacity

• • • • •

Increase Available Technologies

• • • • •

Support the development of building and equipment standards Accelerate the certification of promising new technologies Support the introduction of already certified technologies Accelerate the adoption of low Global Warming Potential technologies Expand the market in North America for building electrification

The BC Building Electrification Road Map outlines five core strategies and a number of associated objectives, actions, and key partners necessary to elicit a market transformation towards widespread adoption of low-carbon, electric buildings

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

The distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Attributed to Buildings in BC shows the importance of decarbonizing the residential sector, as well as commercial and institutional buildings

PAGE 34

Client | Steering Committee made up of BC Hydro, Province of BC, City of Vancouver, City of Richmond, and Metro Vancouver Location | British Columbia (BC), Canada

06


Conclusion

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PAGE 35


07

Conclusion 2020 Outcomes

2021 Opportunities

We are emboldened by the progress made through the 2020 year and covered in this report in the following areas:

In 2021, we will focus our efforts in the following areas to make progress towards our targets and goals:

• Global gender pay equity, and pay scale analysis undertaken as part of our JUST 2.0 label

• Advocacy of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs), especially those most impacted by our industry

• Utilization of Headspace® as a global benefit, helping employees build personal mental health strategies

• Apprenticeships and jobs creation (e.g. “Build-back Together” BidenHarris initiative)

• Submission of our baseline information (2019 data) to the World Green Building Council as required by the Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

• Continuing progress with our Anti-Racism Action Plan

• Release of our Anti-Racism Task Force Action Plan; embedding its metrics into the CSER framework; helping us develop new KPIs related to the inclusion and empowerment of underrepresented minority groups

• Celebrating hitting our 2020 targets: Environmental Footprint • 100% Offset Scope 1 & Scope 2 GHG Emissions • >10% reduction in average EUI compared to our baseline • >20% reduction in total GHG emissions per capita Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion (JEDI) • >50% of all staff from underrepresented groups; >20% of staff from underrepresented minority groups • >40% of leadership from underrepresented groups; >10% of leadership from underrepresented minority groups

• Targets for % female Associate Principals and Office Leadership levels met, and only 1% off target for % female Principals

• Improvements to our data dashboards to include prior years data for better transparency and trending • Launching the ‘new office checklist’ which aligns with our CSER goals, WGBC Net Zero Carbon Buildings commitment, and strategic business plans

• Investigating how we can align our internal suppliers, and our recommended manufacturers, contractors and suppliers to our CSER goals • Begin external stakeholder engagement & materiality assessment • Evaluate the WGBC Whole Life Carbon commitment • Witnessing the first deliverables and recommendations from the Integral Engaged Initiatives: •

Net Zero Carbon Operations | Release of our Zero Carbon Operations Action Plan

Diversity Council | Employee Resource Groups (ERGs)

Wellness Council | Mental Health Action Plan

Integral Gives | Launch of our formalized program for volunteering, pro bono work and fundraising

Safety + Resiliency | Re-imagining and re-launching this initiative

Health + Wellbeing • JUST label score for Employee Engagement jumped up 2 levels since 2018 confirming the ongoing effort in to provide engagement opportunities has been recognized

• Return to Office (RTO) post-pandemic

• 186 social events held across the firm, mainly virtual due to the difficulties in connecting face-to-face during the pandemic

• Recommencing the waste-audit process

Education + Impact and Safety + Resilience • Baselines set for all KPIs, giving us a clear understanding of where progress can be made

• Restarting our Fitwel certifications • Future of Work planning • Measuring our Handprint (Impact Reporting)

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Atlanta Studio PAGE 36


07

Conclusion | Looking Forward INTEGRAL ENGAGED Integral Engaged, our grassroots initiative program, was officially launched in 2020, creating 5 working groups, one per CSER category, that promote staff engagement. These initiatives help guide internal efforts to achieve global impact, are employee-led, and driven with the support of the CSER Core Team. We encourage employees to join these initiatives using an application process open to all staff. Initiative teams were selected to have a range of representation from each region, from multiple disciplines, and from different career levels. Each of the five teams is made up of regional champions, one global lead, as well as a sponsor.

