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SponSorShip/Exhibitor Catalog uture Securing a Bright Future Securing a Bright Future Sponsored by: Securing a Bright Future December 8-9, 2009

ive Trade Show

NetworkingNetworking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade ShowTrade Show Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive TradeCivic Show St. Cloud

Center • St. Cloud, MN

Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry The Voice of Minnesota’sThe Dairy Industry The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry

Securing a Bright Future

The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry

Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

December 8-9, 2009

The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry

St. Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry

Midwest Expo is by coordinated theEducation Events and EducationofCommittee of theMilk Minnesota Milk Producers Association. The Midwest The Dairy Expo isDairy coordinated the Eventsby and Committee the Minnesota Producers Association. and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

December 8-9, 2009

St. Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN

Securing a Bright Future

Milk Producers Association.

The Midwest Dairy Expo is Dairy coordinated the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association. The Midwest Expo isbycoordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

Securing a Bright Future Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

Robotic milkers: How are they working? The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

Jim Salfer with the University of Minnesota Extension will moderate a panel of three dairy producers who are milking with robots. They include Johansen Dairy from Underwood, Minn. The dairy has been milking 120 cows with two robots since January 2009. The Johansens placed one robots in the retrofitted freestall barn built in 2000 and the other was placed in an addition built for the robot. Benson Dairy from Stewart, Minn., is milking 155 cows with three robots. Two robots were installed in November 2008 and the third in June 2009. They still milk one pen through the parlor. Heintz Badger Valley Farm in Caledonia, Minn., has been milking 120 cows with two robots since December 2008. They also have a new freestall barn with sand bedding. Here is a short brief of these three dairies.

Johansen enjoys life with robots Photo by mark klaphake

Ardy Johansen installed two robotic milkers in January on his dairy near Underwood, Minn. He has been able to manage a herd of 120 cows himself while still being able to spend time with his family – wife, Robin, and three sons, Ethan (13), Seth (10) and Logan (7).

By Jill Warren and Krista M. Sheehan Staff writers UNDERWOOD, Minn. – In January, Johansen installed two robotic milkers for his 120-cow herd in Underwood,

Minn., and has since been enjoying a different dairying and personal lifestyle. Johansen chose to install robots because hiring help proved to be a challenge. “I don’t work well with hired help,” Johansen said. “The reliability wasn’t there for and I realized there had to be a better way. There’s never been a day I’ve dreaded this decision (to install robots).” But it hasn’t been without challenges. “It was a long first month,” he said. Johansen said he averaged

three hours of sleep each night because he had to train the cows to use the robots. For 14 hours each day, Johansen spent his time moving cows to the robot to adjust to the new system. There was always a second person to help him train, putting in 10 hours each day. When Johansen wasn’t chasing cows, he was feeding and doing maintenance for another four hours. However, the situation quickly improved. Johansen said fresh cows walk through Turn to Robotics / Page 4

What’s Inside...

Robotic milkers: How are they working?.....................................Pages 1, 4, 6 Water 101 - and why activism matters.............................................Pages 2, 5 Motivation key in Daniels’s seminars........................................ Pages 8 - 9 Learning from history.......................... Page 11 What it takes to be a good manager....................................... Pages 14-15 Observing cows can equal more money................................................. Page 17 Take control of dairy finances...... .Pages 18-19 About the speakers............................... Page 21 “Tina and Lena” are Recognition Banquet featured speakers................................ Page 22


Page 2 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Water 101 – and why activism matters

Concerns for natural resources, water quality brings need for awareness in ag industry By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer WHITEHALL, Mont. – In the Land of 10,000 Lakes, meeting stringent water quality and drainage regulations is something all dairy and livestock producers have to deal with on a regular basis. Not only do these regulations keep the water clean and adequate for consumption and everyday use, but they keep the natural waterways themselves healthy. With concern for Earth’s natural resources on the rise, more pressure is being put on those in production agriculture to meet and surpass pollution

standards, especially in regards to water quality. With this rise in concern comes a rise in the need for activism among t h o s e within the ag industry to stand up and defend their Tammy Johnson livelihood. Environomics Inc. A t 11:30 a.m. on Dec. 9, Tammy Johnson will discuss these issues and more during her breakout session, “Water 101 – and why activism matters.”

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522 Sinclair Lewis Ave. Sauk Centre, MN 56378 Phone: (320) 352-6303 Fax: (320) 352-5647 General Manager/Editor/Sales Mark Klaphake (West and South Central MN) 320-352-6303 (office) 320-248-3196 (cell) 320-352-0062 (home) mark.k@dairystar.com Ad Composition Janell Westerman 320-352-6303 janell.w@dairystar.com Nancy Middendorf 320-352-6303 nancy.m@dairystar.com Staff Writers Krista Sheehan - Assistant Editor SE MN/NE IA 507-259-8159 • krista.s@dairystar.com Jennifer Burggraff 320-352-6303 jennifer.b@dairystar.com

Online Editor/Online Sales Andrea Borgerding 320-352-6303 andrea.b@dairystar.com Advertising Sales Main Office: 320-352-6303 Fax: 320-352-5647 Deadline is 5 p.m. of the Friday the week before publication Sales Manager - Jeff Weyer (National Advertising, Northern MN, East Central MN) 320-260-8505 (cell) jeff.w@dairystar.com Mark Klaphake (West and South Central MN) 320-352-6303 (office) 320-248-3196 (cell) Laura Seljan (SE MN) 507-250-2217 (cell) fax: 507-634-4413 laura.s@dairystar.com Jerry Nelson (SW MN, NW Iowa, South Dakota) 605-690-6260 (cell) jerry.n@dairystar.com Lori Young (Central MN) 612-597-2998 • lori.y@dairystar.com Lori Menke (Eastern Iowa) 563-608-6477 • lori.m@dairystar.com Deadlines: The deadline for news and advertising in the Dairy Star is 5 p.m. Friday the week before publication. Subscriptions: One year subscription $26.00, outside the U.S. $110.00. Send check along with mailing address to Dairy Star, 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave., Sauk Centre, MN 56378.

Water 101 – and why activism matters “One of the issues facing everyone in production agriculture in Minnesota is compliance with the federal Clean Water Act and the required development of TMDLs (total maximum daily load),” Johnson said. Through the federal Clean Water Act (CWA), all states are required to review and identify all waterways within their respective state and determine if the beneficial uses of each waterway are being met. When a waterway is “impaired” – not meeting the definition of being

clean enough and well enough to support its beneficial uses – TMDL comes into play. According to the EPA, “A TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a water body can receive and still safely meet water quality standards.” “TMDL is a relatively simple concept,” Johnson said. “Under federal and state law, a state is required to figure out why a waterway is impaired and to draft a plan to eliminate the problem and restore the waterway so it supports its beneficial uses.” In Minnesota alone, 3,049 waterways are classified as im-

paired through pollution from either point sources (specific, measurable sources) or nonpoint sources (broad sources difficult to quantify and monitor). Most of the ag industry falls under the non-point sources. “The problem is the regulators have spent 30 years concentrating on point source discharges. Now they are focusing on non-point sources,” Johnson said. “You can’t get precise measurements on erosion within a field or what fertilizer components may be in any given place. As they move Turn to Water 101 / Page 5


Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 3


Page 4 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Continued from Robotics / Page 1

on their own after a couple milkings and there are only about 15 cows he routinely has to take to the robot. Since January, he has only had to cull two cows because of teat placement. Herd health has been a big improvement. The herd’s somatic cell count plummeted from 400,000 to 250,000 since installing the new milking system. Conductivity and temperature reports have also been helpful for Johansen. The cows have been averaging 2.9 milkings per day. Production has increased four to seven pounds per cow and the herd has a rolling herd average of 23,000 pounds. A technician visits the farm for a routine maintenance check every three months. Although the robots are a major investment at the beginning – costing about $170,000 each – they are estimated to pay back their debt within about eight years. The robots also help save on labor costs, saving Johansen $45,000 per year for employees, and have cut his repair bills in half. In addition to changes in his dairy barn, Johansen has also had a change in lifestyle. The robots allow him to spend more time with his wife, Robin, and their three sons, Ethan (13), Seth (10) and Logan (7). “I can now go to any of my sons activities, and that’s important to me,” Johansen said.

Robots work for Benson

STEWART, Minn. – For

Photo by nancy middendorf

Doug Benson has been milking 160 of his 250 cows with three robotic milkers on his farm near Stewart, Minn. Benson installed the robots to take care of labor issues on his farm and free up time for himself.

“We’ve had a good experience, basically. There have been some trials, but mostly just learning the computers” - Doug Benson, installed robotic milker a year ago just over a year, Doug Benson has been milking 160 of his 250 cows with three robotic milkers on his farm,

Benson Dairy, in Stewart, Minn. Like most, Benson installed the robots to take

care of some of the labor on his farm and free up time for him. He also said the consistent milking of the robots is a benefit to cows, among other benefits. Before the robots, Benson used a double-12 parlor to milk his all his cows. Some of his cows are still milked in the parlor. But the installation of robots hasn’t been without challenges. Benson said it was hard getting the permits and many people weren’t used to working with robots, from the construction workers to the milk inspectors. “It was a struggle just to get everything together, but it worked out fine,” Benson said. Since starting to milk with the robots, Benson hasn’t encountered many challenges. Even up to 80 percent of the cows adapted immediately. “We’ve had a good experience, basically,” Benson said. “There have been some trials, but mostly just learning the computers.” Cows are milked an average of 2.6 or 2.7 times each day. The increased number of milkings has helped with herd health, Benson said. “We treat less cows on the robots than we do the ones in the parlor,” he said. The cows aren’t the only ones benefiting from the robots. “We get more sleep,” Benson said. “The milking is being done even when you’re not always there.” Benson said robots are a good option for milking systems and offers some advice

to those contemplating installing robots. “They do work,” he said about his new milking system. “The people who install the robots work with you, so don’t be afraid of the computers or anything like that.”

