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DAIRY ST R “All dairy, all the time”™

December 24, 2011

GUTTER CLEANER CHAIN & TS PARTS

Visit us online at www.dairystar.com

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

LIQUID MANURE EQUIPMENT FOR RENT

Thank you for your business this year, we look forward to serving you in 2012!

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Land Rollers

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Harms Mfg., Inc. 14451 430TH ST. • BERTHA, MN 56437 • 218-924-4522

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Second Section


Page 2 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Willmar Kimball 320-398-3800 320-235-4898

Glencoe St. Martin 320-864-5531 320-548-3285

AWD TRACTORS

AWD TRACTORS

No. Mankato Alden 507-387-5515 507-874-3400

AWD TRACTORS

CIH 335 Mag, ‘11, 90 hrs................$219,000 CIH 335 Mag, ’10, 4120 hrs............$151,900 CIH 335 Mag, ‘10, 3885 hrs.............$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, ’10, 510 hrs..............$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, ‘10, 465 hrs..............$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, ’10, 2815 hrs............$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, ‘10, 3225 hrs............$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, ’09, 1595 hrs............$182,800 CIH 305 Mag, ‘09, 2505 hrs............$169,500 CIH 305 Mag, ’08, 1300 hrs............$167,500 CIH MX305, ‘06, 4640 hrs...............$125,500 CIH 290 Mag, ‘11, 200 hrs..............$192,500 CIH 275 Mag, ’11.............................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, ‘11, 625 hrs..............$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, ‘09, 765 hrs..............$182,500 CIH 275 Mag, ‘07, 2265 hrs.............$146,900 CIH 275 Mag, ’07, 1385 hrs............$162,500 CIH MX275, ‘06, 2020 hrs................$129,500

CIH 245 Mag, ‘11, 300 hrs..............$140,000 CIH 245 Mag, ’10, 1505 hrs............$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, ‘09, 2250 hrs.............$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, ’09, 2475 hrs.............$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, ‘09, 2160 hrs.............$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, ‘08.....................................Call CIH 245 Mag, ’07, 3205 hrs.............$105,000 CIH 245 Mag, ‘07, 3160 hrs.............$105,000 CIH MX245, ‘06, 2005 hrs...............$119,500 CIH 215 Mag, ’09, 880 hrs..............$129,500 CIH 215 Mag, ‘10, 3100 hrs.............. $105,000 CIH 180 Mag, ’11.....................................Call CIH 230 Puma, ‘11, 130 hrs............$135,000 CIH 55A Farmall, ’11, 2 hrs................$28,000 CIH 8950, ‘98, 8725 hrs.....................$62,500 CIH 7230, ’96, 5655 hrs.....................$61,000 CIH 7140, ‘92, 8795 hrs....................$45,900 CIH 5250, ‘92, 5650 hrs....................$36,500

CIH DX25E, ‘04, 175 hrs......................$13,900 CIH 40 CVT..........................................$36,250 Agco ST40, ’02, 435 hrs......................$18,500 $7,950 Kubota BX2350TV, ‘08, 655 hrs............. Kubota BX2230, ‘04, 695 hrs...............$7,750 Kubota BX2200, ’01, 2450 hrs.............$8,750

4WD TRACTORS

4WD TRACTORS

SKIDLOADERS

CIH 535 Quad, ‘10, 910 hrs............$292,750 CIH 535 Quad, ‘09..........................$287,500 $225,000 CIH 530 Quad, ’06, 2565 hrs............ CIH 500 Steiger, ‘11, 515 hrs..........$265,500 CIH STX500 Quad, ‘05, 2320 hrs.....$189,500 CIH 485 Steiger, ‘10, 870 hrs..........$228,000 CIH 435 Quad, ’11, 220 hrs.............$285,000 CIH 435 Quad, ‘08, 1755 hrs...........$237,500 CIH 9390, ‘97....................................$88,500 CIH 9380, ’97....................................$79,000 CIH 9270, ‘91, 4815 hrs....................$72,900 CIH 9170, ’89, 7825 hrs....................$56,500 CIH 9170, ‘87, 7740 hrs....................$47,500 CIH 9150, ’88, 7390 hrs....................$45,300 CIH 9150, ‘87, 5625 hrs....................$48,500 Case 550H, ’00, 1680 hrs..................$35,500

IH 6588, ‘83, 4700 hrs......................$17,500 Challenger MT865B, ‘06, 3805 hrs.$199,500 JD 9400T.........................................$109,000 JD 9400, ’98, 3245 hrs.....................$104,900 JD 9400, ‘97, 5065 hrs......................$83,900 NH T9060, ‘08, 1575 hrs..................$212,000 NH 9880, ‘94, 6775 hrs.................... $69,500 NH 9282, ’97, 3585 hrs......................$64,900 Versatile 835, ‘78.............................$21,500

Case SR250, ‘11, 7 hrs......................$42,500 $30,500 Case 445, ’07, 2000 hrs....................... Case 440, ‘08, 685 hrs......................$26,500 Case 430, ’10, 1000 hrs....................$28,000 Case 430, ‘10, 310 hrs.......................$31,500 Case 430, ‘09, 130 hrs.......................$29,900 Case 420, ’09, 2985 hrs.....................$19,500 Case 430, ‘08, 355 hrs......................$28,000 Case 430, ’06....................................$20,800 Case 430, ’06, 3905 hrs....................$22,000 Case 420, ‘09, 3000 hrs.....................$19,500 Case 420, ‘08, 3885 hrs....................... $16,900 Case 410, ‘07, 2375 hrs....................$15,750 Case 1845B, ‘92, 5550 hrs..................$7,400 Case 1840, ’91, 6355 hrs.....................$9,850 Case 1818, ‘94, 685 hrs......................$4,950

2WD TRACTORS

CIH 7120, ‘88, 10400 hrs..................$35,500 CIH 7110, ‘91, 7650 hrs....................$32,500 CIH 5130, ’91, 3920 hrs.....................$28,900 Case 584C, 7610 hrs...........................$9,500 Farmall 350.........................................$3,900

CIH 2294...........................................$14,500 Deutz D6207, ’83................................$6,995 Fendt 818, 4220 hrs...........................$79,500 Ford TW25II, 6635 hrs........................ $15,000 Ford 8970, ‘95, 5600 hrs....................$57,500 Ford 8970, ’94, 8140 hrs....................$62,500 Kubota M6800, ‘03, 775 hrs..............$24,500 McCormick XTX165, ’09, 260 hrs......$89,500 McCormick TTX230, ‘09, 615 hrs......$90,000 NH 8870, ’00, 4145 hrs.....................$62,500

COMPACT TRACTORS

Put us in your favorites...www.arnoldsinc.com


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 3

Debating chocolate milk in schools

MDA providing resources for promoting flavored milk in schools

By Kelli Boylen Staff writer

Obviously, for dairy farmers, the very idea of banning chocolate milk in schools seems ludicrous. For those with a mission to decrease obesity rates in children, cutting calories everywhere possible, including those in flavored milk, it makes sense. A national spokesperson in the national school healthy lunch campaign named Anne Cooper, director of Food Services at the Boulder Valley School District in Colorado, (known in the media as The Renegade Lunch Lady) recently called chocolate milk “soda in drag” in a national news article. Others locally claim that the nutritional content of chocolate milk is somehow different than white milk. Several schools in Northeast Iowa limit the amount of chocolate milk students can have. Some schools only offered white milk at breakfast, others only offer chocolate milk at lunch, and some have no limit at all. The Iowa Food and Fitness Coalition School Wellness team reported at their June 2011 meeting that North Winneshiek, Decorah and MFL MarMac have all decreased the availability of chocolate milk. The Midwest Dairy Association has many resources available for those interested in promoting flavored milk in schools.

Melissa Young of MDA said they have been actively offering educational material to producers and others who want to promote the product. “All the handouts we offer feature USDA approved and science-based facts,” she said. “For example, all milk has nine essential nutrients, whether it is flavored or not.” There are more calories and more grams of sugar in flavored milk, but the nutritional content does not change otherwise. The chocolate milk distributed by Prairie Farms served at Waterville Elementary (part of the Allamakee Community School District) has 30 calories (100 versus 130) more than white milk. If a young student drank three chocolate milks instead of white milk he or she would get 90 additional calories a day (compare that to one package of Reeses Peanut Butter cups at 210 calories, or approximately 160 calories in one ounce of sour cream and onion potato chips). According to midwestdairy.com, “Leading health and nutrition organizations – including the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Dietetic Association, American Heart Association, National Hispanic Medical Association, National Medical Association and School Nutrition Association – recognize the valuable role that low-fat or fat-free milk, including flavored milk, can play in meeting daily

nutrient needs, and helping kids get the daily servings of milk recommended by the Dietary Guidelines.” They also state, “Flavored milk accounts for less than 3.5 percent of added sugar intake in children ages 6-12 and less than 2 percent in teens. Removing flavored milk hardly moves the needle on added sugar intake but what it does remove are critical nutrients for growth and development.” It was facts such as these that were presented to the administration and school board of the North Fayette School District this fall. During fair week, the North Fayette school newsletter came out. There was a sentence mixed in with a lot of other information that got a lot of people in action quickly. It stated that chocolate milk will no longer be available. The school administration apparently eliminated chocolate milk based on the recommendation of the school wellness committee, according to Todd Wolverton, North Fayette High School Principal. Area dairy producers sprang into action. They contacted State Representative Andrew Wentley, other dairy producers, school board members, and due to good timing of a fair visit, they even were able to have Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey speak up on their behalf. The Iowa Dairy Association was contacted, and they contacted the Midwest Dairy Association. Before school started, due to the efforts of the local dairy producers, the decision to drop flavored milk was reversed. “I’m glad it ended when it did because it really could have turned into a

showdown,” said dairy producer Ryan Sparrgrove. “We really encourage producers to stay proactive,” said Young. The American Heart Association states that “when sugars are added to otherwise nutrient-rich foods, such as sugar –sweetened dairy products like flavored milk and yogurt and sugarsweetened cereals, the quality of children’s and adolescents’ diets improves, and in the case of flavored milks, no adverse effects on weight status were found.” A study released in the April 2008 Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that children who drink flavored or plain milk consume more nutrients and have a lower or comparable body mass index (BMI, a measure of body fatness) than children who don't drink milk. Prairie Farms and Anderson Erickson, both large suppliers of school milk programs, offer low-fat and no-fat varieties. Anderson Erickson is proud to quickly point out they haven’t had to reformulate their chocolate milk to meet consumer demands; it’s been a low sugar formula since they first offered it many years ago. “The chocolate milk we sell in the stores is the same as what we serve in schools,” said Kim Peters, Director of Marketing for AE. “We get love letters about our milk. It’s made with gourmet chocolate. There is talk about lowering the sugar content, but we have always had low sugar content.” The Midwest Dairy Association, Anderson Erickson and Prairie Farms all have resources available on their Web sites.


Page 4 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 YOUR NORTHEAST IOWA JOHN DEERE DEALERS

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JD 7350 4H harvester

2-JD 8330 ILS, MFWD, 1884 & 2030 hrs. 06 C

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TRACTORS

JD 9330, 4WD, PS, PTO, 1501 hrs ..............8 E JD 9420, 4WD, 2600 hrs .......................... 05 Cr JD 9300, 4WD, PS, 5525 hrs ..................00 NH JD 9220, 4WD, 24 spd, 1450 hrs ............. 07 Cr JD 9220, 4WD, 24 spd., PTO, 3094 hrs .... 02 D JD 8560, 4WD, 24 spd, 6100 hrs ...............91 E 2-JD 8640, 4WD, 4693 hrs .................. 81 D&Cr 2-JD 8630, 4WD, 3253 & 4169 hrs.......78 W&E JD 8520 ILS, MFWD, 5002 hrs.................. 04 N 2-JD 8430, MFWD, 1976 hrs ..................... 08 D JD 8420, MFWD, 10782 hrs ....................03 DV 2-JD 8410, MFWD, 7968 & 8800 hrs 00&01 D&E 2-JD 8335R’s ILS, 2 hrs .............................11 D 5-JD 8320R, MFWD, 700-1332 hrs ........... 10 D 2-JD 8295R, MFWD, 394-450 hrs ....... 10 D&Cr JD 8235R, MFWD, 3 hrs ............................11 D 3-JD 8225R’S, MFWD, 290-600 hrs .......... 10 D 2-JD 8330 ILS, MFWD, 1884 & 2030 hrs .. 06 C JD 8320, MFWD, 1731 hrs ........................ 02 D JD 8200, MFWD, 8544 hrs ........................ 96 C JD 8130, MFWD, 1005 hrs ........................ 07 N JD 8130, MFWD, 3472 hrs ........................ 07 D JD 8120, MFWD, 1876 hrs .........................04 E JD 8110, MFWD, 3920 hrs ........................01 W JD 7930 IVT, ILS w/746 ldr, 340 hrs .......... 10 D JD 7820, MFWD, IVT, 4500 hrs .................04 M

COMBINES

JD 7810, MFWD, PS, 1823 hrs .................02 M JD 7810, 2WD, PQ, 1293 hrs .................... 98 D JD 7800, MFWD, PQ, 10435 hrs ................94 E JD 7710, MFWD, PS, 6956 hrs .................99 M JD 7710, 2WD, PQ, 9458 hrs .................... 97 C 2-JD 7700, 2WD, 6237 hrs .............93&96 C&D JD 7400, MFWD w/740 ldr., 6812 hrs........ 94 D JD 7330 Std, MFWD, 16 spd., PQ 925 hrs 10 N JD 7330, MFWD, PQ w/741 ldr., 1534 hrs 08 D JD 7320, MFWD, 1900 hrs .........................06 E JD 7230, MFWD, IVT w/741 ldr., 2326 hrs 07 D JD 7230, MFWD w/ldr., 3091 hrs............... 08 D JD 7130, MFWD w/741 ldr., 2799 hrs........ 09 D JD 6430, MFWD, 24 spd., PQ w/673 ldr., 2444 hrs................................................... 08 D JD 6230, MFWD, OS w/673 ldr., 2939 hrs 08 M JD 6230, MFWD, cab w/563 ldr., 6266 hrs 08 M JD 5525 OS, MFWD w/ldr, 2170 hrs ......... 05 D JD 5520, 2wd, OS, 2600 hrs .....................01 W JD 5310, 2wd w/520 ldr., 2100 hrs ............ 98 D JD 5105M w/cab, ldr, 240 hrs ..................10 DV JD 5085M, 45 hrs ....................................10 CR JD 4850, 2WD, OHD .................................89 W JD 4630, QR, 1000 hrs on OH ...................77 E 2-JD 4560, MFWD, PS, 9700 hrs .......92 DV&M 3-JD 4450, MFWD, PS .....................CALL C&D JD 4440, QR, 9200 hrs .............................. 80 C

JD 4430, QR, 9417 hrs ...............................73 E JD 4230, QR ..............................................77 W JD 4040, OS, 7500 hrs ............................82 DV JD 4030, OS, 9900 hrs ...............................73 E JD 2950, OS, 2wd, 11250 hrs..........................E JD 2755, MFWD, cab w/245 ldr ................90 W JD 2755, 2wd, OS, 8866 hrs ........................DV 2-JD 2550, MFWD, 1w/ldr., 6818 hrs .83 C&DV JD 2440 w/48 ldr, 4882 hrs ......................77 NH 3-JD 4020, 1 w/148 ldr .................64-68 C,D&E JD 4010 ......................................................63 E 3-JD 3020 .............................................64 N&W JD 3010 ...........................................................E JD 620 ............................................................ D JD 50 .......................................................55 DV JD A ................................................................ D CIH 215, MFWD w/susp., 3726 hrs .........08 DV CIH 7250, MFWD, 6348 hrs .......................95 E IH 5088, 5692 hrs ....................................82 DV IH 826 .............................................................W IH 574 ...........................................................DV Case 1090 ...............................................70 DV NH TG255, MFWD, SS, 4595 hrs .............05 M NH 8260, MFWD w/Ldr, 7373 hrs..............97 W AGCO 8610, MFWD, w/ldr., 5538 hrs ....... 93 D MF 135 w/ldr .................................................. W Oliver Super 55............................................... D

John Deere 326D w/C, H, AC, 2 spd., 122 hrs..........10 E&D 320 C & HT, 400 hrs .................................. 06 D 325, C & HT, 2 spd, 2968 hrs ....................07 M 3-328, C, HT, 2 spd., 1476-7316 hrs 07&08 W,DV&N 2-317 C & HT, 1910-2079 hrs .......05-08 W, & N 332, 2 spd., 575 hrs ................................... 08 C 270, 1254 hrs...........................................99 DV

JD 9660STS, 1789 hrs ..............................05 W JD 9650STS, 2844 hrs ..............................02 W JD 9650STS ..............................................01 W JD 9650 Walker, 2380 hrs ........................ 00 Cr JD 9570STS, 480 hrs ................................11 W JD 9570STS, 389 hrs .................................10 E JD 9570STS, 380 hrs .................................08 E JD 9570STS, 417 hrs .................................08 E JD 9570STS, 550 hrs ................................ 08 N JD 9570STS, 750 hrs ..............................08 DV JD 9560STS, 755 hrs ............................... 07 Cr JD 9560STS, 900 hrs ..............................07 DV JD 9560STS, 1324 hrs ........................... 05 DV JD 9560LL Walker, 1175 hrs.......................04 E JD 9610, 2280 hrs .....................................98 M JD 9600, 2555 hrs .....................................97 W JD 9550SH, 2542 hrs .................................99 E 5-260, 1542-3700 hrs ...............00-04 D,DV&Cr 2-250’s, C & HT, 1334-3500 hrs .. 01&03 DV&M New Holland L781, 2610 hrs...........................................98 W Bobcat 642B, 1950 hrs .............................................. Cr 742B, 2442 hrs ................................................E 773 w/cab, 1500 hrs ................................00 DV Mustang 2040, 2024 hrs .........................98 DV