Ramya Shivkumar Global Lead

For the Integral Engaged programs, 2020 was a year of brainstorming, planning, building frameworks, engaging local offices and doing the groundwork for things to come in 2021. So far in 2021, one initiative has been spotlighted per quarter. Each spotlight features a launch of their program and/or sharing their initiative action plan.

Yara Machnouk UK Champion

We are proud of the hard work and accomplishments from each team and look forward to the continued impact and legacy that they create.

CSER +

Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion (JEDI)

Diversity Council

Health + Well-Being

Wellness Council

Education + Impact

Integral Gives

Safety + Resilience

Safety + Emergency Response Planning

Employee led Initiatives!

CSER reporting categories

Zero Carbon Operations Plan

Shane Esmore Australia Champion

Anika Bell Canada Champion

Alex Pepper UK Champion

Briana Jeffery Global Lead

Sam Brooks Sponsor

Silvia Misuraca Australia Champion

Sinead Browne Canada Champion

Hellen Awino US Champion

Andrew Mather Sponsor

Zero Carbon Operations (ZCO)

Diversity Council

Integral pledged to making our Scope 1 and Scope 2 operational emissions net zero by 2020 as part of our commitment as a founding signatory with the World Green Building Council’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment.

With the launch of the Employee Resource Group (ERG) program in January 2021, the Diversity Council is focused on nurturing and growing this program to ensure maximum impact for our employees. Each ERG will have their own strategies to bolster their sense of community within the firm. The following ERGs were launched in January 2021: BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, Women, and Healthy Heads.

This commitment includes the need to introduce energy efficiency measures in all of our offices, advocate our landlords and property managers to move towards on-site renewable energy (where applicable), or move towards green power. We committed to making up the shortfall by purchasing highquality RECs /Offsets in the regions where the emissions are released, and to developing a transition plan to occupying buildings which will be Net Zero Carbon and all-electric by 2030.

Integral Engaged Environmental Footprint

Kanika Sharma US Champion

The initiative team is working toward publishing our Zero Carbon Operations Action Plan in 2021. The focus will then shift to how we can reduce operational emissions further and in turn reduce our REC/offset reliability. This includes reductions beyond just Scope 1 and 2 emissions, examining how we can reduce our highest impact Scope 3s - business flight and employee commute in line with our global targets. In 2021, we successfully purchased RECs / Offsets to make us Net Zero Carbon for our 2020 Scope 1 and 2 emissions, read more on this here.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 37

Following the release of our Anti-Racism Task Force Action Plan in February 2021, the Diversity Council, alongside the Anti-Racism Task Force (ARTF), will continue to act as an oversight body for the action plan, pushing for progress and accountability around our public commitments. Other projects the Diversity Council are focussed on include: ●

Building a ‘Glossary of Terms’ to remove gendered and often unintentionally inappropriate terms from workplace language Act as an advisory body on JEDI related or impacted policies, trainings and external communications Internal communications to share JEDI-related learnings and opportunities


07

Conclusion | Looking Forward

Sharon McGeorge Global Lead

Alexandra Garcia US Champion

Anais Engel US Champion

Sinead Browne Canada Champion

Marguerita Chorafa UK Champion

Tiffany Elston Sponsor

Harriet Lilley Global Lead

Antonio D’Aquilio UK Champion

Alan Miller US Champion

Roshan John Australia Champion

Megan White Sponsor

Joanne Walledge UK Champion

Louise Wilkinson Canada Champion

Gwen Welshman Australia Champion

Alan Miller US Champion

Doug Kerr Sponsor

Tiffany Elston Sponsor

Wellness Council

Integral Gives

Safety + Emergency Response Planning

Directed at looking into ways we can create an engaged and accountable workplace environment that supports all facets of health. This initiative also touches on how we can show up as our most authentic selves, feel connected to our mission, and be responsible for creating the community we wish to be a part of.

With the launch of the Integral Gives program in April 2021, employees from all locations can now utilise four hours annually toward volunteer activities during work hours. These hours can be used towards any of the four streams included in the program; Youth Outreach, Volunteering, Pro Bono Design and attending Integral Engaged Workshops.

This initiative was temporarily paused as the firm transitioned to a temporary work from home model in early 2020 due to the global pandemic.