Heintz Badger Valley Farm introduces robotic milkers

By Greg Schieber Freelance Writer CALEDONIA, Minn. – On Dec. 29, 2008, the Heintz Badger Valley Farm near Houston, Minn., introduced their 120-cow herd to two new robotic milking systems. For the Heintz family, there are many reasons they made the transition. Until Dec. 29, Doug Heintz milked cows in a tiestall barn. Since he didn’t have the investment of a parlor, an upgrade to the robotic system seemed economically feasible. Secondly, at age 43, Heintz saw robots as an opportunity to preserve his health, especially his knees and back. “This will get me to retirement,” Heintz said. The robots would also be an investment for the future. Heintz’s 16-year-old son, Dayne, shows interest in taking over the farm after college. Turn to Robotics / Page 6

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Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 5

Continued from Water 101 / Page 2

into non-point sources, there’s a lot more guesswork involved.” Because of the difficulty of measuring pollution from non-point sources, there is more room for error, meaning those in the ag industry may be wrongly blamed. “Ag as a whole – including dairy producers – have to be very engaged because if the information gathered identifies the pollution sources incorrectly, the burden will be on the ag industry to solve the problem,” Johnson said. During her breakout session at the Midwest Dairy Expo, Johnson will discuss how the CWA and TMDLs affect dairy and ag producers across the state. She will also talk about the need for activism to defend one’s business and industry. “If we are not actively involved in protecting ourselves, others will determine our future,” Johnson said. Throughout her session, which is geared towards everyone within the dairy industry and related industries, Johnson will use her background in communications and her experience prior to and with Environomics, Inc. – a public relations and government affairs consulting firm based in Montana – to stress the importance of these issues. Johnson has no specific experience within the dairy industry; instead her family has a history in the mining industry and her husband’s family is in agriculture. To Johnson, the differences within these industries are miniscule compared to the similarities they all

“If we are not actively involved in protecting ourselves, others will determine our future.” - Tammy Johnson

Environomics, Inc.

share. “[These similarities are] the issues that all natural resources sectors face and the need to defend against the “conflict industry,” such as the PETAs of the world who want to put you out of business,” Johnson said. “One thing I’ve learned during the last 30 years is that the issues each industry faces are the same whether you run a dairy farm or a mining operation or a lumber operation or are growing crops,” Johnson said. “The underlying issues transcend all that.” She has also realized that activism needs to be a part of every business’s bottom line. “Everyone needs to figure out how to give 30 minutes to one hour per week to defend their business, their industry, and the necessary task of providing food, fiber, minerals and energy to this country,” Johnson said. “It isn’t somebody else’s job.”

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Page 6 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Continued from Robotics / Page 4

“Most people do it because of the lack of good help. We had real good help,” Heintz said, referring to a previous employee who decided to go back to school, another factor playing into Heintz’s decision to purchase the robots at the time. The cost savings in employee wages will make the payment on the robots every month. Heintz expects the payoff for his setup to be about seven years, with the robots expected to have a 20 to 25-year life-span. Initially, Heintz was skeptical of the technology, but seeing the cows almost fighting to get into the system to be milked is what impressed him during robotic farm tours. So far Heintz described the transition as “real good.” Somatic cell counts are down 50 percent while his production average increased 12 pounds per cow per day from historic averages. Of Heintz’s 120 cows, only 20 need a little prodding to walk to the robot. The machines also worked well through the cold weather with the freestall barn staying above 20 degrees even on the coldest days. Heintz has also found himself with more free time and flexibility. Heintz believes this tech-

photo by greg scheiber

Doug Heintz (right) and his son, Dayne, of Caledonia, Minn., began milking their 120-cow herd with two robotic milkers on Dec. 29, 2008. Heintz expects the payoff for his setup to be about seven years while the robots are expected to have a 20to 25-year lifespan. Each robot can milk 60 to 70 cows and works around the clock, except 15 minutes twice a day when it cleans itself.

nology is good for the future of the dairy industry. “I think it’s the perfect fit for the upper Midwest. I think it’s for the family farm. I’ve heard a lot of farmers say ‘I wish I wouldn’t have done that parlor.’”

For the farmer interested in this technology, Heintz offered some suggestions. “Do your numbers. What might be the right fit for one might not be for another,” he said. “Don’t be afraid to ask advice. We didn’t know a lot

of stuff so I tried to surround myself with people who did.” When asked if there was ever a time when he imagined one day his cows would be milking themselves, Heintz responded with a laugh.

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Page 8 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Motivation is key in Daniels’s seminars

Expo speaker will encourage producers to reconnect with passion, tell dairy story By Krista M. Sheehan Staff writer

COBB, Wis. – Laura Daniels thinks people need a little motivation every once in awhile. Using her own farming experiences and her passion for promoting agriculture, Daniels will motivate others at this year’s Midwest Dairy Expo in St. Cloud. Daniels is the Women in Jeans Featured Speaker at this year’s Midwest Dairy Expo. She will present two seminars on Dec. 8 – “Using baler twine and barn lime to identify your values and design your life” at 1:30 p.m. and “Needed ‘hitch pins used or new’: The importance of connecting with people who eat” at 2:30 p.m. “I’ll make them comfortable and we’re going to have fun,” said Daniels, who started speaking regu-

“What happens – and this happens to me, too – is that we get so busy. There is so much work to be done every day,” she said. “Sometimes we lose track of why we’re doing [our work]. I think almost everyone at some point needs to reconnect with their purpose.” One area she will discuss will be finding “what really matters.” “It’s different for everyone,” she said. “You need to leave yourself time to discover what’s important for you.” Daniels will talk about how people can find what really matters to them and will also explain her own discovery process. Over time, she found the three most imporPhoto submitted tant aspects of her family’s Laura Daniels, pictured with her children, Nathan (7) and Julia (4), owns Heartwood Farm with dairy: gentleness, reliability her husband in Cobb, Wis. Using her past and present dairy experiences, Daniels wants to and a positive attitude. motivate other producers to reconnect with their passions and tell their dairy story during her “This started as what we seminars at the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo Dec. 8 and 9 in St. Cloud, Minn. were looking for in our employees, but it evolved into values we use to make decilarly about six months ago. 10 years. Now as the gen- story to others. sions on our farm at every Daniels is no stranger eral manager of Heartwood to the dairy industry. She Farm, the 250-cow dairy she Baler twine and barn lime level,” she said. grew up on a farm south of owns with her husband in During the first of her No matter what age or Milwaukee, attended the Cobb, Wis., Daniels plans two seminars, Daniels wants occupation, the people who University of Wisconsin- to draw on her own dairy to help anyone – not just will benefit from this semiMadison for her degree in experiences to motivate oth- dairy producers – rediscover dairy science and worked ers to reconnect with their their passion and refocus Turn to Daniels / Page 9 as a dairy nutritionist for passions and tell their dairy their mindset.


Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 9

Continued from Daniels / Page 8

nar are people who are busy, Daniels said. “That’s the common denominator,” she said. “Sometimes we need to slow down and think about things in a little different way.” Hitch pins – new or used In her second seminar, Daniels wants people to step out and tell their story. “It’s really going to be all about encouraging people to be advocates for agriculture,” she said. With the population more removed from agriculture, Daniels said everyone involved in agriculture – dairy producers, nutritionists, vets, extension agents, agronomists, etc. – needs to find a way to connect

ent people by reposting information on individuals’ pages. “It might be a five minute investment that’s reaching a big number of people,” she said. Although she knows not everyone is familiar with the social media scene, she encourages people to try. She said people of all ages can use sites like Facebook and Twitter. “Maybe that farm owner or manager has someone on their team who could take the step and be the voice of their farm on the Web,” Daniels said. Once people try the new method, they can decide if they want to fall back on the “used” methods of promoting agriculture, she said. “There are still those tried and

Take control of your time

“If we don’t tell our story, someone else will tell it for us and that’s not working out so well for us.”

- Laura Daniels on motivating other producers to connect with consumers

with consumers. “They (consumers) are just real people. Sometimes they’re neighbors and sometimes they’re farther away than those who we can see face-to-face,” she said. Daniels said there are several ways – “new or used” – to share dairy messages with others. Facebook, Twitter, blogs and other social media are the new ways to interact. Daniels said she has only been using these methods for about a year. “It’s been an interesting process where people are really connecting,” she said. “People trust personal contact and that’s what this is.” She also said social media is an efficient way to communicate, reaching several networks of differ-

true methods to connecting with people,” she said. Daniels suggested writing a letter to the editor, talking with people at church about agriculture or telling the fourth grade teacher to bring the class out to the farm for a field trip. “They don’t have to use social media,” she said. “There are still so many ways to connect with consumers.” Whatever the means of communicating, Daniels said communicating in the first place is the most important part of being an advocate for agriculture. “If we don’t tell our story, someone else will tell it for us and that’s not working out so well for us,” she said.

