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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII NO. 18

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

More than

225

instructors petition Penn to allow remote teaching

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First years and sophomores say returning to campus feels normal despite initial fears While excited to be back on campus, some students are also feeling a sense of anxiety associated with in-person interactions ELIZABETH MEISENZAHL& DELANEY PARKS Senior Reporters

ISABEL LIANG

The petition, which was sent to Penn administrators on Aug. 22, is inclusive of tenured and non-tenured faculty, adjunct professors, lecturers, and graduate student instructors KAMILLE HOUSTON Senior Reporter

More than 225 instructors have signed a petition urging Penn to allow instructors to make their own decisions about whether to teach in person or virtually — but administrators insist students should remain in the classroom. The petition expressed concern over rising COVID-19 infection rates linked to the more contagious Delta variant, inefficient air circulation in closed buildings, limited capacity to social distance in classrooms, and instructors who have unvaccinated family members or relatives with weakened immune systems. The petition also leveraged criticism at current Penn guidelines, which no longer mandate weekly testing and recommend nonmedical grade masks instead of the more effective N95 respirators. The petition, which was delivered to Penn administrators on Aug. 22, is inclusive of

Penn announces presidential search committee for Gutmann’s successor Penn Student Government leaders call for more students in the search committee ELIZABETH MEISENZAHL Senior Reporter

Penn Student Government leaders are calling on the University to include more students in the search committee for Penn’s next president, which they hope will prioritize student feedback on issues affecting marginalized communities on campus. The Consultative Committee, which was announced on Tuesday, consists of seven trustees, two deans, five faculty members, one staff member, one undergraduate student, and one graduate student. Penn President Amy Gutmann was nominated in July by President Joe Biden to serve as the next United States ambassador to Germany. She confirmed that she will continue to serve as Penn’s president until June 30, 2022, or until the U.S. Senate confirms her as ambassador, which could accelerate her departure. “The outcome of our search will affect the University far into the future,” Penn Board of Trustees Chair Scott L. Bok told the Penn Almanac. “The goal of the Trustees, in which they seek the Committee’s assistance, and the Penn community’s input, is to identify the best individual to serve as the new president of this extraordinary institution.” College senior and Undergraduate Assembly

tenured and non-tenured faculty, adjunct professors, lecturers, and graduate student instructors. “We recognize that the circumstances around COVID-19 are evolving and that the administration has difficult decisions to make,” the petition reads. “And while we understand that our academic responsibilities are primarily to meet the educational needs of our students, we also recognize the necessity of protecting each other in dangerous times. Health and safety must come before all else.” In an emailed statement to The Daily Pennsylvanian on Sept. 8, Vice Provost for Faculty Laura Perna reiterated Penn’s commitment to an in-person undergraduate education. Perna added that instructors may be permitted to shift to virtual instruction for a short duration of time, such as if the instructor or a significant number of students in the course need

to quarantine. “Should the risk assessment associated with classroom teaching change, we would make accommodations accordingly and quickly communicate with faculty and other members of our community,” Perna wrote. The Faculty Senate released a memo on Aug. 27 addressing faculty concerns about in-person teaching, noting the safety of in-person teaching depends on vaccination, masking in the classroom, and regular testing and contract tracing. According to the memo, faculty members who qualify for an exemption from in-person teaching may request a medical accommodation through the

President Tori Borlase will serve as the sole undergraduate student on the committee to search for a new president, which Borlase said has not met yet. Borlase hopes the University will find a successor who makes student voices a priority. “At the end of the day, Penn is a school — not a business,” Borlase said. “So it’s really important to make sure that student voices are prioritized in decision-making processes.” Penn released a survey Tuesday on Penn Almanac for members of the Penn community to fill out if they wish to nominate a candidate, list characteristics they hope to see in the next president, and describe challenges they see arising for Penn during the tenure of the next president. “We invite members of the University community to provide input by responding to the survey on the presidential search or directly to a member of the Consultative Committee listed below,” Bok said. College and Wharton senior and UA Vice President Janice Owusu said she hopes that more members of the UA will have a role in selecting the new president as the committee narrows down candidates. University spokesperson Stephen MacCarthy did not respond to a request for comment on whether any other student leaders or student groups will be consulted during the search process. Owusu said she hopes the next president will also prioritize diversity, equity, and inclusion within the University, particularly by giving space on Locust Walk to the cultural houses and supporting FGLI students. The 6B, a coalition of groups representing marginalized communities on Penn’s campus, has long called for houses on Locust Walk, rather than their current rooms in the basement of the ARCH building. “Because of [Gutmann], we have this term ‘[FGLI],’ and the FGLI program, the highly aided program,” Owusu said. “I couldn’t go to Penn if it wasn’t for [Gutmann’s] role in fundraising for them.” In 2008, Gutmann instituted the University’s noloan financial aid policy, making Penn’s financial aid policies grant based and without loans. In 2016, Penn became the second Ivy League university to

open a center dedicated to the needs of FGLI students. The percentage of FGLI students at Penn has tripled since the beginning of Gutmann’s tenure in 2004. Owusu added that she hopes the next president will continue to emphasize expanding financial aid, as Gutmann did, by meeting full need for international students. Similar to other student group leaders, Engineering senior and Student Committee on Undergraduate Education Chair External Aidan Young said that while he thinks PSG should have some part in the selection process, he hopes to see other student groups consulted as well. Young said his biggest hope is that the new president would be someone who “is willing to take risks” over the next two to three years to implement the policies SCUE outlined in their most recent White Paper. These changes include revamping sector requirements to add more flexibility and increased support for FGLI students. “I think what we’re setting our sights on the next couple of years is going for some of those bigger projects and ideas that we set out in the White Paper,” Young said. “So we would love to have a president that is willing to take risks and work with us and the rest of the student body.”

“We must commemorate the American lives lost in the 9/11 tragedies and the heroism that was on display that day. But we must also commemorate how, in the face of tragedy, our country reacted with discrimination, violence, and war.” - DP Editorial Board SEND STORY IDEAS TO NEWSTIP@THEDP.COM

Penn men’s soccer dominated against Colgate in its first match at Rhodes Field since Nov. 16, 2019.

