Page 1

Dairy St r Central Plains Dairy Expo Preview

Special Edition 2nd Section

March 12, 2011

Coming full-circle

Ladlie discusses improving health of entire dairy operation to increase profitability By Jill Warren Staff writer SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – Dairy farmers know that everything comes full circle. From inputs to profitability, what you put into something directly affects what you get out. For Dr. James Ladlie, that concept is the foundation of his dairy management system designed to improve the health and profitability of an entire operation. Ladlie will present “The Full-Circle Animal, Manure and Soil-Plant System™” at the Central Plains Dairy Expo in Sioux Falls, S.D. on March 30 at 11 a.m. and on March 31 at 1 p.m. “My system allows dairy farmers to achieve balance and health throughout their dairy operation,” La-

dlie said. “The Full-Circle System™ improves everything from the health of animals to soil and feed health.” The Full-Circle System™ encompasses the concept of using a probiotic, biological approach to improve manure composition, which enhances soil nutrients, seed health, feed quality and ultimately, animal productivity. By achieving a balance, you can improve the financial health of your dairy, according to Ladlie. “The main concept is bringing the entire system into balance,” Ladlie said. “I’m not just focusing on the animal, the manure or the crops, I prefer to address all three with one concept.” The entire process starts and ends with the animal. What cows are eating is going to come out in the manure, be applied to field soil, be used by plants,

and come back to affect the feed that cows will be eating. “Eighty percent of health is based on what cows eat,” Ladlie said. Ladlie’s animal component of the system involves utilizing a probiotic additive in the feed that improves cows’ feed efficiency, increases immunity and enhances manure digestion. Dr. James Ladlie A d d r e s s i n g ProfitPro, LLC the manure part of the Full-Circle System™ is a major part of Ladlie’s concept. Biologically digesting it reduces odor, solids and salts. The manure component of the Full-Circle System™ is accomplished by using a biological manure additive that stimulates or inoculates the microorganisms to properly digest manure. “Manure is where a majority of

the problems lie. There’s no reason to have flies, odors or sludge with your manure. If you have that, your system is out of balance,” Ladlie said. Improving the organic composition of the manure will directly benefit the fields it is applied to. With reduced toxins – salts, phosphate and nitrate levels – in the manure, Ladlie said the nutrient availability for crops is much higher, resulting in healthier feed – reduced aflatoxins and mycotoxins. Using your own bioaugmented manure can also reduce the reliance on costly high-salt fertilizer. “The end result is high energy feed that is going to be fed to your animals,” Ladlie said. “If you look at the ag industry today, we are overlooking the full picture. We’re out of balance.” Treating your dairy operation as a whole system and keeping each part Turn to Ladlie / Page 3


Page 2 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

A fresh look at mastitis

Would you like to showcase your dairy to your neighbors and community?

Sosa to present “Udder Dissection Wet Lab and Mastitis Workshop” at CPDE By Jennifer Burggraff Staff writer

To learn more about how you could host an event at your farm, visit Ag United, booth E, while at the Central Plains Dairy Expo located near registration. Find us on

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SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – According to Marko Sosa, Milk to the Max customer support specialist for Vi-COR®, mastitis is the most costly disease in the world. With that in mind, Sosa urges the practice of prevention in an effort to avoid treatment. “Wouldn’t it be cheaper to understand how to prevent it (mastitis) than to treat it?” Sosa said in an e-mail interview. Attendees of the 2011 Central Plains Dairy Expo will have the opportunity to learn more on Sosa’s thoughts regarding mastitis, prevention and treatment during a seminar that will air twice. Sosa’s session, “Udder Dissection Wet Lab and Mastitis Workshop,” will be held at 1 p.m. on Marko Sosa March 30 and at 9:30 a.m. on March 31. This session is for Vi-COR® everyone – employees, owners, managers, ag students and everyone who is involved in the milking process of a dairy, Sosa said. “The session will be comprised of a brief introduction and explanation of the basic components that we understand as ‘mastitis,’ followed by the dissection of the udder to understand how the udder anatomy can help us fight and prevent mastitis,” Sosa said. Throughout the workshop, Sosa said he will emphasize the three main components most people understand as ‘mastitis’: mastitis, bacteria and somatic cells. According to the session description, “the lab dissection class gives dairy workers, nutritionists, managers and owners a unique look at the importance of cleanliness and proper technique.” “[My] hope is that everyone takes home an easier understanding of how to prevent mastitis and how all of the three key components of mastitis interact,”

“[My] hope is that everyone takes home an easier understanding of how to prevent mastitis ...”