See Laura Daniels’s presentations: “Using Baler Twine and Barn Lime to Identify Your Values and Design Your Life” - 1:30 p.m., Tues., December 8 “Needed ‘Hitch Pins Used or New’: The Importance of Connecting with People Who Eat” - 2:30 p.m. , Tues., December 8

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Page 10 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

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Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 11

Learning from history

Swanson to discuss dairy cycles and how to plan for the future “Something is wrong in how people plan within the dairy industry,” Swanson said. “Why are [dairy producers’] plans for the future linear when they have s e e n nothing but cycles throughout history?” “There is Dr. Michael Swanson a tremenAg economist/consultant dous disconnect,” he said. “[Dairy producers] know [the cyclic pattern] but when asked about it, they can’t get over that gap.” To bridge this gap, producers will need to change their way of thinking and planning when it comes to their dairy operations. “Dairy producers need to plan differently, behave differently,” Swanson said. “When things are good, plan for the worst. When things are bad, they will get better. They have to plan [for these trends]; if they don’t, they will always be behind.” This session, Swanson said, is for every dairy producer out there, whether they man-

By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer

MINNEAPOLIS – It’s a known fact that history tends to repeat itself. The ups and downs of the dairy industry are no exception. Unfortunately, people often forget this concept when laying out their farm business and management plans. At 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 8 during the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo, Dr. Michael Swanson, agricultural economist and consultant for Wells Fargo Bank, will discuss this detached line of thinking during his presentation, “Dairy cycles but your plans are straight lines: What’s the disconnect?” During his breakout session, Swanson will focus on the historical patterns of the dairy industry and what producers can learn from these trends. “The dairy industry has always been cyclical, with good prices and terrible losses back to back,” Swanson said. “… If we look at milk prices, they always cycle from high to low, low to high. Every three years they go from peak to peak.” However, when dairy producers plan for the future, those plans often do not reflect this recurring market.

Highway 23

Wilson Ave.

4th Ave.

5th Ave. S.

1st St. S.

CC

Highway 23

County Rd. 75

Mississippi River County Rd. 75

Highway 15

Washington Memorial Dr.

Dr. Michael Swanson The Midwest Dairy Expo will take place Dec. 8-9 at the Convention Center in St. Cloud, Minn. Aside from a chance to visit the trade show, attendees will have an opportunity to participate in a butter and cheese raffle, silent auction and recognition banquet. The main events, however, are the educational breakout sessions that will take place throughout the two-day event. Swanson will serve as one

fore obtaining his masters and doctorate degrees in agricultural and applied economics from the University of MinnesotaTwin Cities. Swanson’s first post-college career was as a transportation analyst with the Burlington Northern Railroad. Since then, he has been involved in agriculture. He worked for Cargill Cafetera de Manizales in Columbia, South America,

I-94 from East: I-94 to County Rd. 75 Follow it toward St. Cloud To Washington Memorial Dr., turn right To Hwy 23, turn right To 5th Ave. S., turn left To 1st St. S., turn right Civic Center will be straight ahead on the left I-94 from West: To Hwy 15 North To Hwy 23 and turn right To 5th Ave. S., turn left. To 1st St. S., turn right Civic Center will be straight ahead on the left

From Hwy 10: Take Hwy 23 West To 4th Ave., turn right Civic Center will be on the right

I-94 Hwy 15 from North: Follow Hwy 10 South To Hwy 23 West To 4th Ave., turn right Civic Center will be on the right

Hwy 15 from South: To Hwy 23, turn right To 5th Ave. S., turn left To 1st St. S., turn right Civic Center will be straight ahead on the left

for four years before moving into the dairy sector when he took a position supervising a portion of the Land O’Lakes supply chain for value-added cheese. For the past 10 years, Swanson has been working for

“This [topic] is very important because dairy producers work hard but they don’t get the results they hope for because they’re planning without looking in the rearview mirror.” - Dr. Michael Swanson, ag economist and consultant

DIRECTIONS TO THE ST. CLOUD CIVIC CENTER

East St. Germain St.

of the keynote speakers for this year’s Expo. Swanson grew up in the Twin Cities area. After graduating from high school, he attended the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., for his undergraduate studies be-

age 50 or 50,000 cows. “This [topic] is very important because dairy producers work hard but they don’t get the results they hope for because they’re planning without looking in the rearview mirror,” Swanson said. “They have to plan differently and look ahead.” Swanson’s session will give producers insight on how to plan while looking to the future and keeping in mind the historical trends of the industry. His objective is to answer the question, “So what should we do about it?” “I’ll talk about what it takes to manage [a dairy business] in this environment,” he said. “It’s always been a struggle.”

Wells Fargo Bank. As the senior agricultural economist and consultant, his career brings him face-to-face with many dairy producers from across the country on a daily basis. “Wells Fargo is the largest commercial agriculture bank in the country,” Swanson said. “It is also the largest lender to the dairy industry in the country.”

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320-282-4069 (cell)


Page 12 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Tuesday,December8,2009

St. Cloud Civic Center – St. Cloud, MN

December 8-9, 2009

8:00St.a.m. Trade Show Opens Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast (Trade Show & Equipment Alley) 9:00 a.m. Educational Breakouts A. Wearing the CEO Hat (Main Level: Weidner, Clarke & Edelbrock Breakout Room) a Bright Future SecuringJorge M. Estrada, Leadership Coaching International, Inc. This session is geared toward, but not limited to, those milking five years or less. Jorge will get you focused on thinking like a CEO. Participants will dive into a discussion on the skills that are required to be a successful dairy producer now and into the future, how to make the shift needed, and what might get in the way of being effective leaders. B. MMPA Annual Business Meeting (Main Level: Bell & Alexander Breakout Room) Producer members of Minnesota Milk Producers Association are invited to come and be a part of the democratic process of their association. Resolutions, other policy issues and the audit report for the fiscal year completed will be presented and approved. Directors will be elected and voted upon in Districts 4, 7 and 10 along with one At-Large position. 10:00 a.m. Butter & Cheese Raffle Begins (Main Level: Civic Center Lobby) With Christmas baking and gift-giving around the corner, don’t miss this opportunity to buy a raffle ticket and win some butter or cheese from the UMDIA Fall Contest. Winners will be posted at 2:00 p.m. 10:30 a.m. Dairy Cycles but Your Plans are Straight Lines: What’s the Disconnect? (Main Level: Equipment Alley) Dr. Michael Swanson,Wells Fargo Emerging from one of the most painful dairy cycles in memory, what have producers and lenders learned - if anything? The simplest look at the price of milk and the number of cows shows the cyclicality of the dairy industry, but when’s the last time you saw a business plan get built on that reality? What can you do about it? What advantages can you gain, and at what cost or risk? It isn’t enough to be a good dairy operator anymore.You need to be a good business strategist as well. 11:30 a.m. Got Health Care? (Main Level: Equipment Alley) CharleneVrieze, Cooperative Network & Cindy Sheffield, SOMI, Inc. Representatives of an initiative exclusive to Minnesota will present an overview of their efforts in creating a cooperative component to addressing health care for farmers and agribusiness. Come learn how you can benefit from a memberowned, one-of-a-kind project for the state’s agricultural community. 12:00 p.m. Lunch (Trade Show & Equipment Alley) 1:30 p.m. Educational Breakouts A. Wearing the CEO Hat (Main Level: Weidner, Clarke & Edelbrock Breakout Room) Jorge M. Estrada, Leadership Coaching International, Inc. This session will get you focused on thinking like a CEO. Participants will dive into a discussion on the skills that are required to be a successful dairy producer now and into the future, how to make the shift needed, and what might get in the way of being effective leaders. B. Becoming more Profitable through Better Calf Raising (Main Level: Bell & Alexander Breakout Room) Victor S. Cortese, D.V.M., Pfizer Animal Health Proper calf care affects not only the health of the calf but the long term growth and productivity of the calf even through second lactation and beyond. Current information on calf raising including colostrum management and early growth will be covered. C. Using Baler Twine and Barn Lime to Identify Your Values and Design Your Life (Upper Level: Herberger Suite) Laura Daniels, Heartwood Farm Laura will show you how common items on the farm become a metaphor for designing and living your life plan and will help you think about “what really matters” in a new way. Whether you are just starting to think about a purpose-driven life, or have planned it every step of the way, this workshop will help energize and re-connect you to your passion. D. CowSignals (Part I) (Upper Level: Stockinger Suite) Joep Driessen, D.V.M, CowSignals Training Company “Cows constantly provide us with information about their housing, health, and care. And cows always tell the truth.” The CowSignals concept is an approach to stimulate and train farmers to better observe their cows, to help them fight “working blindness” and – as a result of this – to improve health, welfare and production of the cows. The presentation will challenge you to answer the questions: “what are the cows telling you?” and “what actions should you take/ where can you improve?” Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

