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DAIRY ST R March 8, 2014

SPECIAL EDITION

First Section

CENTRAL PLAINS

Dairy Expo March 26-27, 2014

Sioux Falls, SD • Convention Center

Central Plains Dairy Expo bigger, better than ever Three country music stars kickoff event with Roots and Boots concert BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – For dairy producers, all roads lead to Sioux Falls, S.D. later this month. Sioux Falls is the site of the ever-popular Central Plains Dairy Expo that continues to grow and improve. It’s entertainment and education for farmers, dairy producers, and the general public, all under one roof. Just when one thinks that the Expo can’t get any bigger or better, the organizing committee has added great new features. This year’s opening night Welcome Reception on Tuesday, March 25, will include the crowning of the 2014 South Dakota Dairy Princess, comments by South Dakota Ag Secretary Lucas Lentsch, the presentation of the South Dakota Producer of the Year Award, and a Midwest Dairy Association dairy video as part of its Be Our Guest program. Hot and cold appetizers, SDSU ice cream, non-alcoholic beverages, and a cash bar will be available at the 5:30 p.m. reception. The Welcome Reception will be followed by the “Roots and Boots” concert that this year features not one, but three, super stars—Joe Diffie, Sammy Kershaw, and Aaron Tippin. They’ll be on stage together to perform their biggest hits, while telling the stories behind the songs. Between them, the stars have 42 Top 10 singles, 16 Gold and Platinum Albums and 14 No. 1 songs—among them Diffie’s “John Deere Green,” “Pickup Man,” and “Prop Me Up Beside the Jukebox;” Tippin’s “Kiss This,” “Workin’ Man’s PHD,” “There Ain’t Nothing Wrong with the Radio,” and “Where the Stars & Stripes and Eagles Fly;” and Kershaw’s “She Don’t Know She’s Beautiful,” “National Working Women’s Holiday,” “Love of My Life,” “Queen of My Double Wide Trailer,” and “Cadillac Style.” The trio recently released their first album together, “All In The Same Boat.” It features new songs, covers of other artists, and some new

DAIRY STAR FILE PHOTO

This year’s tradeshow will feature hundreds of vendors displaying dairy-related products and services and will be open to the general public March 26 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and March 27 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. twists on some of their most famous hits. Welcome reception/concert tickets are provided by sponsors for dairy producers, their families, employees, and employees’ families. Tradeshow exhibitors and sponsors will also receive a limited number of tickets. Others are asked to contact event manager Kathy Tonneson at 218-236-8420 or Kathy@centralplainsdairyexpo.com. The general public can attend the concert (only) for a $10 donation; doors open at 7 p.m. Expo attendees will want to get an early start for the first full day of Expo, Wednesday, March 26—but not as early as last year, as the first event has been moved to 7:30 a.m. (from 6:45 last year). The day kicks off with the Ag Prayer Breakfast. Dan Meers—better known as “K.C. Wolf,” the official mascot of the Kansas City Chiefs football team—

will be the keynote speaker. (See separate story.) Fortified by the hot buffet breakfast and inspirational speaker, attendees will move on to the first of five time slots of breakout sessions on Wednesday. Five time slots of breakouts will also be offered Thursday. “We’re having so many more educational sessions than we’ve ever done before,” Tonneson said. “Fifteen show sponsors are doing educational sessions. Most are presenting the same session both days, but a few are doing different sessions the second day.” Expo 2014 will feature 17 different breakouts, up from last year’s 11 and nine in 2012. A virtual farm tour on transition calf and Turn to TRADESHOW | Page 3


Page 2 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 3

DAIRY ST R

Continued from TRADESHOW | Page 1 heifer TMRs will be presented as one of the breakouts, rather than scheduled at a separate time as in the past. In addition to the breakouts, two special Hispanic sessions are on Thursday’s schedule, at noon and 2:30 p.m. Both will be presented in Spanish. The first, “Dairy Worker Calf Posting Roundtable,” will stress the importance of getting milk into baby calves as soon as possible. The second, “Food Safety, Am I Responsible?” is a repeat of a program offered last year. As always, Expo’s trade show of vendors selling dairy-related products and services is “bursting at the seams.” Tonneson reported that she managed to finagle three more booths into the trade show, for a total of 345 booths in the convention center and hallway. She also revealed the big news that next year’s trade show will grow exponentially as Expo will be able to use the arena for the trade show…adding about 115 booths. “That will be a big change and one we’re looking forward to,” she said. “The convention center has added a large new event center. We’ll use that for the welcome reception that’s now held in the arena.” That new facility will open in November. This year’s trade show will be open to the general public Wednesday, March

www.dairystar.com

ISSN 020355 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave. Sauk Centre, MN 56378 Phone: (320) 352-6303 Fax: (320) 352-5647

Published by Dairy Star LLC

DAIRY STAR FILE PHOTO

The Central Plains Dairy Expo tradeshow features 345 exhibitor booths in the convention center and hallway of the Sioux Falls Convention Center. Besides the tradeshow, the CPDE includes entertainment and education for farmers, dairy producers and the general public. 26 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday, March 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to free dairy products

that will be available to all, this year’s Expo will also feature a free grilled lunch—sponsored by Raven Industries, Animal Health International, and Bovamine Dairy—at noon Wednesday. A sponsored cheese social will also begin at 5 p.m. that day. “We expect to feed about 750 producers and family members at the lunch,” Tonneson said. Registration for Expo was made easier last year, using the Internet. That process has been tweaked to make it even better. “It worked well last year,” Tonneson said. “We’ll make changes every year…this year we’ll use color on name badges to differentiate.” To sign up for name badges, Welcome Reception tickets, and/or prayer breakfast tickets, go online to www. centralplainsdairy.com/index.htm. DAIRY STAR FILE PHOTO Click on ‘Welcome Reception.” The Central Plains Dairy Expo is a place for dairy farmers to visit with dairy in- The web site also includes a lodgdustry professionals and businesses about new products and technology. ing page that lists area hotels that have rooms available.

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General Manager/Editor/Sales Mark Klaphake 320-352-6303 (office) • 320-248-3196 (cell) 320-352-0062 (home) mark.k@dairystar.com Ad Composition Janell Westerman 320-352-6303 janell.w@dairystar.com Nancy Middendorf 320-352-6303 nancy.m@dairystar.com Staff Writers Krista Kuzma - Assistant Editor SE MN/NE IA Andrea Borgerding - Assistant Editor/Online Editor 320-352-6303 • andrea.b@dairystar.com 507-259-8159 • krista.s@dairystar.com Melissa Mussman (320) 429-1084 • missy@dairystar.com Ron Johnson 608-874-4243 ron.j@dairystar.com Ruth Klossner 507-240-0048 cowlady@centurylink.net Kelli Boylen 563-880-1753 • boylenover@yahoo.com Jenna Lisowe • 920-604-2093 jenna.lisowe@my.uwrf.edu Advertising Sales Main Office: 320-352-6303 Fax: 320-352-5647 Deadline is 5 p.m. of the Friday the week before publication Sales Manager - Jeff Weyer (Northern MN, East Central MN) 320-260-8505 (cell) jeff.w@dairystar.com Mark Klaphake (West and South Central MN) 320-352-6303 (office) • 320-248-3196 (cell) Laura Seljan (National Advertising, SE MN, West Central WI) 507-250-2217 (cell) • fax: 507-634-4413 laura.s@dairystar.com Jerry Nelson (SW MN, NW Iowa, South Dakota) 605-690-6260 (cell) jerry.n@dairystar.com Lori Young (Central MN) 612-597-2998 • lori.y@dairystar.com Lori Menke (Eastern Iowa, Southern WI) 563-608-6477 • lori.m@dairystar.com Linda Lynch (Central WI) 608-387-1202 • linda.l@dairystar.com Deadlines The deadline for news and advertising in the Dairy Star is 5 p.m. Friday the week before publication. Subscriptions One year subscription $28.00, outside the U.S. $110.00. Send check along with mailing address to Dairy Star, 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave., Sauk Centre, MN 56378. Advertising Our ad takers have no authority to bind this newspaper and only publication of an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance of the advertiser's order. Letters Letters and articles of opinion are welcomed. Letters must be signed and include address and phone number. We reserve the right to edit lengthy letters.

The views and opinions expressed by Dairy Star columnists and writers are not necessarily those of the Dairy Star LLC. The Dairy Star is published semi-monthly by Dairy Star, LLC, 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave., Sauk Centre, MN 56378-1246. Periodicals Postage Paid at Sauk Centre, MN. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Dairy Star, 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave., Sauk Centre, MN 56378-1246.


Page 4 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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Brian and Jill Nelson Sleepy Eye, Minn. 144 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? At least five years. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? Catching up with friends and visiting the exhibitor booths. We also enjoy some of the educational workshops. What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? Hard to pick just one. It depends on the needs of the farm. When we were building our barn, we spent the entire time with potential vendors and comparing products. Other years we picked up good information from the workshops. And sometime the most important thing was to just get off the farm and enjoy time with friends. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? It has a great commercial trade show and seminars. I also enjoy that so many companies connect with their customers after hours. It is a relaxed show in a great location. Although we have never been able to stay the night before the show starts, I have heard that the concert and morning worship service are tremendous. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? There is always something that you see or learn that you can bring back to the farm. It’s also a great place to network as we have connected with potential customers for our farm’s genetics. Tell us about your farm. We milk 144 Registered Holsteins twice a day in a relatively new freestall barn/parlor set-up in Sleepy Eye, Minn. We sell breeding bulls and heifers in addition to the milk. We also run just under 700 acres of land.


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 5

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Page 6 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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Ag Prayer Breakfast preview

Meers is uplifting, inspiring

Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 7

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Dan Meers urges on football fans as K.C. Wolf, the official mascot of the Kansas City Chiefs. Meers is the keynote speaker for the Ag Prayer Breakfast.