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Two weeks after diving back into in-person classes, first years and sophomores expressed excitement about the opportunity to have shared on-campus experiences with others. The first years and sophomores said they have enjoyed their in-person classes and the ability to see their classmates face to face on campus, although they admitted the transition has been abrupt for some students after more than a year of primarily solely virtual interactions. “Being on campus and being in person is exciting, although it does come with its limitations,” Eileen Wang, a first year in Wharton, said, explaining that she has faced some COVID-19-related difficulties in classes, including soft-spoken professors wearing two masks and a recitation being held online with poor connection. “It’s not exactly the same, but it’s the best we can get,” she said. “So I’m pretty happy with that.” Similarly, College first year Thomas Shaw said the atmosphere surrounding this semester has been enthusiastic, and that everyone they have met seems excited to be in person. “It is much easier to find people and to find things that are happening just by walking around or being in places where people gather. It’s so much easier, and it’s so much more fun,” Shaw said. Eashwar Kantemneni, a sophomore in the College, said this year has felt much more like an actual college experience so far, since it’s been easier to meet new people and spend time with friends in dining halls and dorm rooms. He added that campus is “much more lively” this year. Likewise, College sophomore Anooshey Ikhlas agreed that Penn’s social element was much more present this year, explaining that she now has the opportunity to walk to and from classes with other students and eat with friends in the dining hall, all new experiences for her at Penn. “At the end of the day — school and all the social activities — I felt so tired, but kind of in a good way,” Marisol Sanchez, a sophomore in the College, agreed, saying that crossing paths with people has become much more common. She said she’s been able to turn casual connections with classmates and acquaintances into friendships by making plans, seeing each other on Locust Walk, and grabbing lunch. While students have eagerly awaited a return to in-person campus life, some are feeling a sense of anxiety associated with in-person interactions. Sanchez said that she has been both anxious and excited about returning to an in-person environment. The pandemic — and not being around lots of people — has caused her to worry about returning to her normal social life, but she has enjoyed in-person interactions in class and meeting new people in a “natural” way. College first year Anthony Wong agreed, saying he has made strong connections with students and professors in his small seminar classes. Another student, Engineering first year Arda Enfiyeci, who took a gap year last year and did not take virtual classes, said he is grateful to have classes in person this year. After a year of awkward breakout rooms, Sanchez said, it has been a relief to connect with her professors more deeply and work with in-person groups for her ASTR 001: “Survey of the Universe” class. Kantemneni also said that in-person classes have provided opportunities to connect with professors in an easier and more natural way. Especially in his small seminar class, he said he’s been able to learn more about his professor and classmates than he previously did in virtual classes. W h ile some students indulged in the pandemic-induced flexibility of virtual learning, Ikhlas realized that having to attend her lectures every day has helped her avoid procrastination and keep up with assignments.

President Amy Gutmann speaks at the University’s 111th Convocation on Aug. 30.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Twenty years after 9/11, Penn and DP alumni recount reporting on and coping with the tragedy The attacks threw a norma day nto uncerta nty as DP reporters rushed to cover the unfo d ng tragedy MRAN S DD QU SHE LA HODGES & MARY TUYETNH TRAN Sta Repo te s & Sen o Repo te

I

t was 8:46 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001 when the first airplane hit the north tower of the World Trade Center. Penn students found out about the tragedy over the course of the next few hours on a day that rapidly transformed from a normal day of classes to an unforgettable tragedy. After hearing the news, college journalists rushed to 4015 Walnut St. — The Daily Pennsylvanian’s office. It was an unusual sight. Ordinarily, reporters met at around 5 p.m. in order to catch up on sleep after long days of working well into the previous night. But that Tuesday, reporter after reporter f looded into the office around noon asking, “What can I do?” and, “How can I help?” and, “What’s the plan?” Emotions varied. Some were fearful. Others were in shock and confused. But all were fueled by a sense of purpose to cover the trauCOURTESY OF W LL TUNG matic event unfolding. Twenty years after 9/11, the DP spoke with alumni who were students at the time and recounted their experiences of that unforgettable day.

The morning of the attacks 2004 Wharton graduate Will Tung — then a sophomore — was sleeping when the towers fell. That day, he did not have any classes until the afternoon, so he was woken up by a phone

call from a high school classmate telling him to turn on the news immediately, as he knew that Tung’s parents worked nearby. “I turn on the TV, and it is just the shadow of the towers collapsing over and over again, on repeat,” Tung said. “My mom worked in the World Trade Center, so I thought that she was in there. As far as I knew, the towers came down right away and I thought she was just in there. I thought she was dead.” With cell phone service throughout much of the northeast United States failing, Tung was unable to contact any family members in New York and was uncertain about his mother’s condition. He said that many of his peers at Penn knew that his mother worked in the city and tried to comfort him. “It was great to be with my roommates and very good friends,” Tung said. “There were probably at least half a dozen people in my tiny room — all these friends that I just made in my time [at Penn] lending me support.” But later that afternoon, Tung’s mother — who had walked barefoot for miles in order to reach her company’s branch in Madison Park to use a telephone after escaping the World Trade Center — was able to get in touch with her son and let him know that she had made it out of the building without serious injuries. Prior to the attacks, many Penn students said it was just a normal morning. But the attacks threw the day into uncertainty — some students proceeded to class as usual before the University suspended operations around 10:30 a.m., nearly two hours after the first tower was struck.

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2004 College graduate Kirsten Griffith, a sophomore at the time, was getting ready for a Spanish class when she heard through a call from her family that a plane had crashed into one of the World Trade Center buildings. Griffith remembered watching the news unfold on a television in her on-campus residential apartment in Rodin College House. Not knowing exactly what to do, she said that she went to Spanish class as usual. When she got out of class, Griffith said that Locust Walk and the student body had transformed. Students were whispering of the event that had just occurred, unsure and scared of what could happen next. Like Griffith, 2003 Wharton graduate Alexis Volpe and 2004 College graduate Kate Jay Zweifler said calls from their family alerted them about the attacks, prompting them to check the nearest television. “In the moment, you don’t know that history is happening,” Jay Zwei- COURTESY OF K RSTEN GR FF TH fler said. “Everyone decided that they should go to class first.” Volpe said she was shocked by what she saw, but before receiving word that the University suspended operations, she decided to walk to Van Pelt-Dietrich Library for her morning class. “I remember walking [to class], and on Locust Walk there were people smiling, laughing, and just acting normal,” Volpe said. “I was saying to myself, ‘Oh my god. I don’t think these people realize what has happened because I wouldn’t have known without my mom telling me about it.’”