2:00 p.m. Butter & Cheese Raffle Concludes (Main Level: Civic Center Lobby) Winners will be selected and posted and must pick up their items by 4:00 p.m. today, December 8th. 2:30 p.m. Educational Breakouts A. Execute Swiftly: Practical Day-to-Day HR Management (Main Level: Weidner, Clarke & Edelbrock Breakout Room) Jorge M. Estrada, Leadership Coaching International, Inc. One person not doing something properly can affect what happens that entire day on the farm. Managing everyday performance is a challenge, tending to employee’s attitude, training and slotting people in the correct position affects performance and profitability of the entire farm. B. Novel Forages and Novel Research (Main Level: Bell & Alexander Breakout Room) Dr. Neil P. Martin, U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center Come and learn about the latest research done at the USDA Dairy Forage Research Center in Wisconsin. Some of the projects they are working on include redesigning alfalfa for dairy cattle and for potential use as a feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production. New varieties of grasses and legumes are being developed for use under intensive grazing by dairy cattle - varieties bred to increase yield, persistence, and forage quality. Their herd of cows is used to better understand forage utilization and how to maximize forage use in dairy cows diets. C. Needed “Hitch Pins Used or New”: The Importance of Connecting with People Who Eat (Upper Level: Herberger Suite) Laura Daniels, Heartwood Farm Laura will help participants incorporate their values and connect! “Used” ways of spreading the word still work. Letters to legislators get read, letters to editors get printed and the people beside you in church might have questions about your farm. “New” ways to connect are also available. Facebook, Twitter and Blogs might seem overwhelming, but Laura will help you understand the importance and help you get started. Or if you are already connecting on-line give you some new ideas and inspiration. D. CowSignals (Part II) (Upper Level: Stockinger Suite) Joep Driessen, D.V.M, CowSignals Training Company This is a continuation of CowSignals Part I. Joep will continue discussing the CowSignals concept and challenge you to answer the questions: “what are the cows telling you?” and “what actions should you take/where can you improve?” 3:30 p.m. Visit Trade Show (Trade Show & Equipment Alley) Show your appreciation to all the Midwest Dairy Expo sponsors by visiting their booths in the Trade Show and new Equipment Alley. 4:30 p.m. Scholarship Auction (Main Level: Equipment Alley) This year’s auction has something for everyone with a variety of on and offfarm items. All proceeds go toward the scholarship programs of Minnesota Milk Producers Association and Upper Midwest Dairy Industry Association.While bidding, network with other progressive members of the dairy industry while sampling the top three cheddar cheeses from the UMDIA Fall Contest. A cash bar will also be available. 5:00 p.m. Trade Show Closes 6:30 p.m. Recognition Banquet (BestWestern/ Kelly Inn: Grand Ballroom) • 2009 Producer of the Year • 2009 Legislator of the Year • Tina and Lena Discover “wildlife” with Minnesota’s hottest comedy/singing/variety team, “Tina and Lena.” You’ll go-pher their clean, clever style of backyard wit and wisdom that’s stuffed with heaping helpings of hilarity. “Tina and Lena,” two loony ladies with lots of laugh lines, spout off about everything from woodstoves to websites. And just when you think you can’t laugh any longer, their beautiful blend of twopart harmony brings a smile of sweet moose-ic to your ears. It’s a custom crafted show with plenty of audience interaction…so get ready to loosen up, lighten up and LAUGH. 8:30 p.m. Hospitality Suites (BestWestern/Kelly Inn: Pool Area) Hosted by Five-Star Sponsors around the Pool Area

Trade Show Sponsors/Exhibitors

40 Square Cooperative Healthcare....................................6 A & L Laboratories........................................................436 ADM/ Alliance Nutrition...............................................215 Advanced Comfort Technology, Inc.............................. NA AFACT: American Farmers for the Advancement and Conservation of Technology........................................327 AgCountry Farm Credit Services.................................. NA Ag-Lime Sales, Inc........................................................107 Agri-King......................................................................440 AgroChem, Inc..............................................................342 AgStar Financial Services..................................221 & 320 Albers Dairy Equipment, Inc..............................339 & 341 American Agco Trading Company................................325 Aminoplus/ Ag Processing, Inc.....................................110 Anez Consulting Inc......................................................114 Arnold Companies Inc............................................32 & 33 Arnzen Construction/ St. Rosa Lumber...............117, 119, 121, 216, 218 & 220 Associated Milk Producers Inc......................................311 Barenbrug USA.............................................................442 Big Gain, Inc.................................................................105 Biogreen........................................................................112 Blue Star Power Systems...............................................427 Bongards’ Creameries....................................................118 Bremer Bank..................................................................323 Burnett Dairy Co-op......................................................503 Byron Seeds LLC..........................................................106

Cargill, Inc..................................................................... NA Carlson Wholesale, Inc.......................303, 305, 402 & 404 CBM Electronics Lighting.................................435 & 437 Central Minnesota Federal Credit Union......................113 Champion Milking Systems LLC/ Champion Ag Electric..............................415, 417 & 419 Conewango Products, Corp...........................................443 Countryside Environmental Systems............................130 Croplan Genetics...........................................................329 Dairy Science Dept., South Dakota State University..........109 Dairy Star.......................................................................100 DairyLand Pest Control.................................................406 Dairyland Supply Inc..........................500, 502, 504 & 506 DeLaval Inc................................................136, 138 & 140 Domain, Inc...................................................................238 DQCI Services...............................................................219 Ecolab Inc...................................................................... NA Elanco Animal Health.........................................103 & 202 Falls Silo Service...........................................................441 Famo Feeds....................................................................243 Farm-Rite Equipment, Inc..................................507 & 509 Feed Supervisor Software..............................................234 Finken Water Solutions......................................245 & 344 First District Assoc........................................................237 Form-A-Feed, Inc..........................................................423 Freeport State Bank.......................................................226 Genex Cooperative........................................................127

Genex Farm Systems..........................129, 131, 228 & 230 Gillis Agricultural Systems Inc..................429, 431 & 433 Gilman Coop Creamery.................................................213 Greystone/ Cover-All Building Systems.......................438 H & S Manufacturing Co., Inc.........................50, 51 & 52 Hanson Silo Company......................................44, 45 & 46 Hoard’s Dairyman.........................................................125 Hubbard Feeds Inc..............................................336 & 338 Hydro-Engineering Inc..................................................108 IBA................................................................................309 Idexx Laboratories.........................................................337 Industrial & Environmental Concepts (IEC).................505 Jung Seed Genetics........................................................422 KASM 1150 AM........................................................... NA KDM Trading, Inc.........................................................236 Kleen Test Products.......................................................425 Kuhn North America, Inc..............................................411 Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products Co......................331 Land O’Lakes Dairy Foods...........................................333 Land O’Lakes Purina Feed............................................329 Lauren AgriSystems......................................................208 MEDA, Inc....................................................................426 MERIAL........................................................................206 Midwest Dairy Association........................................1 & 2 Midwest Dairy Beef Quality Assurance Center/ Minnesota Beef Council..............................................447 Midwest EnRG Flakes........................................132 & 134


Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 13

Wednesday,December9,2009 St. Cloud Civic Center – St. Cloud, MN

December 8-9, 2009

8:00St.a.m. Show CloudTrade Civic Center • St.Opens Cloud, MN 8:00 a.m. Breakfast (Trade Show & Equipment Alley) 9:00 a.m. Educational Breakouts A. Taking Control of W A. hat You Can During Volatile Times Securing a Bright Future (Main Level: Weidner, Clarke & Edelbrock Breakout Room) Steve Bodart, Lookout Ridge Consulting In today’s volatile environment, it’s easy to focus on the challenges and roadblocks impacting your dairy’s financial success. But in times of uncertainty, your operation can greatly benefit from identifying and managing those factors that can be controlled.You’ll learn how to use key financial measures and analysis, benchmarking and other tools to make the most of your on-farm production and financial data. Plus, you’ll discover how proper communication of this key information can benefit your operation –making your business and management decisions a less stressful process. B. Using Automated Calf Feeders (Main Level: Bell & Alexander Breakout Room) Jim Paulson, University of Minnesota Extension Information will be presented on the use of computer controlled calf feeders along with the pluses and minuses of the equipment. Find out what guidelines must be followed for the best success. C. Which Management Practices are Critical in the Control of Johne’s Disease (Upper Level: Herberger Suite) Sandra Godden, D.V.M, University of Minnesota This presentation will review findings from long-term controlled clinical trials in Minnesota designed to investigate the effects of a variety of management strategies on transmission of Johne’s disease in dairy cattle. Strategies to be discussed will include maternity pen management (single vs group pens), colostrum management strategies (colostrum replacers, pasteurized colostrum), milk feeding practices (pasteurized milk vs milk replacer), heifer rearing location (on-site vs off-site), and transmission in adult cows. Results from the Minnesota Johne’s Disease Demonstration Herd Project will also be presented. D. Milk Marketing: Challenges and Opportunities (Upper Level: Stockinger Suite) Phil Plourd, Blimling and Associates, Inc. Dairy producers continue to confront price volatility on a regular basis. There are tools available to manage risk...but the process doesn’t always appear straightforward. What’s a producer to do? This session will feature a thorough discussion of how dairy producers might look at risk and ways in which it can be better managed. 10:00 a.m. Educational Breakouts A. Taking Control of What You Can During Volatile Times (Main Level: Weidner, Clarke & Edelbrock Breakout Room) Steve Bodart, Lookout Ridge Consulting In today’s volatile environment, it’s easy to focus on the challenges and roadblocks impacting your dairy’s financial success. But in times of uncertainty, your operation can greatly benefit from identifying and managing those factors that can be controlled.You’ll learn how to use key financial measures and analysis, benchmarking and other tools to make the most of your on-farm production and financial data. Plus, you’ll discover how proper communication of this key information can benefit your operation –making your business and management decisions a less stressful process.