- Marko Sosa, Milk to the Max customer support specialist

Sosa said. Sosa is originally from Honduras, where he and his family dairy farmed. He attended El Zamorano Agriculture School for a degree in agronomy before receiving bachelor’s degrees in animal and dairy science and a master’s degree in agriculture economics from Louisiana State. For four years, Sosa worked as a calf manager on a large calf ranch in Wisconsin. He joined the team at Vi-COR, one of the largest animal health distributors in the county, in 2004 as a Milk to the Max customer support specialist. He works on dairies throughout the Upper Midwest. Sosa resides in northeast Wisconsin with his wife, two sons and a daughter.

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Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 3

Continued from Ladlie / Page 1

in balance is the overall message of Ladlie’s presentation. Understanding how everything comes full-circle can help increase profitability and overall health on your dairy operation. “Dairies are under a lot of financial stress, but there are economic options out there that you can do,” Ladlie said. “Everyone can gain knowledge about how to economically address dairy cattle health, manure health, feed quality and overall balance with the Full-Circle System™. The quest is to understand what creates healthy living things, and how that can make you more profitable.”

About Dr. James Ladlie As the founder and president of ProfitPro, LLC in Albert Lea, Minn., Ladlie is no stranger to the dairy industry. Ladlie grew up on a dairy, beef, swine and chicken operation near Albert Lea. He earned his doctorate in Crop Science from Michigan State University, and has gained over 30 years of experience in the agricultural industry to develop the Full-Circle System™. Lou Ann Hughes will also be presenting with Ladlie. Hughes is the president and majority stockholder of Performance Products, Inc. of San Antonio, Texas.

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Page 4 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

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Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 5

Dairy Star asks: How have you benefited from the expo in the past?

“By learning from the new things that are out there.” Cliff and Karen Wynia Sibley, Iowa Osceola County 120 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? We have been going for at least six or more years. What is your motivation for attending the Central Plains Expo? To visit with people and dealers and to learn new things to better our dairy operation. How have you or your dairy benefited from the expo in the past? By learning from the new things that are out there.

What are you most excited to see or hear at expo this year? All the new things out tine to fit this expo into your schedule? Tell us about your farm. Our son, Chris, there and to hear how other people do We go when we have the morning chores runs the dairy and he does hoof trimming things so we can better our dairy. done and make sure we are back for milk- on the side as well. ing in the afternoon. How do you rearrange your chore rou-

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Page 6 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

Connecting to the consumer S.D. farm organization takes urban moms on informative bus tour of area farms By Jerry Nelson Staff Writer SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – The importance of the connection between consumers and ag producers cannot be overstated. One farm-based South Dakota organization has taken concrete steps to strengthen this connection. Ag United For South Dakota is a coalition of commodity and livestock groups from across the state. This past summer, Ag United initiated a program called “Mom’s Day Out On The Farm.” The goal of this program was to connect urban moms directly with producers via a bus tour of area farms. More than 100 Sioux Falls moms applied for the 40 spots available on the bus tour. Most of the moms learned about the tour after it was advertised on siouxfallsmomslikeme.com. “We chose the moms for the tour based on their answers to a survey,” said Kelly Nelson, outreach director at Ag United. “We were looking for moms who had a lack of knowledge regarding agriculture or had never been on a farm before.” During their day-long bus tour, the moms were take to three livestock operations including a beef farm, a hog operation, and a dairy farm. The moms also stopped at a grain operation to learn about some of the basics of modern agronomy. The dairy chosen for the tour was Boadwine Dairy, which is owned and operated

Photo submitted

Leah Shipe a Brandon, S.D., mom, pets a baby calf at the Ryan and Sarah Vande Vliet farm near Crooks, S.D. during last summer’s “Mom’s Day Out At The Farm” tour.