In 2021, the primary focus of the Wellness Council will be creating a global Wellness Action Plan for release in Q4. This action plan will use our Now, Next, Future framework and will look to:

Throughout 2021 the Integral Gives team will continue to source and create opportunities for employees to give back to their local communities. This work will include:

Breaking the stigma around mental health

Provide mental health support and training for employees

Increase employee engagement and satisfaction at work

Support a healthy and authentic company culture

Build leadership skills within our pipeline

Offer personal development opportunities for growth

● ●

Engaging employees and creating intentional partnerships with non-for profits aligned with our CSER + Anti-Racism goals Overseeing our annual #WeAreIntegral Month to help increase awareness about volunteering opportunities Providing communications throughout the year to staff via our firmwide intranet and All Hands meetings to build awareness about the program

Maintaining a robust playbook to ensure alignment and positive impact Creating partnerships with local schools and youth organizations to help influence the up and coming pipeline of potential engineers

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 38

Covid-related global resilience strategies required implementation from the senior management team to keep all employees safe and productive at home. However, due to the hard work, flexibility and perseverance of our employees, we have used this time as an opportunity to create a foundation for this initiative. We expect this initiative to re-start in early 2022, once all offices have stabilized in their new, return-to-office reality. The goal of this initiative is to develop global and local emergency response protocols, evacuation plans and trainings; as well as on larger global business continuity plans. In addition to the initiative’s original intention, the committee has been supporting the submission of environmental, health & safety (EH&S) KPI’s to the Dar Group on a quarterly basis.


07

Acknowledgements The 2020 CSER initiative, including the report and the staff engagement events, is possible due to contributions from across the firm. Our global team of representatives includes a network of Office Champions, Integral Engaged Initiative members, Anti-Racism Task Force members, Peer Reviewers, Operational Teams (Finance, People, Marketing and Administration) and a Core CSER Team. Everyone involved provided expertise, effort, passion and dedication which deserve recognition. We are grateful to all employees who have attended and participated in workshops. We are grateful for our colleagues who had supported us to meet our 2020 goals but are no longer with the firm. Our “One Team, One Dream” mentality is what helps us to reach our Social and Environmental goals in the long and short term, and every contribution is valued deeply, and shapes who we are. #WeAreIntegral