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Griffith lived on the 21st floor of a high rise residential building at the time, which she said was “scary, given that planes were flying into skyscrapers.” “There was a period when there were a few hours when nobody really understood what was happening,” 2002 College graduate Stacy Frazier said. “Nobody knew what was going on, and you knew Washington had been hit. You knew New York had been hit. You didn’t exclude that Philadelphia could be hit.”

Reporting on, and coping with, the news While some students proceeded to class during the confusion that morning, 2003 College graduate Rod Kurtz, the managing editor of the DP at the time, went straight to the DP’s office. “I just got dressed. I don’t even remember if I showered,” Kurtz said. “I headed to the DP [office] and was already starting to think.” After calling all the reporters and editors into the newsroom, Kurtz told reporters that the DP would not cover the events in a way that catered to a national audience like The New York Times. Kurtz wanted to tailor the DP’s coverage of 9/11 and its impacts specifically to its audience of Penn students and Philadelphia residents. “I said we were going to keep covering it until we ran out of COURTESY OF ROD KURTZ angles,” Kurtz said. The DP covered many stories on 9/11, including the shock students who had just moved to campus felt; analyses from professors who were experts on terrorism, geopolitics, and economics; the expanded services Counseling and Psychological Services offered in the wake of the attacks; as well as vigils held in Houston Hall and on College Green. 2002 Wharton graduate Jonathan Margulies, the DP editorial page editor at the time, said that he found it difficult gathering commentary on 9/11, even from Penn professors. “I don’t know that anybody had much to say initially,” said Margulies. “I think there was so much to process.” DP alumni remembered that staff members were especially eager to contribute during 9/11. 2003 College graduate and copy editor at the time Drew Armstrong said he found himself and others volunteering for tasks and assignments outside their usual roles. “I was out there finding students to interview and things like that over the course of the day,” said Armstrong. “It was really one of those situations where whatever you think your job is,

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

you’re going to be doing that, but you’re also going to be doing three other things.” The bustle of the reporting that day helped DP reporters and alumni process the event, Armstrong recounted. “I think that was a little bit of a blessing to be honest — to get through being able to process what all of this meant by being so busy and so engaged, and not having to just sit there and consume it,” said Armstrong. Frazier, the campus editor at the time, remembered one of her reporters asking for a story to write after hearing about a loved one who had been affected by the event. The reporter found work to be a way to redirect her energy in a positive way, Frazier recalled. Despite their fatigue, the reporters and editors all remained at the office until around 3 a.m. the next morning so that the paper would be ready for publication and distribution Sept. 12. Other students also turned to their respective clubs and communities on campus to grieve. A member of the Undergraduate Assembly, Griffith remembered that she headed straight to Houston Hall, which houses the UA office. Several other UA board members had the same idea, congregating in the office out of a desire to help support each other in any way they could. They hosted a phone drive in Houston Hall, so students without access to cellphones or landlines could try to get in contact with family members. “All of us naturally gravitated there and felt like we needed to do something,” Griffith said. “We had TVs everywhere trying to keep track of what was going on because we knew that there were so many people — recent Penn grads — that were in those buildings.” Many students, faculty, and staff were connected to and grieved for those affected by the towers falling — even those they had never met. Members of the Penn community kept a lookout for familiar names as the death tolls mounted and victims were identified. Sixteen Penn alumni were among those killed in the attacks. “We set up this room at the bottom of Houston Hall as information came in, and if we found out that a Penn alum had perished on the towers, their name would go up on this wall,” Griffith said. “People would come, and there was a lot of quiet reflection.”

Adjusting to a post-9/11 world In the months following the attacks, students and staff began to adjust to the world that had changed before their eyes. The University created a plaque on the second anniversary of 9/11 in remembrance of the 16 alumni who died in the terrorist attacks.

NEWS 3

Students took their time to adjust to the post-9/11 world. Zweifler took a semester abroad in fall 2002 in Rome and was met with a changed world, from the increased security at the airport to an anti-former President George W. Bush atmosphere abroad. She said the trip helped her process a nd contextua lize what had happened, as she learned the world is much bigger than just the United States. “The world changed that day for the rest of our lives, and it was also a time of change in my own life because I was in colCOURTESY OF STACY FRAZIER lege,” Zweifler said. “A different world started, and that’s the world I graduated into, so I at least had the time to adjust to that world.” Ref lecting on the event two decades later, Armstrong said his experiences at the DP prepared him to work at Bloomberg and cover the COVID-19 pandemic. “It really did give me exposure to what it was like to work on a massive — the biggest story in the world,” Armstrong said. “Work as hard as you can to cover it and try to figure out all of the problems and questions and just the ways of trying to do journalism in the middle of chaos.” Alumni reported noticing shifts — both big and small — in how they lived their lives following the tragedy. Tung, who was studying finance at the time, said that witnessing 9/11 forced him to rethink his priorities and goals. “Seeing this enormous catastrophe in lower Manhattan and seeing all the folks just senselessly dying — especially folks who worked in finance for years and years, working a job that I couldn’t see myself being fulfilled by – I feel like it caused me to reevaluate what was important for me,” Tung said. While he actually did end up working in finance after graduating from Penn, Tung left his job after just a year. He now lives in Philadelphia and works as a fire lieutenant. Though it did not feel like a direct consequence of witnessing the tragedy at the time, Tung said he cannot help but see the correlation now. COURTESY OF ALEXIS VOLPE “I felt so helpless on that day. I felt like I wanted to do something, and I wanted to go there to help, but I obviously couldn’t. There was nothing I could do,” Tung said. “Now I’m in a position where I can actually go and help people at their worst moments.”