JD 9510SH, 1930 hrs ................................99 M JD 9510LL, 2000 hrs .................................99 M JD 9500LL w/RWA, 2994 hrs ..................90 DV JD9500LL, 3798 hrs ..................................9 DV JD 9450, 3008 hrs ...................................03 DV JD 9410, 2404 hrs ..................................... 98 D JD 9400, 1400 hrs .....................................97 W JD 9400, 1695 hrs ..................................... 92 C JD 9400, 1934 hrs ......................................90 E 2-JD 7720 .......................................... 83 D&DV 2-JD 6620SH 2-LL .............................80-88 Call CIH 2388, 1897 hrs ....................................06 E JD Cornheads: 612CSM, 612C22, 1293, 608C, 608CSM, 893, 843, 643, 693, 444, 244 JD Flexheads: 635F, 630F, 625F, 620F, 930F, 925F, 920F, 925, 930, 920, 915, 220, 216, 215, 213, 454A, 3-JD 5 Belt Pickups ...... CALL Case 95XT, 1480 hrs ........................................02 DV 75XT, 5318 hrs ........................................98 DV 1840, 4500 hrs................................................M 1816, 1105 hrs ................................................ E Gehl 4840E, 2300 hrs ....................................... 07 D 7810 w/C & HT, 2 spd., 2626 hrs .............05 DV 2500................................................................M

JD 332 skid ldr, 619 hrs ..................$28,500 CR Bobcat 642B, 1950 hrs .....................$7,950 CR Krause 5515, 15’ air drill ...................$5,950 CR BC 864 Trk Ldr .....................................$12,500 P&H 16R liq. fert. app ...........................$28,500

TA1100 Top Air Sprayer 60’ ............ $11,000 NH ‘04 CAT GC25K Fork lift ...................$6,500 NH JD 9300 4WD, 5400 hr .......................$104,900 JD 8130 MFD, 1000 hr .......................$135,500 Demco 1250 sprayer, 60’ boom............$19,950

Parker 4000G wagon..............................$3,750 Kawasaki & Arctic Cat Motor Sports Brent Grain Carts & Wagons JD 2440 w/Ldr ...................................... $11,500

HAY JD 568 ...................................................Coming JD 535 Baler w/wrap ...................................Call JD 567 No Wrap ..........................................Call JD 566 Wrap.........................................$15,500 JD 567 Mega Wide ...............................$22,000

Gehl 1875 round baler ............................$6,500 NH 688 baler ........................................$10,900 JD 7350 4H harvester.........................$198,000 JD 630 C hay head ......................................Call USED 1535 20’ drill & coulter cart

1770 NT, 16 row. JD 3430 windrower 300, twin knife, head & cond, cab/air.............................$9,500 Frontier 7’ Blade Unverferth 420 grain cart ........................$8,000 Check on our Used Lawn Mowers

HAY JD 568 rd balers ........................ $22,000 USED Kinze 2300................................. $16,000 JD 325 skid ldr ........................... $20,500 Wood 10’ cutter............................ $3,500

Schultz shedder ..........................Coming JD 1770 16RN planter ............... $44,500 JD 1720 16RN stackfold ............ $68,500 (3) JD 1770 NT 16RN planters ...Coming Buhler 60” 3pt mower .................. $2,150

Frontier 5’ 3pt rear blade ............. $1,250 Brent 776 Grain Cart ................. $23,000 Woods 3180 Cutter...................... $8,000 Kent Field Cultivator .................... $2,500 JD 6X335, 48” deck ..................... $2,350 JD 7000 6RN planter ................... $6,000

SPECIAL MENTION Leon 575 Vertical Beater Spreader New S&R Vertical Beater Spreaders Pikrite 1190 Hyd Push Spreader JD 4x2, 620i, 850D XUV Gators JD 250, 260, 320, 328 Skidsteers Case 75XT Skidsteer, Just In, Call Case 95XT Skidsteer, 1500 hours

JD 444, 643, 893 608C Cornheads JD 7200 6rn Planter, Vac, Dry Fert Bush Hog 15 ft Rotary Cutter Killbros 375 Gravity Wagon Glencoe 9 &11 Shank Colter Chisels IH 496 Wingfold disk, 20 ft, harrow IH 5088 Tractor, 5692 one owner hrs New JD MX 15, HX 15 Rotary Cutters

HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT JD 5460 Chopper, RWA, Iron Guard JD 3970 Chopper, Kernal Proc, Metal JD 3975 Chopper, Kernal Processor JD 3940 Chopper, 5ft Hay Head, Nice JD 5’, 7’, 10’ Hay Heads, JD 3RN, 3RW JD 535, 566, 567, 568 Balers, Mesh JD 926 Mower-Condioner, Impeller

Brent 644 & 440 Wagon ..........start @ $7500 Brent 1084&1194 Avalanche cart w/dls .Coming Brent 1050 Graincart ............................... Call JD 1790 24R22” Cornplanter.............Coming White 8516 CCS Planter 16rn,‘10 .....Coming JD 630 disc, 18’ .................................Coming Westemdorf TA26 ldr (off 4020).......... $5,500

JD 7000’s 8rn,12rn .................................. Call Kinze 2000 6/11R Planter ..................Coming (2) CIH 160 PT crumbler, 20’, 15’ ......Coming JD 5820 SPFH w/10’ Champion head . $36,000 JD 8200 12’ drill, GS........................... $4,250 Kinze 2600, 12/23..............................Coming

JD 9870STS, 580 hrs ..............................10 DV JD 9870STS, 1043 hrs ...............................09 E JD 9870STS, 1196 hrs ...............................09 E JD 9870STS, 796 hrs ................................ 09 N JD 9860STS, 1500 hrs ...............................05 E JD 9770STS, 287 hrs ................................ 11 M JD 9770STS, 252 hrs ................................ 10 D JD 9770STS, 850 hrs ................................ 09 N JD 9770STS, 1218 hrs ...............................08 E JD 9770STS, 2014 hrs ...............................08 E JD 9670STS, 350 hrs .............................. 11 DV JD 9670 STS, 730 hrs ............................. 10 Cr 2-JD 9670STS, 575 & 580 hrs.................. 09 Cr JD 9660STS, 1103 hrs ..............................05 M JD 9660STS, 937 hrs ................................ 05 N

SKIDSTEERS

New Hampton • 641-394-3061

*Cresco • 563-547-2152

Clermont • 563-423-5206

Monticello • 319-465-3515

Dyersville • 563-875-2724

Elkader • 563-245-2470

JD 2510S Strip-Till 12RN w/NH3............. Call Gehl 970 Chopper box ........................ $5500 JD 740 NSL Ldr off 7710 ..................... $7000 Knight Slingers 818,8024,8124 ............... Call JD 1710A 9 Shk Mulch tiller...............Coming 2-White 508 5x16”&4X18” Plow........... $3500 IH 490 32’ Disc .................................... $6500

Waukon • 563-568-3463

HAY Phibber 8’ hay merger ............... $15,000 NH 664 round baler ................... $12,000 Kuhn SR 112 speed rake............ $5,100 Badger 14’ box ............................ $4,500 USED 20’ & 30’ head carts ................ $2,900 ea Frontier 2 bottom plow .................... $750

JD 148 loader .............................. $3,900 Kinze 3200 12x24 planter .......... $49,000 JD 213 platform ........................... $1,900 Ag Chem 854 sprayer................ $45,000 JD 4700 sprayer .....................Coming In CIH 1200 planter, 6 row ............... 19,000 White 6100 8 r wide w/interplants ............................ $19,000

JD 1530 15’ drill on 1570 cart .... $17,500 Knight 8114, red ....................... $14,900 JD HPX ....................................... $6,500 DMI 527 ....................................... $8,500 Hardi 2200, 750 gal spryer, 60’ bm ...................................... $19,000 Lull 844C-42 telehandler, cab/heat ...Call

Decorah • 563-382-2961 HAY JD 567 RB ................................. $16,500 USED JD 726 Finisher 30’ Coil Tine..... $34,000

Knight 5042 TMR....................... $21,000 Knight 3250 TMR....................... $12,000 Knight 3142 TMR....................... $23,000 JD 8300 drill 10’ ........................... $4,500 2 Gehl 980 Chopper Box ............. $7,500 Good selection of used mowers Gehl 1620 Chopper Box ............ $10,500

For a full list of equipment and pictures go to www.bodimp.com

Rosanne Caughey Fort Ripley, Minn. Crow Wing County Tell us about your family. Bruce and I have been married and farming together for 34 years. We raised four children: Katy, Rebecca, Daniel and Mac. Katy and her husband, Dana Blume, farm near Herman, Minn., and have four children: Kilee (10), Cole (7), Addison (5) and Charlie (2). Rebecca and her husband, Josh Joerger, have a son, Jerome (4). Rebecca is a partner in our farm, along with Dan and Mac, and is in charge of calf raising and helping Dan with the dairy. Dan and his wife, Emily, are the parents of an 8-monthold daughter, Clare. Dan is our herdsman. Mac works at BNSF (Burlington Northern Santa Fe) in Brainerd, Minn., and is our farm mechanic. Bruce manages the youngstock and the crops. I am the public relations person and do the bookwork. Tell us about your farm. Our farm, B & C Dairy Farms, consists of 65 registered Holstein cows, 170 beef cows and all the youngstock. We farm about 1,500 acres and raise corn, soybeans, alfalfa, oats and rye. What’s the busiest time of day for you? Since we moved across the road from the "main" farm and the kids have taken over, I really don't have a busy time of the day. Perhaps I could say the busiest season is canning season as we have two big gardens and I do the canning. May is usually a busy month because we host farm tours for pre-school children and their parents. How much time do you spend doing farm work compared to house work? When the children were younger, I spent a lot more time doing farm work than house work. Now, I try to stay out of their way. However, I am on call when they need a babysitter or help with chores, picking rock, making hay or running for parts. What do you do in your free time and why? In my free time, I promote agriculture with the help of the Farm Bureau, Midwest Dairy, Beef Council and Soybean Growers. I believe it is important to tell our story and educate people about where their food comes from. I also enjoy embroidery and reading. What’s the best thing about farming? The best things about farming are the smells of freshly tilled soil and fresh-cut alfalfa, and entering a warm barn on a cold Christmas morning. There are so many "teachable moments" on a farm that I shared with my children and now with my grandchildren. When you look back on your life, what do you want to be remembered for? I would like to be remembered by my smile and the laughter and joy I shared with others. Do you have any ideas that could make farming easier for you and all farming women? A reliable high speed internet service that works in rural Minnesota! A farm woman has a very busy schedule. The information available on the Web needs to be quick and easy to use.

Minnesota Farm Bureau is proud to sponsor the dedicated women of the dairy industry

Farm Bureau of Crow Wing County Salutes Rosanne Caughey


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 5

Keeping employees safe Knisley presents seminar at Midwest Dairy Expo about being OSHA compliant By krista m. sheehan Staff writer

ST. CLOUD, Minn. – When employees are involved in any business, their safety should be a top priority. “Most of us are very concerned about the welfare of our employees and those working with us,” Mike Knisley said. Knisley presented the seminar “Ready or Not Get Ready for OSHA” on Nov. 28 during the Midwest Dairy Expo’s pre-conference executive workshop. Knisley is a safety consultant for OSH Inc., which focuses on occupational safety and health consulting and training, in addition to being a 20-year firefighter in his Kansas hometown and the Division Chief of Fire Rescue Operations for the International Speedway Corporation in Dayton, Fla. Since the early 1960s, the federal government has been creating organizations to help businesses create a safe environment for their employees. These organizations have included the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). “They came into existence because we had irresponsible companies that weren’t looking out for employee safety. These organizations were put in place after significant accidents and loss of life,” Knisley said. Although there are many federal regulations to follow, Knisley said they’re simple rules.

“When you look at OSHA regulations, they’re basically common sense just written in government language,” Knisley said. But Knisley knows it’s a big task to follow each regulation. As long as businesses are doing their best to follow all Mike Knisley the rules, Safety consultant O S H A shouldn’t be a problem. “The federal government knows there are a lot of regulations. They’re looking at if people are willful serious violators – those are the people they want to crack down on,” Knisley said. There are also three other times when OSHA will show up at a business: when there is an employee complaint, a fatality or three or more employees injured in the same accident. “It’s a bunch of the basics that get us in trouble. These little things lead to big things and lead to bigger things,” Knisley said. Knisley explained some of the safety basics, including hazard communication. This includes identifying hazardous materials, using product warning labels, knowing the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and training employees. “People need to understand the chemicals around them. We’re not all HazMat chemists, but if we have the right resources it allows us to

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determine a course of action and do the right thing,” Knisley said. Product warning labels include the name of the product and list all the physical and health hazards associated with it. Having MSDS sheets is a very important aspect in hazard communication. They provide information for: emergency phone numbers in case of a spill, how long people can be around the product before it will be harmful, at what points it turns into a gas and becomes more hazardous and how to extinguish the product. Additionally, the MSDS sheets explain how to transport the material, what to do if someone is exposed to the product, what to wear around the product and how to dispose of it in case of a spill. “You can’t just wash it down the drain and expect to get away with it,” Knisley said. People also need to know how to respond to a problem if a delivery truck that comes onto their property is leaking. “If you have anything delivered, you need to know how to respond … you can’t just send it down the road. It’s your problem,” Knisley said. Businesses also need to have plans when emergencies, such as bad weather, arise. Emergency plans should include evacuation routes and meeting places, in-shelter procedures and spill control. “None of this stuff has to be 10 pages long, but a little preparation can go a long way,” Knisley said. Recognizing lockout/tagout safety is also important.

“When you deal with machines for work you forget how powerful these machines can be,” Knisley said. “We don’t shut down because it’s inconvenient, but we need to deenergize.” Employers also need to make sure they have the correct personal protective equipment and make sure the employees are trained on how to wear it. Back strains and other similar injuries are frequent for employers that require heavy lifting. “Soft tissue injuries are the ones that are eating our bottom line,” Knisley said. “We need to teach good lifting habits and make sure there is enough

“When you look at OSHA regulations, they’re basically common sense just written in government language.”

– mike knisley

tread on shoes.” One suggestion is to have a set time in the morning and afternoon for everyone to stretch. “It reminds you of what you’ll be doing – that you’re going to lift something heavy,” Knisley said. When using powered industrial vehicles such as forklifts or skidloaders, OSHA requires employees to be trained once every three years.

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OSHA also requires correct usage of ladders, making sure it’s the correct height and is able to hold the weight. An annual inspection done by the employer is required. “We have a failure to throw things away, especially when it comes to ladders. If it’s broken, throw it out,” Knisley said. In agricultural communities, Knisley said the rate for grain elevator accidents is the highest it has ever been, which is a concern. Some of the accidents and fatalities have been people under the age of 18. “I was taken by how dangerous these grain elevators are. We need to step back and say, ‘What are we doing wrong?’” Knisley said. He said the proposed child labor law partly came into affect because of the increase of these accidents. In confined spaces such as grain elevators and silos, employers need to be cautious about checking for oxygen and making sure its safe before entering. If businesses are not following these safety procedures, OSHA could fine them thousands of dollars. “For a small business, a fine from OSHA would be devastating. Do you want to bet your livelihood that OHSA will understand?” Knisley said. He encouraged everyone to look at their own business, make plans and be prepared. “Forget about the fine. The impact of losing someone is a significant thing,” he said. “We don’t want that to happen.”