K.C. Wolf to lead CPDE Prayer Breakfast BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

The first full day of Central Dairy Plains Expo will get off to a fast start with a hot buffet breakfast, great gospel music, and an inspirational speaker— all part of the Ag Prayer Breakfast. This year’s breakfast gets underway at 7:30 a.m.—a little later than last year’s 6:45 a.m. start—in the Sioux Falls Arena. “The nice thing about the arena is that we’re not limited in numbers, like we used to be,” Vickie Franken, a member of the co-sponsoring Western Iowa Dairy Association, said. “This is our fifth annual event and it’s growing each year.” The Circuit Riders—a popular northwest Iowa gospel quartet—will provide the music. The quartet was organized 30 years ago and was originally associated with the United Methodist Church of Sheldon, Iowa. The group entertains at church services, retirement homes, community celebrations, and more. Group member Dr. King Hickman commented, “The neat thing is that any money we raise goes back to the United Methodist Youth Fund for any kids in the community to go to camp.” Hickman, a founding partner of GPS Dairy Consulting, is a nutritional management consultant and was the keynote speaker at the 2012 Prayer Breakfast and sang with the Circuit Riders. The breakfast organizing committee is especially excited to have Dan Meers of Kansas City as the breakfast keynote speaker. A committee member heard Meers speak at an MDA event in Arizona and knew that he’d be perfect for the Ag Prayer Breakfast. Meers has an unusual occupation. Like many other young men, he goes to work dressed in a suit. But rather than wearing a tie with his suit, Meers wears a tail! He is “K.C. Wolf,” the official mascot of the Kansas City Chiefs football team. At the breakfast, Meers will share his unique wit and wisdom about life, as

well as give testimony of how Jesus has been key in his life. Although Meers travels throughout the United States and around the world entertaining in costume, what makes Dan truly special is that he is equally entertaining out of costume. Meers was born and raised in St. Charles, Missouri, about 25 miles west of St. Louis. He grew up on a small farm with extended family living nearby. As a youngster, his parents taught him that, with big dreams and hard work, he could become anything he wanted. Little did they realize he Dan Meers would turn into an animal. Dan always did well in high school, despite also being known as the class clown. He was an enthusiastic athlete—though he will tell you he was a three-sport benchwarmer—and he was active in many extracurricular activities, including Fellowship of Christian Athletes. At the University of Missouri in Columbia, Dan decided that if he couldn’t be a college athlete, he would become the school’s mascot and No. 1 fan—Truman the Tiger. In 1989, he was named top college mascot in the nation at the National Collegiate Mascot Championships. After graduating from college with a double major in journalism and communication, Dan surprised his parents when he announced that his first “real job” would be dressing in a bird suit for the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team. After one season in St. Louis, Dan was offered a job with the Kansas City Chiefs. He decided that this was his big chance to move up the food chain…and he traded in his bird feathers for wolf fur. Meers has just finished his 24th season as K.C. Wolf. During that time, he has traveled the United States and world, entertaining fans at games, parades and other events. His enthusiasm, optimism and love for life are contagious and makes him an inspiration to all those around him. Turn to BREAKFAST | Page 9

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Page 8 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 9

Continued from BREAKFAST | Page 7 Dan makes about 425 appearances a year as K.C. Wolf, doing “anything you can imagine”…. birthday parties, wedding receptions, business grand openings, and speaking at schools, churches, and nursing homes. “I’ve even walked three women down the aisle,” he said with a chuckle. On game day, Meers arrives at the stadium nearly four hours ahead of time. “I wolf down Gatorade and water as I know I’ll sweat a lot and need to hydrate,” Meers said. “I prefer games in December when I can see my breath to the sweating days of August. Mascots always prefer cold weather to hot.” After making tailgating visits around Arrowhead Stadium prior to the game, Meers visits with people during the game—giving high fives, hugging kids, and posing for lots of photos with fans. “I kind of wing it…I play off what’s going on,” he said. There’s another aspect of his game-time work that he enjoys. “I help guys get engaged. I carry a dozen roses and a sign to the girl’s seat. It’s the same routine every time. I do 15 or 20 a year and I’m sure I’ve done at least 150 engagements. Nobody has said ‘no’ so I’m batting one thousand,” Dan said. In 2006, Meers was honored to be the first NFL mascot inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame. At the breakfast, Meers will share his story of how he came to faith and the impact faith has had on his life. “My joy comes from my relationship with Christ, not from my job as a mascot. My hope is found in Him,” Dan stated. “The biggest difference in my life is not my strange occupation, but that the Lord has given me reason to smile a lot. He’s blessed me in so many ways—my hope is found in him.” A training accident at the end of November has given Meers a whole new appreciation for life. While practicing before game day, Meers fell 75 feet, landing on stadium seats, in a failed bungee jump. He broke seven ribs, had a collapsed lung, broke his tailbone, and suffered numerous other injuries. He still has rods in his back. “The doctors said I’m lucky to be alive and lucky not to be paralyzed,” Meers said. “Every day we have is a gift from Him. We get to choose how we’ll live it. I’ll take Him up on it. I choose to live it abundantly.” The Ag Prayer Breakfast will be one of Dan’s first appearances since the accident. Meers’ appearance at the Prayer Breakfast is sponsored by the Midwest Dairy Association. That’s something he appreciates as he’s worked with MDA for well over 20 years. “I work with so many different sponsors in my job. MDA has been a consistent sponsor over the years. They’re some of the best people I’ve worked with. Dairy farmers are the salt of the earth—I love to spend time with them.” Dan has been married for 20 years. He and his wife have three children—a daughter who’s a high school senior, a son who’s a sophomore, and a daughter who’s a seventh grader. The family lives in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. You won’t want to miss his appearance at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. In previous years, the breakfast featured both a keynote speaker and a featured family. To allow enough time for the speaker, the planning committee has decided to rotate the two, with a keynote speaker one year and a featured family the next. Tickets for the Prayer Breakfast can be purchased online at www.centralplainsdairy.com/Expo/ExpoPrayerBreakfast.htm or by calling 218-236-8420.

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Page 10 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 11

Seminar preview

Speak up for dairy Carter and Dohle share tips for telling dairy’s story BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

Midwest Dairy Association staffers Samantha Carter and Stacy Dohle will tagteam to present the breakout session, “Telling Your Story: How to Speak Up for Dairy,” on Wednesday, March 26 at 2:30 p.m. It’s a session dairy producers will want to attend as it will give insight into the social media world that affects how people think. If 98 percent of the population isn’t attached to farming, where do they go if they don’t know anything about farm life, dairy or farmers? For producers, representing themselves and the dairy industry—both in day-to-day conversation and in social media is a powerful opportunity to bridge the gap between farmers and consumers. Whether speaking at a community event, hosting a farm tour or sharing a photo of a newborn calf on Facebook, it’s important to understand how consumers view dairy farmers today. In this session, Dohle will share the latest consumer research and attitudes regarding dairy foods and dairy farmers. “People have a high trust for farmers, but they also have questions about food and where it comes from,” Carter said. “Stacy’s presentation will tie into what I’ll talk about—how farmers can

be ambassadors with consumers. The best way is online. Many people get their information online—whether it’s true or not.” She continued, “We want people who are interested in being ambassadors to understand how to tell their story better, whether it’s at church or PTA. I’ll give tips on how to be a better ambassador.” Samantha Carter Among those tips are how farmers talk about themselves and what they do. “Remember, right now, we don’t speak the language. We don’t always use terms that people understand,” she said. “One thing that sticks out is that we talk about dairy farmers but dairy farmers refer to themselves as dairy producers. But, consumers see them as dairy farmers. We talk about ‘animal waste’ when we need to say ‘manure.’ We talk about ‘dairy products.’ I try to incorporate ‘dairy foods’….milk, cheese, yogurt.” Other tips that Carter will emphasize include how to be authentic when they’re online, to be transparent, and to make relationships to consumers. “It’s important for dairy farmers to understand the research that’s being done. They need to communicate on an

emotional level—but also give them facts. We can all be better about telling it from that emotional level,” Carter said. Overall, Carter emphasized that it’s important to convey the importance of social media. “Our farmers are aware of social media and its power. One small message can go viral,” she said. “Now we’re at the Stacy Dohle next stage of determining what channels are important and where we need to be. We’ll provide tools and resources for dairy producers who want to tell the story.” Meet the presenters Stacy Dohle is senior communications manager at Midwest Dairy Association. Prior to joining Midwest Dairy, she worked for six years at KTTS radio in Springfield, Missouri as the Farm News Director, delivering 14 agricultural markets and news per day. Stacy has been with MDA for 14 years and helps lead the influencer outreach and dairy image programs; connecting consumers with dairy farm families and the understanding of onfarm practices. In the past four years,

she has been involved in more than 100 dairy farmer presentations and farm tours with key influencer groups to help build trust and understanding about dairy farming. Dohle lives near Springfield, Missouri on a beef and dairy farm, and works with dairy farm families across Midwest Dairy’s 10-state area. Samantha “Sami” Carter is a communications manager with Midwest Dairy. In addition to being the voice behind MDA’s social media presence, Carter enjoys helping dairy farmers tell their story using social media. Since she began working with the Midwest’s more than 9,100 dairy farm families in 2009, she’s helped dairy farmers and dairy farm moms connect with consumers online. From Facebook and Twitter to Pinterest and Instagram, Sami navigates the social media landscape to inspire consumer confidence in dairy foods and on-farm practices. She also provides strategy and support to Midwest Dairy’s communication channels, including DairyMakesSense.com and the site’s Dairy Makes Sense blog. Sami is an advocate for dairy farmers and an ambassador for enjoying all dairy foods. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling and learning new culinary skills. You can stay in touch with her through Twitter @SamiJCarter or email at scarter@midwestdairy.com.