B. Robotic Milkers – How are they Working? (Main Level: Bell & Alexander Breakout Room) Producer panel moderated by Jim Salfer with University of Minnesota Extension. Producers Include: • Benson Dairy from Stewart, MN: Milking 155 cows with 3 Lely robots. Two robots were installed in November of 2008 and the third in June of 2009. Retrofit into a free stall barn built in 1994. Still milks one pen through the parlor and also has an automatic calf feeder. • Heintz Badger Valley Farm LLC from Caledonia, MN: Milking 120 cows with 2 Lely Robots since December 2008. New free stall barn was built with sand bedding. • Johansen Dairy from Underwood, MN: Milking 120 cows with 2 Lely robots since January 2009. Retrofit the freestall barn that was built in 2000 and one robot was placed in the freestall barn and the other was placed in an addition built for the robot. Learn about the keys to success using automatic milking systems (robots) from producers with experience.They will be sharing the reasons they installed robots and their personal experiences in making them successful. C. Reproduction Success: It’s More Than Just a Good Synch Program (Upper Level: Herberger Suite) Ricardo Chebel, D.V.M., University of Minnesota The focus of the presentation is to remind dairy producers of some of the critical managerial and health events that affect fertility and how to avoid them.We will also explore some of the new reproductive protocols available for resynchronization of lactating dairy cows. D. Managing Price Volatility through Milk Marketing (Upper Level: Stockinger Suite) Producer panel moderated by Phil Plourd, Blimling and Associates, Inc. Producers include: • Dave Brutscher, Day Star Dairy, from Little Falls, MN. • Mark Sauter from Cannon Falls, MN. • Rod Schulze, Schulze Dairy, from Holland, MN. Learn from producers about how they are using milk marketing tools to help manage the increasingly volatile milk prices. They will share their strategies and how they have utilized milk marketing to reduce their milk price volatility. 11:30 a.m. Water 101 - And Why Activism Matters (Main Level: Equipment Alley) Tammy Johnson, Environomics, Inc. & Warren Formo, Minnesota Ag Water Resources Coalition Minnesota citizens are taxing themselves in order to assure that their future includes clean and healthy water systems. MPCA is identifying polluted waters, where it is coming from and how to fix any problems. Tammy will discuss what this means for Minnesota dairymen and why this is important to your future. She will also talk about the importance of being an ambassador for your personal operation, for your industry and for your communities. The hardworking people in the dairy industry have a rich heritage and are proud of what they contribute to the well-being of society. Dairymen must defend their ability to continue to provide their product to a consuming public. By acting individually and collectively, it is not only possible, but very likely, to make a positive difference for your future. 12:30 p.m. Lunch (Trade Show & Equipment Alley) 1:30 p.m. Trade Show Closes

Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

Trade Show Sponsors/Exhibitors Continued

Vigortone Ag Products..................................................310 Vita Plus Corporation.................................................... 111 VitaFerm/ BioZyme Inc.................................................445 Wells Fargo....................................................................126 WI Farm Technology Days - Pierce Co.........................439 Wieser Concrete............................................................224 Xcel Energy...................................................................241 Ziegler CAT................................................401, 403 & 405

The Minnesota Chemical Company..............................501 The Minnesota Project...................................................421 Titan Machinery Inc......................................................232 Udder Tech, Inc..................................................122 & 124 University of Minnesota....................................................5 University of Minnesota Extension............................... NA USDA/ Farm Service Agency.......................................410 USDA/ NRCS................................................................412 Vi-COR...............................................................210 & 212

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St. Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN

OVERHEAD DOOR

S T OR AG E

December 8-9, 2009

St. Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN

500

Midwest Grain Systems, Inc..........................................120 Midwest Machinery Company.........................47, 48 & 49 Mies Outland Inc...........................................................211 Minnesota Corn Growers Association...........................222 Minnesota Dairy Initiatives...........................................318 Minnesota Department of Agriculture...........................316 Minnesota DHIA...........................................................217 Minnesota Farm & Food Coalition....................................3 Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation..................................4 Minnesota Farmers Union.............................................413 Minnesota Milk Producers Association..................10 & 11 Minnesota Select Sires..................................................407 Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council...........3 Miraco............................................................................430 Mix 30 - Agridyne.........................................................343 MN Ag Water Resources Coalition...............................239 MN Board of Animal Health.........................................314 Modern Farm Equipment.........25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 & 31 Mycogen........................................................................312 National Farmers Organization.....................................443 Pfizer Animal Health.....................................................102 Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl......................................................340 Progressive Dairy Publishing........................................204 Quality Liquid Feeds, Inc..............................................432 RDO Equipment Co. ............................315, 317, 319, 321, 414, 416, 418 & 420 Ridgewater College...........................................................7 Somatic Cell Count Guys..............................................408 Soybest..........................................................................123 St. Joseph Equipment...........................34, 35, 36, 37 & 38 Stearns Bank..................................................................307 Stearns Vet Outlet ............................203, 205, 207, 209, 302, 304, 306 & 308 Steuart Laboratories.......................................................428 Stray Voltage Consulting...............................................104 Superior Concrete..........................................................313 TABS.............................................................................128


Page 14 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

What it takes to be a good manager

Estrada discusses the skills required to make a dairy operation successful By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer

Good management has always been a key to success on dairy farms. As dairies have grown over the years, however, the skills needed within the lead roles have changed drastically, with the focus shifting from animal management to employee management. During three educational breakout sessions at the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo, Leadership Coaching International, Inc. president and CEO Jorge Estrada will discuss the skills it takes to be a good CEO and manager in today’s world. For those not involved in the high-end decision making of an operation, he will also discuss the day-to-day management skills it takes to make a dairy operation successful. “We’re very good at the technical side of the business – identifying mastitis, determining which antibiotics to use, reproduction,” Estrada said. “We are not as good at managing Jorge Estrada people.” Leadership Coaching International, Inc. Wearing the CEO hat Estrada’s first and second sessions will take place at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Dec. 8. Entitled “Wearing the CEO hat,” these sessions are geared towards “the people that are at the top of their organization, those making decisions and leading change at the highest level of their organization,” Estrada said. “This is a session that will challenge the ultimate decision maker or person that sits at the very top to come and do a self assessment of where they are at, where they are applying themselves and where they might be,” Estrada said. “This session will delve into the competencies these people need to have.” During these sessions, Estrada will take a look at the behaviors that help and hinder a leader’s effectiveness in his or her organization – the behaviors to focus on and those to avoid. As a professional facilitator, Estrada hopes to answer any questions attendees might have regarding these issues. “This topic is important because the motivation of your employees – how

engaged they are towards the organization, how dedicated they are, how focused they are on quality and how well they understand their mission – is highly driven by the behaviors and actions from the people at the top leading them,” he said.

Execute swiftly: Practical day-to-day human resource management Estrada’s third and final session, “Execute swiftly: Practical day-to-day human resource management,” will take place at 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 8. Because his first sessions are focused on the higher-level leaders within an organization or business, this session, Estrada said, will cover the day-to-day human resource practices to use at any level within a business. “We’ll talk about employee management across the organization: employee motivation, keeping employees accountable, ensuring performance, training employees and the basic supervision people need around them,” Estrada said. “Every business needs someone thinking about human resource management,” he added. Anyone interested in hearing practical approaches for managing people is invited to attend this session. “A business’ human resources are very important. They are the hands making things happen, doing the hard work and making decisions on the front line,” Estrada said. “That’s why it’s called ‘Execute swiftly,’ because to operate in an efficient manner you have to have your ducks in a row. If you have one bad apple, you need to know the impacts that will have on the rest of the business.” Jorge Estrada and Leadership Coaching International, Inc. Estrada was born and raised in Guatemala, with ties to his mother’s family’s dual-purpose dairy and beef operation. Those ties ignited a lifelong passion for agriculture. “That’s where I got my love for dairying,” Estrada said of his family’s operation. “When I went to school, my aim was to pursue a career in agriculture.” Estrada earned his first degree from the Pan-American School of Agriculture in Honduras. He then went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in animal science and masters in animal nutrition and management from Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan. Turn to Estrada / Page 15

Considering a Change to Your Manure Handling or Manure Storage System? Stop in our Genex Farm Systems booth and check out our FAN, Parkson, and Slurrystore options. We have end of the year discounts on now for our Harvestore products.

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Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 15

Continued from Estrada / Page 14 From there, Estrada worked for a feed company in Pennsylvania. It was there – in his sales training and development role – that Estrada discovered his passion for coaching people. This passion grew as Estrada took a training and development position with Monsanto’s Posilac team, a position he stayed with for seven years. In 2000, Estrada became a professional certified coach and earned a masters degree in leadership development and coaching. He then organized Leadership Coaching International, Inc., a leadership development, coaching and organizational consulting firm. “[Leadership Coaching International, Inc.] came about for two reasons,” Estrada said about his business. “For one, it was a dream come true for me to have my own business and to apply myself.”