Manure balls & bullets

• 1200 – 1500 GPM engine-drive pumping units and PTO pumps • Hose reels to handle 1 hose to 1.5 miles of hose • Many types of hose couplers, hardmenders and repair hose pinchers • Hydro shug grip – Rringlcock – Bauer – Delie – camlock fi ttings • Many sizes of Layflat, Mainline and draghose – suction hose • Magnectic flow meters – stainless steel knife valves – brass gate valves – gate valves - stainless steel risers • Many sizes of flanges – steel weldon fittings 10 – 14 gauge and schedule 40 types • Rubber gaskets – traveling guns – SS pipe risers • Equalizer manifolds for tank wagons & draghose 3 Pt and pull type toolbar injectors • Hose humpers – PTO air compressor – JAG wivels – hose road ramps


Page 6 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

The “Mielke” Market Weekly

By Lee Mielke

Not the holiday “dip” we’d like to see Cash cheese prices declined for the fifth consecutive week. The blocks closed December 16 at $1.5625 per pound, down 9 1/4-cents on the week but still 24 cents above a year ago. The barrels dropped to $1.5350, down 3 3/4-cents on the week, and 17 cents above a year ago. Seven cars of block traded hands on the week and 22 of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price lost 2 cents, averaging $1.8606. The barrels averaged $1.8325, down 8 cents. Stewart Peterson’s Matt Mattke speculated in Tuesday’s DairyLine that cheese prices might remain close to current levels, pointing out that $1.58-$1.60 is a “key range of support” and “pretty important level to stay above,” because, if we don’t, he warned that we could see the market test $1.54 and possibly as low as $1.48. He quickly added that, if cheese prices stay at current levels, it doesn’t necessarily mean prices will take off and move higher either. He also contrasted the trading activity and pointed to the large volume of butter particularly that changed hands the last week of November and first week of December and reminded us that the first couple weeks of December are typically not seasonally strong for cheese prices. Sometimes the first week of December is positive, he said, but the second, third, fourth, and whenever we have a fifth week, they’re typically down weeks so “we’re kind of in the seasonal doldrums.” He pointed out that, historically, if cheese finishes December on a down note we have seen some pretty decent rebound in January so, “perhaps there’s a little bit of a silver lining here.” Butter reversed two weeks of small gains despite a small uptick on Thursday and finished Friday at $1.6025, down 3 3/4-cents on the week, and a nickel below a year ago. Fifteen cars were sold. The NASS average inched 0.4 cent lower, to $1.6245. NASS powder averaged $1.4418, down fractionally, and dry whey averaged 65.37 cents, up 0.7 cent. California’s Milk Producers Council (MPC) reported in its December 9 newsletter that butter production continues to increase in line with higher seasonal milk production and butterfat content. It quoted USDA’s Dairy Market News saying that retail and food service sales leading into and over the holiday weekend have been good to very good, helped greatly by retailers’ ads and promotions. Buyers who have not already placed orders for the next big wave of expected consumer demand are now taking advantage of the current lower prices to place those orders. All aspects of the butter manufacturing and marketing channel are very active, producing, shipping, converting and packaging. MPC said price increasing two weeks in a row “may be a possible indication that the long, but unsteady, fall which began the last week in August may be at an end,” and added that “DMN hears from butter exporters of possible growing interest as U.S. prices are super competitive with Europe’s but major competition for those sales continues to be Oceania, where milk production is booming. Mattke praised the whey market which “has had a phenomenal year,” rallying from the 32 cent level to the mid 60s and “we haven’t seen much of a setback this year.” “It’s been a pretty quiet, pretty steady and controlled rise,” he said, but recalled that, in 2007, whey got to the mid 70s. He advised that we keep an eye on that market because every penny movement in whey translates into 6 cents on the milk price though he warned “we could see a setback at any point.” Meanwhile; schools are or will be closing for the Christmas/New Year’s holidays sending more milk to the cheese vat and pressure prices. Hopefully, Super Bowl will keep cheese demand strong. I have to mention that my favorite team is the Green Bay Packers and I think it a safe bet they will be in the Super Bowl again so it’s so appropri-

ate that the “cheese heads” will be driving cheese demand. The Agriculture Department’s latest Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook said that an improved feed price outlook is balanced by lower milk prices in 2012. Production in 2012 is forecast to rise slightly based on higher milk output per cow. Exports are likely to decline next year compared with 2011, contributing further to the lower milk price outlook. Cow numbers were virtually unchanged from the November forecast and dairy cow slaughter for the January to October 2011 period was about 4 percent above the corresponding 2010 period, and replacement heifer prices are steady. This suggests no major liquidation is in the offing, according to the Outlook, but cow numbers are expected to decline slightly next year. Output per cow continues to rise, and lower expected feed prices are the basis for the increase in the December projected output per cow to 21,315 pounds this year and 21,610 pounds next year. Looking “back to the futures;” the Class III average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $16.63 on November 4, $16.72 on November 11, $16.78 on November 18, $17.16 on December 2, $16.84 on December 9, and was around $17.02 late morning December 16. California starts 2012 with a 79 cent drop in its January Class I milk price. The Northern price was announced at $19.88 per hundredweight. The Southern price is $20.15. Both are up $3.43 from January 2011 however. The Federal order Class I base price is announced by the USDA on December 23. Like a broken record, U.S. fluid milk demand continues to slip. USDA reports that sales in the August to October period were estimated at 13.62 billion pounds, down a half percent from the same period a year ago, based on Federal Order and California state data. Year-to-date sales were off 1.4 percent. Class I demand is settling into non-holiday week norms, according to USDA. Cream demand is on the rise as production of various butterfat-based products such as dips, whipping cream, and sour cream pushes higher to reach store shelves before holiday grocery shopping begins. Demand for condensed skim is also increasing prior to the holiday. As winter weather envelopes much of the northern tier of states, dairy farmers in those areas are turning their attention to feed crop yields and feed input costs. Recent opportunities to buy feed grains at lower prices have helped, but forage prices and availability remain challenging. In the Utah/Idaho milk shed, announcement of a new yogurt manufacturing facility scheduled to open in mid 2012 has milk processors recalculating milk supply and demand, according to USDA. The milk production season in Oceania has passed the peak in both New Zealand and Australia and the decline is gradual. USDA says manufacturers and handlers indicate that milk volumes are generally sufficient to maintain near capacity production schedules. Producers and handlers believe the positive close of last season which carried over to the spring of the current season is a contributing factor for good milk volumes at this time. Spring and early summer weather patterns have generally been good in both countries. In other international news; the December 9 CME Daily Dairy Report said that October U.S. dairy export volumes of milk powders, whey, lactose, cheese and butterfat totaled 281 million pounds, down 2 percent from September (daily-average basis) and down 9.1 percent from a year ago. Shipments of skim milk powder and nonfat dry milk, the largest U.S. export category, totaled 76.1 million pounds in October, down 13.6 percent from September, and down 30.1 percent from the record-high levels of a year ago. Cheese exports, on the other hand, amounted to 37.3 million pounds, up 8.5 percent from September, and

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up 22.2 percent from a year ago. In the first 10 months of the year, U.S. dairy exports were valued at $3.96 billion, 29 percent higher than last year, according to USDA. This is already a record-high figure for a full year, even with two months to go in 2011. The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) gave a thumbs-down on a 4b milk price hearing petition. In a letter to Western United Dairymen (WUD) CEO Michael Marsh, CDFA director Kevin Masuhara, denied a request for a public hearing on the California Class 4b milk pricing formula. Masuhara said CDFA would review the issue in mid2012 to determine if a hearing was necessary at that time, according to Dairy Profit Weekly. The current dry whey sliding scale in the Class 4b formula has been in effect since September 1 and Masuhara said the three-month period was not long enough to determine how the formula will perform. As the result of a June 30-July 1 hearing on the issue, CDFA raised the whey factor paid to California dairy farmers, from a permanent 25 cents per hundredweight, to an adjustable rate between 25 and 65 cents. In its December 2 petition, WUD called for the new hearing, proposing changes to the Class 4b formula to more closely reflect the whey value generated by the federal order Class III formula. The 4b price in the California order and the Class III federal order price reflect minimum prices paid to dairy farmers for milk used in cheese processing. WUD was joined by other dairy farmer groups in calling for the hearing, including the Milk Producers Council, Dairy Farmers of America and California Dairy Campaign but several processing groups and companies asked CDFA to deny the request. They argued that further adjustments would negatively impact their ability to expand and innovate at a time when California milk production is growing and more manufacturing capacity was needed. In another political arena; the consuming public continues to demand integrity in the food it consumes and animal traceability is an important part of that demand. Jamie Jonker, National Milk’s vice president of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, discussed a letter he authored to USDA regarding animal identification and traceability standards in Thursday’s DairyLine broadcast. He said that USDA has for a number of years been contemplating how it might revise U.S. animal traceability and National Milk communicated its support for mandatory animal identification and how it “fits with animal disease traceability,” Jonker said. The Federation reaffirmed its support of RFID tags being the official identification for dairy cattle. The current USDA identification proposal doesn’t go far enough, according to Jonker. Occasionally a tag will fall out of an animal’s ear by getting snagged on something, he argued, and the tags the Federation is recommending is being used by dairy producers within their own management system and it would be nice if USDA had an allowance where you could replace the tag with the exact same number so that it can continue to be used in identifying that animal in that management system. The tags are also used in breed associations, he argued, so keeping that number the same with the animal during its lifetime, even if it happens to lose a tag so that it can be replaced with the exact same one. When animals cross state lines, they’re required to have an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection (ICVI) meaning that they have been reviewed by a veterinarian to insure that they meet the animal health standards moving from one state to another. National Milk supports this concept and believes it should continue but want USDA to move from the paper ICVIs currently used to an electronic ICVI. The paper base version has many drawbacks, he said, including the length of time required to search volumes of records and the quality of the data that’s actually entered on the forms such as legibility.

Check our current market prices & upcoming sale dates at Fergus Falls Livestock Auction Market on our website: www.cattle-hay.com

We do take cattle all day on Monday from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m., all pens with hay and water. John Morrell hog buying daily (no commission) Contact Steve Wagenaar at 218-736-5464 UPCOMING Sheep buying Wed., 8 a.m.-10 a.m. $2/hd. commission SALES: CATTLE REPORTS FOR TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2011 Beef Cow 1310 $73.00 Ulen Beef Hfrs. 473 $146.00 Ada HOL. FATS Tues., Dec. 20th Pelican Rapids Hol. Cow 1730 $72.00 FF Beef Hfrs. 455 $145.00 FAT BEEF Forman ND Hol. Strs. 679 $77.50 Beef Cow 1655 $72.00 Special Feeder Sale Dalton Beef Strs. 644 $145.00 Hoffman Waubun Beef Strs. 1407 $121.75 Parkers Prairie Hol. Strs. 1554 $115.00 BULLS Hol. Strs. 1749 $115.00 Deer Creek - Along with our Beef Strs. 593 $144.00 Underwood Beef Cow 1320 $72.00 Sauk Centre Beef Strs. 1308 $121.50 NYM Beef Bull 1800 $82.50 FF Hol. Strs. 1857 $115.00 Menahga regular auction Beef Cow 1665 $71.50 Beef Hfrs. 385 $142.00 Hoffman Parkers Prairie Beef Strs. 1403 $120.50 Vining Beef Bull 1620 $82.00 Ulen Hol. Strs. 1326 $113.50 Hawley CONSIGNED: Hol. Cow 1635 $71.00 Beef Strs. 686 $141.00 RLF Halstad Beef Strs. 1434 $119.75 Brandon Beef Bull 1960 $82.00 Ulen Hol. Strs. 1425 $113.50 Vining Hol. Cow 1670 $70.00 • 20 Beef Stock Cows bred Beef Hfrs. 435 $140.00 Lake Park Verndale Beef Strs. 1370 $119.50 Ulen Beef Bull 1650 $79.00 Hawley Hol. Strs. 1450 $112.00 Vining Beef Cow 1385 $70.00 for spring calving Beef Hfrs. 509 $140.00 Ada Barnesville Beef Strs. 1350 $119.25 RLF Beef Bull 1605 $76.50 Freeport Hol. Strs. 1645 $111.50 Ada Beef Cow 1555 $69.50 • 17 hd. Beef str. # 500 Rothsay Beef Strs. 691 $138.50 FF Beef Strs. 1255 $117.00 Evansville BEEF FEEDERS Brandon Hol. Strs. 1413 $109.50 Lake Park Hol. Cow 1895 $69.00 Ulen Beef Hfrs. 609 $138.00 Hewitt Beef Strs. 1457 $117.00 Tues., Dec. 27th Beef Bull 498 $165.00 Hol. Strs. 1425 $109.00 Freeport Beef Cow 1630 $68.50 Special Feeder Sale Ulen Beef Hfrs. 609 $138.00 Freeport Carlos Beef Strs. 1380 $117.00 Hewitt Osakis Beef Strs. 526 $160.00 Evansville Hol. Strs. 1853 $109.00 Beef Strs. 614 $137.00 Walcott ND Beef Cow 1345 $68.50 FF Beef Strs. 1410 $116.50 - Along with our Erhard Beef Bull 458 $152.00 Grey Eagle Brandon Beef Cow 1250 $68.50 COWS HOLSTEIN FEEDERS Glenwood Beef Strs. 1391 $116.50 regular auction Underwood Beef Bull 565 $148.00 Beef Cow 1620 $73.00 Kensington Beef Cow 1470 $68.50 Hol. Strs. 468 $104.00 Freeport Waubun Beef Hfrs. 1231 $116.50 Lowry Beef Hfrs. 383 $147.00 Freeport

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 7

Market Reports Alan Levitt’s

Dec. 21, Grain Markets 11.11

Litcheld, MN Cargill

5.83

10.96

Pipestone, MN Cargill

5.88

11.05

Elrosa, MN Elrosa Feed & Grain

5.86

10.85

Garretson, SD Eastern Frmrs Co-op

5.91

11.00

Ostrander, MN

5.81

10.88

Gareld, MN Pro-Ag Frmrs Co-op

5.77

10.84

Monona, IA United Co-op Assoc.

5.66

10.92

Winona, MN Cenex Harvest States

5.62

11.00

Ostrander Frmrs Co-op

he r

5.97

Ot

Soy

Sanborn, MN ADM

Oa ts

Co rn

bea

ns

Daily Dairy Report-Summary

Dec 19-November 50-state milk production: +1.8%

3.75

3.40

Barley 4.40

S. Wheat 8.69

Watertown, SD Watertown Co-op Elevator 5.79

11.03

Morris, MN Johnson Feed & Grain

5.83

11.04

Little Falls, MN Central MN Ethanol

6.04

Dennison, MN Interstate Mills

5.81

Class III Milk Options Sett

up just 8,000 head after expanding by 7,000 head per month for the previous year-and-a-half, according to USDA’s latest “ Milk Production” report. CME Group dairy trading will be closed Monday, Dec. 26, in ovbservance of Christmas.

USDA Announcement of Milk Class Prices

NOVEMBER 2011 Class III Price: $19.07 (+$1.04) Class IV Price: $17.87 (-$0.54)

While we trust the information, gathered from reliable sources, is reasonably accurate, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. For additional information log on to www.dairystar.com or www.dailydairyreport.com

10.84

(CME closing prices Dec 21, 2011) Strike

Milk production in November in the 50 states was estimated at 15.775 billion lbs., up 1.8% from last year, according to USDA’s latest “Milk Production” report. The report should be neutral to the market - roughly in-line with expectations and with the long-term trend. Cow numbers Dec 20-On-farm expandecreased 1,000 head to 9.216 milsion slowed since midlion, the rst decline since the nal CWT cull in August 2010. Producyear tion-per-cow was 57.1 lbs. per day, up 0.5 lbs. (0.8%) from a year ago. Cow numbers have attened since Weather was conducive for milk mid-year. In the June-November production during the month, but period, 50-state cow numbers were

S. Wheat W. Wheat

Glenwood, MN Prairie Lakes Co-op

feed quality is lacking. Compared with a year ago, the largest production growth occurred in California (+77 million lbs. vs. last November), Texas (+61 million lbs.), New Mexico (+40 million lbs.) and Wisconsin (+32 million lbs.). The only states to register signicant losses were Pennsylvania (-17 million lbs.) and New York (-13 million lbs.).