Page 12 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

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How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? Not sure, but I think I've attended nine or 10 years for sure. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? There are many things I've enjoyed about attending the expo: The breakout sessions are great. You can take the information you gather home and implement the ideas on your own dairy. Socializing, seeing friends you haven't seen in a while, talking to vendors about their products and the technology that's out there. Getting away for a few hours and having some laughs. And ice cream!

What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? So many. If you're expanding, remodeling or upgrading, you can compare freestalls, headlocks, feeder (mixer) wagons, milking equipment and all the other technology there.

What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? This expo is for the dairy industry. It's small enough so you can see everything in one day, but big enough that two days are more realistic. Not all expos are designed for the dairy industry.

How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? You get new ideas and get enthused about what you’re doing. Seven years ago we expanded our dairy and we had been gathering information for years, and it was all at the Central Plains Dairy Expo.

Tell us about your farm. It's a partnership with my dad, Bob, my brother Gregg, and myself. We have around 350 cows and right around the same number of youngstock. Our current herd average is over 27,000 lbs. milk, over 1,000 fat and over 800 protein. We farm around 750 acres corn and alfalfa. We have four employees – all brothers – so getting along and communicating is very important.

Come see us at booths 173 & 174 and don’t miss Dr. Rich Ernsberger’s sessions on Total Heifer Management!


What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“I look for ideas at the trade show.”

Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 13

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What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? I look for ideas at the trade show. What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? Anything that I can use to increase efficiency, cow comfort, or milk quality. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? It’s closer than the World Dairy Expo. The prayer breakfast is also different. I like to visit with the organizations that represent our industry in the tri-state area. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? We’ve applied a lot of ideas over the years, as we have upgraded our parlor and milkhouse, and manure storage. Tell us about your farm. We are a third generation farm with 120 Holstein cows. We have a freestall with a double-8 parlor. We have about enough corn and alfalfa to provide corn silage, hay, haylage and grain to the cows and replacements. We have our own hay and forage equipment. We do some custom harvesting.

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Page 14 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Seminar preview

Key learnings from 75,000 cows Breakout session focuses on cow comfort BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

Dairy farmers can learn a lot from their cows. When those cows number 75,000, they can tell us a lot. Lindsay Collings, C.O.W.S. project manager with Novus International, will share what she and others have learned in a breakout session at Central Plains Dairy Expo. Collings will present “Applying the Basics of Cow Comfort: Key Learnings from 75,000 Cows” at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26 and at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 27. The C.O.W.S. Program (Comfort – Oxidative Balance – Well being – Sustainability)—assesses individual dairies for cow comfort measures — lying time, lameness, and hock injuries—as well as facility and management measures—stall size and design, bedding type and quality, and stocking density. To date, more than 470 assessments have been made across North America. C.O.W.S. started as a masters project at the University of British Columbia in 2008-2009. When Novus became aware of it, the company partnered with UBC to collect benchmark data that eventually led to the program. In its first phase, the same two women who had worked in British Columbia collected data on 43 stall farms in California, 40 in the northeast (primarily Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont), and 35 open lot dairies in Texas and New Mexico. In May 2011, Novus officially took the program on as a value-added service offered to its customers. “We work through nutritionists to take it to the farms they work with across the U.S.,” Collings said. “The

®

goals of the program are to give producers feedback on how they are doing cow comfort-wise, to see how they compare to regional benchmarks, and to see how their peers are doing as well.” Collings and two others collect the data on-farm, score it, and summarize the results. Only five women have worked with the program since it began. That contributes to consistent scoring of the results. An on-farm assessment to collect data takes one or two visits. The on-farm work genLindsay Collings erally involves one pen of cows—usually a high producing, mature cow pen. The evaluators need at least 40 cows in a pen to get adequate lying time measures. Using transponders on the cows, measurements are made over three days. The assessment also includes measurement of pens and stalls, bunk space, water space, and more. Observation is also made of hock and knee injuries and lameness. Every animal in the pen is scored. The women use a questionnaire to collect information on management practices, such as how often fresh bedding is added, etc. “It’s not an audit, it’s not pass/ fail,” Collings stressed. “Our goal is to give producers information that they can use to move forward, to promote a discussion of how changes can be made and to track that in the future.” She added, “We’re limited in what we can collect in one or two visits. We don’t know the farm as well as the management team. We’re there to facilitate discussion. We hope to give them information that’s harder for Turn to COW COMFORT | Page 15

See us at Booth B4

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Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 15

Continued from COW COMFORT | Page 14

them to collect.” After the assessments are summarized, regional Novus sales managers take the report to the producer and walk them through the data, helping them to understand how their farm differs from others, as well as possible areas to make small or large changes that can improve cow comfort. Although C.O.W.S. continues to focus more of its time in the northeast and California, the women travel and reach farms from coast-to-coast. The program is offered to dairies of any size— from 60 to 6,000 cows. “We’ve just now visited the Midwest enough to have benchmarks. The area includes South and North Dakota to Indiana, Collings said. “Central Plains will be one of the first times we’ll present the program at an industry event in the Midwest.” There are currently 43 farms in the Midwest benchmark. In her presentation at Central Plains, Collings will walk through the data from four regions—the Northeast, California, Texas/New Mexico, and the Midwest. She’ll compare the regions for differences and similarities. “I’ll use graphs to highlight that there are farms in each region that do real well—and others that are struggling,” she said. “Management and facilities affect the measurements.” Some key issues that apply to the Midwest include overstocking in the freestalls and at the bunk— and how those factors affect lying time, production, and reproduction. Another issue that Collings pointed out is the time budget—how much time cows are out of the pen, in the holding area and milking. “One of the main take homes messages from our research is that there are multiple factors. We can’t just look at one thing. Everything is inter-connected. To help nail that down, I’ll use case studies, including one in the Midwest where the same owner had two farms with different managers. Management as it relates to stocking density and time budget make a big difference,” she said. Meet the Presenter Lindsay Collings grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and completed her undergraduate degree at the University of British Columbia. After graduation, she took an internship with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s research station in Agassiz, BC. There she conducted a study investigating the effects of feeding colostrum ad libitum on intake and the immune status of newborn calves. For the next year, Collings worked as a research coordinator and student manager at the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre. She assisted with several research trials focusing on calf management and nutrition, transition cows, and lameness. She then started her Masters with the UBC Animal Welfare Program where her thesis focused on the effects of overstocking at the feed bunk and restricting feed access time. Upon completing her Masters, Collings joined Novus in May 2011 to assist in the implementation of the C.O.W.S. program. As part of the program, she conducts cow comfort assessments on over 100 dairy farms per year across the United States. Through this program, she hopes to help producers remove limitations on milk production through improving cow comfort and well being. She is based in Syracuse, New York.

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Page 16 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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Seminar preview

Doing what’s best for the calf Earleywine to ‘Assess the Baby Calf Diet’ BY MISSY MUSSMAN Staff writer

The first eight weeks of life are essential when it comes to setting a calf up to have a successful future. “Those weeks are the most critical,” said Dr. Tom Earleywine, the director of nutritional services with Land O’ Lakes. “Nutrition and their diet at that time are important.” Earleywine will present ‘Assessing the Baby Calf Diet from a Nutritionist’s Perspective’ at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Mar. 26 and at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, Mar. 27 during the Central Plains Dairy Expo in Sioux Falls, SD. Earleywine will provide farmers with practical solutions to achieve good calf health and prepare calves for success when they enter the milking herd in the future. According to Earleywine, there are three goals for calf rearing: keeping the calf alive, keeping the calf healthy and helping the calf grow. “Farmers have to take care of the first two to achieve the third,” Earleywine said. When looking at calf mortality rates in beef and dairy calves from birth to weaning, beef is 2.3 percent and dairy is 7.8 percent. “From a nutritional approach, the dairy calves are weaned earlier and fed less than beef calves,” Earleywine said. In order to keep calves alive and healthy, Earleywine feels that farmers need to focus on feeding dairy calves more and feeding them more frequently as well as assuring good starter intake. One way farmers can achieve this is by decreasing the fat content in the diet to improve starter intake. “It (starter intake) is not the end all, be all,” Earleywine said. “But if we are going to be weaning them at two months of age which is 2 to 3 months earlier than Mom intended, then farmers have to focus on it.” Water quality is another area Earleywine believes is important to keep young calves healthy. “Calves are more sensitive to water quality than cows or humans,” Earleywine said. “Water quality is one of the basic challenges farmers face with their young calves. There are specific water quality tests for calves that farmers can do. “Calves can’t fight off a bacterial contamination like a cow can since the microbial population in the rumen isn’t built up and they can’t compete,” Earleywine said. “Also, if farmers are using soft water, there is the potential for high levels of sodium in the water. This can cause sodium toxicity.” When it comes to helping the calves grow and double their birth weight by weaning time, Earleywine emphasizes the importance of nutrient needs, especially in the cold weather. Earleywine said that a calf being fed three quarts twice a day may sound good, but with the cold temperatures, the calf may only be gaining three-quarters of a pound under no other stresses. If the calf is also dealing with scours or respiratory problems, it could drop to gaining only .17 pounds per day or potentially losing weight. “It may appear to be a good diet, but the cold stress and disease stresses can cause the calves to use up their reserves,”