4 OPINION

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

OPINION Saplings in Juniper Valley Park

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 9, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII, NO. 18 137th Year of Publication DANE GREISIGER President ASHLEY AHN Executive Editor HADRIANA LOWENKRON DP Editor-in-Chief ISABEL LIANG Design Editor CONOR MURRAY News Editor PIA SINGH News Editor HANNAH GROSS Assignments Editor BRITTANY DARROW Copy Editor KYLIE COOPER Photo Editor ALFREDO PRATICÒ Opinion Editor SUNNY JANG Audience Engagement Editor BRANDON PRIDE Sports Editor LOCHLAHN MARCH Sports Editor SOPHIE HUANG Video Editor QIANA ARTIS Podcast Editor ALESSANDRA PINTADO-URBANC Business Manager PETER CHEN Technology Manager JASPER HUANG Analytics Manager GREG FERREY Marketing Manager EMILY CHEN Product Lab Manager ERIC HOANG Consulting Manager

THIS ISSUE ALANA KELLY DP Design Editor JONAH CHARLTON Deputy News Editor

Caroline’s Queries | How will we memorialize 9/11 in the years to come?

A

t the start of every school year in New York City, our social studies teachers focused their lesson plans on 9/11. Each teacher had a different approach. Some described their own experiences and encouraged students to talk to their parents about the event. Others had us watch documentaries. In a geography class, my teacher started with a case study of how we link diseases to specific locations, tying back to the lingering health effects among 9/11 survivors. But one thing they always emphasized, without fail, was that almost all of our grade was born in 2002. We were the first grade they would teach where the majority of students had been born after 9/11. As I’ve gotten older and gone through more and more of these classes, it makes me question: How do I, or any of us, connect to 9/11 so strongly when we weren’t even alive when it happened? In school, we studied the impact that 9/11 had on our communities, while also seeing the effects playing out before our own eyes. Teachers reminisced about a time when airplane travel was “anything goes,” and they didn’t have to pass through strict airport security, much like how we may lament pre-COVID-19 travel in the future. Gradually, we started to discuss instances where post-9/11 patriotism went amiss: We learned about anti-Muslim rhetoric and hate that grew following the PATRIOT Act, as well as the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, which have cost thousands of lives and trillions of dollars. Growing up, my parents and I usually went to the 9/11 candlelight vigil held in Juniper Valley Park, where we stood with our neighbors to remember 9/11. We spanned generations and cultures. There were elderly Italian Americans, alongside their children and grandchildren, who often sat on their stoops and made small talk with passersby. Many of them had personally lost loved ones. There were also recent immigrants, like my mom and dad, and lots of children, ranging from high school seniors to toddlers. As a kid, I didn’t enjoy the vigil very much. I was scared of fire (and never held the candles), and like most kids, I was impatient. It was the same thing every year, I would think. It functioned like clockwork. In reality, the memorial was fluid and changing every year. Yes, there were roughly the same local politicians speaking every time, at the same meeting spot, with the same sequence of events, but things were also changing. In 2011, leading up to the 10th anniversary, volunteers and landscapers came together to plant a commemorative garden in Juniper Valley Park. It was a beautiful sight, and a necessary monument if we are to never forget what happened. But with the construction of this memorial, I

NICKY BELGRAD Associate Sports Editor AGATHA ADVINCULA Deputy Opinion Editor VARUN SARASWATHULA Deputy Opinion Editor VALERIE WANG Deputy Opinion Editor THOMAS CHEN Copy Associate TIFFANY PARK Copy Associate SOPHIE NADEL Copy Associate

LETTERS Have your own opinion? Send your letter to the editor or guest column to letters@thedp.com. Editorials represent the majority view of members of The Daily Pennsylvanian, Inc. Editorial Board, which meets regularly to discuss issues relevant to Penn’s campus. Participants in these meetings are not involved in the reporting of articles on related topics.

fear that 9/11 will inevitably recede into the background, as other key historical events have, and it will be thrown into a list that students are forced to memorize. It won’t always be the all-encompassing learning experience that it has been for me and my peers every year in New York City. In the fall of 2018, the 17th anniversary, I scrambled to finish my history homework and got to Juniper Valley Park two hours late. There were only a handful of people there. Did the event always finish so quickly, or had it ended earlier than before? Last year, the candlelight vigil was held virtually. I am not sure how many people attended, but I do know that for the first time, the vigil included not only the names of Middle Village residents who died on 9/11, but also rescue and recovery workers who died from 9/11-related illnesses. I thought of Catherine Choy, an alumna of my high school who was interviewed for an HBO documentary on 9/11, only to pass shortly thereafter from 9/11-linked gastric cancer. The effects of 9/11 still reverberate through New York City, but for how much longer will we be remembering them in the same capacity that we once did? After COVID-19, will our memorials ever be as large and meaningful as they once were? Change is necessary, and perhaps the only constant in this world. When my mom and dad first moved to Middle Village, the Twin Towers rose over young saplings in Juniper Valley Park’s field. The towers fell, but we bounced back: The skyline now is denser and taller than it was before, but so are the trees. Some of the saplings didn’t make it. Since they were planted, Central Queens has endured tornadoes, hurricanes, and flooding, but nevertheless, the now-mature trees obscure most of Manhattan’s skyscrapers. Kite flyers, dog walkers, and aspiring baseball and soccer players now intermingle in the field where our candlelight vigil is held, appreciating the trees’ shade when they need to take a break. And when the sun goes down on 9/11, the Tribute in Light shines bright blue, up and over the trees, an ethereal presence in a living and breathing city. I don’t know what the Juniper Valley Park candlelight vigil will look like 20 years from now, or if it will still continue to happen. But I do know that even as memories of 9/11 grow distant, New Yorkers will continue to gather in one way or another, valuing their camaraderie and emotion anew. CAROLINE MAGDOLEN is a College and Engineering sophomore studying systems engineering and environmental science from New York City, N.Y. Her email address is magdolen@ sas.upenn.edu.