by Lynn Boadwine and his family. Heidi Selken, herdswoman at Boadwine Dairy, took the moms on a walking tour of the operation. “Heidi explained every aspect of dairying,” Nelson said. “This included animal welfare issues and the use of antibiotics, the sorts of things that consumers are concerned about.” A few farm moms rode on the bus to address any questions that cropped up in between stops. Olga Reuvekamp, a dairy farm mom from Elkton, S.D., answered dairy-related questions during the bus tour and handed out informational brochures that also contained dairy recipes. “Not only did the farm moms provide more information, they helped connect producers to consumers on a mom level,” Nelson said.

In addition to the free bus tour, each mom was given three $20 gift certificates that could be used toward the purchase of beef, pork and ethanolenhanced gasoline. A drawing held at the end of the bus tour awarded one lucky mom a $500 grocery certificate. “Moms are making the decisions about what the family eats,” Nelson said. “We want to make sure they have the correct information. There’s so much incorrect information out there. It’s important that they have the facts regarding food production.” The “Mom’s Day Out On The Farm” program proved so successful that two similar bus tours are scheduled for this summer. A third tour has also been added for professionals who work in the food industry, such as chefs and restaurant owners.

Photo submitted

Heidi Selken, herdswoman at Boadwine Dairy, explains modern milk handling procedures to a group of urban moms during the “Mom’s Day Out At The Farm” bus tour held last summer.

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Dairy Star asks: What are you most excited to see at the expo?

“I really enjoy the trade show.” Chad Roelfs Sanborn, Iowa Osceola County 200 wet calves

How have you or your dairy benefited from the expo in the past? The Central Plains Dairy Expo has helped me to be a better manager. I have been exposed to new products and ideas that have helped my operation prosper and grow.

What are you most excited to see or hear at expo this year? I really enjoy the trade show. I like being able to talk to all of the drug representatives and learn about new products. Also being able to walk around and see all the new innovations in the calf industry such as automatic feeders and calf huts. Seeing the robotic milkers is fun too.

How do you rearrange your

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How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? Six years.

What is your motivation for attending the Central Plains Expo? There are a lot of reasons to attend the expo. I attend to see people in the industry that I don’t get to see often. I think it is also a good place hear new ideas and see the newest technology in the industry.

Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 7

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chore routine to fit this expo into your schedule? I rely on my family to help pick up the slack so I can take the day off. Tell us about your farm. My wife and I operate a 200 head Holstein calf operation and have a small cow/calf herd at the farm I was raised on. We raise the calves to 225 pounds to sell to area feed lots. The calves we raise come from local dairy farms and Hamlin Ag Marketing. All our calves are involved in the age source verification program. The calves come to us between one to four days of age and remain in calf huts on milk until about six weeks of age. They are then weaned and moved to pens where they are on grain till about twelve weeks old. Our small cow-calf herd is comprised of limousin and shorthorn cows. These cattle are mainly used for show cattle.

Directions to the Central Plains Dairy Expo

Clip & Mail With Payment To: DAIRY STAR 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave. • Sauk Centre, MN 56378 Name Address City State A Gift From The Dairy Star is currently sent out free to all registered dairy farmers in the state of Minnesota, northern Iowa, eastern South Dakota, and western Wisconsin.

“A secure market for my milk equals security for me.” Member-owner Scott Boening Boening Bros. Dairy Floresville, Texas

The Convention Center is located at 1101 N. West Ave., Sioux Falls, S.D.

From the east: Take I-90 to I-29 South. Get off I-29 South at Exit 81 and go east (left) approximately 1.5 miles to N. West Ave. Turn right. The Sheraton Hotel and Convention Center is on the right.

From the west: Take I-90 to I-29 South. Get off I-29 South at Exit 81 and go east (left) approximately 1.5 miles to N. West Ave. Turn right. The Sheraton Hotel and Convention Center is on the right.

From the North: Get off I-29 South at Exit 81 and go east (left) approximately 1.5 miles to N. West Ave. Turn right. The Sheraton Hotel and Convention Center is on the right.