Earleywine said. Although the cold weather can create issues with calves growing, Earleywine doesn’t suggest adding fat to the diets. “That is not the answer,” Earleywine said. “They are going to need other nutrients such as protein to grow.” Instead, Earleywine suggests farmers should focus on the volume and dry matter fed to the calf. Calves should be fed a minimum of two gallons of milk per day and 1.8 to 2 pounds of dry matter per day. “When it is colder, farmers should increase the amount of milk that is fed per feeding or feed more often,” Earleywine said. Although calf blankets and clean bedding are important, Earleywine said that those alone wouldn’t cut it. “They are going to need energy and nutrition, too,” Earleywine said. “They need the full package.” Feeding calves three times a day is a growing trend but Earleywine believes feeding calves twice a day is still a viable option. “The biggest mistake farmers make when feeding twice a day is the feedings are too close together,” Earleywine said. “During the coldest part of a 24 hour period, the calves are going the longest without nutrition. They need to feed at 12 hour increments.” Increasing the amount of milk is not only beneficial to helping the calf during cold stress, but it can be helpful in setting the calf up for a successful lactation in the future. “Calves fed more milk during the first eight weeks of life can produce 1,000 to 3,000 more pounds of milk in their first lactation,” Earleywine said. To help reduce the cost of proving more milk nutrition to the calf, research is being done on incorporating protein blends in milk replacer, but Earleywine suggests farmers not use any of those products that are available unless there is research to back it up. In the end, Earleywine knows keeping the calves’ best interests in mind is key. “Farmers have to do the right thing for the calf,” Earleywine said. “Everyone will be better off that way.” More on Tom Earleywine Dr. Tom Earleywine is Director of Nutritional Services for Land O’ Lakes Animal Milk Products, where he is responsible for neonatal animal research and technical support. Previously he was a Dairy Field Nutritionist and Technical Services Manager for Land O’ Lakes. Prior to coming to Land O’ Lakes, he was a nutritionist at T.C. Products Co. and was an Extension Agent for Washington State University in Western Washington. Dr. Earleywine has served on the Executive Committee and as Chairman of the Dairy and Nutrition Committees of the American Feed Industry Association Nutrition Council and serves as one of two feed industry representatives on the Bovine Alliance on Management and Nutrition. He also was twice chair of the Informal Calf Conference and served on the Growth and Development committee for the American Dairy Science Association. Dr. Earleywine received his B.S., M.S. and doctoral degrees from the University of WisconsinMadison and was raised on a dairy farm near Brodhead in southern Wisconsin.

Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 17


Page 18 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Seminar preview

Taking control of markets Babler explains market volatility, steps to reduce risk BY JEAN ANNEXSTAD Staff writer

“The most important thing – the point we bring up a lot – is there are so many factors that you can’t control, but you can take steps to reduce your commodity risk,” said Will Babler, who is making two presentations at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. Dairy producers will want to attend to learn how price volatility in milk and feed markets has led to wild swings in profitability over recent years. Entitled, “Dairy Margin Management – Taking Control of Volatile Markets,” Babler’s session will focus on the need for a structured approach to commodity hedging and dairy margin management. Babler is a principal at Atten Babler Commodities LLC. The presentation will be given on Wednesday, March 26 at 9:30 a.m. and again on Thursday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m. at the Expo. Practical steps will be provided for dairy producers who would like to implement a margin management program, said Babler. “Besides the things you focus on in your business such as production, producers should also recognize that they can minimize risk and capture margins,” said Babler. “That’s our business – two pieces – first education and advice. We advise producers on when and why a hedging strategy can be applied. Then, second,

we help them execute the necessary transactions,” he said. Producers open a futures and options account which allows them to transfer their risks in the financial market. The commodity hedging firm works with people all over the country. Some of these producers have small or large facilities, some have no debt and some are highly Will Babler leveraged, some are without land and some have a large acreage, said Babler. “At the end of the day, we can only point out what we’ve seen work,” he said. “We provide an educational process to learn what tools are available – how they are paid for milk and how to protect feed prices. We offer instruments to lock in prices or set minimum or maximum prices so producers can know what to expect for revenues and costs. Our clients are coached one-onone with us and we often collaborate using online tools,” he said. “We start with basic strategies. We start small and slow and build from there. The most successful hedgers we have now have had a five- or six-year learning process,” he said. “People’s interest peaks when things are bad – markets turn down,

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then they go back up. You have to apply tools year in and year out and you don’t know when you’ll hit turning points,” he said. Some of the key points Babler teaches their clients enrolled in regular meetings, classes or seminars are: interpreting market fundamentals, mechanics of market strategies, and most importantly to be consistent, have a plan, and expect volatility. The seminars at the Expo will also cover an analysis of global dairy and feed market fundamentals, along with current hedge recommendations, said Babler. “For example, the Chinese

“We have traditionally been more evened out in the U.S., but international markets are now more important.”

– WILL BABLER

don’t have a fluid market dynamic. Their markets depend on policy decisions and that can unlock huge volatility in the market. New Zealand has extreme highs and lows in their dairy industry. All of these factors add up to increased uncertainty for U.S. producers,” he said. “We have traditionally been more

evened out in the U.S., but international markets are now more important. The Farm Bill has a lot of interesting impacts on dairy. The situation for dairy producers is great right now, but producers still need to take steps to protect themselves if things go sour,” Babler said. “We don’t predict the market; we give advice on ‘what’s your risk and what will you do about it?’”

More about the speaker Will Babler is actively involved in Atten Babler Commodities’ dairy risk management activities, which include futures and options brokerage, margin management programs, forward pricing programs and research and advisory. Babler works with clients engaged in all aspects of the dairy industry including producers, co-ops, processors and end-users. He specializes in helping clients create and execute structured risk management programs. Prior to working with Atten Babler Commodities, Babler was employed by John Deere in engineering and business analysis. As a National Merit Scholar, Babler attended Iowa State University on a full academic scholarship. After completing his bachelors of science in mechanical engineering he attended the Stuart Graduate School of Business where he completed a graduate program in financial markets.

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Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 19


Page 20 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Trade Show Vendors

Central Plains

Dairy Expo S i o u x F a l l s , S D Convention Center

Company ....................................................................Booths ABS Global ....................................................................................40 ADM Alliance Nutrition...................................................................48 Aerotech Fans / Munters, Aghor..............................................20, 21 Ag Processing, Inc. a cooperative ...............................................137 Ag United For South Dakota ...........................................................E Agri-King Nutrition ...................................................................50, 51 AgriLabs.......................................................................................160 Agri-Plastics Mfg. ........................................................122, 123, 124 AGRI-TRAC......................................................................................9 Agropur ................................................................................180, 181 Akey .............................................................................................301 Albers Dairy Equipment ...........................................................59, 60 Allflex/Destron Fearing...................................................................57 Alltech............................................................................................A4 American Agco Trading Co..........................................................136 AMPI ........................................................................................11, 12 Anez Consulting...................................................................132, 133 Animal Health International ..................................................185-187 ANIMART .................................................................................97, 98 Arm & Hammer Animal Nutrition .......................Southwest doorway Arnolds Inc...........................................................................149, 150 Artex Manufacturing ....................................................................295 Atten Babler Commodities ............................................................33 Automated Dairy Services .............................................................E2 Bag Man .......................................................................................38 Bakker Consulting ........................................................................15 Barenbrug USA..............................................................................93 Bayer Animal Health ........................................................................F Bayland Buildings ........................................................................197 BECO Dairy Automation .....................................................170, 171 Big Bear Genetics ...........................................................................K Big John Mfg. Co.........................................................................291 BioZyme Incorporated .................................................East doorway Blue Hilltop .................................................................146, 147, 148 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica.............................................26, 45 BouMatic .......................................................................................E2 Byron Seeds................................................................................Q-R Calf Star ......................................................................................144 Cargill Animal Nutrition ................................................................302 CBM Lighting ...........................................................................88, 89 Central Life Sciences ....................................................................AA Central Valley Dairy Supply ............................................................W Chr. Hansen Inc ...........................................................................182 CIH (Commodity & Ingredient Hedging) ......................................138 Countryside Environmental Soulutions..........................................99 Creative Genetics ......................................................................189A Croplan by Winfield .......................................................................A2 Dairy Farmers of America ............................................................152 Dairy Gross Margin, LLC .................................................................H Dairy Science-SDSU .......................................................................O Dairy Star.......................................................................................C2 DairyBusiness West .....................................................East doorway Dairyland Laboratories...................................................................68 Dairyland Real Estate.......................................................................8 Dakota Environmental.......................................................................I Dave’s Repair ................................................................................D4

Company ....................................................................Booths Dean Foods ...................................................................................A5 Haan, Grabs & Associates.............................................................92 Deluxe Feeds.................................................................................B3 DHI-Provo EZ Feed......................................................................307 Diamond V ...............................................................................52, 53 Dick Meyer Company ......................................................................L Diesel Machinery, Inc (DMI) ...............................................94, 95, 96 Digi-Star.........................................................................................43 Dupont Pioneer .............................................................................10 EasyFix Rubber North America.......................................................D EcoLab ....................................................................................84, 85 Edney Distributing Company .......................................129, 130,131 Eisenbraun & Associates .............................................................317 Elanco Animal Health...............................................................46, 61 Enz-A-Bac Advanced Products...................................................316 FAMO Feeds ..................................................................................72 Farm Bureau Insurance ...................................................................X FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative........................................................199 Form-A-Feed .................................................................................13 Forward Farm Lines.......................................................................E3 Freeburg Hay .................................................................................28 Frontier Mills ...............................................................................310 FutureCow ....................................................................................CC GEA Farm Technologies................................................................D1 Genesis Enterprises ........................................................................B Genex Cooperatives ......................................................................44 Genex Farm Systems ....................................................................A3 Global Cow ......................................................................................J Golden Calf Company .................................................................151 Gorter’s Clay & Dairy Equipment ..................................................C5 Great Lakes Insurance ....................................................................C Gruen-Wald Engineered Laminates ...........................Exhibit outside H & S Spraying ................................................................................A H Becker Inc. ...............................................................................3, 4 Hanson Silo Company ..................................................................C7 Hatfield Manufacturing ................................................119, 120, 121 Hawke & Company Ag.........................................................127, 128 Heart of America DHIA ................................................................292 Hoard’s Dairyman............................................................................G Hoksbergen De Stigter Construction...........................................118 Holstein Association USA............................................................308 Hubbard Feeds .......................................................................24, 25 Hydro Engineering .......................................................................306 IDEXX ...........................................................................................155 Immvac ..........................................................................................70 Industrial & Environmental Concepts ..........................................48A Integra Plastics ................................................................................5 Iowa Area Development Group................................................66, 67 ISF International Stock Foods .......................................................47 J & D Manufacturing ................................................................80, 81 Jasper Soy Processors ...............................................................312 Jefo USA Inc .................................................................................56 K2S Engineering ............................................................................79 Kemin.............................................................................................27 Kent Nutrition Group .....................................................................C4 Kuhn North America......................................................................D4