Why commemorating 9/11 matters more than ever

ANA GLASSMAN Opinion Photo Editor SAMANTHA TURNER Sports Photo Editor

EDITORIAL

Cloobeck’s Call | As a generation of young people with little to no recollection of 9/11, it is imperative that we find ways to remember

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n the 20th anniversary of 9/11, many of us come of age with a tragedy that we are unable to personally recall. Like many young people who were either unborn or not old enough to remember the terrorist attacks on Sept.11, 2001, I asked my parents where we were during that tragic day. I was 20 months old living in the suburbs of Las Vegas. I woke up my mom around 5:30 a.m. Feeding me a bottle on the couch, she turned on the television and the news was on. The first plane had already struck the World Trade Center. When my mom and I saw the second plane hit the second tower at 6:03 a.m. Pacific Time, she recalled that “her heart sank.” She ran upstairs, holding me on her hip. She woke up my dad, turning on CNN in their room. My dad said that “they watched a lot of TV that morning.” He remembers planes being grounded within the hour of the attacks. As the head of a timeshare business, he went to work. He recalled having to welcome unexpected plane travelers who were grounded in Vegas on their way to California. “Folks wanted to get home,” so rental cars sold out quickly. Air traffic was at a standstill for weeks. My dad said hotel occupancy plummeted to “almost zero for weeks,” which strained his business. I share my story because it illustrates my lack of a vivid recollection of 9/11 and the days that followed. Yet I still remember it through others’ stories, images and experiences. I believe that we can all find a fitting way to commemorate 9/11. There are numerous ways to remember 9/11, from moments of silence to viewing an interactive timeline of how the events unfolded. I would like to suggest a few ways we can honor 9/11 this year and beyond. First, we can listen to our loved ones about their 9/11 experiences. Where were they? How did they receive the news? How did they react? I acknowledge this can be hard. You can gauge whether this is a sensitive topic for a loved one. I would approach the conversation with honest curiosity to learn more about their life’s experiences. If the opportunity arises, we can also listen to the stories of our professors, our older friends, or our mentors. Because these conversations can be uncomfortable and challenging, here are some ways to remember 9/11 that anyone can do individually. If you wonder how Penn students reacted to 9/11, I recommend checking out the photo gallery compiled for 9/11’s tenth anniversary, or reading alumni recounts of how then-reporters for The Daily Pennsylvanian reacted to the news and rushed to New York City to cover the story within days of the attack. We can also remember the sixteen Penn alumni that we lost to 9/11, who are commemorated on a plaque located to the west of Van Pelt-Dietrich Library’s main entrance. I recommend visiting that plaque the next time you pass by Locust Walk. We can read about the lives of those people our community lost in order to honor their memories and living descendants. If you enjoy examining visual artifacts, I suggest checking out the 9/11 Memorial and Museum’s digital collection. If you enjoy oral histories, you may resonate with the recent NPR Politics Podcast that tells the story of family members and neighbors affected by United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed in southwestern Pennsylvania on September 11th, 2001. You may also enjoy the September 11th

KYLIE COOPER

Digital Archive’s Voices of 9/11 video testimonials or the 9/11 Memorial & Museum brief audio-recorded oral histories. 9/11 was a tragedy for all humanity, so we are all endowed with the right to remember. We can collectively heal from mass trauma, even if we did not directly experience that trauma. Trauma can reverberate for years, and studies suggest that trauma has the potential to become intergenerational, which is a cautionary tale as we attempt to heal from the mass trauma caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Just like 9/11, the next generation — current infants, toddlers and the unborn — will not recall any memories from this pandemic. However, it is imperative that we tell our stories, record them and pass them on to our descendants. Even though it hurts, we have much to gain by remembering events of mass trauma. By commemorating 9/11 each year, we resist the danger of forgetting to tend to unhealed wounds. Even if we were not directly wounded, we know someone who was. Family members, friends, or first responders. Just as we respect each other by wearing masks during a public health crisis, let’s honor those we lost and those who were wounded – physically, mentally or emotionally – by 9/11. In my opinion, the best way to honor another person is by giving them your time and attention. In the future, 9/11 will have no living survivors to tell their tales. Yet their memories can live on if we revive their stories every year in commemoration of this day. The only way to never forget is to remember. JADEN CLOOBECK is a College senior from Laguna Beach, Calif. studying psychology. His email address is jaden@sas.upenn.edu.

Remember all the legacies of 9/11

KYLIE COOPER

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n the 10th anniversary of 9/11, The Daily Pennsylvanian Editorial Board wrote in part, “In another 10 years, students at Penn will have no firsthand memory of that day, no recollection of the sorrow and solidarity that followed … It is for this next generation that we pause for remembrance on the 10-year anniversary of 9/11. We must leave them a record that conveys the momentousness of the event and imparts the lessons we’ve learned.” Those 10 years have now passed. And though we have no memory of those tragic attacks, we take pause and commemorate the 2,977 American civilians who lost their lives that day. We commemorate the 343 New York City firefighters, 23 New York City police officers, and 37 Port Authority officers who gave their lives in the line of service. We commemorate the sacrifice of the 40 passengers and crew members of Flight 93 who gave their lives that day to prevent further casualties. But on this 20th anniversary we must also commemorate the ugly legacies of that day. Twenty years ago there was solidarity, but not solidarity for all Americans. In 2001, hate crimes against Muslim people rose tenfold, and to this day, they remain five times higher than their pre-9/11 levels. In schools, 42% of Muslim parents report that their children have been bullied, compared to just 20% of their Protestant peers. Islam has become a politicized religion, and many Muslim people have been barred from practicing their faith at work and from wearing religious garb, like hijabs, under the threat of losing their jobs. Further, the post9/11 wave of Islamophobia has negatively affected not just Muslim people, but also people of Middle Eastern descent or people who practice religions, like Sikhism, that can be mistaken for Islam. Our Muslim, Sikh, and Middle Eastern classmates and friends may not remember 9/11, but they do remember the discrimination and hardship they have faced and continue to face every day. In 2002, as a direct result of the 9/11 attacks, Congress passed the Homela nd Secur ity Act wh ich, a mong its provisions, established the Department of Homeland Security and its subsidiaries — Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection. To this day, these agencies separate families, violently police the United States-Mexico border, and forcefully deport those who have lived almost their entire lives in this country. Our undocumented classmates and friends may not remember 9/11, but they do remember living under the threat of deportation. Twenty years ago, the United States began the War on Ter ror, a war that has been waged all our lives and has only now ended. The war has claimed nearly 1 million lives, including those of over 387,000 civilians. The war has destabilized the region, and as a result, the people of Afghanistan have been left to be ruled by extremists as the United States withdraws. Many people in Pakistan, Iraq, Yemen, and Afghanistan do not remember 9/11, but, every day, they deal with the destruction, violence, and destabilization wrought by the U.S. invasion. Many in the United States have the privilege of contending with the legacies of 9/11 on only one day each year. But for many citizens in the United States and for the people of the Middle East who have experienced invasion, the legacies of 9/11 are their everyday lived experiences. We must commemorate the American lives lost in the 9/11 tragedies and the heroism that was on display that day. But we must also commemorate how, in the face of tragedy, our country reacted with discrimination, violence, and war.