From the South: Get off I-29 North at Exit 81 and go east (right) approximately 1.5 miles to N. West Ave. Turn right. The Sheraton Hotel and Convention Center is on the right.

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Page 8 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

From calves to consumers

Neubauer discusses salmonella’s affects on entire dairy operation By Jill Warren Staff writer SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – Dairy farmers know their operation requires focus on many areas on to be successful. From calf health to milk production and worker safety, the key is understanding the relationship between them all when it comes to preventing and controlling disease on your farm. For Dr. Gary Neubauer, that concept is the focus of his presentation, “Salmonella A Case Study: Concerns for Calves, Cows, Workers and Potentially, Consumers. What You Should Know about Salmonella, Plus Strategies for Prevention and Control,” on March 30 at 4 p.m. and March 31 at 1 p.m. at the Central Plains Dairy Expo in Sioux Falls, S.D. “My main objective is to make people aware of the considerations and prevention and control methods. I want to look at the impacts salmonella has on calves, cows, workers and consumers,” Neubauer said. Neubauer is senior manager for dairy veterinary operations (east) at

Pfizer Animal Health. He grew up on a farm near Bird Island, Minn. and has 33 years of veterinary experience. He is using that knowledge in his approach to salmonella. Citing a University of Pennsylvania investigative study, Neubauer will show an actual progression, from start to finish, of a salmonella outbreak and how that affects an entire operation. “I’m going to walk through a storybook presentation of an actual salmonella outbreak. It was the perfect storm situation, and it serves as a great example to show people,” Neubauer said. “It’s going to show the threat to cattle health and production, but also the human danger, too.” Salmonella prevalence on U.S. dairy farms has doubled since 1996, according to Neubauer, making it vital for dairy producers to understand the danger it poses to their herd and what that danger means for the bottom line. “In most clinical cases, producers will see the signs; diarrhea, high fevers, animals going off feed, but that’s only the tip of the iceberg,”

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Neubauer said. “Subclinical forms are much more devastating. Those are the animals that don’t appear sick but are shedding it and spreading it to other animals. That’s where the economic damages can occur.” Salmonella can directly affect milk yield, reproduction, turnover rates and overall profitability throughout an operation, making the importance of identifying both clinical and subclinical cases vital. Neubauer will share a variety of approaches to identify salmonella threats and ways to improve your dairy before an outbreak and after. From the maternity pen to colostrum management and treating sick calves, Neubauer will cover multiple animal prevention methods and treatment options for dealing with salmonella on a dairy farm of any size. A key topic of discussion during the presentation will also be salmonella’s effect on humans.

“Food safety starts at dairy operations of all sizes. We have a very important role in producing safe, quality products,” Neubauer said. “Whether it’s worker safety or consumer knowledge and safety, we have to start working with our vets on implementing salmonella management programs.” Completely eradicating salmonella will be very difficult to do, according to Neubauer, so the key is to understand the different ways it can affect your dairy operation and learning how to control and prevent it. “Salmonella is present on many dairy operations. The whole dairy industry should be aware of the issues salmonella creates,” Neubauer said. “Having a management plan can help increase production, improve the health of calves, insure a safe environment for workers and a quality product for consumers.”

“Whether it’s worker safety or consumer knowledge and safety, we have to start working with our vets on implementing salmonella management programs.”

- Dr. Gary Neubauer, Pfizer Animal Health


Fuel Up To Play 60 schools receive funding for wellness initiatives 67 schools awarded $128,295 by Midwest Dairy Council

ST. PAUL, Minn. – Midwest Dairy Council awarded $128,295 to 67 schools in 10 Midwest states, including Arkansas, Iowa, Illinois,

Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and eastern Oklahoma, to support their Fuel Up to Play 60 initiatives. Funding for this competitive program is provided by the Midwest Dairy Council, on behalf of Midwest dairy farmers.

Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 9

DON’T FORGET TO FLUSH

Continued on Fuel Up / Page 13

Photo by Jill Warren

Charles Kruse answers questions about his dairy farm for adult leaders at the Fuel Up to Play 60 Training Camp 2010, which was held at the Metrodome on Oct. 21. Kruse milks 170 cows on his dairy near Buffalo, Minn. There will be a “SpeakOut In The Classroom with Fuel Up To Play 60” training session on March 30 during the Central Plains Dairy Expo.