Strike

Call

Sett

Put

Dec

NA

NA

NA

NA

J-12

NA

NA

NA

NA

Feb

NA

NA

NA

NA

Mar

NA

NA

NA

NA

Apr

NA

NA

NA

NA

May

NA

NA

NA

NA

June

NA

NA

NA

NA

July

NA

NA

NA

NA

Class III Milk Futures

(CME closing prices Dec 21, 2011) Dec

18.70

Dec 21

Dec 14

18.56

18.49

Dec 7

Nov 30

J-12

17.21

16.66

17.22

17.19

Feb

17.38

16.94

17.13

16.90

Mar

17.19

17.01

17.02

16.93

Apr

17.05

16.90

16.88

16.85

May

16.99

16.93

16.98

16.85

June

17.02

16.98

16.98

16.84

July

17.15

17.14

17.09

17.07

Aug

17.21

17.21

17.20

17.10

Sept

17.20

17.17

17.21

17.03 16.92

Aug

NA

NA

NA

NA

Oct

17.05

Sept

17.05

16.95

NA

NA

NA

NA

Nov

17.00

16.94

16.90

18.43

USED EQUIPMENT SPECIALS

Tractors ‘79 JD 4840, powershift, SN: 6835R, new tires ......................$27,000 C-IH 595 w/2250 loader, SN: JJE002134...............................$19,500 ‘04 C-IH MX285, MFD, Autoguidance ready, excellent.........$129,000 ‘01 C-IH STX375, 4WD ........................................................$135,000 ‘01 C-IH STX440, quad, new transmission, SN:JEE0098348, 5200 hrs. $149,000 ‘05 C-IH STX500, quad, SN:JEE0107814, 3600 hrs., nice .........$195,000 C-IH STX485HD, 4 WD, triples, Outback guidance, nice ........$219,000 ‘06 C-IH 430, quad, SN:Z5F100007, only 1200 hrs! ............$210,000 ‘09 C-IH 535, quad, Z9F113071 w/full Autoguidance, 1005 hrs .$285,000 Case 40XT Uniloader, SN:JAF0347305, cab w/heater ............$19,900 Case 1840 Uniloader, SN: JAF0190608 .................................$13,900 Planting/Tillage New Case-IH 50’ Crumbler.....................................................$16,000 Case-IH 730B Ecolotiger cushion gang, SN: JFH0030013........ $21,900 Case-IH 9300 DMI, 9 shank Ecolotiger, SN: JFH0005771 ........ $29,000 IHC 800, 10B flex frame plow, good unit, SN:5705 ..................... $8,500 IHC 800, 12B flex frame plow, SN:1988 ...................................... $8,500 JD 2700, 9 shank ripper, SN:X002004 ...................................... $27,900 C-IH Tigermate II field cultivator 50-1/2, SN:JFN0007137........ $39,000 ‘09 JD 1770NT 16R30” front fold planter, SN:730366 ............... $93,500 Combine & Harvest Equipment IHC 1480 combine, SN:34813 ..................................................... $8,400 Case-IH 1680, SN: 28549, good unit ......................................... $26,000 ‘88 C-IH 1680 combine, SN:JJC0044270, RWA ........................ $29,900 ‘90 C-IH 1680 combine, SN:JJC0047995, long sieve, cross flow fan, RWA, 4550 hrs., nice........................................ $38,900 ‘93 Case-IH 1688, SN: JJC0119373, 3213/2495 hrs. ................ $45,000 ‘97 Case-IH 2188, SN: JJC0195483, w/duals, Field Tracker, nicest one around, 3365/2561 hrs. .......................................... $98,900 ‘98 Case-IH 2388, SN: JJC0197410, 4080/2996 hrs. ................ $69,900

‘00 Case-IH 2388 combine, SN;JJC0268246, 3154/2450 hrs...........$89,900 ‘01 C-IH 2388 combine, RWA, SN:JJC0269888, 3087/2308 hrs. .....$98,900 ‘03 C-IH 2388 combine, SN:JJC0273736, RWA, 2350/1833 hrs ....$150,400 ‘04 Case-IH 2388, RWA, Field Tracker, SN: JJC0275552, 2200 hrs.$129,000 ‘09 C-IH 8120 combine w/tracks, SN:Y9G206739, 1000 hrs. .........$280,900 IHC 810, 13’ pickup head, SN: 30350 .......................................... $1,900 IHC 810 13’ pickup head, SN: 50106, good ................................. $1,900 C-IH 1020, 22-1/2’ flex head, SN: JJC0060276 ........................... $6,000 C-IH 1020, 25’ flexhead, SN:JJC0060496.................................... $6,500 ‘98 Case-IH 1020, 25’ flex head, SN: JJC0316690....................... $9,500 ‘97 Case-IH 1020, 25’ flex head, SN: JJC0225123..................... $11,000 Case-IH 1020, 25’ flex head w/crary air reel, SN: JJC0328402, very nice ..$19,500 Case-IH 1020, 30’ flex head, SN: JJC0089295 .......................... $11,000 ‘02 Case-IH 1020 30’ flex head, SN: JJC0328308, good............ $18,500 ‘05 Case-IH 2020, 30’ flex head, SN: CBJ020189 ...................... $21,000 ‘08 Case-IH 2020, 35’ flex head, SN: CBJ041646 ...................... $22,500 ‘08 C-IH 2020, 35’ flex head, SN:CBJ041669 ............................ $23,000 C-IH 1063 Series 6R30” corn head, SN:JJC0153158, nice ........ $14,500 IHC 883 8R30” corn head, SN:26035........................................... $5,200 ‘97 Case-IH 1083 Series, 8R30” corn head, SN: JJC0243722 ........ $14,500 Case-IH 2608 Series 8R30” folding chopping head, SN: 816N27001 $69,000 Alloway 20CD, 20’ shredder, SN: 24222 ...................................... $8,500 Alloway 22CD, 22’ shredder, SN: 25782 ...................................... $8,900 Loftness 22’ shredder ................................................................... $9,500 Bradford 528, 500 bu. grain cart .................................................. $4,900 ‘09 J&M 1151 grain cart w/walking tandems, scale, 22” row spacing, exc. $41,500 Miscellaneous ‘11 Degelman 51’ land roller, demo/rental ..............................$36,500 Cub Cadet 1440 w/42” deck mower, eng. overhaul ..................$1,650 Cub Cadet 3235, 25 hp w/60” deck, 200 hrs............................$4,200 WE ALSO RENT SKIDSTEERS, SHREDDERS & RIPPERS

PEDERSON’S AGRI-SERVICE, INC. 320-677-2255 • 101 3rd St. E, Herman, MN

E-mail: pedersonsag@frontiernet.net • Web site www.pedersonsag.com

© 2007 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

We stock parts for older model IH tractors

CME Spot Cheddar Cheese & Butter Market Summary

Dec 21 Blocks Barrels Butter

Settle 1.5625 1.5500 1.5950

Change UNCH Up 1/2 UNCH

Trades 1 3 6

Butter Futures (Cash Settle) Settle NA NA NA

Month Dec Jan Mar

Change NA NA NA

Log on now:

www.dairystar.com

k c o A t s u e c v tion Com i L e i r i a r P pany 43 Riverside Drive oL ng Long Prairie, MN 56347

Home of the longest running dairy sale in the Midwest! SALES START EVERY TUESDAY AT 6:30 P.M. with baby & started calves, feeders, and dairy cattle and then followed by fat cattle, bulls and slaughter cattle.

December Tues., Dec. 27th January Tues., Jan. 3rd Tues., Jan. 10th Tues., Jan. 17th

SALE DATES:

Special Feeder Sale

- Along with regular sale

Dairy Sale

- Along with regular sale

Special Feeder Sale

- Along with regular sale

Special Feeder Sale

Please consign your cattle as early as possible! Thank You!!!

- Along with regular sale

SPECIAL DAIRY SALES are held the rst Tuesday of every month. Dairy cattle sell approx. 7:30 p.m.

For an on the farm estimate or current market info, call 320-732-2255 WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!

Market Phone 1-320-732-2255 Fax: 1-320-732-2676

tfn


Page 8 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Iowa farmland value reaches historic $6,708 statewide average By Michael Duffy & will Klein ISU Extension

AMES, Iowa — Average Iowa farmland value is estimated to be $6,708 per acre, an increase of 32.5 percent from 2010, according to results of the Iowa Land Value Survey conducted in November. This is the highest percentage increase ever recorded by the Iowa State University annual survey. The increase matches results of other recent surveys of Iowa farmland value -- the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank’s estimated 31 percent increase in Iowa land values and the Iowa Chapter of the Realtors Land Institute’s 12.9 percent increase estimated for six months of 2011. The 2011 values are historical peaks. “The 2011 land value survey covers one of the most remarkable years in Iowa land value history,” said Mike Duffy, Iowa State University economics professor and extension farm management economist who conducts the survey. “This is the highest percentage increase recorded by the survey, and the average land value of $6,708 per acre, when adjusted for inflation, is at an all-time high.” The previous inflation-adjusted high was in 1979. Scott County, with an estimated $9,223 average value for all farmland, saw the highest percentage increase and highest increase in value, 37.7 percent and $2,524 respectively, of the 99 Iowa counties. However, O’Brien County farmland estimates of $9,513 were the highest average county values recorded by the Iowa Land Value Survey. The Northwest Crop Reporting District, which includes O’Brien County, reported the highest land values

at $8,338, an increase of $1,983 (31.2 percent) from 2010. “This rate of increase in 2011 has led to concerns that farmland may be the next speculative bubble,” said Duffy. “Some people feel farmers are setting themselves up for a fall similar to the 1980s. Without a doubt, it’s an interesting time and something to watch, but it isn’t a time to panic.” Why Iowa farmland values are increasing Duffy said that examining some of the causes for the current increase in farmland values and the reactions is helpful in assessing the situation. Farmland values are highly correlated with gross farm income. As gross farm income increases, so will land values. In 2005, corn prices averaged $1.94 per bushel in Iowa. The preliminary estimated price for November 2011 is $6.05. Soybean prices changed from $5.54 to $11.40 over the same period. There has been considerable variation in commodity prices over the past few years, but net farm income has increased substantially and is projected to increase even more for 2011. The Iowa State economist goes on to say, this increase in income has been the primary cause for the increase in farmland values, but not the only one. “There are other causes for the increase,” Duffy said. “Interest rates are at the lowest level in recent memory. Farmland purchased by investors went from 18 percent in 1989 to 39 percent of purchases in 2005, but investor purchases decreased this year to 22 percent.”

Duffy pointed out another factor that should be considered, the relatively dismal performance of the stock market – people want to buy farmland or are not selling it because they don’t know where else to put their money. The increase in farm income, the changes in investor demand and the changes in investment alternatives have all led to a volatile market. One area where the volatility is revealed is in the number of sales. Land value survey respondents have shown considerable variation over the past few years when queried about the number of sales. Sales decreased considerably in 2009. They improved somewhat in 2010 and based on the results reported in 2011, most people are seeing more sales or at least similar sales in 2011 relative to 2010.

One of the differences is in the use of auctions; respondents noted what appears to be a rapid increase in the use of this method of sale. Preliminary analysis of 2011 sales data shows an increase in price by using an auction. As one respondent said, economics may get the person to the auction but emotion often leads to the purchase. Duffy believes farmland values should remain strong for the next several months at least. Beyond that, there is a fair degree of uncertainty with respect to whether land values can maintain their current levels. The economist said there are several key components to watch: • The amount of debt incurred with land acquisition • Government policies – especially policies related to en-

ergy • What happens to input costs – land being the residual claimant to any excess profits in agriculture • The performance of the overall economy, especially with respect to income • Government monetary policies as they relate to inflation and interest rates • The performance of the U.S. economy and economies throughout the world – which impact commodity prices, which in turn impact land values • Weather related problems – both here and around the world

Overview of 2011 Iowa land values While the highest county land values were reported in See land value | Page 11

AAA DRAIN CLEANING Serving Central MN, For Over 25 Years

We specialize in plugged manure and lagoon lines Emergency Service Available

320-252-6330

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Hixwood Metal,, Inc. We Manufacture, Buy Direct and Save!! The Boss I handles mid size square bales up to 8’ long. From feeding to bedding this hydraulically driven processor is ready to take charge. The adjustable chute means you can go from windrow feeding to bedding pens. The bucket-mount design can raise above gates and pens getting you to places other processors can’t. Put your work to bed with the Boss I skidsteer square bale processor.

• G-100 40 yr. warranty, 18 colors • G-60 30 yr. warranty, 18 colors • Liner Panels, 10 yr. warranty, white only • Job site deliveries • Special trims made to order. • C.H.I. Overhead Doors • Plyco Service Doors • Silverline Windows

HIXWOOD METAL ROOFING, INC. Phone: (715) 644-0765 Fax: (715) 644-4931


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 9

Kubota is celebrating 1.5 million sales. And when Kubota celebrates, Kubota customers win.

Take advantage of Customer Instant Cash Rebates on select new Kubota equipment, now through December 31, 2011.

You could save hundreds or even thousands of dollars!

ZD Series

RTV Series

M Series

SEE ONE OF THESE AUTHORIZED KUBOTA DEALERS FOR DETAILS • St. Joseph Equipment, Inc.

• Lano Equipment, Inc.

• Arnold’s of Kimball, Inc.

• St. Joseph Equipment, Inc.

• Haug Kubota, LLC

• Gary’s Tractor and Implement, Inc.

• Thermo King Sales & Service, Inc.

• Kesteloot Enterprises, Inc.

• J.P. Scherrman, Inc.

• Niebur Tractor & Equipment, Inc.

• Arnold’s of St. Martin, Inc

• Town & Country Implement, Inc.

• Lano Equipment, Inc.

• Arnold’s of Mankato, Inc.

• Pfeifer Implement Co.

• Lano Equipment, Inc.

• Arnold’s of Glencoe, Inc.

• Portland Implement, Inc.

Eyota, MN | (507) 545-2000

Lewiston, MN | (507) 523-2114

Albert Lea, MN | (507) 377-1631 Hastings, MN | (651) 437-3531

Anoka/Ramsey, MN | (763) 323-1720 Loretto, MN | (763) 479-8200

Shakopee , MN | (952) 445-6310

Willmar, MN | (320) 235-2717 Marshall, MN | 507-532-0100 • 866-317-8344 St. Martin, MN | (320) 548-3285

N. Mankato, MN | (507) 387-5515 Glencoe, MN | (320) 864-5531

Kimball, MN | (320) 398-3800

Waukon , IA | (563) 568-3509 Farley, IA | (563) 744-3393

Rock Valley, IA | (712) 476-2731

Sioux Falls , SD | (605) 338-6351 Cashton, WI | (608) 654-5575

www.KubotaMilestoneSavings.com ©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2011


Page 10 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Area Hay Auction Results

Dyersville Sales Co. Inc. Dyersville, Iowa

Dec. 14, 440 tons

Fort Atkinson Hay Ft. Atkinson, Iowa

Rounds Good $120-130/ton Fair $90-105/ton Utility/wet hay $70-100/ton Prairie grass (fair) $90/ton Cornstalks $30-33/bale

Rock Valley, Iowa

Dec. 19, 30 loads

Dec. 14, 72 loads

Small Squares Large Squares Premium $195-220/ton Good $150-190/ton Fair $120-140/ton Utility $135-145/ton Straw (3x3) $27-35/bale Mixed hay $195-205/ton

Rock Valley Hay Auction Co.

Small Squares Grass hay $135/ton Cornstalks $1.05/bale

1st crop 2nd crop 3rd crop

Small Squares $150/ton $145/ton $210/ton

3 loads 1 load 1 load

1st crop 2nd crop 3rd crop 4th crop

Large Squares $100-215/ton $100-110/ton $150-225/ton $115-170/ton

4 2 5 4

1st crop 2nd crop 3rd crop 4th crop New seeding Grass Cornstalks

Large Rounds $60-150/ton $105-165/ton $100-160/ton $135-150/ton $125/ton $100-135/ton $50/ton

15 loads 20 loads 8 loads 2 loads 1 load 5 loads 1 load

Large Squares

loads loads loads loads

Large Rounds 1st crop $140-190/ton 2nd crop $175-190/ton 3rd crop $195/ton 4th crop $190/ton Grass $90-135/ton Mixed hay $100-120/ton Straw $90/ton Cornstalks $37.50/ton

Central Livestock Association

A subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International www.crinet.com Albany, MN, Toll Free 800-733-6828 • Phone 320-845-2000 Albany, MN • EASY Access off Co. Rd. 10 So. of I-94 Greg Supan, Manager 320-249-5221/cell phone Lonnie Ritter, Assistant Manager, order/buyer 320-293-5311/cell phone

DEC. 13 SALE 757 HEAD SOLD HOL. FINISHED STEERS

Maple Lake Glenwood Glenwood Grey Eagle Little Falls Kimball Paynesville Albany Browerville Buffalo Grey Eagle Melrose Sauk Centre Buffalo Clearwater New Ulm Sauk Centre Belgrade Brooten Brooten Rice South Haven Gibbon Little Falls Richmond St. Joseph Watkins Albany Buffalo Holdingford Paynesvile

1,556 1,635 1,576 1,602 1,521 1,467 1,484 1,553 1,520 1,460 1,505 1,493 1,493 1,482 1,596 1,524 1,543 1,397 1,330 1,517 1,517 1,572 1,483 1,611 1,448 1,542 1,331 1,730 1,285 1,367 1,470

5 2 7 3 4 8 4 2 4 2 3 4 14 8 7 7 7 5 1 3 10 15 10 4 5 10 8 1 1 6 5

118.00 116.50 116.50 116.50 116.50 116.00 116.00 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 115.50 114.50 114.50 114.50 114.50 114.50 114.25 114.00 114.00 114.00 114.00 113.50 113.00 113.00 113.00

Clearwater Melrose Clearwater Sauk Centre Watkins Brainerd Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Freeport Freeport Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Rice Elk River Freeport Paynesville Rice Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Albertville Belgrade Melrose Rice Rice Freeport Melrose Sauk Centre Albany Albany Silver Lake

1,425 1,670 1,355 1,600 1,645 1,494 1,675 1,735 1,435 1,495 1,875 2,090 1,325 1,815 1,785 1,364 1,421 1,770 1,575 1,720 1,525 1,660 1,290 1,230 1,560 1,400 1,390 1,460 1,460 1,800

1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 5 1 2 1 2 1 4 3 1 1 1 2 1 1

78.00 78.00 77.50 77.00 77.00 75.50 75.50 75.50 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 74.50 74.00 74.00 74.00 73.00 73.00 73.00 72.50 72.50 72.00 72.00 72.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 70.50 70.50 70.50

SLAUGHTER COWS

South Haven Richmond Sauk Centre Silver Lake Albertville Sauk Centre Brooten Clearwater Freeport Hamel Melrose Silver Lake

1,460 1,340 1,745 1,680 1,525 1,215 1,395 1,398 1,305 1,760 1,575 1,770

3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1

70.50 69.00 69.00 69.00 68.50 68.50 68.00 68.00 68.00 68.00 67.00 67.00

DEC. 14 FEEDER SALE 1625 HEAD SOLD HOL. FEEDER STEERS

Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Holdingford Buffalo Lake Melrose Melrose Sauk Centre Sauk Centre Paynesville Albany Paynesville Albany Bowlus Swanville Paynesville Bowlus Bowlus Osakis Buffalo Lake Spicer New London Clarissa Grove City Spicer Sunburg Swanville St. Cloud Bertha Freeport Osakis Sacred Heart

232 208 208 232 223 365 293 372 376 324 340 288 323 443 189 372 279 450 463 447 350 376 449 380 424 416 568 305 377 706 373 819 639 656