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OPINION 5

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

9/11: Have we already forgotten? Lexi’s Take | The 20th anniversary of 9/11 should remind us that our attention matters

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rowing up in the New York area (my hometown of Stamford, Conn., is about 45 minutes outside of Manhattan), 9/11 was always a day that was filled with sorrow, commemorative events, memories, and education. Living so close to the city, everyone was impacted by the tragedies of the terror attacks in some way, whether it be through a parent who died in a tower collapse, a traumatic recollection of debris scattering through NYC, or a tale of heroic responses like those of firefighters fraught with lung cancer from the risks they took to save lives in the attacks. As most people from the tristate area understands, everyone around us has their 9/11 story. My own father was caught in traffic on the George Washington Bridge on his way to work at the Twin Towers when the first plane hit — traffic that undoubtedly saved his life, and is the reason why he lived, and why I am at Penn today. Every year on 9/11, I relived, in great detail, an event that my immediate peers and I were not alive to see. I heard stories of my teachers’ vivid memories of their students’ parents not making it home to pick them up from school and of the fear that they felt as phone lines jammed and they couldn’t contact their families. I’ve watched countless 9/11 documentaries that now serve as regular memorials of the Ground Zero events in my childhood. Despite not being alive on 9/11, it is an event I feel as though I have experienced through the lens of virtually every person I have spent this day with over the past 19 years. However, within the generations that have followed my own, I can see how much “never forget” has not been nearly as prolific as we might have hoped. This was evident last year, even among people in my own area, when the 9/11 Tribute in Light, a light display projected from Ground Zero to honor the lives of those lost, was almost not displayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While backlash from survivors and families affected by the tragedy resulted in the light show occurring, advocacy among people my age was almost nonexistent, despite the wave of political passion that had occupied social media feeds throughout last summer. The failure of 9/11’s memory to persist in generations who weren’t alive to witness the event has also been indicative in light of recent events surrounding the Biden administration’s withdrawal from Afghanistan. You will recall that this war was in a large part initiated by the refusal of the Taliban to extradite members of the terrorist

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group Al-Qaeda (which was responsible for the coordinating and carrying out of the 9/11 attacks), causing the United States to launch “Operation Enduring Freedom” and invade Afghanistan. Whatever your opinion on the act of withdrawal itself, there has been almost unanimous agreement among both the president’s supporters and critics that the way in which we fled was disastrous. A recent Pew Research poll recorded 70% of Americans believing the United States. “mostly failed in achieving its goals in Afghanistan”. The withdrawal left approximately 200 Americans stranded on the ground as the final planes left Kabul and killed 13 American Military members as a result of a suicide bomber, and had been carried out with broken promises and limited physical presence on the part of the president himself. You would think that this type of butchered political action — which has opened the door for a well-known terrorist organization, whose human rights violations are infamous throughout the world, and cost American lives in the process — would elicit roaring social media criticism from

arguably the most politically active generation in recent history. Yet, what have I heard? Crickets. There’s been virtually no criticism of the administration’s response, support for the families of the marines lost in Kabul, or even concern for the decreasing rights for women in Afghanistan among so-called “feminists.” The apathy and lack of attention towards this particular issue among people my age, is in my opinion, indicative of how little the emotional tolls of 9/11 have been translated to future generations. We were brought into a world where my own parents debated raising a child in the shadow of one of the worst tragedies to occur on American soil. We are not “excused” from the impacts of that and frankly do not have the luxury to be apathetic to the fallout of that just because it was before our time. The very first conversation I had about the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the rise of the Taliban was in the mixed political company of people from home, all of whom lived through the attacks. What was their first response? “How

long before we see another attack like 9/11 all over again?” That frightening and instinctual response by people who bear the burden of those memories is something I want people my age to be forced to be familiar with. This is not an issue of politics or generational differences. This is a simple reminder that we do not live in a world where we can afford political apathy on any topics — under any administration. So, take time on the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks to contact people in your life who experienced the day themselves, particularly if you are someone who isn’t old enough to remember it yourself. We must “never forget” the lives of those lost that day, and in their honor, it is our very fundamental civic duty to remain vigilant about the fallout of those events. LEXI BOCCUZZI is a College sophomore studying philosophy, politics, and economics from Stamford, Conn. Her email is abb628@ sas.upenn.edu.

Vigilance and historical understanding are key to student safety this semester Emily’s Eye | As students return to campus with decreased COVID-19 restrictions, safety is more important than ever

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new school year brings nothing but thrill. And while COVID-19 unfortunately continues to rage on, students relish the growing doses of normalcy granted at Penn; in-person classes, increased social activities, and sit-down dining halls, to name a few. But in the midst of this excitement, many students forget to consider the various public safety precautions that must be taken, especially in a large city like Philadelphia. And while no one wishes to associate danger with our cherished City of Brotherly Love, it is important to face the facts to prevent facing peril. After being cooped up for so long due to the pandemic, students must remember that social outings come with risk, and no matter how eager one is to have fun, safety comes first. This is especially important for first years and other students coming to campus for the first time, as they are new to the city and likely unfamiliar with their surroundings. And while it is ultimately each student’s responsibility to make smart decisions when going out, many of these safety concerns are actually Penn’s fault. Philadelphia is known to have the highest murder rate out of the country’s 10 largest cities, with West Philadelphia specifically listed as a high-risk area. Students may recall last semester’s shooting at Golf and Social Club, a popular bar in Fishtown that Penn students frequented. Closer to campus, Center City has had its share of police brutality and racially motivated hate crimes, as well as more recent reports of assault and attempted robbery on women walking home. Just last week, there was a shooting at 40th and Chestnut streets, only three streets away from campus and within close proximity to many