“This is a session that will challenge the ultimate decision maker or person that sits at the very top to come and do a self assessment...” - Jorge Estrada

Visit us at Midwest Dairy Expo Booth #208 www.laurenagrisystems.com

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Leadership Coaching International, Inc.

His second reason for starting the firm was the rise in need for training and development within the dairy industry. Leadership Coaching International, Inc. has five main areas of focus, Estrada said. Those areas include: 1. Coaching and development of business leaders; 2. Coaching in organization development; 3. Change management; 4. Development of highly engaged cultures/helping organizations overcome cultural barriers; and 5. Team development. Although the firm’s focus was originally on the ag industry, it has since broadened its clientele. Leadership Coaching International, Inc. is based out of Washington state, but Estrada has done work in both English and Spanish throughout the world.

See Jorge Estrada’s presentations:

“Wearing the CEO hat” - 9 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., Tues., December 8

“Execute Swiftly: Practical Day-toDay Human Resource Management” - 2:30 p.m. , Tues., December 8

Come Visit Us At The Expo! See us in booth #100 on December 8th & 9th. Stop by the Dairy Star booth December 7 and visit with our columnist Sadie Frericks. Sadie’s column “The Next Generation” details her family’s journey as young dairy farmers in Central Minnesota. Sadie and her husband, Glen, have two children, Dan and Monika. Sadie has been a columnist with the Dairy Star Sadie for a year. She also has a very popular blog on the Web site in which she updates several times a week about the joys and trials of their dairy farm.

Andrea

Visit with Jennifer Burggraff about any story ideas you might have in your area. Jennifer is the Dairy Star’s main writer in the northern twoJennifer thirds of Minnesota. Jennifer is a University of Minnesota graduate and is always willing to talk story ideas with our dairy farmers.

Talk Web site with our online guru Andrea Borgerding. Andrea designed the Dairy Star Web Site and spends her days finding stories throughout the nation that pertain to dairy. The Web site is now focusing on on-line videos. Andrea has been with the Dairy Star for eight years and is excited to show how Web site advertising can enhance your businesses. Andrea can also talk to you about some of the neat ideas she has to enhance the news section of the Web site with videos.


Page 16 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

One day workshops created by dairy producers to educate, challenge and connect the dairy industry across Minnesota .

February 2, 2010

Holiday Inn St. Cloud, MN

February 3, 2010 Holiday Inn New Ulm, MN

February 4, 2010

International Event Center Rochester, MN

Educational Breakout Speakers Milk Marketing: What We Have Learned From the Ups and Downs of the Market Kenneth W. Bailey, Ph.D.

Ken has been working in the U.S. dairy industry for over 20 years. He is one of just a few Ph.D. agricultural economists who specializes and focuses on the complexities of the U.S. dairy industry. His major expertise is in analyzing policy changes, international trade, price forecasting, and risk management.

Lessons Learned with Low Milk Prices & Looking Back to Look Ahead in the Minnesota Dairy Industry Michael F. Hutjens, Ph.D.

Mike Hutjens was raised on a 313 acre, 70 cow grade Holstein farm near Green Bay, Wisconsin. His master’s degree involved mastitis detection at Wisconsin. In 1971, he earned his joint doctorate degree in dairy science and nutritional science with a minor in biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Keeping Success in Your Succession Plan Marv Siekman, CFP

Marv Siekman, Business Planning Consultant for Lookout Ridge Consulting in Waite Park, MN, draws on 30 years of experience in working with over 1700 farm families on various financial planning topics to site some basic principles that can help you improve the probability of achieving success. Siekman was raised on a dairy and crop farm in Illinois. He has an M.S. from the University of Illinois, and is a Certified Financial Planner.

Dairy Animal Welfare: What is Happening Today? Marcia Endres, Ph.D.

Dr. Marcia Endres is an associate professor and extension dairy specialist in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Minnesota. She joined the faculty in October 2001 after working as Animal Nutrition Manager for Mycogen Seeds. She received her Ph.D. in Dairy Science from the University of Minnesota, M.S. in Animal Nutrition from Iowa State University, and a Veterinary Medicine degree from University of Parana, Brazil. For the last 6 years, Dr. Endres has focused her research and extension efforts in the area of dairy management, welfare and behavior.

The Voice of Minnesota’s Dairy Industry

DMW are made possible by the support of MMPA’s dairy producer members and other associate members within the industry including AgStar Financial Services and Land O’Lakes, Inc.


Observing cows can equal more money

Driessen talks about cow body language during seminars at expo By Krista M. Sheehan Staff writer GELDERMALSEN, The Netherlands – Dr. Joep Driessen said dairy producers can prevent every cow problem by taking time to observe their herd. “It does not cost much time,” Driessen said via e-mail about observing cows. “You just have to learn to be more alert.” Dairy producers will be able to learn what to look for during Driessen’s two seminars, Cow Signals Part I at 1:30 p.m. and Cow Signals Part II at 2:30 p.m., on Dec. 8 during the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo in St. Cloud, Minn. After growing up on his Dutch parent’s dairy farm in Luxemburg, Driessen became a veterinarian after graduating from the University of Utrecht. “In vet school we learned to judge cows with sharp observation and I really enjoyed this,” he said. During his early veterinary years while volunteering at a farmers training project, Driessen realized only 20 percent of farmers read their cows. That realization sparked an idea. Driessen and one of his colleagues created CowSignals – workshops that teach farmers about the body language of cows. He said most dairy producers don’t spend enough time every day observing their cows. “We teach them to observe better while they work between or with the cows, or passing the cows,” Driessen said about his workshops. “See the waiting cows and think to yourself, ‘Why are they doing this? How can I improve it?’ Challenge your management skills. Look, think and act.” Cows that aren’t observed means cows that have problems. “Twenty-five percent of cows are lame and/or 25 percent are wounded today in the world and this is an underestimation,” Joep said. “Minnesota is

“Wounds and lameness make cows live one or two years shorter on farms. We teach farmers to look for the hidden money.” - Dr. Joep Driessen

CowSignals workshops

very likely not better than this.” Driessen said dairy producers should look for lameness and wounds to the pressure points on the neck, bow, backbone, ribs, and hips, among many other problems. They should also be aware of bad color and shine, low heads and ears, deep eyes, and thick manure in first lactation cows. “Dirty swollen claws, empty rumens and bloody wounds or rough skin are easy to recognize and you don’t

Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 17

Minnesota Soybean

Research & Promotion Council The dairy industry is one of the soybean farmer’s biggest livestock customers

– consuming 594,000 tons of soybean meal annually. Soybean producers depend on dairy and other livestock operations of all sizes for the profitability of their farms.

Photo submitted

Dr. Joep Driessen said dairy producers can prevent every cow problem by taking time to observe their herd.

have to be a rocket scientist to know that this is bad for the cows,” Driessen said. Watching for these signals and acting on these problems can lead to cows that live longer and are more productive. “Wounds and lameness make cows live one or two years shorter on farms,” Driessen said. “Those are big losses. We teach farmers to look for the hidden money.” Driessen calls his workshops practical and an eye opener. “We’ve had farmers who listen and change, and afterward they thank us for having even more increase in milk (production) than we predicted,” Driessen said. With many vets in the field busy treating sick animals, Driessen said reading a cow’s body language can help prevent disease and a visit from the vet. “I would like to see more vets like us – teaching farmers to prevent disease by showing them, successfully persuading them with excellent arguments and examples, and thinking together with them for solutions.”

That’s why the Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council annually invests in projects to increase the dairy farmer’s bottom line – such as improving the nutrition content of feed and communicating its important contributions to Minnesota’s economy. By working together, Minnesota’s soybean and dairy farmers can continue to provide the necessary employment and tax revenue to keep our state strong.

www.mnsoybean.org

Producing award-winning products is just one reason why producers choose

Associated Milk Producers Inc. as their milk marketing organization.