25 10 15 25 25 1 13 21 24 23 25 9 31 8 4 5 9 1 10 20 10 5 14 8 5 5 25 1 3 18 10 61 6 11

156.00 156.00 156.00 156.00 156.00 147.00 132.00 132.00 132.00 130.00 130.00 124.00 123.00 123.00 122.00 122.00 121.00 120.00 116.00 116.00 116.00 115.00 115.00 113.00 111.00 110.00 109.50 109.00 109.00 107.25 107.00 107.00 107.00 107.00

Howard Lake 414 Eden Valley 377 Staples 403 Holdingford 325 Paynesville 285 Sauk Centre 465 Princeton 370 Foley 413 Long Prairie 413 Sauk Rapids 433 Staples 493

5 3 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 10

155.00 152.00 147.00 146.00 146.00 143.00 142.00 141.00 141.00 141.00 141.00

COLORED FEEDER HEIFERS

Grove City 416 Howard Lake 506 Sauk Centre 420 Sauk Centre 372 Sauk Centre 292 Sauk Centre 523 Sauk Centre 460 Clearwater 563 Paynesville 196 Cold Spring 521 Foley 527 Grove City 414 Holdingford 368 Watkins 532 Princeton 440 Sauk Centre 545 Sauk Rapids 367

1 6 1 3 5 5 1 4 2 4 3 4 3 3 1 2 3

140.00 140.00 140.00 140.00 139.00 139.00 138.00 137.00 137.00 136.00 136.00 136.00 135.00 135.00 132.00 132.00 131.00

Howard Lake 353 Eden Valley 345 Paynesville 300 Long Prairie 365 Buffalo 529 Howard Lake 503 Eden Valley 424 Hawick 485 Long Prairie 525 Long Prairie 443 Sauk Rapids 440 Albany 340 Swanville 588 Paynesville 535 Sauk Centre 295 Holdingford 237 Belgrade 370 Clearwater 631 Cold Spring 664 Avon 537 Avon 600 Avon 312 Sauk Rapids 383 Swanville 577

2 2 1 3 5 2 5 1 1 3 3 4 2 1 1 5 3 6 7 3 1 9 2 3

176.00 172.00 169.00 165.00 159.00 159.00 157.00 157.00 156.00 156.00 143.00 142.00 142.00 141.00 140.00 137.00 136.00 136.00 136.00 134.00 131.00 130.00 130.00 130.00

Freeport Albany Albertville Melrose Albany Freeport Melrose Sauk Centre Avon Freeport Villard Albany Cokato Randall Sauk Centre Melrose Albany Holdingford Melrose Sauk Centre

2 1 1 1 1 4 5 1 1 2 6 1 2 4 4 2 1 1 3 2

155.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 145.00 145.00 145.00 145.00 135.00 135.00 135.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 120.00 110.00 110.00 110.00 110.00

COLORED FEEDER STEERS

DEC. 15 SALE 576 HEAD SOLD BABY CALVES 103 115 146 135 95 95 129 95 135 135 124 110 145 135 125 98 110 85 102 113

NEXT DAIRY SALE: WEDNESDAY, JAN. 4 NEXT FEEDER SALE: WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 11

Continued from land value | Page 8 O’Brien County, Decatur County had the distinction for the second year in a row as having the lowest reported land value, $2,721 per acre, and the lowest dollar increase, $636. Washington County had the lowest percentage increase, 28.2 percent, with a reported $7,166 average value. Low grade land in the state averaged $4,257 per acre and showed a 26.8 percent increase or $900 per acre, while medium grade land averaged $6,256 per acre; high grade land averaged $8,198 per aacre. The lowest land value and smallest percentage increase were estimated in the south central crop reporting district, $3,407 and 26.7 percent respectively. The southwest crop reporting district reported a 36.5 percent increase, the highest district percentage reported. Maps showing 2011 values, percentage change and comparisons to 2010 data and additional information from Duffy are available at www.extension.iastate.

edu/topic/landvalue. The Iowa Land Value Survey was initiated in 1941 and is sponsored by the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station, Iowa State University. Only the state average and the district averages are based directly on the ISU survey data. The county estimates are derived using a procedure that combines survey results with data from the U.S. Census of Agriculture. The survey is based on reports by licensed real estate brokers and selected individuals considered knowledgeable of land market conditions. The 2011 survey is based on 487 usable responses providing 642 county land value estimates. The survey is intended to provide information on general land value trends, geographical land price relationships and factors influencing the Iowa land market. It is not intended to provide an estimate for any particular piece of property.

U S E D EQU I P M E NT TRACTORS

CIH 485, 4WD, ‘08, 1045 hrs., luxury cab............... $203,000 CIH Farmall 35 compact, ‘08, 48 hrs., ldr, “like new” $20,400 JD 4555, ‘91, 5300 hrs., powershift ................$47,500 NH TG285, ‘06, 1560 hrs., dls, SS, Intellisteer ready .$117,300 NH T2220 compact, ‘08, 185 hrs., ldr .............$19,500 NH 3045 compact, ‘08, MFD, hydro .....................$15,500 NH 1630 compact w/loader, ‘97, 795 hrs. ............$12,900 White 2-155, ‘79, 5530 hrs., 18.4x42 ..................$11,600

FORAGE

NH FX60, ‘04, 1916 CH hrs., KP.....................$113,000 NH FX60, ‘03, CH hrs. 625, Crop Pro .............$158,000 NH FX28, 2328 CH hrs., Crop Pro, RWA ..........$76,000 JD 6950, ‘99, 3393 CH hrs., kp, RWA, O/H eng . $72,500 Ear corn adapters available for multiple brands ..... Call Kemper 4500, ‘97, JD mounts .........................$21,700 Large selection of heads for the above units

BALERS

2.9% 48 MONTHS

NH BR 7090, ‘07, 1800 bales, endless belts ...$23,900 NH BR 7090, ‘07, 4950 bales, Xtra sweep ......$24,600 NH BR7090, ‘08, 6950 bales, Xtra sweep, endless belts $19,500 NH BR7090, ‘09, 8650 bales, corn stalk special.$24,500 NH BR7090, ‘10, 10,200 bales, corn stalk special.$24,000 CIH 8460 round baler, ‘89 .......................................$2,250

HAY EQUIPMENT

NH 1475 haybine, 18’......................................$22,950 NH 166 inverter w/ hyd. extension ....................$6,450 NI 5409 disc mower, 9’3”, new knives ..............$5,950 2) CIH MD92 disc mower, 9’3”, ‘09, 3 pt. .........$6,950 Sitrex MK 12 wheel rake ...................................$8,950 Sitrex 10WR rake, kicker wheels .......................$3,450 MacDon square bale mover, ‘99, 4x4 bales .......$9,950 Rowse merger fluffer, 8 ft. ..............................$10,500 Degelman 14 wheel rake, ‘08 ............................$9,950 Hiniker 1734 stalk chopper, ‘09, 15’ ................$11,500 Hiniker 1700 stalk chopper .............................$12,400

SKID LOADERS, WHEEL LDRS & TELEHANDLERS

NH L190, ’09, 870 hrs., C&H, HMP, wts, radio $35,250 NH L190, ‘08, 1122 hrs., C&H, HMP, wts., radio $33,900 NH L190, ‘08, 2365 hrs., C&H, AC, HMP, wts., radio $27,900 NH L190, ‘06, 3296 hrs., C&H, Hmp, wts. ......$21,950 NH L185, ‘09, 2335 hrs., C&H, HMP, wts........$24,750 NH L185, ’07, 900 hrs., HMP, weights ............$27,200 NH L185, ’07, 2900 hrs., C&H, A/C, HMP, wts $24,950 NH L185, ‘06, 1860 hrs., C&H, new tires ........$23,500 NH C185, ‘09, 635 hrs., C&H, AC, tracks ........$40,900 NH L180, ’06, 4100 hrs., C&H, HMP, wts........$19,600 NH L170, ’07, 377 hrs., weights .....................$23,300 NH L170, ‘08, 2235 hrs., C&H, HMP...............$19,750 NH L170, ‘06, 1423 hrs., C&H, wts., new tires $20,700 NH L455, ‘89, 3300 hrs., wts. ...........................$5,650 NH LW80B compact wheel loader, 5160 hrs ...$39,800 NH LM 5060 telehandler, ‘08, 160 hrs., grapple, nice $92,000

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LAWN MOWERS

YazooKees, 17 hp, 42” deck (must more) .................... Call JD F725, 25 hp, 54” deck (must move) ....................... Call Jazee 1642, 16 hp, 42” deck ..................Call - Must Move! Cub Cadet zero turn, 48” deck, bagger....................$3,950 Bush Hog TC220, ‘97, 940 hrs., 60” front deck ......$1,950

24 Ho

Out Of Minnesota Call 320-859-5340

SPREADERS

2) Meyer’s VB750, ‘10, pintle chain, hyd. web, vert. beater ....................................................$29,500 Meyer’s 2550, ‘01, double beater ......................$7,950 Meyer’s VB750, ‘09, new webs .......................$27,450 Roda R610, ‘05, hyd. web, slop gate ..............$12,500 NH 195, ‘95, hyd. web.......................................$8,950

1-800-433-0581 7 Days AurWseek

Call Anytime

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CLIP AND SAVE

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WESTCO ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICE, INC.

Open Plugged Pipes From Barn To Lagoon Without Digging!

763-444-5501 • Robert Friedle • Isanti, MN

LOADERS

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Page 12 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Battling stray voltage

Jennifer Burggraff / Dairy Star

Debbie and Larry Dreier own and operate Dreier Farm near Norwood Young America, Minn. They have been battling stray voltage on their farm for many years. Recent changes, however, have them on the path to recovery.

Dreier optimistic about future of his dairy By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer

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NORWOOD YOUNG AMERICA, Minn. – To Larry Dreier, the coming new year brings more optimism than he has felt in years – optimism that he will be able to continue the dairy farming tradition that was started by his family over a century ago. It’s optimism he hasn’t felt in quite a while, since he and his family began their struggle with stray voltage. Dreier owns and operates Dreier Farm near Norwood Young America, Minn., with his wife, Debbie, who also works off the farm part time. They have four children: Carissa (26), Derek (24), Dayna (21) and Makayla (14). The Dreiers milk around 200 cows twice a day in a double-9 parlor, raise their replacement heifers and steers and farm around 1,650 acres with the help of six employees. Their search into the possibility of stray voltage running through their farm actually began in the late 1980s, when their power company tested the blocker twice a year on their farm to see if it was working. With the testing methods at the time, no problems were

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This 150-foot stretch was replaced with new wires in March 2010. Following that, the Dreiers saw a brief improvement in their dairy herd.

detected. “We questioned stray voltage a number of times [over the years] but we could never find any,” Dreier said. “The testing methods were marginal, and we always blew it off. We couldn’t find much on the farm, and we weren’t aware of the off-the-farm stuff.” At the same time, they also questioned the quality of their water, thinking that may have been contributing to the problems they were seeing within their herd. But again, nothing turned up amiss. Ten years ago they began questioning stray voltage again, when their herd health took a drastic turn for the worse over a period of time. “We were frustrated with the death loss,” Dreier said. “We actually sold off half of our cows, going down to around 110 ... partly because of our frustration with the death loss and because we were never meeting our goals.” Milk production dropped to around 20,000 pounds, SCC continued to rise, and they saw countless herd health problems. Cows weren’t eating or drinking like they should have been, metabolic problems were an issue, many of the cows suffered swollen joints and cows refused to let down their milk, leading to teat end problems. These health concerns weren’t limited to the lactating animals alone. “Many of the dry cows looked horrid,” Dreier said. Their conditions didn’t improve after they calved, and the colostrum, he said, was likely not the best quality. With that, the calves were also affected and pneumonia became yet another problem. When they completely remodeled their parlor in 2008, the Dreiers hoped to see improvement within their herd. Everything within the parlor was done by the book, including putting in several ground rods. Unfortunately, things went the opposite. “Things got progressively worse,” Dreier said. “Basically, on the farm – and particularly in the parlor – we were providing better ground than the power company was because the 77-year-old wires weren’t large enough to get the current back to the power company.” Turn to Dreier| Page14


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 13

Early registration discount for Minnesota Organic Conference Early registration ends Dec. 30

Take advantage of the registration discount by signing up now for the 2012 Minnesota Organic Conference! The conference will held Jan. 13-14 at the River’s Edge Convention Center in St. Cloud. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) has organized the conference for the past 10 years and every year interest in the event has grown, according to MDA organic specialist Meg Moynihan. “Last year this conference broke attendance records with more than 500 people, and this year we expect an even bigger turnout,” said Moynihan. “Organic food sales are climbing and there’s increased in- “Last year this terest in organic production from farm to table.” The educational conference will offer three general conference broke sessions and 36 individual breakout sessions. Speakers attendance records include 18 seasoned organic farmers who will share their own experiences in everything from weed control to wa- with more than 500 ter management to poultry production to on-farm seed breeding to marketing. Other speakers include research- people, and this year ers, extension educators, consultants, marketers, organic certifiers, regulatory staff, attorneys and a veterinarian. we expect an even In addition to the educational program, a large trade bigger turnout .” show will feature equipment manufacturers and suppliers, seed companies, fertilizer dealers, certifying agencies, agMeg Moynihan ricultural consultants, soil labs, nonprofit organizations, public agencies, organic traders, buyers and distributors, and a host of other resources of interest to farmers. Registration includes bountiful meals and snacks made with mostly organic ingredients specially sourced for the conference from farms and companies in Minnesota and neighboring states. Early bird registration costs $125 for the two day conference with significant discounts for those registering from the same farm or business operation. One day registrations are also available. Early bird rates for the conference and hotel room block end Dec. 30. The registration brochure, which contains program details and registration materials, is available now at www.mda.state.mn.us/food/organic or by calling 651-201-6012.

Young farmers celebrated in Young Organic Stewards Program MOSES Conference

The Young Organic Stewards (YOS) program aims to connect, educate, inspire and empower young farmers to thrive in a sustainable, organic system of farming. Workshops and social activities for young organic stewards offered during the conference will provide educational and networking opportunities. Young Organic Stewards is for any young person (18-plus) who is interested or involved in organic and sustainable farming. According to Young Organic Stewards Organizer, Lindsay Rebhan, this year’s YOS workshops will address key issues young farmers face including access to capital, business planning and building a supportive community. “YOS programming is targeted for young people who want to grow food and care for the earth,” said Rebhan. “This conference is a unique opportunity to connect and share young farmer experiences.” Three social events are planned for the YOS including an Open Mic Night, breakfast discussion and Movie Night. The Movie Night will be screening the much anticipated documentary “The Greenhorns” about young farmers in America, King Corn, Big River and episodes from Perennial Plate. Conference scholarships are available and the deadline is Jan. 4, 2012. Applications are available online at www.youngorganicstewards.org. Please contact the MOSES office if you would like a hard copy mailed to you, 715-778-5775 or email jessi@mosesorganic.org. The Organic Farming Conference, scheduled for Feb. 23-25 in La Crosse, Wis., is organized by the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) and is the largest organic farming conference in the U.S. Young Organic Stewards (YOS) is a program of MOSES and Renewing the Countryside. In 2011, the OFC attracted nearly 3,000 farmers and agriculture professionals. In 2012, this extraordinary, farmer-centered event will feature more than 65 informative workshops, ten daylong Organic University trainings, 160-plus exhibitors, nationally known keynote speakers, locally sourced organic food and live entertainment. For more information or to register, go to the MOSES website, http://mosesorganic.org/conference.html or call 715-778-5775.

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Page 14 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Continue from Dreier | Page 12 Milk production continued to drop and SCC hovered right around 500,000. “We had continued death loss and sick cows, and there were never-ending vet bills,” he said. Labor cost was also getting to be an issue. The cows were defecating so much during milking that the parlor had to be cleaned between each group, and cow treatment time was adding up to a couple of hours each day. “We were down to the tail end. We seriously thought about selling out of the dairy,” Dreier said. “... We continued to bring in people [to test for stray voltage] but they would never say that’s what it was, and we didn’t know how to address it.” It wasn’t until July 2009 when things finally took a turn. Dreier brought in a team of people – consultants, his electrician and nutritionist, and representatives from the power company – and they started attacking the issues, he said, testing throughout that summer, fall and winter. While there were minor problems on the positive wires, they discovered the neutral wires weren’t large enough to bring ground current off the farm. They also found an excess of milliamps running through the property, including the Dreiers’ house, which, he believes, directly affected his family’s health. Two main changes were

made on the Dreier Farm by March 2010: the variable speed drive on the milker pump was replaced with a new one in July 2009, which was then replaced with a standard drive in February 2010, and in March 2010, the power company replaced the 150-foot stretch of wires from their primary line to the Dreiers’ secondary line. “We saw an immediate substantial increase in milk production,” Dreier said after the lines were replaced. “The cows seemed to look better. SCC never went down, but the cows were eating and drinking better.” That trend, however, didn’t last, and before long production had again dropped to marginal, at best. In January 2011, another step was taken when 18 ground rods were put in across the railroad tracks that run parallel to the Dreiers’ driveway, with another nine rods put in along the driveway. These temporary grounds took much of the neutral current away from the farm, Dreier said, proving the need for new power lines to be run from the Dreier Farm to town. The 77-year-old lines were replaced in April and the temporary grounds were removed. The latest changes came this November, when the power company replaced the Dreiers’ two transformers with one large transformer and replaced the old blocker with a new Dairyland blocker.