student homes. Much of this increased crime in Philadelphia is due to COVID-19 and the social and economic consequences of the pandemic. Not only has the virus resulted in premature death and long-term health issues, job loss, housing displacement, and increased poverty levels, but it has also caused racial conflict, mental health crises, and political unrest. Social and economic factors are closely connected to crime, and because West Philadelphia was hit especially hard by the pandemic, the increase in crime is not surprising. Penn’s presence in West Philadelphia has exacerbated social and economic unrest. For starters, the school’s decision to invite students back to campus in January 2021, one of the peak months of the pandemic, had life-threatening effects on the surrounding community. West Philadelphia is home to many people of color who were already disproportionately affected by the virus, so the arrival of thousands of teenagers from all over the world only hurt the neighboring area more. This was not the first time Penn failed to consider the well-being of the broader community. Over the years, Penn has taken resources from the local area without adequately giving back, allowing the school to grow into an elite institution while the surrounding area continues to suffer in persistent poverty. One of the most obvious indicators of Penn’s economic privilege is the fact that the school is the largest landowner in Philadelphia but does not pay PILOTs (or Payments in Lieu of Taxes) — funds that would significantly contribute to underfunded public schools. Penn continues to expand and gentrify with an endowment that currently stands at $14.9 billion, yet its

home of Philadelphia remains the poorest of the largest United States cities. The UPennAlert system, while a quick and efficient way to notify the community of nearby danger, is also problematic. For instance, a public safety warning was issued regarding a “large group of protestors.” However, the texts failed to mention that the event was an organized Penn student protest. By specifically telling all members of the Penn community to avoid that area, the school was actively attempting to prevent students from participating in civic engagement with their peers, indicating ulterior motives behind the school’s so-called safety measures. The UPennAlert texts are also responsible for perpetuating a negative relationship between students and the surrounding area, often characterizing all West Philadelphia residents as dangerous and using language that is racially charged. With descriptions merely including a person’s race, gender, and approximate height, many students are at risk of being wrongfully accused. The system contributes to false stereotypes regarding race and social class, which transcend to other aspects of campus and create an environment of distrust where stereotypes become dangerously generalized. With countless incidents of racial profiling and violence targeting people of color, Penn Police pose a threat to the very students they are meant to protect. Many Black students have reported Penn Police singling them out from their white peers to question for suspicious activity. The so-called “suspicious activity” often consists of simply walking on campus, such as the incident where Penn Police followed and accused a Black student of trespassing while walking home

from the library. So while Penn urges students to utilize their safety resources, students are often not comfortable asking for help. An abolitionist assembly, Police Free Penn, seeks to abolish policing to improve campus safety, making significant strides in educating the community about police brutality. Despite being ranked as the number one school for safety and security, danger on Penn remains prevalent. The combination of Penn’s detrimental actions, harmful police activity, and increased crime makes it more important than ever for students to remain alert and aware as they return to school. Members of the Penn community must be mindful of their actions and be held accountable for the ways in which they have contributed to safety issues, but at the same time, every student must remain vigilant for the sake of their own personal well-being. All students deserve a fulfilling college experience stocked with social contentment, but that cannot be attained without attention to safety. It is important to be aware of what safety resources Penn has to offer. For instance, the 24/7 walking escort service is a great way to ensure a safe arrival home, especially for female students walking alone at night. The service can be requested at 215-898-WALK (9255) or by asking any public safety officer on duty. For more information on the Division of Public Safety and other Penn safety resources, visit https://www. publicsafety.upenn.edu/. EMILY CHANG is a College sophomore studying sociology from Holmdel, N.J. Her email address is changem@sas.upenn.edu.

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Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs. Instructors who need an exemption for non-medical reasons, such as a family member at risk, can request an accommodation from a department chair or dean. Shortly afterward, the Faculty Senate held a virtual seminar on Sept. 1 to address faculty attendees’ prewritten questions they posed about in-person learning. Panelists at the seminar included Perna, Chief Wellness Officer Benoit Dubé, Vice President for Human Resources Jack Heuer, and Vice President for Facilities and Real Estate Services Anne Papageorge. In response to questions asking why faculty aren’t able to teach virtually, Perna said online classes cannot replace the in-person education the University promises undergraduate students, citing data indicating undergraduate students found remote learning difficult. Perna also noted instructors of graduate students have greater flexibility in determining the format of their course, and that all instructors are given the option to teach in outdoor spaces. “At the undergraduate level, and as a residential inperson University, the expectation is that our students will receive and reap the benefits of an in-person pedagogical experience,” Perna said during the seminar. During the seminar, instructors in the Zoom chat criticized administrators on the panel for failing to answer questions directly or adequately explain the motivation

for current University COVID-19 guidelines. Annenberg professor Barbie Zelizer, who teaches the virtual seminar COMM 739: Collective Memory and Journalism, said she signed the petition due to a growing sentiment among faculty across the University that their health and safety is not being prioritized by Penn. “We are teaching in different kinds of classroom situations, and we are coming at these situations with different capabilities, different risks, different home environments, different health profiles,” Zelizer said. “To not be given a choice as to whether this feels like safe behavior or healthy behavior, that’s a real problem.” Romance Languages professor Ericka Beckman, who signed the petition, similarly said that frustration with Penn stems from a lack of clear, direct communication on faculty concerns, including the policy on exemptions from in-person teaching. Instructors were not informed of the policy prior to the start of the semester, according to Beckman, and two weeks into the semester, instructors who have safety concerns have already been required to teach in the classroom. No Ivy League universities currently offer instructors the ability to teach remotely without a medical exemption. Penn instructors are not the only faculty concerned about in-person teaching — Princeton faculty members with young unvaccinated children previously expressed concern about in-person instruction. “I don’t think anyone signing the petition is calling for an immediate cessation of in-person classes, that’s not really the issue,” Beckman said. “Under these conditions, we shouldn’t be forced to take medical risks