See Dr. Joep Driessen’s presentation:

“CowSignals Part 1 & II” - 1:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Tues., Dec. 8

Visit the AMPI Booth at the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo.

www.ampi.com 800-533-3580

2009


Page 18 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Get your herd in V formation

Get the all-in-one power of Celmanax® yeast culture, yeast extract, and hydrolyzed yeast

www.vi-cor.com Visit us at booth # 210 & 212

Take control of dairy finances

Bodart’s seminar focuses on what producers can do during volatile times

work on the smaller ones.” Although he welcomes anyone to his presentation, Bodart said BALDWIN, Wis. – Nearly 11 owners and managers of dairies are months into the milk price crash, the best fit for his seminar. Steve Bodart said dairy producers “They’re the ones looking at not can still make management deci- just the production side of things, sions that can benefit their bottom but also the financial implication of those production changes,” Bodart line. “Just like any other business, said. dairies have op- And this year, connecting proportunities for duction and finances has been one of further growth the most important aspects on dairand improve- ies. ment,” said the “Finances have always been imsenior business portant, but after a year like 2009 consultant with that came through with low milk Lookout Ridge prices, managing every area of your Consulting. “If Steve Bodart producers are Lookout Ridge looking for one Consulting key item to take “Understanding home from the cost of production is seminar, I would like to see them take one area that will be highlight- important because ed, bring it back to their operation and evaluate opportunities for im- when it comes to the provement.” bottom line, that is Bodart will be presenting the seminar, “Taking Control of What what really rules.” You Can During Volatile Times” at - Steve Bodart 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. on Dec. 9 at this year’s Midwest Dairy Expo in St. Lookout Ridge Consulting Cloud. Bodart describes his seminar as one that will give producers an outside perspective to obstacles on their business is more vital now than ever to try to control your cost of profarm. “All too often we see people try- duction and minimize the losses a ing to work on an area that has very dairy has seen,” Bodart said. “It will little impact on their overall busi- also maximize profit potential when ness picture,” he said. “We need to prices rebound.” turn over the big stones first … then Turn to Bodart / Page 19 By Krista M. Sheehan Staff writer

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Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 19

Continued from Bodart / Page 18

Bodart said the focus of his seminar is identifying aspects of the farm that producers can control. In order to find those control factors, Bodart said producers must first understand their business from both a production and financial level. “Understanding cost of production is important because when it comes to the bottom line, that is what really rules,” he said. “You may get to the cost of production differently than your neighbors, but we all have to be competitive in this market and in the perceivable future in order to survive.” One of the main areas Bodart said dairy producers can control is feed expense. However, Bodart said producers need to think beyond the obvious feed costs. “There’s a lot more to controlling feed cost than just looking at the price per ton,” he said. “That’s

one aspect, but there are many other details they can dig into to figure out how to reduce their feed bill further than price per ton per ingredient.” He also said his seminar would look at another aspect to control – herd replacements. “Not a lot of people have thought about it in the past, but we need to look at how fast we’re turning cattle over in our herd, what the replacement rate is for the herd and the impact that has on cost of production,” Bodart said. From this seminar, producers will be able to improve the future of their farm, Bodart said. “We’re not just looking in the rearview mirror because if we only look at the financial numbers, that’s what we’re doing,” he said. “You have to take the financial numbers and tie them to production so you can forecast forward.”

He said learning from the past to correct the future can also make dairies more efficient. Bodart has been involved in the dairy industry since a young age. “It’s been all I’ve ever known,” Bodart said about the dairy industry. After growing up on a dairy farm 10 miles from Green Bay, Wis., Bodart attended the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He then went on to Iowa State for his Master’s. After college, he worked at Land O’Lakes in nutrition consulting before moving into the field of finance. In the mid 1990s, Bodart worked with the finances of dairies that were expanding into modern facilities. Bodart then worked as the Chief Financial Officer of a commercial dairy in western Wisconsin for two years before joining Ag Star eight years ago. For the past six years, Bodart has been in consulting.

See Steve Bodart’s presentation:

“Taking Control of What You Can During Volatile Times” - 9 a.m. & 10 a.m., Wed., Dec. 9

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Page 20 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

We Invite you to Farm Technology Days!

Heavy Duty

Pierce County 2010

Curtain System

July 20-22

WISCONSIN’S PREMIER SHOWCASE FOR AGRICULTURE AND RELATED INDUSTRIES

www.piercefarmtech.com

Over 80,000 Spectators 600 Commercial Exhibitors 60 Acres of Tent City 250+ Field Demonstrations

River Falls, WI • Visit booth 439 for detailed information

Designed Exclusively For Your Dairy Barn! • Single or split sidewall options based on your needs. • Manual or automatic temperature control. • Heavy duty suspension components • Bottom roll, top down opening or bottom roll, bottom up opening.

See us at the show!

J & D’s Fiberglass Make-A-Gate

INTEREST AS LOW AS 0% ON QUALIFYING EQUIPMENT Please see your Farm-Rite Sales Rep for more details

• High impact strength berglass • Bright yellow for visibility • Easy to assemble and adjust • For openings from 10 ft. to 18 ft.

1-800-224-3613 Agricultural Systems, Inc.

One Of The Largest Skidloader Dealers In The State Of Minnesota!

320-235-0444 Willmar, MN 56201

www.gillisag.com

Gilman Co-op Creamery 85 Years of Serving the Dairy Industry

FARM-RITE EQUIPMENT, INC. Visit our website: www.farmriteequip.com

SALES - SERVICE - RENTAL PH: 320-275-2737

Toll Free 1-888-679-4857 West Hwy. 12 • Dassel, MN 55325

• Feed • Milk Marketing • Seed • Ag Supplies • The Best in Dairy Foods

Visit us at booth 213

FEED & FARM SUPPLY STORE - Gilman, MN • 320-387-2770

Open M-F 7:30-5, Sat. 7:30-Noon


Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 21

More about the speakers Victor S. Cortese, D.V.M., Ph.D. Becoming more Profitable through Better Calf Raising December 8 at 1:30 p.m.

Udder Tech at he

Midwest Dairy Expo, St. Cloud, MN December D b 8-9, 8 9 2009 200 09 9

Victor graduated from Michigan State University in 1980 with his doctorate in veterinary medicine. He then entered a predominantly dairy practice in Wisconsin where he also held a non-tenured adjunct professor position with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Veterinary Medicine. In 1989 he joined Diamond Scientific in their technical services department where he was promoted to director of veterinary operations. In June of 1990 he moved to SmithKline Beech Animal Health (now Pfizer Animal Health). He currently holds the title of Director Specialty Veterinary Operations - Cattle Immunology. He has many publications on viral infections, immunology and young dairy calf management, several textbook chapters and guest lectures at many veterinary and university meetings.

Neal P. Martin, Ph.D. Novel Forages and Novel Research December 8 at 2:30 p.m.

Neal P. Martin was reared on a dairy farm in Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Agronomy from Ohio State University and Iowa State University, respectively, and a doctorate in Agronomy and Animal Science from Iowa State University. From 1974 to 1999 he was an Extension and Research Agronomist/Forages in the Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics at the University of Minnesota. His extension and research efforts were directed at forage and grassland improvements and methods of forage quality evaluation. In March 1999, Dr. Martin became Director of the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDAARS), in Madison, Wis. Current basic and applied research at the Center involves animal nutrition, protein utilization, forage cell wall digestibility, forage management and genetics, rumen microbiology, nutrient management and water quality, and analysis of sustainable dairy forage systems.

Ricardo Chebel, D.V.M. Reproduction Success: It’s More Than Just a Good Synch Program December 9 at 10 a.m.

Dr. Chebel is a veterinarian and professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Previously Dr. Chebel has been on staff at University of California and University of Idaho. Dr. Chebel’s expertise is in the area of reproductive biology of cattle. He has done extensive research in the area of estrus synchronization and factors affecting conception rate and embryo loss of dairy cattle.

Sandra Godden, D.V.M., DVSc Which Management Practices are Critical in the Control of Johne’s Disease December 9 at 9 a.m.

Sandra is a 1993 graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. After working for two years as an associate veterinarian in mixed practice in Eastern Ontario, she returned to Guelph to complete a three-year Doctor of Veterinary Science degree specializing in dairy production medicine. From 1998 to present she has been a member of the Center for Dairy Health, Management, and Food Quality at the University of Minnesota where she is involved with student teaching, applied research and dairy outreach activities. Major academic interests include applied research in pasteurization of waste milk and colostrum, Johne’s Disease control, colostrum management, mastitis control, and transition cow management.

Jim Paulson Using Automated Calf Feeders December 9 at 9 a.m.

Jim Paulson received a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science from the University of Minnesota in 1978 and a Master of Science degree in Dairy Science from the University of Minnesota in 1989. He is currently a Dairy Extension Education with University of Minnesota in Hutchinson, Minn. Prior, Jim served as a dairy nutritionist with Land O’Lakes and Farmland. He was also director of dairy operations and instructor at Northeast Iowa Community College. Jim has also managed the research herds at the Waseca Experiment Station and on the St. Paul campus.

Phil Plourd • Milk Marketing: Challenges and Opportunities December 9 at 9 a.m. • Managing Price Volatility through Milk Marketing December 9 at 10: a.m.

Phil Plourd is President of Blimling and Associates, Inc. and Roger W. Blimling, Inc., Wisconsin-based firms that have specialized in dairy markets and risk management for more than 15 years. The companies work with numerous producers, cooperatives, manufacturers and end-users from coast-to-coast. A popular speaker, Phil finds ways to bring a fresh, frank perspective to the dairy issues of the day.

Stop by and se u 

Booth 124! New for 2009

FREE! Udder Tech T-shirt with purchase of $50.00 or more www.uddertechinc.com

Waterproof Milking Sleeve with Thumb Hole

1-888-438-8683


Page 22 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

To Celebrate our 1 101st 01st 1s 1st year in business, we will be giving away

$101

Stop by booth #226 to register for CASH! Locally Owned Freeport State Bank Offers Loans for all Your Needs

MEMBER

FDIC

“Tina and Lena” are Recognition Banquet featured speakers

at the Midwest Dairy Expo! FREEPORT 320-836-2126 800-252-9856 NEW MUNICH 320-837-5297 320-256-7342 MELROSE 320-256-7208 800-337-0292 www.freeportstatebank.com

December 8 at 6:30 p.m.