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Adam LaRue

Dawn Park

Julia Hoffman

Sam Brooks

Adeel Ahmed

Dean Willows

Kanika Sharma

Samson Tam

Alan Miller

Debbie Halifax

Keeley O’Reilly

Sengavi Thirupathy

Alex Pepper

Denis Lvov

Kevin Hydes

Sharon McGeorge

Alexandra Garcia

Derick Thompson

Kristen Spoon

Shane Esmore

Alissa Roland

Donna Isaia

Lauren Frazier

Shannen Friel

Aliki Papasifaki

Doug Kerr

LaVeitra Gardner

Sierra Dennis

Allison Naganuma

Ed Garrod

Lily Hetherington

Silvia Misuraca

Alvin Varan

Emily Codlin

Lisa Kelly

Simon Ebbatson

Amber Hart

Gavin Laskey

Louise Wilkinson

Sinead Browne

Annie Martin

Genevieve Osariemen

Lydia Gomez

Suzie Pedersen

Andrew Mather

Gerritt Atkinson

Maciej Wodecki

Staly Chin

Anais Engel

Gerry Faubert

Marcel Tabor

Stephanie Soper

Anika Bell

Gwen Welshman

Marco Treglia

Tania Vasquez

Andy Chong

Hang Fong Lai

Marshall Duer-Balkind

Tatiana Schonhobel

Antonio D’Aquilio

Harriet Lilley

Marguerita Chorafa

Thuy Hoang

Bill Overturf

Heidi Mathena

Marilyn Specht

Tiffany Elston

Breanne Day

Helena Cowper

Marissa Clark

Tirion Evans

Briana Jeffery

Hellen Awino

Matt Colbert

Tom Berkhout

Bruno Vahedi

Jacques Bourgeois

Matt Grace

Tom Marseille

Bungane Mehlomakulu

James Perakis

Matt Hydes

Tonia Douglas

Caitlin Stead

James Tosh

Matthew Sykes

Tyler Disney

Candice Savery

Janika McFeely

Megan White

Violeta Stojkovic

Carl Foster

Jared Gow

Meloney Bulliner

Virginia Bailey

Cathy Chan

Jennie Kim

Michael Murphy

Yara Machnouk

Chandan Jain

Jennifer Harvey

Michel Wizenberg

Charles White

Jennifer Tanquay

Molly Schremmer

Chris Doel

Jessica Derban

Mudit Srivastava

Dan Popa

Jeremy Field

Nauman Sultan

David Arnott

Jhony Sanchez

Nura Darabi

David Barker

Joanne Walledge

Ramya Shivkumar

David Novak

Juan Contreras

Roshan John

PAGE 39


Appendix

David

Lynn

Tom

Sam

Jennie

Jorge

Elias

Mark

Latricia

Becky

Meloney

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 40


Governance, Methodology, Scope, Assumptions (1 of 2) METHODOLOGY

This report is based on available data to measure our baseline environmental and social performance. To facilitate future tracking and reporting we are developing a process for ongoing data collection. Where data was challenging to obtain, we used proxy values based on industry benchmark data as representative of the local region and building type. For reporting on our carbon emissions, we are currently focused on Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect) building emissions globally, as well as some Scope 3 operational emissions. We collected employee commute data by analysing the results of an All Staff Survey. We collected flight data using a combination of reviewing our travel records and expense forms, and working with our regional travel agents. Measuring our Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (JEDI) performance is done annually through an All-Staff Survey, through analysis performed as part of our JUST 2.0 label submission, as well as data collected from standard employee records. Data from employee records is scrubbed for anonymity by our People Director prior to analysis by the CSER team. Health and Well-being data is obtained partially through our All-Staff Survey. In addition to the survey, data is collected through certification efforts in select offices, our JUST 2.0 label and from our internal CSER tracking mechanisms with the help of our Office Champions. Education and Impact data is collected through internal tracking mechanisms, as well as the All-Staff Survey, and our JUST 2.0 label. Our team has reviewed this report for accuracy and validity. The final report was approved by the CEO, the Chair of the Board, and our CSO.

STAKEHOLDERS

This report is intended to be viewed by our employees, clients, and others with whom we collaborate. We want this report to inspire employees to continue to uphold our values and support our goals. We hope our clients will gain a better understanding of what makes us unique and how we are able to continuously strive for innovation and performance in our projects by taking action across all aspects of sustainability. We have completed annual internal stakeholder engagement since the inception of the CSER program. However, we have not executed external stakeholder engagement yet, but have identified this as a key 2021 opportunity.

SCOPE + STRUCTURE

This report contains data from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020. This is in alignment with our fiscal year. The data in this report pertains to all offices including all newly acquired offices across all of our regions.

CSER PERFORMANCE DASHBOARDS

See online CSER Performance Dashboards for more detailed results beyond that is included within this report:

• • • •

Environmental Footprint Justice, Equity, Diversity + Inclusion Health + Well-being Education + Impact

CORPORATE POLICIES Integral Group operates within a framework of policies, some of which are global and others which are regionally specific. These include: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Equal Opportunity Environmental Discrimination, Harassment & Retaliation Prevention Paid Parental Leave Professional Development and Training Employee Relations Health and Safety Travel Anti-Bribery & Anti-Corruption (ABC) Whistle Blowing Domestic Violence Mental Health

The following additional policies are available online through our JUST 2.0 Certification: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Workplace Diversity + Equity Engagement, Full-Time Employment Freedom of Association Pay Scale Equity Living Wage Gender Pay Equity Physical Health + Wellbeing Healthcare, Retirement Provisions Family/Medical Leave, Training/Education Local Communities Animal Welfare Charitable Giving + Volunteering Positive Products Equitable Purchasing

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 41

PEOPLE DATA Aside from the Gender Distribution, People Data was collected based on a voluntary All-Staff Survey during October 2020. Data from employee records is scrubbed for anonymity by our People Director prior to analysis by the CSER team. All-Staff Survey response rates were not 100%, so in turn the data is only representative of employees who completed the survey. Employee numbers listed are a static snapshot number based on the staff headcount when the survey was opened and are based on the number of employees in the system and not a Full Time Equivalence (FTE). Corporate employees were re-allocated to the office they most frequent.