Jennifer Burggraff / Dairy Star

While stray voltage directly affected his dairy herd, Larry Dreier believes it also affected his calves indirectly. His dry cows, he said, were in poor health and so their colostrum was likely not the best quality. With that, pneumonia became a problem.

“Since January things have slowly gotten better,” Dreier said. In the last 45 days, the Dreiers cows have increased the tank average from 57 to 67 pounds of milk. Butterfat and protein are up as well, and for

the first time in a long time the SCC has remained consistently lower for a six-week period. Pregnancy rate is also getting back on track. At the low point, it was at nine percent; the Dreier herd’s current pregnancy

rate is 16 percent. While things are not yet where Dreier hopes they will be – Dreier’s goals are for a tank average of 85 to 90 pounds of milk with SCC under 200,000 – it’s a step in the right direction. “I’ve had more optimism in the last month than I’ve had in a long time,” Dreier said. “I think we are close to being cleaned up.” It was the team approach that Dreier said has gotten them to where they are today in their battle against stray voltage. “The team work to get this solved was really critical,” he said. “It’s not been a fun road, but we are getting there.” For getting through the stress and financial strain this ordeal has put he and his family through, Dreier relied on his faith. “This has actually made us stronger as a family,” Dreier said. “We are very sound in our faith. If it wasn’t for our faith in God, I don’t know how we would have gotten through it.” Defeating stray voltage on his own farm as well as others has become somewhat of a New Year’s resolution for Dreier. “I’m on a mission. We need to get this cleaned up,” he said. “I know farmers are hurting and they don’t know where to go, where to start ... Part of my mission is to take the controversy out of (stray voltage). This is for real.”

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 15

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Page 16 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Stray voltage SUBSCRIBE TODAY!! What it is, what the signs are and what to do about it Are you looking for up-to-date information on the dairy industry?

By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer

LAKEFIELD, Minn. – There is nothing simple about stray voltage. Even the name itself is misleading, according to nationally known consultant, Chuck Untiedt. “It’s misnamed,” Untiedt said. “It’s the current going through the cows that bothers the cows.” Stray voltage is peak to peak current – similar to a shock from an electric fencer – that is pushed through cows or other animals by the voltage. The animal’s level of resistance determines the amount of current flow a given voltage will push through the animal. Resistance within cows varies greatly, and cows are thought to be 10 times more sensitive than humans. “Resistance in cows is less than in humans, so it takes less voltage to affect cows,” Untiedt said. There are really only two contributing sources of stray voltage: on-farm sources and offfarm sources. Problems can also be caused by a combination of both, which is often the case. The most common on-farm sources are due to improper wiring or poorly installed electric fencers and cow trainers. Off-farm problems can be due to a number of electrical issues, including the utility neutral current. When consulting a farm on stray voltage, there are a number of things Untiedt looks at. “The first thing I ask is, ‘Are the cows responsive to normal treatments?’” he said. Untiedt also asks if the nutritionist feels the cows are responsive to ration changes. From there, many of his answers come from watching the cows. He observes if there are places the cows don’t want to walk, or if there are certain areas where cows consistently stop. Other signs of stray voltage include little to no barrel fill on cows, dull hair coats, listless eyes, cows that are not eating or drinking right, and poor fermentation of the ration found through observing the manure. If a producer feels they have stray voltage, Untiedt urged them to look into it right away and not leave it as a last resort. Find someone to consult and test for stray voltage – such as a good electrician. “If you have a volt meter, don’t be afraid to use it because sitting on a shelf, it won’t do you any good,” he said. Additionally, working with the utility company is a key to successfully diagnosing and solving the problem, he said. Untiedt also recommended talking to others who have dealt with stray voltage and learning all you can about the subject.

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About Chuck Untiedt Chuck Untiedt knows the devastation of stray voltage, as he dealt with it on his own dairy farm, with milk production dropping to 39 pounds. He eventually lost hundreds of animals through the ordeal. After rebuilding their herd, Untiedt’s family continues to milk around 200 cows on their farm near Lakefield, Minn. Over the last six years, Untiedt has become an independent stray voltage consultant. He now travels throughout the United States, and has been invited to travel internationally, helping livestock producers work through their stray voltage problems.

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 17

Managed grazing used by 22 percent of Wisconsin dairy farms By RON JOHNSON Staff writer

MADISON, Wis. – Nearly a fourth of Wisconsin dairy farms used managed grazing in 2007. That’s according to a new report by Laura Paine, the state agriculture department’s grazing and organic agriculture specialist, and Rhonda Gildersleeve, UW-Extension’s grazing specialist. Twenty-two percent of Badger State dairy operations used managed grazing four years ago. As for actual numbers, the 2007 Census of Agriculture put it at 3,070 dairy farms. Paine, Gildersleeve and the Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service added to the census information by sending surveys last year to 1,568 randomly selected farmers. In 2007, those farmers indicated that they used managed grazing. Forty-nine percent of the farmers filled out and returned survey forms. In their report, “A Summary of Dairy Grazing Practices in Wisconsin,” Paine and Gildersleeve wrote: “Managed grazing is an effective option for dairy farmers in Wisconsin. This system, which maximizes utilization of fresh pasture and focuses on reducing production costs, has potential to improve (the) profitability of dairy operations of all sizes. Managed grazing is size-neutral and flexible, a practice that can be adapted to any farming system.” Farms using managed grazing had from fewer than 10 cows to more than 1,000 cows milking. But the average milking herd size was 61, with 64 youngstock. Farms not using managed grazing averaged 109 cows milking and 93 head of youngstock. “One thing that’s clear is that managed grazing is a good fit for many dairy producers in Wisconsin,” Paine said. “Eighty-nine percent of dairy graziers said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their systems. The three top reasons for switching were: improving animal health, reducing production costs and increasing net income, and having more time with the family.” Very large farms use managed grazing, the report noted. “Ten percent of non-MIG (managed intensive grazing) farms averaged over 200 milking cows, compared to only three percent of MIG farms. Among the largest MIG farms, 30 milked between 200 and 300 cows, 25 were between 300 and 500 cows, and 10 farms milked over 500 cows.” Besides generally having smaller herds, managed grazing farms themselves were smaller – 249 acres versus 292 acres for other types of dairy operations. Land values were reported as lower, too - $2,850 per acre versus $3,355 per acre. The grazing specialists wrote that they did not know whether the price difference was due to less productive land being used for grazing, or some other factor.

Most in southwest Most of Wisconsin’s managed grazing dairy farms are in the southwestern part of the state. That region had 632, or 28 percent of the area’s 2,240 dairy farms. North-central counties ranked second, with 517 managed grazing dairies (23 percent) out of 2,241 dairy operations. That area was followed by west-central Wisconsin, with 477 managed grazing dairies (23 percent) out of 2,066 dairy operations. Northwest Wisconsin counted 329 grazing dairy farms, while the south-central part of the state had 243, and the eastcentral region had 234. Central Wisconsin tallied 169 dairy

farms using managed grazing; the northeast had 97; and the southeast had 54. Lower production cost One reason for using managed grazing that farmers often cite is that it’s a cheaper way to produce milk. The report agreed. Farmers using managed grazing reported an average per-cow production cost of $2,370. Farms not grazing had a cost that was $386 higher, at $3,116 per cow. “Hired labor accounted for the most significant cost difference, $439 versus $635 for MIG and non-MIG, respectively,” the grazing specialist said. “Of the 11 categories surveyed, RON JOHNSON / DAIRY STAR MIG farms had lower costs by 10 per- A recent survey found that 22 percent – or more than 3,000 – of Wiscent or more in five categories. Fuel consin dairy farms used managed intensive grazing. Farmers cited higher and repair costs were slightly lower. Utility and fertilizer costs averaged profitability, less labor and more free time as reasons. slightly higher – four and six percent, respectively.” Crossbreeding popular Nearly half – 48 percent – of managed grazing farmers reported using crossbreeding, and 27 percent said crossbreds were their “primary” breed. Holsteins were well represented, with 62 percent of the survey’s respondents saying that breed was their base. Jerseybased herds accounted for 12 percent of the total. Guernseys, Brown Swiss and Milking Shorthorns each made up less than five percent of the cows on all the grazing farms. Other breeds farmers mentioned using are Red and Whites, Ayrshires, Normandes, and Dutch Belteds. For all breeds, grazing dairy farms had average milk production of 15,430 pounds per cow. Those with predominantly Holsteins had the highest production: 16,476 pounds per cow. Per-cow milk production rose as herds grew larger. Those made up of more than 100 cows averaged 17,042 pounds yearly per cow. Farms with 50 to 99 cows had 15,217 pounds per cow, while those with one to 49 cows had production of 14,040 pounds per cow. Just 36 percent of the survey respondents said they used DHIA testing. Farmers using managed grazing reported that they kept cows in their herds an average of 6.4 years. That, according to Paine and Gildersleeve, is “significantly higher than the national average of 1.8 lactations.” Another tidbit from the report: 14 percent of managed grazing farms used organic production practices. That compares to less than one percent using organic practices among farms that don’t graze their dairy cattle. The smallest grazing farms had nearly three acres of pasture for each cow. Those with 26 to 100 cows averaged one to 1.3 acres per cow, while the five largest grazing herds had “significantly less than the recommended acreage per cow,” according to the report. On both grazing and nongrazing farms, the average age of the operator was 51 years. And, farmers in both categories said they averaged 35 days worked off the farm each year, and that

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More work ahead While the survey pointed out how many dairy farmers use managed grazing, and why, it also showed more educational efforts are needed, according to Paine. “Among the 3,070 dairy producers using managed grazing, about half reported using less-intensive rotations of three days to more than seven days on a paddock. These producers could easily step up their management (move the cows more often) and see significant increases in forage production and quality,” Paine said. More money is needed to keep grazing’s momentum going and encourage other farmers to adopt the practice, Paine said. She said, “A lot of the gains we’ve seen in the use of managed grazing in Wisconsin have been made possible through grant-funded grazing education and technical assistance programs. As agency budgets tighten, grazing organizations such as GrassWorks and the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative (GLCI) steering committee are working with state and federal agencies to maintain our capacity to help producers wishing to utilize managed grazing on their operations.”

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Why grazing? Dairy graziers were also asked why they adopted the practice. Improving animal health was selected as an answer by 80 percent of the respondents. Seventy-nine percent said reducing production costs and increasing net income were primary reasons. Reducing labor and having more time for family was chosen by 71 percent. Forty-six percent cited improving environmental performance. In all, 89 percent said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their grazing systems.

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Page 18 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

THE HAY AUCTION

Located 1/2 mile North of The Hay Auction on Highway 71 - Sauk Centre, MN

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Mid-American Hay Auction results for December 15 Lot no. Desc.

634 687 690 596 659 660 650 637 638 639 617 674 618 692 587 589 582 697 594 619 695 681 616 640 679 608 583 591 628 689 636 624 593 630 595 599 635 643 669 644 621 622 676 665 601 586 584 598 611 612 625 626 600 641 629 649 651 645 603 580 656 657 683 684 694 685 700 686 677 673 605 666 620 623 610

Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Medium Rounds Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Rounds Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares

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Cancer Screenings, Hearing Tests & Blood Pressure Checks.

moisture protein

15.36 35.76 15.6 12.43 16.45 15.03 16.36 14.81 10.74 15.48 13.84 16.71 12.96 14.95 14.23 15.6 12.79 14.21 12.96 11.9 14.24 14.18 11.36 17.27 16.64 13.05 12.31 14.58 16.41 17.89 12.74 16.28 12.95 11.01 13.67 38.87 13.06 12.8 14.34 14.94 12.61 11.04 14.89 15.88 15.44 14.68 14.67 12.79 13.57 15.25 21.02 12.59 19.72 13.53 15.73 14.17 13.71 12.24 13.44 15.92 16.12 14.33 13.58 14.97 16.08 14.27 15.48 15.12 14.34 12.6 11.74 15.23 20.51 13.35 12.83

19.77 17.75 14.48 17.41 11.03 10.13 20.47 8.72 22.91 9.96 11.55 12.16 13.21 14.32 12.71 19.44 13.24 16.46 18.26 17.57 18.93 18.6 17.19 15.32 21.42 13.63 17.2 22.58 7.98 9.64 8.3 5.03 19.42 13.87 18.57 19.96 19.19 16 18.8 19.48 11.79 12.14 18.22 14.43 19.27 12.59 20.54 19.83 17.94 17.63 21.7 18.85 21.19 18.89 20.23 13.01 20.88 19.83 18.84 21.02 15.65 19.59 20.71 21.15 14.11 11.66 9.55 14.24 21.81 17.92 18.84 23.23 128.81 20.99 19.13

RFV

cut.

149.81 1 112.08 1 84.18 1 91.43 1 76.35 1 74.86 1 111.45 1 79.71 1 171.59 1 65.81 1 83.64 1 72.8 1 90.69 1 85.75 1 89.55 1 91.05 1 75.69 1 109.15 2 129.72 2 99.13 2 92.85 2 104.3 2 107.15 2 98.64 2 97.83 2 95.24 2 91.07 2 146.5 3 79.37 68.46 86.72 66.75 82.57 2 99.78 2 94.95 2 143.84 1 125.66 1 85.72 1 125.99 1 95.61 1 95.81 1 99.06 1 94.23 1 90.17 1 108.96 1 101.2 1 118.69 2 135.7 2 98.53 2 91.94 2 118.56 2 101.48 2 151.52 2 98.57 2 106.12 2 91.86 2 120.72 2 95.88 2 100.91 2 120.86 2 95.02 2 137.49 2 132.09 2 95.09 2 88.12 2 91.58 2 82.82 2 93.46 2 95.69 2 108.46 2 111.26 2 113.21 2&3 13.22 2&3 108.85 3 122.74 3

Ld. size

16.44 21.63 17.39 11.01 21.56 21.21 13.81 10.33 14.28 17.39 18.92 13.54 21.5 17.26 13.78 13.34 20.58 6.49 23.18 21.31 11.42 9.76 21.44 8.96 26.6 9.02 18.82 25.57 8.22 17.84 8.53 16.33 17.18 18.81 17.67 10.6 8.85 23.8 25.38 6.96 21.96 23.07 20.94 24.25 14 15.24 21.38 18.68 15.39 19.54 9.97 7.23 22.02 22.4 8.72 8.3 23.57 15.65 18.68 24.28 10.05 8.5 23.45 21.39 8.88 23.02 9.75 22.18 19.03 22.12 15.71 24.21 24.93 16.6 22.94

price

$120.00 $50.00 $75.00 $100.00 $45.00 $45.00 $110.00 $45.00 $210.00 $30.00 $70.00 $85.00 $50.00 $85.00 $45.00 $75.00 $70.00 $100.00 $130.00 $130.00 $130.00 $107.50 $130.00 $70.00 $115.00 $70.00 $95.00 $190.00 $50.00 $30.00 $50.00 $40.00 $105.00 $95.00 $115.00 $80.00 $105.00 $120.00 $145.00 $110.00 $110.00 $105.00 $115.00 $100.00 $85.00 $45.00 $145.00 $170.00 $110.00 $95.00 $115.00 $115.00 $140.00 $135.00 $120.00 $115.00 $150.00 $135.00 $135.00 $150.00 $120.00 $110.00 $135.00 $125.00 $80.00 $90.00 $130.00 $95.00 $120.00 $130.00 $115.00 $140.00 $130.00 $110.00 $95.00

Lot no. Desc.

648 652 670 642 682 688 661 678 675 633 604 691 701 607 704 588 698 592 680 664 663 631 654 597 667 702 672 602 662 655 614 696 703 581 699 671 646 590 632 613 658 668 609 647

moisture protein

Medium Squares 15.57 Medium Squares 16.34 Medium Rounds 16.28 Medium Squares 11.96 Medium Squares 19.49 Medium Squares 14.04 Medium Squares 15.42 Medium Squares 14.26 Medium Squares 19.08 Medium Squares 15.62 Medium Squares 12 Medium Squares 14.94 Medium Squares 14.32 Medium Squares 13.52 Small Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Medium Squares Large Rounds Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Large Rounds Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares

RFV

cut.

25.32 125.23 3 23.7 155.65 3 23.33 117.12 3 23.47 159.81 3 22.26 125.06 3 24.54 129.3 3 24.87 161.35 3 20.84 142.38 3 28.18 175.42 3 23.91 166.21 3 21.78 161.84 3 24.2 175.69 4 8.54 89.63 8.91 80.88 NO TEST 2 GRASS 1 GRASS 1 GRASS 1 GRASS GRASS GRASS GRASS 1 GRASS 1 STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW WHEAT STRAW CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS

price

$160.00 $195.00 $130.00 $200.00 $105.00 $130.00 $185.00 $170.00 $225.00 $215.00 $200.00 $250.00 $85.00 $75.00 $65.00 $40.00 $30.00 $30.00 $45.00 $40.00 $35.00 $110.00 $45.00 $85.00 $23.00 $70.00 $30.00 $26.00 $27.50 $35.00 $85.00 $25.00 $20.00 $20.00 $22.50 $22.50 $29.00 $25.00 $24.00 $24.00 $39.00 $14.00 $12.50 $15.00

Hay sales are the 1st and 3rd thursdays of the months of September thru May as follows:

January 5, 2012

January 19, 2012

All sales begin at 12:30 p.m. For more information, contact Al Wessel at 320-547-2206, (c) 320-760-2979 or Kevin Winter 320-352-3803

The next issue of the Dairy Star is published January 14th.