When you use UTERFlush you won’t be flushing your money down the drain. “I have been a herdsman for 30 years, and my experience has shown me that it is more profitable to keep my cows healthy using methods other than antibiotics. Van Beek Natural Science provides products that are natural and antibiotic free. Their newest product, UterFlush, allows me to prevent and control post-partum problems in my cows. Since California’s Central Left to right: Victor Castellon, Cesar Rodriguez, Valley summer temperatures usually exceed 100 Luis Beltran, Carlos Vargas degrees, fresh cow problems really take a toll and must be taken care of immediately. Using antibiotics can mean more days in the hospital pen. UterFlush helps me manage my fresh cows in a more healthy and profitable way.” Cesar Rodriguez, Manager - Wreden Ranch, Hanford, CA

Turn to Fuel Up / Page 13

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Page 10 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

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Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 11

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Page 12 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

Dairy Star asks: How have you benefited from the expo in the past?

“There is always something you can learn and ideas that you can bring back to the farm.” Brian Howe (with son, Nathan) Howe Dairy Sherman, S.D. Minnehaha County 240 cows How many years have you attended the Central Plains Dairy Expo? I have attended the Expo every year since it started. It keeps getting bigger and better every year. What is your motivation for attending the Central Plains Expo? The entertainment at the banquet is always very good. I like to see what is new and check out the vendors. I try to attend some of the breakout sessions. I enjoy meeting up with other dairy producers. How have you or your dairy benefited from the expo in the past? There is always something you can learn and ideas that you can bring back to the farm. What are you most excited to see or hear at expo this year? We are very excited to see John Michael Montgomery at the banquet this year and also to check out the trade show to see what's new.

It's only 25 miles away so it’s not a lot of travel time. We try to get morning chores done early and make sure we have help scheduled for night chores so we don't have to hurry home.

brother, Steve, and we are the fourth generation to farm here. My son, Nathan, is now involved in the dairy, so he is the fifth generation. We milk 240 cows, raise all our own replacement heifers and feed out all our steers. We grow all our feed for the How do you rearrange your chore rou- Tell us about your farm. Our farm was dairy operation. We raise corn, alfalfa and tine to fit this expo into your schedule? homesteaded in 1874. I farm with my soybeans.

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Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 13

Continued from Fuel Up / Page 7

Schools across the country applied for this second round of funding to help them jumpstart and sustain nutrition and physical activity improvements. To be eligible, they had to assign a program manager, complete a school wellness investigation, form a student team and identify a healthy eating and a physical activity plan. Awarded funds for Fuel Up to Play 60 provide support for a variety of activities and tools, such as foodservice materials and equipment, nutrition and physical education materials, student and staff incentives, staff development and overall Fuel Up to Play 60 implementation in an effort to champion school wellness. More than 70,000 schools across the United States are participating in Fuel Up to Play 60. Launched by National Dairy Council, local dairy councils and National Football League (NFL), in collaboration with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the program encourages youth to consume nutrient-rich foods and achieve at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day. Multiple health organizations and several major corporations are also supporting Fuel Up to Play 60, now in its second year. “Fuel Up to Play 60 has really taken off with wellness champions and students in more than 8,000 Midwest schools embracing the program. These funds will help many of the participating schools engage in student wellness initiatives,” said Melissa Young, Health and Wellness Director for Midwest Dairy Council. “I encourage all schools enrolled in Fuel Up to Play 60 to apply for up to $3,000 to help them increase awareness of and access to nutrientrich foods and physical activity opportunities for their students.” By giving students both a voice and a valuable role in shaping the future of their generation, National Dairy Council in collaboration with local dairy councils, the NFL and USDA are providing concrete opportunities for children to lead real change in the fight against childhood obesity. Fuel Up to Play 60 taps the power of the NFL and its teams, players and physical activity programming to add recognition and value for students. National Dairy Council’s trusted school relationships are crucial in sustaining the program. All 32 NFL teams are participating in Fuel Up to Play 60 through local dairy councils and schools in their respective markets. Fuel Up to Play 60 empowers students to engage their peers to “fuel up” with nutrientrich foods they often lack – particularly lowfat and fat-free milk and milk products, fruits, vegetables and whole grains – and “get up and play” with 60 minutes of daily physical activity. The program can complement and enhance existing wellness initiatives or efforts with additional resources, tools, rewards and incentives for students, adult program advisors and the school. To learn more about eligibility requirements, and find the funds for a Fuel Up to Play 60 application, visit FuelUpToPlay60.com. There are several application windows each year, including the upcoming deadline of June 15, 2011.