PLANET DATA BASELINES | Baselines are set depending on category or key performance indicator in different ways. Most baselines are set using datasets from specific performance years, when we feel a data set has hit a high enough quality standard. Where no previous baseline data exists, the current year will become the baseline if the data quality is deemed good enough. Where the data quality is not yet optimal, the baseline will be set once we hit the data quality target. Baselines have been set or will be set based as follows: • Energy and Water - the first year for which there is GOOD data for an office will be the baseline year (see data quality framework on page 43). • Business Travel – 2018 and 2019 data used for comparison only. 2020 was intended to be our new baseline year, however as the global pandemic affected travel significantly, 2022 to be our new goal to baseline data. • Employee Commute - 2018 performance (prorated by headcount) is the baseline for most offices. Where new offices opened in 2019, this data will be their baseline. New offices for 2020 will not be baselined until 2022. • Waste - not applicable – we will target the 2022 dataset will be our baseline for future reports. • Supply Chain - TBD

08


Governance, Methodology, Scope, Assumptions (2 of 2) Benchmark | Benchmarked data ideally comes from third party sources,

and does not reflect actual performance of our buildings. Its primary use is to compare our performance to that expected of a similar building, in a similar location. It is also used where actual consumption data was not available for an office. In these cases, standard benchmarking datasets and tools were used to determine typical electric, gas, and water use intensities for office buildings within similar regional zone. Where Benchmarked data is not available for non-utility based KPI’s, we use high quality annual data sets (baseline) normalized for current headcount to create an internal benchmark. This is typical of our Scope 3 measurements such as Employee Commute and Business Flights.

Energy & Water Data | For offices that needed to rely on benchmarking proxy data either:

• Data was collected from pro-rated landlord building data • Data was benchmarked from publicly disclosed data • Data was benchmarked from other published data These methods introduce a margin of error that is difficult to quantify – as the data is not from raw data, nor is it representative of only office use (it includes all common areas and can be particularly problematic for mixeduse buildings - particularly if the other uses have energy-intensive uses, such as hotels, or have industrial uses). It was assumed that the Electrical Grid Carbon Factor sources (listed to the right) were representative of 2020 energy generation. Knowing that not all factors are updated annually, the most current data available was used for all calculations. Publicly disclosed, or benchmark data had to be used for: • Calgary - Leased area consumption was calculated from the Canadian Median EUI for offices (SCIEU 2014) • Los Angeles – CBECS 2012 Average Office EUI, GUI and WUI used • New York - City benchmarking disclosure (whole building) • San Jose - State of California benchmarking disclosure (whole building) • Seattle - Whole Building, Landlord shared Portfolio Manager • Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney Offices - base-building water consumption data was calculated from the NABERS disclosure where available, and the NABERS regional median from the 2019-20 Annual Report where is was not. • Toronto - Leased area gas and water consumption was calculated from the Canadian Median EUI for offices (SCIEU 2014) and the BOMA BEST 2017 National Green Building Report, respectively

Using building-specific disclosed data means that we are assuming energy consumption is equivalent in all leased areas of that building, and for regional benchmarks, it is assumed that the consumption is equivalent to an average building performance. Whole building utility bills (pro-rated for leasable space) were used for: • Australia: None – all spaces are sub-metered for electricity. No gas • Canada: Edmonton, Vancouver (partial sub-meter available), Victoria • Europe: Belgrade, Oxford (floor-level sub-meters), London (Water, part year) • USA: San Diego, Austin, Washington DC, Richmond

Employee Commute | Emissions data has been prorated for

transportation based on survey respondents and actual employee counts for October 2020 when the survey was completed. Where employees entered a time for their journey instead of a distance their response was not included in the calculation. Where employees were unable to provide a fuel efficiency for their vehicle, the UK Government DBEIS carbon factor for an average gas/petrol vehicle was applied even if they were not based in the UK where the factor is most relevant due to the difficulty in finding localized carbon factors for vehicles. For the metrics on % employees using each travel method, the predominant method was chosen per person to calculate the result. Where two methods were equal, the method that theoretically takes the most time was chosen. All offices were reported by assuming the data collected was representative of 250 working days in the year.

Waste | No waste data was collected in 2020 Business Travel | Corporate travel was split out from regional travel this

year to allow us to analyze the environmental cost of our business in more detail. In 2020, data was more complete as Integral had started using travel agencies that produce a report for all flights booked through them. As such, much fewer items were process through the expense system. Where business travel was tracked through the expense records, in most cases the starting and destination airports were recorded in the expense description, which allowed the emissions to be calculated based on air distance travelled, obtained using https://www.airmilescalculator.com/, and the UK Government DBEIS carbon factor for an average flight applied.