Company ....................................................................Booths Lacey Hay..................................................................................155A Lallemand Animal Nutrition............................................................29 Land O’Lakes ................................................................................A2 Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products .............................................A2 Land O’Lakes, Inc. ........................................................................A2 Lange Ag Systems.......................................................................198 Larson Construction ....................................................................117 Lauren Agri System .....................................................................311 Leedstone ....................................................................163, 164, 165 Lely USA........................................................................................C5 Masters Choice .............................................................................7A MDS Manufacturing.........................................................................1 Mensch Mfg ..................................................................................B1 Merck Animal Health................................................................30, 31 Merial LTD ......................................................................................58 Meyer Equipment .................................................................108-111 Meyer Manufacturing ...........................................................102-107 Midwest Ag Supplements..............................................................39 Midwest Dairy Association ............................................................32 Midwest Dairy Beef Quality Assurance .......................................320 Midwest Livestock Service ..........................................................125 Midwest Livestock Systems ...............................................140, 141 Minnesota Department of Agriculture............................................37 Minnesota Soybean Processors........................Southwest doorway Multimin USA ...............................................................................318 Mycogen Seeds ...........................................................................161 Nebraska State Dairy Association ................................................BB New Direction Equipment Co........................................................B4 Nextire ........................................................................................59A North Dakota Dairy Coalition .........................................................22 Northland Farm Systems .............................................................3, 4 Novartis........................................................................................305 Novus International........................................................................41 Nutrition Physiology.......................................................................23 Osakis Silo Repair........................................................................126 Patz Sales .....................................................................................C6 Poet Nutrition...............................................................................314 Polytank ........................................................................................77 Post Equipment.............................................................................C9 Prairie Land Ag Supply .................................................................69 Prairie Livestock Supply ..............................................................297 Prince Agri Products .....................................................................C3 Progressive Dairy Publishing ...................................Middle doorway PSI Power Washer ..........................................................................N Purnia Feeds .................................................................................A2 QC Supply ...............................................................................90, 91 QualiTech .......................................................................................71 Quality Liquid Feeds......................................................................A1 Ralco Nutrition .....................................................................100, 101 RDO Equipment Co. ....................................................200, 210, 202 REA Hybrids.................................................................................319 REAL-TUFF....................................................................................36 Reaves Building Systems ............................................................196 Rice Dairy LLC .............................................................................175 Rodman Welding ...........................................................................86 Roll-O-Matic Curtains ..................................................................153 Roto-Mix...............................................................................192-195 Scherer Corrugating & Machine ..........................................149, 150 Schuler Manufacturing.................................................146, 147, 148 Select Sires MidAmerica......................................................178, 179 Semex USA..............................................................................34, 35 SGS North America .....................................................................172 Sheehan Mack Sales & Equipment...............................................C6 Silo Stop/SuperCova ......................................................................U Sioux Automation Center...................................................74, 75, 76 Sioux City Foundry .......................................................................DD Sioux Dairy Equipment..................................................................B2 Sioux Nation Ag.......................................................Middle Doorway South Dakota Dairy Producers Association ....................................E South Dakota Department of Agriculture - Dairy Development ......................................................................42 Soy Best ..................................................................................54, 55 Stearns DHIA Laboratories ............................................................73 Steuart Laboratories ........................................................................6 Stockholm Refrigeration ................................................................E2 Stray Voltage Consulting .................................................................P Superior Attachments..................................................................Y, Z Supervisor Systems.....................................................................139 TechMix....................................................................................18, 19 Temple Tag.....................................................................................87 The Saskatoon Colostrum Company ..........................................296 Town & Country Implement ..................................................112-116 Trans-America Genetics ..............................................................303 Tri State Scabbling.......................................................................293 Tri-State Neighbor........................................................................304 Tru-Test ...........................................................................................M Udder Tech ..........................................................................183, 184 V and M Company ...................................................................82, 83 Valley Ag Software .........................................................................49 Valley Dairy Farm Automation..............................................145, 154 Valley Dairy Supply...............................................................188-189 Valley Queen Cheese ...................................................................294 Valley Vet Supply .............................................................................7 Van Beek Natural Science ...........................................................134 Van Beek Nutrition .......................................................................135 Van Bruggen & Vande Vegte, PC .................................................313 Verity Farms .....................................................................................T Vi-COR...........................................................................................E1 Vigortone Ag Products.................................................................301 Vita Plus ...................................................................................16, 17 Western Farm Sales.......................................................................78 Western Iowa Dairy Alliance ........................................................298 Westway Feed Products......................................................173, 174 Wieser Concrete Products...........................................................162 Winfield Solutions..........................................................................A2 XFE Products ..................................................................................S Z Tags North America ......................................................................V Zoetis Animal Health .....................................................................C1


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 21

Trade Show Sponsors 5 Star Sponsors

Central Plains

Dairy Expo S i o u x F a l l s , S D Convention Center

4 Star Sponsors

3 Star Sponsors

2 Star Sponsors Agri-King Nutrition, Inc. Allflex/Destron Fearing Dupont Pioneer J & D Manufacturing Lallemand Animal Nutrition

Merial LTD Poet Nutrition Post Equipment Corp. Schuler Mfg. & Equip. Co., Inc. Semex USA

Udder Tech Valley Ag Software Valley Dairy Farm Automation Inc. Valley Dairy Supply

1 Star Sponsors ABS Global ADM Alliance Nutrition, Inc. Aerotech Fans / Munters, Aghort Ag Processing, Inc. a cooperative AgriLabs Agri-Plastics Mfg. AGRI-TRAC Albers Dairy Equipment American Agco Trading Co. Anez Consulting, Inc. Arnolds Inc Bag Man LLC BECO Dairy Automation Inc. Calf Star LLC/ABTS Bou-Matic LLC

Chr. Hansen Inc. CIH (Commodity & Ingredient Hedging, LLC) Dairy Farmers of America Dairyland Laboratories Dairyland Real Estate, LLC Diamond V Digi-Star Enz-A-Bac Advanced Products Form-A-Feed Freeburg Hay Genex Cooperatives, Inc. Golden Calf Company IDEXX

Iowa Area Development Group ISF International Stock Foods Jefo USA Inc Lacey Hay Leedstone Masters Choice Midwest Ag Supplements Minnesota Department of Agriculture Minnesota Soybean Processors Munters, AgHort Mycogen Seeds Nextire Inc. North Dakota Dairy Coalition Nutrition Physiology Co LLC

Prairie Land Ag Supply Inc. REAL-TUFF Reaves Building Systems SGS North America So. Dak. Dept. of Agriculture-Ag development Soy Best Steuart Laboratories Supervisor Systems-KS Dairy Valley Vet Supply Van Beek Natural Science Van Beek Nutrition Wieser Concrete Products Inc.


Page 22 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS TUESDAY, MARCH 25 All events in Sioux Falls Arena, unless otherwise noted All day

Registration, Convention Center Corridor.

5:30 p.m.

Welcome Reception begins. Hot and cold appetizers, cheese, SDSU ice cream, cash bar.

Tickets for dairy producers, their families, employees and employees families provided by Welcome Reception Sponsors: Agropur, BelBrands, Davisco/Lake Norden Cheese, Farm Credit Services of America, First Bank and Trust, Land O’Lakes and Valley Queen Cheese. Tickets for exhibitors are included with their booths. (Some limits apply.) Tickets for all others are $30 per person. Registration is required. Pre-register online at www.centralplainsdairy.com or call 218-236-8420. Cheese donated by Agropur, Hull, Iowa; AMPI, Hoven, S.D.; AMPI, Freeman, S.D.; Bel Brands USA, Brookings, S.D.; DairiConcepts, Pollock, S.D.; Dimock Cheese, Dimock, S.D.; Lake Norden Cheese Co., Lake Norden, S.D.; Land O’Lakes, Brookings, S.D.; Saputo Cheese, Big Stone, S.D.;SDSU Dairy Plant, Brookings, S.D.; and Valley Queen Cheese, Milbank, S.D.

6:15 p.m.

Welcome – Lucas Lentsch, South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture

6:30 p.m.

S.D. Dairy Princess Coronation S.D. Dairy Producer of the Year Award

7:15 p.m.

Midwest Dairy Association’s “Be Our Guest” program

7:30 p.m.

Roots and Boots Concert

9:00 p.m.

Hospitality Rooms, Sheraton Hotel Fontanelle I and II Sponsored by Vi-COR and Farm Credit Services of America

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 All events in Sioux Falls Arena, unless otherwise noted 7:30 a.m.

Ag Prayer Breakfast, Arena Hosted by Western Iowa Dairy Alliance and Central Plains Dairy Expo Speaker sponsored by Midwest Dairy Association

9:00 a.m.