Annette “Lena” Hustad has degrees in Music Therapy from Alverno College and in Music Education from Augsburg College and the University of Minnesota, Morris. She taught K-12 music for 10 years, and served on the Minnewaska School Board for 12 years. She and her husband live in Glenwood, Minn. They have four daughters, four sons-in-love, and three granddaughters. Susan “Tina” Edwards taught K-12 Physical Education & Elementary Music and coached after receiving a BA degree from the University of Minnesota, Morris. She worked in radio and advertising for 15 years. Sue and her husband live in Alexandria, Minn. They have five children, a son-in-love and a daughter-in-love, and three granddaughters.


Page 23 • Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009

Sponsors December 8-9, 2009 5 Star Sponsors St. Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN • AgStar Financial Services • Croplan Genetics • Dairy Star • Elanco Animal Health a Bright Securing

• Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products Co. • Land O’Lakes Dairy Foods • Land O’Lakes Purina Feed Future

Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

4 Star Sponsors • Arnold Companies Inc. • DeLaval Inc. • Midwest Dairy Association • Midwest Machinery Company

3 Star Sponsors

• Minnesota Dairy Initiatives • Modern Farm Equipment • Minnesota Department of Agriculture • St. Joseph Equipment • Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council

• DQCI Services • Ecolab Inc. • Famo Feeds • First District Assoc. • Genex Farm Systems

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

• ADM/ Alliance Nutrition • Arnzen Construction/ St. Rosa Lumber • Bongards’ Creameries • Cargill, Inc. • Central Minnesota Federal Credit Union

2 Star Sponsors

• 40 Square Cooperative Healthcare • A & L Laboratories • Advanced Comfort Technology, Inc. • AFACT: American Farmers for the Advancement and Conservation of Technology • Ag-Lime Sales, Inc. • Agri-King • AgroChem, Inc. • Albers Dairy Equipment, Inc. • American Agco Trading Company • Aminoplus/ Ag Processing, Inc. • Anez Consulting Inc. • Associated Milk Producers Inc. • Barenbrug USA • Big Gain, Inc. • Biogreen • Blue Star Power Systems • Bremer Bank • Burnett Dairy Co-op • Byron Seeds LLC • Carlson Wholesale, Inc. • CBM Electronics Lighting • Champion Milking Systems LLC/ Champion Ag Electric • Conewango Products, Corp. • Countryside Environmental Systems • Dairy Science Dept., South Dakota State University • DairyLand Pest Control • Dairyland Supply Inc. • Domain, Inc. • Falls Silo Service • Farm-Rite Equipment, Inc.

1 Star Sponsors

• AgCountry Farm Credit Services

• Minnesota Milk Producers Association • Stearns Vet Outlet • University of Minnesota Extension

• Hubbard Feeds Inc. • Minnesota Corn Growers Association • Pfizer Animal Health • Ziegler CAT

• Miraco • Feed Supervisor Software • Mix 30 - Agridyne • Finken Water Solutions • MN Ag Water Resources Coalition • Form-A-Feed, Inc. • MN Board of Animal Health • Freeport State Bank • Mycogen • Genex Cooperative • National Farmers Organization • Gillis Agricultural Systems Inc. • Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl. • Gilman Coop Creamery • Progressive Dairy Publishing • Greystone/ Cover-All Building Systems • Quality Liquid Feeds, Inc. • H & S Manufacturing Co., Inc. • RDO Equipment Co. • Hanson Silo Company • Ridgewater College • Hoard’s Dairyman • Somatic Cell Count Guys • Hydro-Engineering Inc. • Soybest • IBA • Stearns Bank • Idexx Laboratories • Industrial & Environmental Concepts (IEC) • Steuart Laboratories • Stray Voltage Consulting • Jung Seed Genetics • Superior Concrete • KDM Trading, Inc. • TABS • Kleen Test Products • The Minnesota Chemical Company • Kuhn North America, Inc. • The Minnesota Project • Lauren AgriSystems • Titan Machinery Inc. • MEDA, Inc. • Udder Tech, Inc. • MERIAL • University of Minnesota • Midwest Dairy Beef Quality Assurance • USDA/ Farm Service Agency Center/ Minnesota Beef Council • USDA/ NRCS • Midwest EnRG Flakes • Vi-COR • Midwest Grain Systems, Inc. • Vigortone Ag Products • Mies Outland Inc. • Vita Plus Corporation • Minnesota DHIA • VitaFerm/ BioZyme Inc. • Minnesota Farm & Food Coalition • Wells Fargo • Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation • WI Farm Technology Days - Pierce Co. • Minnesota Farmers Union • Wieser Concrete • Minnesota Select Sires • Xcel Energy

• KASM 1150 AM

• United FCS


Midwest Dairy Expo Special Edition • Saturday, November 28, 2009 • Page 24

Scholarship Auction

December 8-9, 2009

St.Come Cloud Civic Center • St. Cloud, MN support the Live

Auction at the Midwest Dairy Expo raising funds for the scholarship programs of Minnesota Milk Producers Association and Upper Midwest Dairy Industry Association. Scholarships are awarded annually to post-secondary students continuing their education in a dairy-related field. The auction will begin at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 8th in the new Securing a Bright Future Equipment Alley. A complete listing of all items, including the specific butter and cheese items, will be available at the auction. Networking Opportunities • Educational Programming • Progressive Trade Show

• Vikings Tickets and Merchandise

Donated by: Midwest Dairy Association Autographed Vikings item plus 4 tickets to the January 3rd Minnesota Vikings game against the New York Giants at 12 Noon.

The Midwest Dairy Expo is coordinated by the Events and Education Committee of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association.

• Boomer8N Pedal Tractor

Donated by: Modern Farm Equipment The boomer8N Pedal Tractor is a collector’s edition with a rugged die-cast body, powdercoat finish and authentic decals. Is sized for children 3-10 years old and has durable rubber tires, pedals, plastic seat and throttle.

• Garmin Nuvi 205W GPS Unit

• Custom-Designed Farm Sign

Donated by: AgStar Financial Services Receive a custom-designed farm sign to post at the entrance to your farm. Includes your choice of materials, size and artwork created by Art Sign & Sales.

• John Deere Pedal Tractor

Donated by: Midwest Machinery Co. Kids cast 7930 John Deere Pedal Tractor made with steel and die cast construction.

• Polydome Calf Warmer

Donated by: MERIAL This navigator leads the way with turn-by-turn directions and optional MSN® Direct services. It’s packed with millions of destinations and maps for the contiguous U.S.

Donated by: Dairyland Supply Inc Provides a comfortable environment for newborn calves.

• Milking Set

• Framed Farm Prints

Donated by: Udder Tech, Inc Package includes waterproof bibbed overalls, jacket and cloth towel pouch set. The Waterproof Bibbed Overalls feature taslan nylon, adjustable shoulder straps, 2 pockets on the chest, and an inside zippered chest pocket. The Waterproof Jacket or Waterproof Pullover (winner’s choice) features taslan nylon and our signature adjustable cuff using elastic and Velcro to ensure a good fit. The Jacket features a full zipper and 2 side pockets, while the Pullover has a half zipper and one double layer front pocket. The Cloth Towel Pouch Set consists of a 2 inch sturdy belt and 2 Cloth Towel Pouches in the medium size.

• Quilted Baby Quilt & Wall Hanging

Donated by: Stone’s Dairy in Henning, MN The pink baby quilt is 43” x 38” and features cows jumping over clouds. The wall hanging is 36” x 24” and features classic cows and bottles of milk. Both are hand-quilted by Arleen Stone.

• 2-Chanhassen Dinner and Show Tickets

Donated by: KASM 1150 AM Radio Each ticket is good for 2 people and excludes Saturdays and the month of December. Each ticket is valid until spring of 2011.

• Cheese and/or Butter Packages

Donated by: Upper Midwest Dairy Industry Association Includes blocks of cheddar, specialty cheeses and butter. With Christmas baking and gift giving around the corner, cheese and butter from the UMDIA Fall Contest is the perfect idea!

Donated by: American Agco Trading Company Two framed nature prints by Terry Redlin and one farm print by Bonnie Mohr.

• Imm Power

Donated by: Minnesota Select Sires Convert ImmPower™ is a complete colostrum replacement for newborn calves. It contains a source of globulin proteins, specialized proteins, energy, vitamins and minerals needed for optimal health and performance.

• Live Maine Lobsters

Donated by: Idexx Laboratories 4 – 1 ½ pound live lobsters shipped directly from Maine to your doorstep.

• Fluorescent Light Fixture

Donated by: CBM Electronics Lighting Fluorescent Light Fixture wp351ho120/277 - end with reflector and 6’ powercord.

• Framed Bonnie Mohr Print

Donated by: Vita Plus Corporation Framed Bonnie Mohr print titled, “Raising ‘em Right.”

New Scholarship Raffle Come support the new Scholarship Raffle being held Tuesday, December 8th from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. in the lobby area of the St. Cloud Civic Center. Participants will have the opportunity to purchase raffle tickets to win one of several butter and cheddar cheese packages. One ticket can be purchased for $2 and three tickets for $5. Winners will be drawn and posted at 2:00 p.m. and will have until 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 8th to pick up their item. All proceeds will go toward the scholarship programs of Minnesota Milk Producers Association and Upper Midwest Dairy Industry Association.

Midwest Dairy Expo Preview 2009  

The Dairy Star newspaper compiled a preview of the 2009 Midwest Dairy Expo, "Securing a Bright Future". Read about the presenters, seminars...