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 42

The individual who submitted the expense was contacted for additional information in instances when the flight details were missing. If clarity could not be obtained an average distance / $ value was applied to estimate the distance travelled.

Benchmarking Data Sources • US Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECs) 2012 - US and Canada • EIA EUI Median Data; EU Average Non Residential - Serbia • Statistics Canada Survey on Commercial and Institutional Energy Use (SCIEU), 2014 - Canada • BOMA BEST National Green Building Report, 2017 – Canada • Better Buildings Partnership Real Estate Environmental Benchmark, 2019 typical practice Air Conditioned Office – UK (all) + Serbia (water) • National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) - Whole Building Office Data Report 2019-2020 - Australia

Electrical Grid Carbon Factors • • • • •

DBEIS - UK Government (UK) eGRID – US carbon factors - US Environmental Protection Agency (USA) ES Portfolio Manager Technical Reference Guide (Canada) IGES List - Global Emissions Factor Listing (Serbia) NGA – National Greenhouse Accounts Factors (Australia)

08


08

Environmental Footprint | Data Quality Global Performance Rating

Atlanta (ATL)

Austin (ATX)

Belgrade (BEL)

Brisbane (BNE)

Calgary (CAL)

Edmonton (EDM)

Los Angeles (LA)

London (LON)

Melbourne (MEL)

New York (NY)

Oakland, CA (OAK)

Oxford (OX) Milton Park

Richmond (RVA)

San Diego (SD)

San Jose WeWork (SJ)

Seattle WeWork (SEA)

Sydney IG (SYD) Spring Street

Sydney (SYD) St Leonard’s

Toronto (TOR)

Vancouver (VAN) Floor 1

Vancouver (VAN) Floor 2

Victoria (VIC)

Washington DC (DC)

2020 Data Quality Performance

BETTER

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

N/A

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

N/A

GOOD

BETTER

N/A

N/A

GOOD

N/A

N/A

BETTER

N/A

NR

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BEST

N/A

GOOD

N/A

BEST

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

BEST

BEST

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

BEST

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

SCOPE 1 - Direct A

Company Facilities - Gas

Gas

B

Company Fleet Vehicles

Fleet Vehicle

SCOPE 2 - Indirect C (1) C (1)* C (2)

Electricity Purchased indirect Utilities (Electricity, District Steam*, Heating & Cooling for District Steam* Own Operations Use; Water) Water

BETTER

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BETTER

BETTER

N/A

N/A

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

BEST

NR

NR

NR

BEST

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

SCOPE 3 - Indirect Upstream D

Purchased Goods and Services

Office Supplies

E

Capital Goods

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

F

Fuel & Energy activities (not included in Scopes 1+2)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

G

Upstream transportation and distribution

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

H

Waste Generated in Operations

Waste

I

Business Travel

J

Employee Commuting

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

Business Travel

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

Employee Commuting

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

N/A

Not Applicable to our Business

NR

Not Reported at this time (Data points not available currently)

GOOD

Benchmarking Data (i.e. CBECS COM Energy / LEED Water Assumptions); preliminary data collection efforts which could use improvement (waste, flights, commute)

BETTER

Whole Building Metered Data OR Utility Bills - prorated usage by rentable area; better data quality, improvements made (waste, flights, commute)

BEST

Actual Sub-metered usage; great data quality, confident in accuracy (waste, flights, commute)

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

PAGE 43


08

Glossary Agender: Individuals who identify as not having a gender. Some describe themselves as genderless, while others see themselves as gender neutral.

Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (DBEIS) Factors: The UK government emission conversion factors for greenhouse gas company reporting.

Asexual: A lack of a sexual attraction or desire for other people. One maybe asexual, yet romantically attracted to others.

eGRID factors: The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive source of data on the environmental characteristics of almost all-electric power generated in the United States.

Aromantic: Individuals who experience little or no romantic attraction to others of any gender. One may be aromantic, yet sexually attracted to others. Androgyne/Androgynous: Identifying and/or presenting as neither distinguishably masculine nor feminine. Audit: A formal examination of an organization’s or individual’s processes or financial situation. Baseline: The baseline is the state against which change is measured. A baseline period is the period relative to which anomalies are computed. Bigender: Individuals who experience their gender identity as two genders at the same time or whose gender identity may vary between two genders.