Trade Show opens. Rolls and coffee in trade show sponsored by Farm Credit Services of America/South Dakota and ADM Alliance Nutrition

9:30 a.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 1 • “Is Your Heifer Ration Just A Formula; Or Is It Part Of A Total Heifer Management Program?” -- Westway Feeds, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Transition Cow Management & Nutrition: Optimizing Your Herd Productivity and Minimizing Risk for Disease.” -- Arm & Hammer Animal Nutrition, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Dairy Margin Management – Taking Control of Volatile Markets.”– Atten Babler Commodities LLC, Meeting Rooms 8-9 11:00 a.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 2 • “Preventing Drug Residues in Milk – Current Expectations In An Ever Changing World.” -- Zoetis, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Combat Heat Stress: Learn How Nutritional Factors Affect Glucose Metabolism In Lactating Dairy Cows.” -- Kemin, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Fast Healthy Gains: Getting The Best Economical Return With Feeding Milk Replacer.” – Kent Nutrition Group, Meeting Rooms 8-9 NOON

Cheeseburger lunch (Need postcard and/or invitation from sponsors to attend.) Sponsored by Raven Industries, Bovamine Dairy (Nutrition Physiology) and Animal Health International

1:00 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSION 3 • “Virtual Farm Tour On Transition Calf and Heifer TMR Program” -- Quality Liquid Feeds, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Mastitis: Should You Treat Her Or Should You Eat Her?” -- Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Mycotoxins And HBS: A Hidden Enemy?”-- Vi-COR, Meeting Rooms 8-9

2:30 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSION 4 • “Telling Your Story: How to Speak Up For Dairy” -- Midwest Dairy Association, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Managing and Monitoring Transition Challenges Of Dairy Cattle.” -- Elanco Animal Health, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Applying The Basics Of Cow Comfort: Key Learnings From 75,000 Cows.” -- Novus International, Meeting Rooms 8-9

4:00 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSION 5 • “Assessing The Baby Calf Diet From A Nutritionist Perspective.”-- Land O’Lakes Animal Nutrition, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Udder Health And Milk Quality Workshop” -- Alltech, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Management Practices to Reduce Mastitis in Dairy Replacement Heifers” -- Prince Agri, Meeting Rooms 8-9

5:00 p.m.

Cheese Social Cheese donated by Agropur, Hull, Iowa; AMPI, Hoven, S.D.; AMPI, Freeman, S.D.; Bel Brands USA, Brookings, S.D.; DairiConcepts, Pollock, S.D.; Dimock Cheese, Dimock, S.D.; Lake Norden Cheese Co., Lake Norden, S.D.; Land O’Lakes, Brookings, S.D.; Saputo Cheese, Big Stone, S.D., SDSU Dairy Plant, Brookings, S.D.; and Valley Queen Cheese, Milbank, S.D.

6:00 p.m.

Trade show closes.

THURSDAY, MARCH 27 All events in Sioux Falls Arena 7:30 a.m.

SD Fieldmen’s Update. Meeting Room 3

8:30 a.m.

Trade Show opens. Rolls and coffee in trade show. Rolls and coffee in trade show sponsored by Farm Credit Services of America/South Dakota and ADM Alliance Nutrition.

9:00 a.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 6 • “Transition Cow Management & Nutrition: Optimizing Your Herd Productivity and Minimizing Risk for Disease.” -- Arm & Hammer Animal Nutrition, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Mastitis: Should You Treat Her Or Should You Eat Her?” -- Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica,, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Troubleshooting Mixed Rations: Observations From The Field” -- Vi-COR, Meeting Rooms 8-9 • “Management Practices To Reduce Mastitis in Dairy Replacement Heifers” -- Prince Agri, Meeting Rooms 12-13 10:30 a.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 7 • “Assessing The Baby Calf Diet From A Nutritionist Perspective.” -- Land O’Lakes Animal Nutrition, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Udder Health and Milk Quality Workshop” -- Alltech, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Applying The Basics Of Cow Comfort: Key Learnings From 75,000 Cows.” -- Novus International, Meeting Rooms 8-9 • “Fast Healthy Gains: Getting The Best Economical Return With Feeding Milk Replacer.” – Kent Nutrition Group, Meeting Rooms 12-13 12:00 p.m.. “Dairy Worker Calf Posting Roundtables” -- Alltech, Meeting Room 14. (Presented in Spanish) 12:00 p.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 8 • “Virtual Farm Tour On Transition Calf And Heifer TMR Program.” -- Quality Liquid Feeds, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Combat Heat Stress: Learn How Nutritional Factors Affect Glucose Metabolism In Lactating Dairy Cows.” -- Kemin, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Managing and Monitoring Transition Challenges of Dairy Cattle” -- Elanco Animal Health, Meeting Rooms 8-9 • “Growth of the Upper Midwest Dairy Industry ... It’s Simple Economics!” -- Minnesota Milk and South Dakota Dairy Producers Association, Meeting Rooms 12-13 1:30 p.m. BREAKOUT SESSION 9 • “Is Your Heifer Ration Just A Formula, Or Is It Part Of A Total Heifer Management Program?” -- Westway Feeds, Meeting Rooms 1-2 • “Preventing Drug Residues In Milk.” – Current Expectations In An Ever Changing World.” -- Zoetis, Meeting Rooms 6-7 • “Dairy Margin Management – Taking Control Of Volatile Markets.” --Atten Babler Commodities, Meeting Rooms 8-9 2:30 p.m.

Dairy Worker Workshop: Food Safety… Am I Responsible? – Zoetis, Meeting Rooms 12-13 (Presented in Spanish)

3:00 p.m.

Trade show closes

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 23

Seminar preview

Preventing drug residues Gordon presents what you need to know now, in the future BY JEAN ANNEXSTAD Staff writer

“Preventing Drug Residues in Milk – Current Expectations in an Ever Changing World” will be presented by Patrick J. Gorden, DVM, Iowa State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Gorden is excited to talk on the topic of preventing drug residues in milk and meat, especially because of recent focus on residues by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Producers, veterinarians and industry professionals interested in learning about residue prevention practices to consider, changes that have occurred regarding residues and what could happen in the next few years should attend. “I will talk for 10 or 20 minutes and then I am looking for really good questions from people that we can discuss. It’s an issue that is pretty important to people,” he said. Gorden will present his topic in two breakout sessions at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. The first session is on Wednesday, March 26 at 11 a.m. and the second is on Thursday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m. Gorden will explain a bulk tank milk screening survey taken in 2012 by the FDA. The FDA survey was taken on 1,800 U.S. dairy farms to

determine whether those with a history of residues in beef from culled dairy animals have a higher incidence of residues in milk, he said. Of the surveyed farms, 900 had a history of residues in cull dairy animals and 900 farms did not have a residue violation. “I’ve been doing talks about drug residues since the beginning of 2013, but the FDA has not released the rePatrick Gordon sults of the survey yet,” he said. “They measured milk samples using high-tech analytics as a way to detect minute residues of any drug in milk. The test measured 31 chemicals simultaneously. Some are approved drugs and some are not,” he said. The FDA could likely use the survey results to decide if they should make changes to the required milk residue testing strategy in the future, said Gorden. The changes would need to be made through the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance, which is next reviewed in 2015. The dairy industry is aware that food safety and wholesomeness is a concern of many consumers. The

results of the FDA Milk Residue Sampling Survey could increase the uncertainty about the safety of milk amongst consumers. Gorden will review some simple steps that can be taken at the farm level to minimize the potential for violative milk or meat residues. Gorden also plans to present previews of recent FDA follow-up letters to dairy farms who were cited for a residue violation to help show the audience what FDA investigators are looking for during on-farm investigations. Citations often include

“I am looking for really good questions from people that we can discuss. It’s an issue that is pretty important to people.”

– PATRICK GORDON

improper housing to keep treated animals separate, inadequate records and lack of veterinary/client relationships, Gorden said. The talk will include the following topics: • Tolerance versus violative – how

the FDA establishes withdrawal times for drugs, • Expectations of the FDA regarding drug labeling, treatment protocols, and treatment records, • Managing market cows at the end of their productive lactation life to produce a high quality beef animal, • Take-home steps for proper drug use on dairy farms. Gorden hopes the information he’ll share during the talk, such as the type of drug use protocols and treatment records a dairy should have in place, will help producers and veterinarians prepare for possible changes that could result from the FDA’s findings.

More about the speaker Gorden graduated from Iowa State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1993. He then worked in private practices in Wisconsin and Arizona for 14 years. In 2007, Gorden joined ISU’s College of Veterinary Medicine faculty as a senior clinician in the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine. In May 2010, he was appointed director of Food Supply Veterinary Medicine and director of operations of the Food Animal and Camelid Hospital and of ISU’s Food Animal and Camelid Veterinary Field Services unit.

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Page 24 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

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What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“It is a time to reacquaint with old friends.”

Mark and Kristine Spadgenske with children, Ryan (16), Kate (14), Adam (10) and Seth (7) Menahga, Minn. 250 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? We have attended the Expo almost every year for the last 10 years – having missed only one or two in those 10 years. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? Attending the Expo serves as a break from work on the farm. It is a time to reacquaint with old friends and a time to meet new ones. Last year we took our four children for the first time and they absolutely had a blast. They have been asking all year when we will be going again, so we will be bringing our children with again this year. It makes a great family getaway. What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? It really has not been one specific thing; it is a combination of many things. Many times we have seen something at the expo and it will be maybe months later when we will remember something we saw and realize, “Hey, that would work for us”. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? We have attended other expos and they all contain great information through speakers and vendors, but I have to be honest and say that the Welcome Reception at CPDE is the best! Good friends, good food, good music – can’t get much better than that. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? As dairy farmers and business people, it is prudent that we stay on top of new technology, new products and new practices that can help us stay profitable and successful. Our industry is constantly changing and we must have access to the tools to grow with the change. Tell us about your farm. We have four children: Ryan (16), Kate (14), Adam (10) and Seth (7). Mark is in a partnership with his twin brother, Mike. We milk 250 cows and raise our own heifers. We farm 800 acres of hay and 250 acres of corn.

Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 25


Page 26 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Virtual Farm Tour preview

Drumgoon Dairy’s transition calf, heifer TMR program featured on tour BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

LAKE NORDEN, S.D. —South Dakota dairy farmers Rodney and Dorothy Elliott believe every cow should be looked after as if she were the only cow in the herd. That special attention begins at birth, with the Elliotts and their employees at Drumgoon Dairy paying special attention to raising herd replacements. The Elliotts will discuss their Transition Calf and Heifer TMR program in a virtual farm tour breakout session at Central Plains Dairy Expo both Wednesday (1 p.m.) and Thursday (12 noon). The presentation is sponsored by Quality Liquid Feeds. Although they first employed calf and heifer raisers when they opened Drumgoon Dairy at Lake Norden in 2006, they purchased extra land and put up new facilities to allow them to handle all aspects of calf and heifer raising themselves. Drumgoon now has four separate calf and heifer facilities—for calves, weaned calves, heifers, and pregnant heifers. They are all within four miles of the farm’s two milking facilities. “We follow the latest trends in raising calves,” Rodney said. “We put in an automatic calf feeder in 2010, but it wasn’t as successful as we had hoped. Now we put calves in hutches for 21 days, then move them to the automatic calf-feeding barn. We find that works better for us, even though it’s more work. We have less death loss as the calves build immunity before we co-mingle them.”

The calves are given the best start possible. Colostrum is collected and tested with a refractometer for quality. Calves are housed in small groups until they are weaned and transitioned again to a highenergy diet. Transitioning the calves through the system was “very much a learning curve,” according to Rodney. “We were losing too many calves. That was a big financial loss. We changed facilities, going to an open-front barn and smaller groups. And we went to a TMR mix. Our goal is to have heifers ready to breed so they freshen under two years of age.” It’s paid off, as the farm’s replacements are healthier, reach breeding weight faster, and calve two months younger. A successful 200-400 pound Quality Liquid Feeds transition calf and heifer program provides economical growth and development, resulting in a heifer prepared to utilize the forages and feeds of the next growth phase. The liquid feed mixes easily in a TMR and reduces sorting, ensuring that each heifer receives the proper amounts of nutrients. Since implementing this heifer feeding system, heifers have gone from calving at 24 months to calving at 22 months. After calving, they’re moved into the cross-ventilated barn to join the milking herd. Drumgoon Dairy started with 1,400 cows when it was built in 2006, then expanded to 2,000 by 2008. The family considered expanding again last year, but decided instead to build another stand-

DAIRY STAR FILE PHOTO

Rodney and Dorothy Elliot will discuss their transition calf and heifer TMR program in a virtual tour breakout sessions at 1 p.m. Wednesday and noon Thursday at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. alone dairy with an initial capacity of 1,100 cows. That number will eventually increase to 2,300. Both dairies are on the same quarter of land but the only thing that’s shared is the feed center and management area of the dairies. Calves and heifers are raised jointly at the already mentioned facilities. Elliott’s goal is to have all crossbred cows as he likes the profitability they bring. “They’re more lively, we have less death losses. I like them from all points of view,” he said.

The original dairy is entirely crossbred. In opening the second dairy, the Elliotts struggled to find quality crossbreds, so bought Holsteins instead. “I’ll crossbreed them myself,” he said. “We breed to Jersey for F-1s, then to Swedish Red for a three-way cross. Those are the three breeds we like to use,” Rodney said. “All of our milk goes for cheese manufacturing. We try to produce what the cheese plants require.” The Elliotts own 440 acres of land and rent 200 acres of cropland. They have Turn to DRUMGOON | Page 28


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 27

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Page 28 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Candi-Soy Jasper Soy Processors is the proud manufacturer of CANDI-SOY. The Highest quality bypass soybean meal available. Make more milk. Have better breeding Increase milk components Increase your profit per day

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If you got manure, we got the cure!

Continued from DRUMGOON | Page 26 100 acres of pasture for heifers. While they do raise some alfalfa and silage corn, Rodney said, “I don’t pretend to be a crop farmer.” The bulk of the feed is contracted from area farmers, as close to the dairy as possible. Those same farmers like to get the manure that the dairy produces. The farm employs about 30 people full-time and part-time. About a third of the staff are neighbors or are from nearby towns. Some are sons and daughters of local farmers. Others are international interns and high school students. Meet the Elliotts Rodney Elliott has been milking cows since 1981 when he started milking with a secondhand pipeline system he bought from a neighbor who was putting in a parlor. That was near Maguiresbridge, in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. After building his herd to 140 cows, Rodney and his wife, Dorothy, wanted to expand further but couldn’t because of quotas, regulations, and European legislation. They searched across Europe and found limited opportunities for expansion. It was then that Rodney read about South Dakota’s efforts to recruit dairy farmers throughout the world. He attended a meeting to learn more, then visited the state to, “take a look-see.” After bringing Dorothy and their children – David, James, and Becky there, the decision was made to build a new dairy near Lake Norden. Rodney sold the family’s 180-acre farm to his sister and brother-in-law and Drumgoon Dairy made the move from Ireland in February 2006. The family farm’s name, Drumgoon, came with them. “I couldn’t bring the farm so I brought the name,” Rodney said. Construction of their new farm began in May and the first cows were milked

in their brand new facility in December 2006. Dorothy Elliott is very much involved in the business operations of the farm, working full time in the office. After moving to South Dakota, the family quickly got involved in their new community, church, and state dairy groups. Rodney is a member of South Dakota Dairy Producers, Midwest Dairy Association, and a board member of Ag United. He is a part-time advisor to the SDSU Dairy Department, and has been a speaker at dairy conferences in the Midwest and Ireland. A nurse by training, Dorothy is a volunteer with the Lake Norden ambulance service. She is an advisor to the Hamlin County FSA office and is a member of the Central Plains Dairy Expo planning committee. She has also participated in tours and other events to reach out to consumers about dairy farming and agriculture. The Elliott children are all in college now. David earned a degree in psychology from Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell and is getting his masters in counseling. James is a junior at Mount Marty College in Yankton, pursuing a degree in business; he eventually plans to come back to the farm. Rebecca is a freshman at South Dakota State University, studying psychology. “The children were 14, 12, and ten years old when we came,” Rodney said. “That was a good age—old enough to remember where they came from and young enough to adapt. They enjoy American life—I don’t think they’d go back if we’d ever decide to return to Ireland.” As he looks back at eight years in the U.S., Rodney said, “I have no regrets. South Dakota has offered me opportunities to re-invent myself from a personal point of view. It’s been a lot of work, but I’m enjoying every minute.”

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Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 29

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“It is the best dairy show in the area.”

Target Your Customers! The Dairy Star is sent only to DAIRY FARMERS! If you would like to advertise, call 320-352-6303 for more information.

Don Hoffman New Ulm, Minn. 385 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? Our first Expo was at least 10 years ago. I have only missed one or two years in between. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? It is the best dairy show in the area. It is well-organized and has the latest technology. It is a great place to meet people that you would ordinarily talk on the phone with. There is also good entertainment after hours.

It’s about what can be. Stronger, healthier, more productive animals. A more efficient, consistent and profitable operation. It starts with KemTRACE® Chromium. It’s essential and helps dairy cows optimize energy use and efficiency. It’s essential to them. Essential to you. Essential to what can be.

Essential to you and your operation.

What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expo? It would have to be the TMR information. We were able to compare all TMR brands side-by-side and see which model is better or worse. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? The Expo is very well attended and has a wide variety of major vendors catering to all different needs of the individuals attending the Expo. Having cheese, wine and beer and a variety of hospitality rooms is a nice perk. I thoroughly enjoy that. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? We have sent some of our employees to the show, and they always come back with new and unique ideas. Some of those ideas we have implemented on our dairy. Tell us about your farm. My wife, Diane, and I have 430 milking and dry cows. Our youngest son, Scott, and his wife, Kendra, who also work off the farm, raise our baby heifer calves up to 12 weeks of age. Scott and Kendra dedicate themselves fully to raising healthy calves. From there, the heifers come back to the dairy for nine months. After nine months, they are moved to Brian Hillesheim’s facility, where our heifers are bred and raised up to three weeks from calving. Our oldest son, Brad, does all our chopping for haylage, corn silage and also does our round baling. He has his own business, Three Seasons Harvesting and Baling. We have about 400 acres, which is mostly used for feed. We also have a few acres of soybeans. Our family and employees all work well together, which makes our dairy run smoothly. We all strive to do the very best job possible making our dairy what it is today.

www.kemin.com/chromium

© Kemin Industries, Inc and its group of companies 2014. All rights reserved ®TM Trademarks of Kemin Industries, Inc. U.S.A. Certain statements may not be applicable in all geographical regions. Product labeling and associated claims may differ based upon government requirements.


Page 30 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“Hanging out with fellow dairy farmers.”

Junior Hoogland Maurice, Iowa 1,800 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? As long as the Central Plains Dairy Expo has been going, except last year I missed it. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? The speakers and hanging out with fellow dairy farmers. What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? I enjoy talking with other dairy farmers and exchanging ideas with them and what they like. For me it’s a huge melting pot of ideas. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? There are so many people you know. If you go to the World Dairy Expo in Madison, Wis. or the World Ag Expo in Tulare there’s just not that familiarity. Just about everybody you see, you know, from the exhibitors to the farmers. There’s a ton of people that you know. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? I like learning new ideas and taking them back and going over them with the employees. Sometimes it’s the employees that tell me what they saw. Tell us about your farm. I’ve owned the farm since 1993 and we milk 1,800 cows on an internal 40-cow rotary parlor. We have 500 acres and we plant corn on that land.