Guaranteed Better Milkout With Dairymaster! CALL PAUL AT CHAMPION MILKING SYSTEMS FOR A DEMO ON YOUR COWS - 320.293.3672 • Improved teat end condition • Better milk-out • Less squawking

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34th Midwest Farm Show January 11th & 12th at the La Crosse Center, La Crosse, WI Show hours: 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. FREE Parking, Admission & Entertainment • Farm Health Clinics by Gunderson Lutheran • 50,000 square feet devoted to farm equipment

Ld. size

20.04 24.05 21.5 25.37 9.13 20.84 21.9 21.83 26.23 23.47 24.34 24.26 10.05 15.27 6.49 12.8 6.59 21.27 9.72 16.78 16.8 7.62 21.6 15.09 74 21.06 34 34 30 34 16.43 76 63 82 72 78 74 72 70 76 34 48 48 72

Visit with a Dairy Star rep. at the show.

• On-Stage, see ‘live’ animals from around the world • Visit with Alice in Dairyland & Historian Jerry Apps

A Tri-State Farm Show produced by North Country Enterprises. For further information, call or fax 715-289-4632.


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 19 ‘06 Case IH 1200, 16R30, liq., pivot ..........$72,500 2) ‘03 Kinze 16R31 ................................ Coming In ‘07 Sunower 1435 36’ disc w/mulcher .....$43,500 ‘98 JD 1780, 24R20 ...................................$43,500 ‘04 Sunower 1434 36’ disc w/mulcher .......Just In JD 1760 FF, 16R30....................................$47,500 ‘04 JD 637 37’ disc w/mulcher ...................$39,500 TRACTORS Krause 4560 30’ disc w/mulcher..................$8,950 JD 726 38’ eld nisher .............................$34,500 ‘08 Case IH MX275, 1200 hrs. .............. Coming In ‘06 Case IH MX215, 1100 hrs., loader.........Just In 4 WD ‘99 Case IH MX240, 4300 hrs. ..................$79,500 ‘08 Case IH STX535, quad, 1350 hrs. ... Coming In ‘09 Case IH Puma 165, 800 hrs., loaded...$99,500 ‘02 Case IH SPX450, quad, 4000 hrs......$139,500 ‘92 Case IH 7130, 6900 hrs., MFD ............$37,500 ‘05 Case IH STX375, 2650 hrs. ............. Coming In ‘84 IH 5488, 6616 hrs., MFD, OH ..............$21,900 Case IH STX335, 1650 hrs., PTO, 3 pt. ..$149,500 IH 560 gas, loader .......................................$4,950 ‘01 Case IH ST275, 3500 hrs., PTO ............Just In Massey 165, 5900 hrs., new clutch .............$3,950 ‘93 Case 1840 skid loader, 5000 hrs. ........$11,900 PLANTERS & DRILLS ‘06 Gehl CTL60 skid loader, track, ‘05 SDX40 drill w/3430 cart .......................$75,000 500 hrs.....................................................$22,500 2) ‘08 Case IH 1250 FF, 24R30, 3 pt. ......$119,500 JX70, 85 hrs., w/loader ..............................$21,900 ‘11 Case IH 1250 FF, 24R30, boxes ...... Coming In ‘10 Case IH 1250 FF, 24R30, clutch ...... Coming In JUST TRADED! TigerMate Field ‘06 Kinze 3700, 24R30 ..............................$78,500 Cultivators - 54’, 50’, 46’, 33’ & 23’

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Do you have an upcoming auction? Advertise it in the Dairy Star - call 320-352-6303.

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December 26 NO

Merry Christmas!

UPCOMING SALES SALE Jan. 9 Feeder, Bred Cow & Dairy Sale

Jan. 2 Feeder & Bred Cow Sale HAPPY NEW YEAR!

• Vining - (100) Blk Steers & Heifers, Fancy, Green, Vac & Weaned • Villard - (50) Hol Steers, 275-375 lbs., Vac & Weaned • NYM - COMPLETE DISPERSAL - (9) Bred Cows (5 Purebred Angus - 3rd Calvers, 1 F1 Baldy-3rd Calver, 2 Herefords-2nd Calvers) Fancy, Vac, Due May

• Underwood - (1-3) Jersey Steers, 700-900 lbs., Knife Cut, Dehorned • Wahpeton - (17) Hol Steers, 350-450 lbs., Fancy, Vac, Knife Cut • Thief River Falls - (3) Hol Heifers, Due March-April, (2) Open Hol Heifers, 1 Jersey Heifers Due June • Sebeka - 20 Hol Steers, 275-400lbs Vac, Dehorned, Knife Cut • Park Rapids 12 BWF Steers, 550-600 lbs., SelectVAC program

Jan. 16 Feeder & Bred Cow Sale

• Belgrade - (20) Blk Calves, 500-600 lbs., Weaned-45days, Knife Cut, Poured, Angus Sired on Hay & Grain

MONDAY, DECEMBER 19TH SALE BULL CALVES

Royalton Fergus Falls Frazee Audubon Parkers Prairie Vergas Perham Perham Sebeka Dent Frazee Sebeka Frazee Sebeka Dent Parkers Prairie Frazee Perham Frazee Vergas Dent Dent Perham Dent Perham Bluffton Wadena Wadena Perham Frazee

1 2 5 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Blk R/W Hol R/W Hol Hol Hol R/W Hol Hol R/W Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

250 185 191 225 155 95 100 90 85 125 130 85 90 110 110 125 90 85 95 90 90 90 85 110 90 80 115 100 105 80

370.00 285.00 270.00 270.00 240.00 170.00 165.00 165.00 165.00 165.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 140.00 140.00 130.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 120.00 120.00 120.00 115.00 115.00 115.00 115.00 115.00 110.00 110.00

293 331 331 413 312 401 380

120.00 118.00 118.00 117.00 116.00 114.50 114.00

HOLSTEIN STEERS

Wadena Sebeka Sebeka New York Mills Wadena Wadena Fergus Falls

25 4 1 9 6 15 8

Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

Sebeka Sebeka Wadena Parkers Prairie Verndale Parkers Prairie

1 2 3 5 2 4

Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

455 455 458 490 477 960

DAIRY COWS

107.00 107.00 97.00 97.00 93.00 88.00

Top cow sold by Don C. Meech for $1,850

Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph Gary St. Joseph Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Fergus Falls Sebeka St. Joseph Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Fergus Falls St. Joseph Sebeka

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol RW Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol RW Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

1505 1505 1375 1170 1340 1340 1230 1310 1405 1150 1465 1270 1760 1430 1285 1200 1565 1540 1300 1165 1270 1040 1375 1585 1450 1420 1310 1290 1220 1225

1,850.00 1,850.00 1,800.00 1,800.00 1,785.00 1,740.00 1,700.00 1,670.00 1,650.00 1,650.00 1,610.00 1,600.00 1,560.00 1,525.00 1,525.00 1,525.00 1,510.00 1,500.00 1,500.00 1,475.00 1,475.00 1,460.00 1,460.00 1,435.00 1,435.00 1,425.00 1,400.00 1,400.00 1,400.00 1,390.00

St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Greenbush St. Joseph Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Wadena Sebeka Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Sebeka Wadena Greenbush St. Joseph Sebeka St. Joseph Fergus Falls Fergus Falls Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Sebeka Fergus Falls St. Joseph St. Joseph Sebeka Fergus Falls Greenbush Greenbush Fergus Falls St. Joseph St. Joseph

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hol RW Hol Hol RW Hol RW Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol RW RW Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol RW Hol

1725 1590 1505 1225 1350 1430 1605 1035 1520 1160 1075 1315 1420 1265 1050 1530 1335 1070 1795 1100 1740 1245 1235 1180 1125 1630 1075 1215 1380 1030 1110 1135 1565 1240 1105 1015 1295 1285 1500 1330

1,385.00 1,385.00 1,385.00 1,375.00 1,375.00 1,375.00 1,350.00 1,350.00 1,335.00 1,335.00 1,325.00 1,325.00 1,325.00 1,325.00 1,310.00 1,310.00 1,300.00 1,300.00 1,300.00 1,300.00 1,285.00 1,285.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,275.00 1,250.00 1,250.00 1,250.00 1,250.00 1,235.00 1,225.00 1,220.00 1,210.00 1,210.00 1,210.00 1,200.00

Sebeka Wadena Greenbush Farwell Fergus Falls Farwell Greenbush Greenbush Farwell St. Joseph Wadena Sebeka St. Joseph St. Joseph

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

1030 1340 1225 990 1310 1090 840 1250 1035 1385 1530 1410 1390 1320

1,200.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 1,185.00 1,185.00 1,160.00 1,160.00 1,150.00 1,150.00 1,135.00 1,135.00 1,125.00 1,125.00

BRED HEIFERS

Hawley Hawley St. Joseph Clitherall Frazee Wadena St. Joseph Hawley Hawley Twin Brooks Twin Brooks Hawley Twin Brooks Twin Brooks Greenbush Wadena Twin Brooks St. Joseph Twin Brooks Wadena Kelliher Twin Brooks Twin Brooks Clarissa

1 Hol 1665 1 Hol 1520 1 Hol 1300 1 Hol 1365 1 Hol 1430 1 Hol 1215 1 Hol 1285 1 Hol 1445 1 Hol 1450 1 Hol 1180 1 Hol 1225 1 Hol 1260 1 Hol 1140 1 Hol 1150 1 Hol 1105 1 Hol 1130 1 Hol 1080 1 Hol 1580 1 Hol 1120 1 Hol 1190 1 Hol 1175 1 Hol 1020 1 Hol 1075 1 HoJo1335

1,600.00 1,490.00 1,400.00 1,385.00 1,375.00 1,325.00 1,325.00 1,300.00 1,300.00 1,285.00 1,275.00 1,260.00 1,225.00 1,220.00 1,220.00 1,210.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 1,175.00 1,160.00 1,150.00 1,150.00 1,110.00 1,100.00

Deer Creek 1 Hol Twin Brooks 1 Hol Twin Brooks 1 Hol Wadena 1 Hol Frazee 1 Hol Greenbush 1 Hol Waubun 1 Hol New York Mills 1 Hol

1085 1040 985 1135 1030 1060 1085 1125

1,050.00 1,050.00 1,050.00 1,050.00 1,000.00 975.00 950.00 900.00

SLAUGHTER COWS

Greenbush Pine River Perham Gary Menahga Hawley New York Mills New York Mills Pequot Lakes Verndale Pelican Rapids Hewitt Verndale Fergus Falls Menahga Sebeka Waubun Fergus Falls Pequot Lakes Sebeka Frazee Pillager Frazee Verndale Perham Motley Park Rapids Pelican Rapids Pelican Rapids Wadena

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hol Hol Blk Grey Hol Jer Mix Red Hol BWF Hol Hol Grey Red Hol Swis RWF Hol Hol Hol Blk Grey Hol Blk Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol

1015 1910 1135 1505 1680 1435 925 1410 1140 1445 1615 1585 1700 1115 1585 1670 1100 905 1085 1660 1245 1440 1560 1555 1365 1220 1070 1815 1375 1590

79.00 76.50 75.50 75.25 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 74.50 74.50 74.50 74.00 74.00 74.00 73.50 73.50 73.25 73.00 73.00 73.00 73.00 72.50 72.50 72.50 72.25 72.25 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00

Sebeka Detroit Lakes Menahga Sebeka Sauk Centre Wadena Pequot Lakes Wadena St. Joseph Perham Greenbush Greenbush Pequot Lakes Perham Battle Lake Perham Fergus Falls Perham Pelican Rapids New York Mills Fergus Falls Perham Ottertail Sebeka Verndale Perham Verndale Wadena Fergus Falls

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

BWF Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Hol Red Hol Hol Char Hol Hol Hol Char Hol Hol Hol Blk Hol Hol Hol Hol

1090 995 1680 1510 1580 1495 1285 1395 1540 1570 1150 1450 1195 1430 1510 1365 1250 1245 1450 2160 1120 1555 1830 1050 1540 1200 1145 1275 1205

72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 71.75 71.50 71.50 71.50 71.50 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 71.00 70.75 70.75 70.75 70.50 70.50 70.50 70.50 70.50 70.25 70.25

Perham Frazee Menahga Fergus Falls Foley Park Rapids Pelican Rapids

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hol Hol Blk Char Hol RWF Hol

1710 1635 1970 1600 1620 1455 1505

85.50 79.00 79.00 78.50 78.50 78.25 77.50

SLAUGHTER BULLS

For more in-depth auction results go to www.Perhamstockyards.com • View our sales live at www.cattleusa.com 218-346-3415 • County Road 80 • Perham, MN 56573 • Mitch Barthel 218-639-5228 • Jerry Barthel 218-639-2888 • Pickup Available in Fergus Falls Area - Don Nelson 218-739-9501 Field Rep & Pickup Service Available, Swanville Area - Scott Twardowski 320-220-5501 • Pickup Available at Northern MN Cattle Yards, Blackduck, MN


Page 20 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Serving Dairy Producers Future Dairy Producers Since 1983

BELGRADE 320-254-8294

PAYNESVILLE 320-243-3938

LAKE HENRY 320-243-4401

mark klaphake/ dairy star

The Paulson children, Matt (9) and Morgan (12), are pictured with a calf on their family’s dairy farm near Atwater, Minn.

Morgan Paulson, 12 Seventh grade

When do you do chores and what chores do you do? Friday night through Monday night I feed and water calves, bed the calves, clean the barn, throw out feed, feed hay, grind feed, wash the pipeline, finish up in the milk room and open gates for feeding hay. I also feed calves at other farms. What’s your favorite and least favorite chores? My favorite is washing the pipeline because I know we are almost done. My least is grinding feed because we have to climb into the corn crib and push down the corn and you get very tired. Do you have a favorite animal on your farm? Jasmine and Jacy – Jasmine because she has had all girls and Jacy because I won overall Junior Champion at the Minnesota State Fair in 2011. What do you want to be when you grow up? A vet. What is your favorite winter activity (work or play) to do on the farm? Tubing behind the Gator What’s your favorite Christmas food or treat? French silk pie. What’s on your Christmas wish list this year? A red and white Holstein calf.

Matt Paulson, 9 Third grade

When do you do chores and what chores do you do? Saturday, Sunday and Monday morning and night I feed the bottle calves, throw down hay, put out feed and feed calves at other farms. What’s your favorite and least favorite chores? My favorite is putting out feed because I like the smell. My least favorite is feeding bottle calves because there are spiders in the calf shed. Do you have a favorite animal on your farm? Kendall is my favorite calf from the Kandiyohi County Fair. I like her best because I did an open showmanship class and I won a trophy. mark klaphake/ dairy star What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a carpenter so I don’t have to do chores. Jeff and Tammie Paulson milk 50 cows on their farm in Kandi- What is your favorite winter activity (work or play) to do on the farm? Getting pulled on the inner tube behind the Gator. yohi County near Atwater, Minn. What’s your favorite Christmas food or treat? Christmas cookies What’s on your Christmas wish list this year? A .22 caliber gun.


U of M research helps growers narrow yield gap for corn By jeff coulter University of Minnesota Extension

With high production costs for corn, growers must focus their management on factors that have the greatest potential to increase yield. Prerequisites for high-yield corn include favorable weather and adequate levels of drainage, soil fertility and pest management. Recent research by University of Minnesota Extension has focused on discovering how additional agronomic factors could be modified to narrow the gap between actual and potential corn yields. This research found that decisions related to hybrid selection are among the most important. In corn hybrid trials from 2007 to 2010 near Rochester, Minn., with 98 to 153 hybrids evaluated each year, the highest yielding hybrid yielded 37 to 64 percent more than the lowest yielding hybrid. Hybrid relative maturity was less important in these trials, with hybrids of 98- to 102-day relative maturity yielding just 2 percent more than those in the 93- to 97-day range. Another important factor influencing corn yield is crop rotation. In long-term experiments conducted by land-grant universities in Wisconsin and Indiana, corn yielded 5 to 19 percent higher when following soybean or alfalfa rather than corn, with the smallest yield increases occurring in years with favorable weather and high yields. In these trials, conservation till-

age systems such as strip-till and disktill worked well on silt loam soils when corn followed soybean or alfalfa, but a more aggressive tillage system was needed to optimize yield of corn following corn, especially on heavy soils. Uniform stand establishment is also critical for corn, as research at Lamberton, Minn. found that a plant just one leaf stage behind early in the season yielded 20 percent less. Additional research by University of Minnesota Extension that was funded by the Minnesota Corn Growers Association found that a delay in planting from late April to mid-May reduced corn yield by 2 percent. However, planting in late May rather than late April reduced yield by 15 percent. In these trials, increasing the final stand from 30,000 to 34,000 plants/ acre increased corn yield by 1 to 2 percent, while planting in narrow or twin rows increased yield by 0 to 3 percent. In northwestern Minnesota, however, yield increases with high plant populations and narrow rows have been much greater. These results demonstrate that the easiest options for increasing corn yield are related to hybrid selection, crop rotation, tillage system and uniform emergence. For more educational resources on corn production in Minnesota, visit University of Minnesota Extension’s corn website at www.extension.umn. edu/corn.

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 21

During this holiday season we would like to express our warmest feelings of appreciation to all our customers and friends. May you have a happy and blessed New Year.