Energy Efficiency: A ratio of service provided to energy input (e.g., lumens to watts in the case of light bulbs). Services provided can include buildings-sector end uses such as lighting, refrigeration, and heating: industrial processes; or vehicle transportation. Unlike conservation, which involves some reduction of service, energy efficiency provides energy reductions without sacrifice of service. May also refer to the use of technology to reduce the energy needed for a given purpose or service. Energy Use Intensity (EUI): The ratio of energy consumption to floor space. Ethnicity: A personal identification based on ancestry origin, language, and culture. Can also be based on religion, beliefs, and customs.

Bisexual: A person emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree.

Fitwel: A building rating system to provide guidelines to design and operate healthier buildings. A cheaper alternative to the WELL Building Standard.

Biophilia: The practice of incorporating nature and natural elements into the built environment

Gay: A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the same gender. Commonly used to describe men who are attracted to men.

Carbon Intensity: The amount of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) released per unit of another variable such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), output energy use or transport. Cisgender: A term used to describe a person whose gender identity aligns with those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth. (i.e. “Cisman” & “Ciswoman”) CO2-equivalent (CO2e, CO2eq) emission: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emission that would cause the same integrated radiative forcing, over a given time horizon, as an emitted amount of a greenhouse gas (GHG) or a mixture of GHGs. The CO2-equivalent emission is calculated by multiplying the emission of a GHG by its Global Warming Potential (GWP) for the given time horizon. For a mix of GHGs it is obtained by summing the CO2-equivalent emissions of each gas.

Gender-fluid: A person who does not identify with a single fixed gender; of or relating to a person having or expressing a fluid or unfixed gender identity. Genderqueer: Genderqueer people typically reject notions of static categories of gender and embrace a fluidity of gender identity and often, sexual orientation. People who identify as “genderqueer” may see themselves as being both male and female, neither male nor female or as falling completely outside these categories.

CSER: Corporate Social & Environmental Responsibility; Integral’s interpretation of Corporate Social Responsibility which has a deeper focus on the environment

Greenhouse gas emissions (GHG): Greenhouse gases are those gaseous constituents of the atmosphere, both natural and anthropogenic, that absorb and emit radiation at specific wavelengths within the spectrum of thermal infrared radiation emitted by the Earth’s surface, the atmosphere itself, and by clouds. This property causes the greenhouse effect. Water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and ozone (O3) are the primary greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Decarbonization: The process by which countries or other entities aim to achieve a low-carbon economy, or by which individuals aim to reduce their consumption of carbon.

IGES Factors: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies are a publisher of a global list of grid emission factors. This list is used when a regional source cannot be found.

Demigender: Individuals who feel a partial connection to a particular gender identity. Examples of demigender identities include demigirl, and demiboy, and demiandrogyne.

ILFI: International Living Future Institute

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Indirect Emissions: Emissions that are a consequence of the activities within well-defined boundaries of, a region, an economic sector, a company or process, but which occur outside the specified boundaries of the activity. Invisible Disability: Any physical, emotional or mental impairment which may go largely unnoticed (i.e. anxiety or chronic pain). JUST Label: A voluntary disclosure tool for organizations to help optimize policies that improve social equity and enhance employee engagement. Key Performance Indicator (KPI): a measurable value that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives and/or targets. Lesbian: A woman who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other women. LGBTQIA+: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual and/or Ally NABERS Rating: the National Australian Built Environment Rating System, is an initiative by the government of Australia to measure and compare the environmental performance of Australian buildings and tenancies. Net Zero Carbon: Achieved when the amount of CO2 emissions released on an annual basis is zero or negative (or offset). NGA Factors: National Greenhouse Accounts Factors are prepared by the Department of the Environment and Energy and is designed for use by companies and individuals to estimate greenhouse gas emissions Non-Binary: An adjective describing a person who does not identify exclusively as a man or a woman. Non-binary people may identify as being both a man and a woman, somewhere in between, or as falling completely outside these categories. While many also identify as transgender, not all non-binary people do. Offsets: An investment in an external, carbon positive project which can be purchased to balance out emissions already generated Pansexual: Describes someone who has the potential for emotional, romantic or sexual attraction to people of any gender though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree. Passive House (Passive House): Personal Gender Pronoun: The pronouns that individuals self-select. Asking an individual for their personal pronouns versus assuming based on appearances can go a long way in allowing someone to self-identify. PESTLE: Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal, Environmental Queer: A term people often use to express fluid identities and orientations. Often used interchangeably with “LGBTQ.” Race: A personal identification based on physical/biological attributes, such as skin tone, facial features, hair, etc.