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800.359.8171


Scenes from the 2010 Central Plains Dairy Expo

Page 14 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011

Come to Dairy Star’s booth #178 and play the Dice Game!

now with more options than ever!

It Makes “Cents” To Advertise In The Dairy Star

Photo submitted

Country star Heidi Newfield gave an energetic performance to the approximately 900 people who attended the CPDE Welcome Reception on March 30, 2010.

Lester Buildings Dealer

Sentinal Buildings Dealer

We now offer more options with both wood frame and now steel frame buildings. We specialize in a variety of dairy projects, and have built facilities that ranged in size from small to large. 712-439-1101 Dennis: 712-470-3147 Fax: 712-439-1116

Give us a call today and let us bid your new expansion dairy facility!

Visit us in Booths 117-118

• Ag buildings • Concrete Work • Commercial Buildings • Dairy Facilities hoksdsconst@yahoo.com 514 Main St. • Hull, Iowa 51239 • www.hoksdsconst.com

Call 320-352-6303 to place your ad or mail to: Dairy Star, 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave., Sauk Centre, MN 56378

Photo by Jennifer Burggraff

Gary Sipiorski, one of two keynote speakers at the Central Plains Dairy Expo last year, spoke on what caused the dairy prices to crash in 2009. Sipiorski was joined by Jim Dickrell for two sessions at last year’s expo.

Photo provided

The Deluxe Feeds exhibitor booth was busy at last year’s Central Plains Dairy Expo in Sioux Falls, S.D. This year’s expo will be featuring 209 exhibitors at the trade show.


See us at the Central Plains Dairy Expo Booths 127 and 128

Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011 • Page 15

The JAGUAR 900 Series

www.jcbvision.com

… for those who expect more.

SHOW ORDINARY SKID STEERS THE DOOR

More Comfort. More Strength. More Bite. Complimenting the GREEN EYE range of JAGUAR forage harvesters. CLAAS proudly introduces the new 900 series to the JAGUAR family. Financing available through CLAAS Financial Services.

Up to $3,000 in annual fuel savings 33% larger cab

Your harvesting specialist | www.claasofamerica.com Industry’s only side door entry

60% better than competition

CLAAS of America Inc. 980 / 970 / 960 / 950 / 940 / 930

Hawke & Co. Ag • Hawke & Co. Ag • Hawke & Co. Ag

We Sell & Service all GEA Houle Equipment

Lagoon Pumps • Alley Scrapers • Maxi Pumps • Manure Tanks • Separators

BEST IN

SAFETY

BEST IN

VISIBILITY

BEST IN

COMFORT

BEST IN

SERVICEABILITY

JCB has always been a visionary company, from the invention of the backhoe loader, to the only skid steer with a side door. Now, we’ve redesigned our skid steer from the ground up. We’ve given it greater visibility, increased accessibility and made it more comfortable–all without sacrificing safety. Step in our industry’s only side door and you’ll learn why this is no ordinary skid steer. For more information visit www.jcbvision.com

& COMPANY AG www.hawkeag.com

800-657-4398

BEST IN

EFFICIENCY

Nobody rivals our vision

HawKe 1605 3rd Avenue, Alton, IA

24% better SAE service rating

1605 3rd AVENUE | Alton, IA 51003

Hawke & Co. Ag • Hawke & Co. Ag • Hawke & Co. Ag

800-657-4398


Page 16 • Dairy Star Special Edition - 2nd Section • Saturday, March 12, 2011


2011 Central Plains Dairy Expo Special Edition, Section2  

A preview to the 2011 Central Plains Dairy Expo in Sioux Falls, SD.

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