Where are we on fuel efficiency? Just ask the Nebraska Tractor Test Lab. The proof is in. Massey Ferguson® row crop tractors with e3™ clean air technology now offer better fuel efciency* than any comparable tractor from John Deere®, Case IH® or New Holland®. For complete test results, visit massey ferguson.com. Then come see us soon. MASSEY FERGUSON and e3 are worldwide brands of AGCO. ©2010 AGCO Corporation, 4205 River Green Parkway, Duluth, GA 30096 (877) 525-4384 *Based on Nebraska OECD Tractor Tests of fuel consumption at Max. PTO Power (HP hr./gal.) and Rated PTO HP (HP hr./gal.). Comparisons were between tractors within four model categories of row crop tractors 200 to 300 PTO HP. John Deere ® is a registered trademark of Deere & Company; Case IH ® is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC; New Holland ® is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. MF104Cco13

EQUIPMENT ON HAND

SKIDSTEERS (LH) Mustang 2060, dsl., B, 1 pin, FAT ........................$11,665 (LH) Mustang 2050, dsl., 2 pin, FAT, B, cab & heat ......$14,390 (LH) Mustang 2050, dsl., 2 pin, FAT, B, cab & heat ......$14,165 (LH) Mustang 940, dsl., B, 1 pin, FAT ............................$7,225 (LH) Mustang 2044, dsl., 2 pin, FAT, B.........................$13,280 (LH) Mustang 940, dsl., B, 1 pin, FAT ............................$7,225 (LH) Case 1825, dsl., B ..................................................$6,125 (P) Gehl 5640E, joy, cab & heat, B ...............................$27,500 (LH) Gehl 4835SXT, cab & heat, B ...............................$11,100 (P) Gehl 6640, 1900 hrs., cab & heat...........................$21,500 (P) Gehl 7810E, H, B, 2 pin, FAT ..................................$26,500 (LH) Erskine 79” snow blower, 2 stage, universal attach$2,000 (P) Grouser tracks, 12x16.6 tires, 42.5” WB..................$2,485 (P) Vernig 72” rock bucket................................................$660 (LH) Midsota 66” rock fork ...............................................$725 CHOPPERS (LH) Miller Pro 1061 forage blower .........................$4,725 (LH) Nh 28 forage blower ...........................................$835 (LH) Dion 1460 forage blower .................................$3,275 (LH) Balzer 2000 crop shredder, 20’, 8/30, 1000 pto$7,665 BALERS (LH) CIH 8575 baler, auto app., roller chute, 32,650 bales ........................................................$31,500 (LH) ‘09 MF/Hesston 2150 baler, auto appl., tandem, roller chute .............................................$79,000 (LH) CIH 3650 round baler, 6’x5’ .............................$5,275 (P) JD 435 round baler, 4’x6’ ...................................$8,110 (P) DMI RP 1211 round baler, 4’x5’ .........................$4,445

(P) - Pierz • (LH) Lake Henry

(LH) New Idea 4865 round baler, 5’x6’.....................$6,110 (P) Gehl 1860 round baler, 6’x5’ ..............................$3,895 (P) Gehl 1470 round baler, 4’x5’ ..............................$6,800 (P) CIH 8530 baler, thrower ...................................$10,000 (P) Gehl 2480 round baler, 4’x5’ ..............................$8,615 (LH) NH BR780 round baler, twine, 6’x5’ ...............$19,665 BOXES/WAGONS (LH) 3-H&S BB18 boxes, rear unload, 17 ton tandem $9,100 (LH) 2-Minnesota 10 ton wagon w/used tires .............$725 TILLAGE (P) Glencoe 300, 32.5” field cult., 3BCT harrow ......$2,225 (LH) ‘11 Sunflower 1435-33, new ..........................$45,000 (LH) Pepen HD750, 7 section harrow, coil tine ........$1,665 (LH) Wilrich 3400, 45’ field cult, 3BCT harrow ......$10,555 (LH) Howse 4’, 3 pt., mtd. disc ...................................$595 PLANTERS (LH) White 6700 12/30 VF planter, TPH, M, I .........$16,110 (LH) White 5100 8/36 VF planter, M, I .....................$3,890 (LH) Buffalo Scout guidance system........................$1,000 (LH) Hiniker 5000 6/30 min till cult..........................$3,890 (LH) IH 153 8/30 FC cultivator, fins, sheilds.............$1,530

(LH) White 2-110, cab, 2WD

Call


Page 22 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

Top producing dairy Last Chance herds feed more forage e a ls than you may think

D

2011 2012

By randy shaver & bob kaiser University of Wisconsin

‘98 NH 595 big square baler - $38,900

armers Implement and Irrigation

S300, S250, S220, S205, S185, S130 LS, 863, T250, 753 BC, 743, 542B, several w/low hrs A FEW COPYCATS DeWitt, Iowa

FARM FOR SALE:

Mitchell Co., IA. Farmland and New Dairy Facility in 2009. 105 acres, 88 CSR, 100-150 cattle. Contact Reed Kuper 641-425-8617 Doug Yegge Office 563-659-8185 Cell 563-320-9900 www.totalrealtyco.com

K & R Equipment Fountain, MN

507-268-4425

605-692-6153

‘07 CIH LBX332 baler Only 10,000 bales, very good condition!

Please call! 507-836-857 1

New Northern 40’ silage trailer

JD 4650, PS

unloads in 1 minute! Had on lot too long, will sell at dealer’s cost! - $55,000

507-962-3631

Gehl 1410 manure spreader

$29,900 KIESTER IMPLEMENT 507-294-3387 KIESTER, MN

New-2011-25’ Custom Built GN trailer, tandem duals, 20,000 lb. gvw - $7,300 Call 1-800-887-4634

AgBag 6070 choice of 9’ or 10’ tunnel. Nice shape

Tri-State Equipment

Kevin Meyerhofer

New 2010 Degelman bale shredder, right side discharge, As is – no trade - $16,500

605-336-6224

507 259 5863

605-693-3514

‘09 Farm Aid 560 reel mixer chain and slat discharge, A real straight wagon! $26,000

New Westld TFX100-36 Auger, 36’ PTO Drive $4,695

Pfeifer’s

Beck Implement, Inc.

605-338-6351

507-876-2122

410 bu.

Here's Power!

Bobcat Compact Tractors NOW IN STOCK! USED LOADERS

Jamesway 4600 Gal Manure Tank w/5row inj. - Call

Sioux Falls, SD

VXT-425

Quick Mix Even Discharge 800544-0475

Stacyville, IA

Elgin, MN

60” MRF Tine Grapple

The information in this article was compiled from surveys of forage and feeding programs from selected Wisconsin high-producing dairy herds. For this summary, data from 2004, 2007 and 2010 were combined when six, three and five herds, respectively, were surveyed. Of the 14 herds surveyed, 10 were located in south-central Wisconsin with the remaining herds located in north-central or north-west Wisconsin. Surveys were a single snapshot taken at the same time across herds within each survey year. Milking cow herd size ranged as follows: 280-570 (2004), 60-331 (2007) and 85-2274 (2010). The DHI rolling herd average for milk ranged as follows: 29,000-31,000 pounds (2004), 30,00033,000 pounds (2007) and 32,000-37,000 pounds (2010). Across all survey years, herds were fed a mixture of corn silage and alfalfa silage in total mixed rations (TMR). Most of the herds included some (two to four pounds per cow per day) high-quality dry alfalfa hay in their TMR, but usually only for early-lactation cows. Herd level dry matter intakes (DMI) were 55-60 pounds per cow per day and feed conversions were 1.6-1.8 pounds fat-corrected milk per pounds of dry matter intake (DMI). Forage comprised 50-60 percent of TMR dry matter (DM) with up to 24 percent neutral detergent fiber (NDF) from forage in the TMR DM. Corn silage comprised 40-70 percent of the forage DM. The corn silage starch content (DM basis) ranged as follows: 25-32 percent (2004), 29-38 percent (2007) and 33- 36 percent (2010). The alfalfa silage NDF content (DM basis) ranged as follows: percent (2004), 37-38 percent (2007) Detailed survey data can be 35-42 and 34-47 percent (2010). found at: http://www.uwex. It was calculated that the following percentages of dietary nutrients were proedu/ces/ dairynutrition/ vided by forage: NDF (75 percent), physdocuments/2010wihighically-effective NDF (peNDF; 85 percent), producingherdsppt.pdf. crude protein (CP) (45 percent), starch (40 percent), non-fiber carbohydrates (55 percent) and energy (50 percent). Corn silage contributed more than alfalfa with regard to diet starch, while alfalfa contributed more than corn silage with regard to diet CP. Both contributions are important for reducing feed costs at this time as both corn grain and protein supplements are relatively expensive. The rest of the dietary peNDF was provided by whole cottonseed which was an ingredient in TMR of all survey herds. Most survey herds in 2004 and 2007, and all survey herds in 2010, were fed high-moisture corn (HMC). The HMC in 2007 and 2010 surveys averaged 30 percent moisture. The estimated milk from forage (corn silage, alfalfa silage, and alfalfa hay) was approximately 60 pounds per Bobcat S205 cow per day on a dietary energy basis after apportioning Skid-Steer Loader the cow’s energy needs to support maintenance and body weight gain to forage or concentrate, according to dietary forage to concentrate ratio. On a dietary protein basis, the estimated milk from forage was approximately 50 pounds per cow per day. On average, the estimated milk per ton of forage DM was approximately 3,000 pounds, or $600 of gross milk revenue per ton of forage DM consumed by cows in these survey herds at a $20 per cwt milk price. Although high milk production is often attributed to high concentrate feeding, clearly these top-producing Wisconsin dairy herds rely heavily upon forages not only for fiber, but also for protein, starch, and energy contributions Along with more horsepower, the new S205 loader delivers which have become more important during this period of performance! high concentrate prices. Furthermore, the amount of milk greater2all-around speed available. produced from forage in these top-producing herds contributes significantly to their total production resulting in high milk revenue being generated per ton of forage DM, which • Vertical Lift Path • 2050 lb. Rated underscores the importance of managing the forage proOperating Capacity duction, harvest and storage process to achieve high forage • 118.2 in. Lift Height quality. • 66 hp Kubota Turbo From the December 2011 issue of the Midwest Forage Charged Diesel Association's Forage Focus publication.

Schuneman Equipment

‘09 JD 568 baler $26,000 SHELDON IMPLEMENT

712-324-4811

This is your last chance to Fits 300 & 400 series JD loaders. Dual Cylinder, Dual Hooks. Heavy Duty, weighs over 750 LBS! Used once!

ONLY $1,825.

320-352-3477

SAVE on these items before 2011!

Case 430, cab, ht., AC

NEW • 61 hp BOBCATS Kubota Turbo-Charged IN STOCKDiesel

S205, T190, S185, See your authorized BobcatS175 Dealer: Your Bobcat Headquarters Bobcat Dealer Name

LONG PRAIRIE MACHINERY INC. Address / City

Phone Number

19612 U.S. 71, Long Prairie • 320-732-3715

Bobcat is a registered tradmark of Bobcat Company

www.bobcat.com

Target Your Customers! Advertise Online at www.dairystar.com If you would like to advertise, call 320-352-6303 for more information.


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011 • Page 23

Last Chance

The affordable GPS GUIDANCE Solution

s l a e

D

FOR SALE

2011 2012

849

$

Outback® SS-Lite Lite GPS Guidance System.

Toll Free 1-800-477-7135 Rural Mfg. Co. Inc. Freeman, SD

Order online at: www.ruralmfg.com

Order your Mounted or Pull-type Rolling Baskets early for spring!

712 -439 78 8 -6718 • 888-439-6

100 feet of used leg trunk and 2 used head sections for 3300 bushel per hour grain leg. ®

Contact Famo Feeds 320-836-2145

New Holland LM 5060 telehandler grapple, only 160 hours - $92,000

New Holland TR88 JUST IN! 6 Ton Polybin, 14’ Tall, 10 yr. full warranty - $2,195 Helle Farm Equipment (563) 875-7154

Call-319-465-4552

Meyers VB750 spdr., 750 bu. vert. beater, lights, 2 yrs. old, small 1000 pto, local trade, #1115 - $33,900

Town & Country Implement Post Equipment (712) 476-4500 712-476-2731

www.townandcountryimpl.com

Corp.

Rock Valley, IA • www.postequip.com

www.hellefarmequipment.com

Virnig Snow Buckets IN STOCK Prices starting @ $965

Lano Equipment, Inc. 952-445-6310

‘04 Harsh 575H Mixer, 435/50R19.5 New tires, LH(2) auger discharge, Omni 510 scale - $21,900 Altura, MN 507-796-6741

New Kubota SVL’s IN STOCK 0% Financing for 48 months Demo’s available

Lano Equipment, Inc. 952-445-6310

Since 1 9 1 6

6,/2&203$1<

Good shape 750 hours.

There is a difference Lake Lillian, MN

1-800-THE SILO (843-7456) www.hansonsilo.com

‘08 CIH RB454 Round Baler – Pu gauge wheels, hyd lift for PU, silage special, endless belts - $21,000 Altura, MN 507-796-6741

Small but Tough, Less Horsepower, Wide-Even Spray, REALLY Good Deal

800544-0475

2012 Loadtrail 14000LB, 81”x20’ $3,995

Lano Equipment, Inc. 763-479-8200

Pfeifer’s

Sioux Falls, SD

507 259 5863

605-338-6351

CIH 8570 big square baler - $17,900

JD 8850 4x4, 3pt, PTO, Loaded (weak clutch)

CIH RBX 553 ‘07 - $13,500

Call 218-338-6156

New Kubota M9540HDC24 0% Financing for 60 months

Old pricing, Must call

Lano Equipment, Inc. 763-479-8200

Blowout Price $5,499 New Hydro Cart 544 Since 1 9 1 6

6,/2&203$1<

44 Bushel Capacity

There is a difference Lake Lillian, MN

1-800-THE SILO (843-7456) www.hansonsilo.com

Save $$$

‘12 Loadtrail 14,000 lb. Dump Trailer, 80”x14’

KIESTER, MN

Lano Equipment, Inc. 763-323-1720

armers KIESTER IMPLEMENT Implement and Irrigation 507-294-3387 605-692-6153

West Side Auto Sales www.westsideautosales.com

800-805-3292

Valmetal Vertical Mixer, Demo Unit SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA SILO

400 bu., double chain, end gate, splash guard, upper beater, This is our rental unit! - Only $15,750

Lake County International Madison, SD

St Charles, MN

Phone: (605) 256-3521 www.lakecountyintl.com

We are now dealers for S&R Manufacturing manure spreaders!

CIH RBX562 Round Baler

(507) 932-4560

PEDERSEN MACHINE, INC. Beresford, SD

800-763-7521

Don & Leo Wille Construction

Garnavillo, IA • 563-252-2034

Landoll 2210 Disc-Chisel-Disc, 9 shank, Demo $28,800 Nice! - $15,900 Tri-State Equipment

Beck Implement, Inc. Elgin, MN

605-336-6224

507-876-2122

‘08 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad cab, SLT, 4D, 6-1/4’, Big Horn dsl, 54,962 miles, 4x4 - $29,900

Oswalt 500 Trailer Mixer - Call

• very efficient & reliable machine • requires little maintenance

Knight RA 3160 Commercial mixer wagon, 600 cu. ft., 480 bu. slide tray w/magnet, Ready to go! - $28,500

Stacyville, IA

‘07 Chevy Silverado C5500, Dually, dsl, automatic $20,900

2010 NH 195 spreader

10’ AgBag 6070 Near new! $26,500

Kevin Meyerhofer

Call 218-338-6156

Patz V615, 2 spd. box, 3 yrs. old - Call for price

362 Spreader

$3,599 2005 Weaverline 420 feed cart

MF 596

w/Bushhog ldr., 180 hrs. - $38,000

$6,995

IH 706 gas w/ 320 Du-Al loader, grapple, PTO pump, 6036 hrs. - $6,500

Brookings Equipment

605-693-3522

New Bobcat M Series Call before 2012 price increase

0% Financing available 42 months

Lano Equipment, Inc. 763-323-1720

West Side Auto Sales www.westsideautosales.com

800-805-3292

NDE 802 vert. mixer, 700 cu. ft., 4 yrs. old, 2” scale, RH sliding conveyor, very nice mixer, not much wear, #966, $26,000

Post Equipment Corp. (712) 476-4500

Rock Valley, IA • www.postequip.com

K & R Equipment Fountain, MN

507-268-4425

Ogden Hay Runner rake w/tandems, Available in 8, 10, & 12 wheel models

FENTON REPAIR LLC 563-933-432


Page 24 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, December 24, 2011

New and Used Generators • PTO and engine sets • Generator repair • Maintenance service

HEAVY DUTY CURTAIN SYSTEM Designed Exclusively For Your Dairy Barn!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

• Single or split sidewall options based on your needs. • Manual or automatic temperature control. • Heavy duty suspension components • Bottom roll, top down opening or bottom roll, bottom up opening.

Generators from G3 Power Systems are unsurpassed in value and quality why pay more? We know how hard you work for your money!

G3 Power Systems Jim Schulzetenberg • 320-256-3575

CALL 800-992-8986 for more information & a FREE Catalog 4105 US 12 • Willmar, MN 56201


Dec. 24 Dairy Star - Second Section