PAGE 44

REC: Renewable Energy Credit equivalent to one MWh of renewable electricity (wind or solar) . See REGO in the UK market Resilience: The capacity of social, economic and environmental systems to cope with a hazardous event or trend or disturbance, responding or reorganizing in ways that maintain their essential function, identity and structure, while also maintaining the capacity for adaptation, learning and transformation. RTO: An acronym for “Return To Office” which describes the transition of workforce back into the office after the COVID-19 Pandemic where majority of workforce had been working from home (WFH). SDGs: 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests. Sustainability: A dynamic process that guarantees the persistence of natural and human systems in an equitable manner. Sustainability is a triple bottom line approach = People, Planet, Profit. Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or expression is different from cultural expectations based on the sex they were assigned at birth. Being transgender does not imply any specific sexual orientation. Therefore, transgender people may identify as straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, etc. Transgender is not a noun, nor verb and is offensive if used in that manner. Trans-Man: A man who was assigned female at birth. Can be based on gender or sex. Trans-Woman: A woman who was assigned male at birth. Can be based on gender or sex. Underrepresented Group: A group who are fewer in number than the statistical norm for their group in society, such as women. Underrepresented Minority Group: persons who identify as Indigenous or as a racial or ethnic minority in their region (as per minorityrights.org) Water Use Intensity (WUI): The ratio of water consumption to floor space. Wellness: An active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth. WFH: An acronym for “work from home” which describes work being done remotely, instead of at an office. The acronym “WFH” is used as a nickname for the concept. WGBC: The World Green Building Council is a global network of Green Building Councils which is transforming the places we live, work, play, heal and learn.


08

Resources GENERAL

CENSUS DATA

LGBTQIA+

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

.idcommunity – the population experts, Australia Community Profile, Greater Brisbane Ancestry

GLAAD, Tips for Allies of Transgender People

Disabled World Fitwel JUST Label – International Living Future Institute M.I.T Living Wage Calculator NABERS Annual Report 2019/2020 Minority-rights.org Stanford University Gendered Innovations Project UC Davis Student Health and Counseling Services Dimensions of Wellness United States Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, Commercial Reference Buildings

.idcommunity – the population experts, Australia Community Profile, Greater Melbourne Ancestry .idcommunity – the population experts, Australia Community Profile, Greater Sydney Ancestry Office for National Statistics (UK), 2011 Census Analysis, Oxford Local Authority Office for National Statistics (UK), 2011 Census Analysis, London Region Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Calgary Census Metropolitan Area Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Toronto Census Metropolitan Area

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area

World Green Building Council (WGBC), The Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Victoria Census Metropolitan Area

WGBC: Advancing Net Zero WGBC: Better Places for Better People WGBC: Case Study Library

Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia, Population by ethnicity, age and sex by municipalities and cities - Belgrade United States Census Bureau, Race and Ethnicity by state: California, Georgia, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Washington DC

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, Allies Tips for the Workplace Stonewall: Creating Inclusive Workplaces UMASS. LGBTQIA+ Terminology

JEDI DATA McKinsey + Company, Delivering through Diversity report Harvard Implicit Bias/Association Test The Standing United Project, by Jenae Butler National Museum of African American History + Culture and Smithsonian, Talking About Race Mashable, 6 ways to be antiracist because being ‘not racist’ isn’t enough, by Rebecca Ruiz CNBC make it, What it really looks like to lead an anti-racist organization, by Jennifer Liu BlackSpace Manifesto Simon Fraser University, Beyond Inclusion: Equity in Public Engagement guide

WGBC: Health + Wellbeing Framework World Resource Institute (WRI), The Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector

INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT

Human Rights Campaign

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INTEGRAL | 2020 CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT


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