Seminar preview

Bozic to address industry growth in the upper Midwest BY RUTH KLOSSNER Staff writer

University of Minnesota Assistant Professor Marin Bozic will consider the factors that promote and/or limit the growth of the Upper Midwest dairy industry in a one-time breakout session at Central Plains Dairy Expo. Bozic will make his presentation at noon on Thursday, March 27. “We’ll first examine how this region compares to other parts of the country, how the industry is developing in terms of processing plants and additional dairies,” Bozic said. Questions Bozic will con- Marin Bozic sider include how the Upper Midwest compares to the far east and far west, whether this area is competitive, where there are pockets of growth, what the region’s position is now, and the opportunities that exist for growth. Research being conducted to answer these questions is still in progress, but Bozic indicated that some trends are already emerging. While high mailbox milk prices in our region may be good for producers, they may not be good for processors. “Yet, even so, some processors are increasing the size of their plants,” Bozic said. “Several, including First District, have done so already and others are considering it. But, at the same time, some plants are closing, including one in Nebraska.” What opportunities do our location and prices offer? With new yogurt plants opening in New York, the question comes up, “What kind of plants can this area

attract?” On the other hand, Bozic pondered, “Is the overall situation conducive for growth for producers?” In answer, he noted that some producers are expanding their operations and others are moving into the I-29 corridor. After a decade of steady growth, the growth trend slowed some in recent years, but continues. “There are opportunities on the processing side as well as on the producers’ side. When we combine the two, we can consider overall opportunities,” Bozic said. Bozic’s presentation is sponsored by Minnesota Milk and South Dakota Dairy Producers Association.

More about the speaker Marin Bozic is Assistant Professor in Dairy Foods Marketing Economics in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of MinnesotaTwin Cities, a faculty position created in collaboration between the University of Minnesota and Midwest Dairy Association, and fully funded from dairy check-off funds. Bozic’s research agenda includes analyzing the economic potential of new dairy foods products; price and trade analysis to identify threats and uncover opportunities for the dairy industry, both nationally and in export markets; investigating consumer trends; and analysis of price risks faced by producers and buyers of dairy products. Before joining the University of Minnesota, Marin worked as a researcher on agricultural development in Croatia. He holds a Master’s degree in comparative local development from the University of Trento, Italy, and a doctorate in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 31

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Page 32 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Thank You Dairy Farmers from Blue Hilltop and Schuler!

A 500-cow dairy operation reported an increase in daily peak milk production from 116 to 119 lbs. within three months after installing a Verity Revitalized Water Unit.

Experience the Power of “REVITATLIZED WATER” with Verity Water Systems and Improved Water Quality Revitalized water provides better hydration hydrated animals are healthier and less stressed.

PRONOUNCE PIT PUCKS

Advanced technology to reduce sludge build-up, foaming and odor thresholds.

Come see us at booths 147-148 at the Expo!

Blue Hilltop, Inc.

• Up to 90% sludge reduction • Decrease foaming & odor • Create a healthier environment for livestock • Typically 3 feet of sludge can be reduced to only a couple of inches

Dana Berreau & Jon Berreau

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Dairymen & Dairywomen Talk to us about the sugar in our forages... Get a FREE Jar of Jelly! WE HAVE • • • • •

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For more info or dealer inquiries please call:

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877-995-2490

High energy forages can raise forage/concentrate ratio, reduce ration input costs, and improve herd health. Ask us how!

SEE US AT CENTRAL PLAINS DAIRY EXPO BOOTHS Q - R


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 33

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“I really enjoy the concert.”

Chad Groos Colman, S.D. 50 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? I’ve been attending the Central Plains Dairy Expo since it started up in Brookings. What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? First of all the welcome reception is great. I run into old friends from college that I visit with. I also really enjoy the concert. What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? Last year I bought myself a calf carrier that you can attach to a skidloader. I use it to move calves around and it also has headlocks so you can dehorn calves with one person instead of two. It’s a labor saver. What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? The one in Sioux Falls is the only dairy expo I’ve been to. But compared to farm shows I attend I like the CPDE better because it focuses solely on dairy. I haven’t been to any other dairy shows. How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? We have tried different products on the farm that I’ve learned about at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. We have used different mastitis controls and also looked at different barn designs for cattle. Tell us about your farm. I farm with my parents, Andy and JoAnn, and two brothers, Eric and Grant and his wife Tami. We have 1,100 acres of corn, 700 acres of soybeans, 150 acres of alfalfa and 300 stock cows.

DAIRYSTAR.COM KNOW WHERE TO GO FOR YOUR DAIRY NEWS

New Mini Babybel plant beginning production in Brookings, SD 4 1 0 2 y l Ju bel brands USA Follow us on www.belbrandsusa.com

See us at the Central Plains Dairy Expo!


Page 34 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“Visiting with other producers.”

Dan Kleinjan Lake Norden, S.D. 40 cows

How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? Four years.

What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? Visiting with other producers and seeing the new technology.

What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? The information about the robotic milker. This is something I would like to have in my own operation.

ACI-0214-057 No Rough Stuff 5x7:Layout 1 2/27/14 5:13 PM Page 1

What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? The location.

How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? It gives me information on the latest technology and how I am able to apply it to my own operation.

Tell us about your farm. My wife and I purchased the dairy operation in 1996 from my wife’s parents. I have 40 registered cows and farm 130 acres. Cows are housed in a freestall barn and milked in a parlor. Plans for the summer are to build a new freestall barn and milk between 50 and 60 cows.

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After HealMax. ©2014 AGROCHEM INC.


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 35

Holy Cow, O nT

WE SPECIALIZE IN COTTONSEED im e

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American AGCO Trading serves everywhere NATIONWIDE! Call one of our traders: SEAN LASCHINGER - 800-836-5674 Cottonseed & Grain by-products (MN, ND, SD, WI, IA, NE)

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Page 36 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

… H T L A E H ERD H K C O L UN

What do you enjoy about CPDE?

“We like to see the new technology.”

Healthier More Ef ficient Cows

Plus ® h s e r F A m u ...with R See us in Booth # 15

1002 20th Avenue, Rock Valley IA l Phone: 712.476.6088 l accounting@bakkerconsultinginc.com

Troy Stimson Watertown, S.D. 70 cows

Stop by and visit with Dairy Star staff at the Expo - booth #C2

How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? We’ve attended every year since it’s been in Sioux Falls.

What do you enjoy most about attending Central Plains Dairy Expo? We like to see the booths and exhibits to see the new technology. We also like to visit with people we haven’t seen for awhile.

What is the best product or piece of information that you have taken home from previous Central Plains Dairy Expos? The Udder Tech products. We really like the coat and the towel holder and there are a couple more things we use from them. We seen them in Sioux Falls first and have been hanging with them. We were also introduced to the robotics there and that’s something we are looking into also.

What makes the CPDE different than other Expos? We’ve only been to that dairy show – but one thing that makes it cool is the entertainment the first night. I don’t think they offer that at any other expos.

How is attending the CPDE a benefit to your farm? It’s a good way to see the new products and technologies. Sometimes there are speakers we like to hear. There is always something new at the Central Plains Dairy Expo and that’s a good thing.

Tell us about your farm. I farm here with my wife Dana. We are buying the farm from my dad. We have four children ages 8, 7, 5, and 2.5 months old. They help out when they can. We farm 600 acres with my dad and we plant corn, soybeans, wheat and alfalfa.

VISIT OUR BOOTH AT THE CENTRAL PLAINS DAIRY EXPO #139

Celebrating 20 Years in Business!


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 37

1400 HEAD OPERATING DAIRY WILLOW LAKE SD

WE HAVE SCRAPERS!

RODMAN SCRAPERS

80 acres, herringbone parlor, freestalls, bunker silos, earthen lagoon, heifer facilities - $3.25 million

• Holds more than a loader bucket • Mountings to t your loader • Scrapes cleaner • Less wear

See us at the Central Plains Dairy Expo, booth #8

OPERATING EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA DAIRY 200 cow capacity, 25 acres, herringbone parlor, freestalls, Ag Bags, earthen lagoon, heifer facilities, 4 bdrm, 2 ba house. - $550,000

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL FARMS

DAIRYREALTY.COM 608-882-3700

MIDWEST MIDWEST Ag Supplements, LLC 601 Ontario Road • Marshall, MN 56258

Our shop is only 36 miles from the Expo! Bring your pickup and trailer!

5’ to 12’ available

(Mounting brackets & tires sold separately)

CALL AHEAD FOR PRICING AND PUT IN YOUR PREORDER!

RODMAN FEED PUSHERS

Come see us at Booth 86! DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME

RODMAN WELDING, MACHINE & LUMBER LLC

305 S. Railroad • Jasper, MN • (507) 348-4133 • www.rodmanwelding.com

LIQUID SUPPLEMENTS DESIGNED TO FIT YOUR NEEDS

Consistently A Great Value We hope to see all of our many friends and customers at the Central Plains Dairy Expo. Be sure to stop at our booth (39) and visit with us.

STOP BY & SEE US AT THE EXPO

CALL FOR A DEMO

2250 Austin Rd. Owatonna, MN 55060

EASY RAKE

FARM SYSTEMS

1 mi. south, 1/2 east of Rock Valley

Phone 712-476-4500

www.postequip.com

Fax 712-476-4501

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507-451-3131 or 800-385-3911

SEE US AT BOOTHS 3- 4


Page 38 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 WAT E R P R O O F APRONS

KEEPING YOU CLEAN AND EFFICIENT SINCE 1994

888.438.8683 UDDERTECHINC.COM

Last year at Central Plains Dairy Expo... The 2013 Central Plains Dairy Expo brought hundreds of people to the Sioux Falls Convention Center for the tradeshow, seminars and the welcome reception featuring Phil Vassar.


Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014 • Page 39


Page 40 • Dairy Star Special Edition • Saturday, March 8, 2014

Make a splash

THAT CAN STOP FLIES

CLARIFLY ADD-PACK: FOR USE WITH WHOLE MILK OR MILK REPLACER

®

Help stop irritating, disease spreading flies by adding ClariFly Add-Pack to your calves’ whole milk or milk replacer. ClariFly Larvicide controls the house flies, face flies, stable flies and horn flies that develop in calf manure. It works as a feed through, passing into manure where flies lay eggs to prevent larvae from developing into adults. ClariFly Add-Pack is fly control that starts with calves and benefits the whole operation. ®

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For more information visit centralflycontrol.com or call 1.800.248.7763 Always read and follow label directions. ClariFly and ClariFly Larvicide with design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International. ©2012, 2013 Wellmark International.

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