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as a condition of employment.” In an emailed statement to the DP, English graduate student Clinton Williamson said he views allowing instructors to make their own decisions about class format as a labor rights issue. Williamson also believes Penn has failed to account for the ever-changing circumstances of the pandemic. “For instance, as a graduate instructor who isn’t recompensed at the level of professors, I take public transit to get to campus,” Williamson wrote. “So even as the classroom is masked, teaching in person adds the risk factor of a larger community contact that is managed by the city rather than the university (and masks are hardly omnipresent on SEPTA).” Biology professor Kimberly Gallagher teaches three courses this semester, which have maximum capacities varying from 15 to 130 students. Gallagher said she is comfortable teaching in-person with current mask mandates, but signed the petition because she believes other instructors should be able to make their own decisions, especially those who have young unvaccinated children, have weakened immune systems themselves, or have relatives with weakened immune systems. For Gallagher, the inability for professors to switch to a virtual format also poses a risk for students. “Honestly, if I was a student I would be concerned as well,” Gallagher said. “I’ve had students in my classes before who have Crohn’s disease, or sicklecell anemia, or conditions that put them at risk, and as faculty members we’re being limited in our ability to help those students as well. By not being allowed

virtual options, those students then have to attend class in person.” Germanic Languages professor Kathryn Hellerstein teaches five seminar courses, each with a maximum capacity of 20 students. Hellerstein, who also signed the petition, said she was excited to return to in-person teaching, but is uncomfortable with the inability for social distancing and limited information from the University regarding on ventilation systems in specific classrooms. The petition’s demand echoes recent calls by Penn’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors. AAUP-Penn is a membership-based national professional organization created by Penn faculty members earlier this spring that seeks to advance shared university governance and academic freedom, define professional values and standards, and promote economic security for university faculty members. On Sunday, AAUP-Penn sent its members an email addressing exemptions from in-person teaching. AAUP-Penn wrote it has contacted the Provost and Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs to address problems with the process to request exemptions, which include privacy concerns from instructors and the denial of exemptions by deans “on grounds previously identified as eligible,” such as unvaccinated children. On Aug. 17, AAUP-Penn had also published a statement calling on the University to endorse a policy to allow instructors to conduct “some or all” of their classes in-person, virtually, or in a hybrid mode.

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Sanchez and Kantem neni also said they sometimes miss the flexibility of online classes and recorded lectures, even though they find in-person classes to be more engaging. “I was scared at first, but then it felt normal,” Ikhlas said. Several students said that participating in New Student Orientation and Second-Year Orientation helped them adjust to campus life. Even the students who are not going to parties on campus, Wang said, have seemed eager to embrace new in-person social activities and NSO events, especially after spending so much of the past two years isolated. “It was just very difficult to get out of my comfort zone when I was stuck inside,” Wang said, adding that walking around campus and going to the club fairs have been very exciting. Arfiyeci echoed this sentiment, saying that even though many of the scheduled activities during NSO appealed to him, he appreciated the opportunity to meet people in an organic way. “[The pandemic] has, if anything, brought us closer, in wanting to work together after a long span of time of not really having good chances to meet, and discuss and create,” Shaw said.

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Masked students in GEOL 100, a large lecture class, on Sept. 1.

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NEWS 7

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

Undergraduate Assembly elects new executive board for 2021-2022

Study abroad is back — but with limited options

The board aims to secure campus space for cultural houses and solicit feedback on Penn’s new schedule system

Penn Abroad is offering 14 programs compared to the typical 99

ELIZABETH MEISENZAHL Senior Reporter

The Undergraduate Assembly elected its speaker, secretary, and treasurer to round out its executive board for the 2021-2022 academic year — and the team plans to advocate for creating avenues for student feedback and increasing student awareness about the work of the UA. The UA internally elected College and Wharton junior Carson Sheumaker as speaker, College sophomore Pranav Tadikonda as secretary, and College junior Sarah Ramadan as treasurer. The students were elected on April 25 at the UA’s transition meeting, where UA body members can declare their candidacy for one of the three open positions before their fellow UA members vote. The transition meeting follows the general election in April, in which College senior Tori Borlase and College and Wharton senior Janice Owusu were sworn in as UA President and Vice President, respectively. Borlase and Owusu campaigned on diversity and community advancement, wellness and mental health, academic reform, and administrative accountability. As speaker, Sheumaker, who served as secretary last year, will assign UA members to the body’s committees, including the Academic Initiatives and Equity and Inclusion committees, as speaker. He added that the main aspect of his role as speaker will be to run the UA’s weekly meetings and UA Cabinet meetings, which include committee directors. He hopes to use his leadership position in the UA to advocate for refining this year’s new block class schedule based on feedback. The new schedule, which standardized course start times and eliminated back-to-back classes, was initially met with mixed reactions from students and professors — some embraced the guaranteed breaks between classes while some found the change unnecessary. Sheumaker also hopes to bring back the sense of

The 2021-2022 UA board (Photo from Sarah Ramadan)

community he felt UA members had before COVID-19 that was diminished when its meetings moved online. The transition to virtual meetings led to several people from the Class of 2023 in particular leaving the UA, creating a “leadership gap” that Sheumaker hopes to fill. “The UA is something I’m really passionate about so I want to make sure that it’s still functioning really well,” Sheumaker said. “I want to try to make sure the organization does well in the next semester.” As secretary, Tadikonda will serve as the UA’s liaison to sections of the administration, take attendance and minutes at each UA meeting, and oversee committees including the Student and Campus Life Committee. In addition to helping interested students learn what the UA is working on, Tadikonda said he hopes to use his leadership position to lobby for increased funding and support for cultural groups on campus, and particularly Penn’s cultural houses — a demand for which the UA has long advocated, and for which Borlase voiced support in a UA presidential debate. He added that he also hopes to push for increased financing for performance spaces for Penn’s arts groups. Tadikonda said he wanted to become secretary after seeing how vital the role was to the internal functioning of the UA as an associate member last year. “I really liked the internal work that the secretary does,” Tadikonda said. “I think there’s a large responsibility for keeping track of all the minutes and keeping track of attendance which, although it seems like busy work, it’s actually very important.” Ramadan will serve as the UA treasurer this year, a role that primarily involves allocating Penn Student Government’s budget of over $2 million. Budget season for the each school year takes place in the previous spring semester, when each of the six branches of PSG submit their funding requests. Ramadan added that she will also oversee contingency requests for extra funding throughout the year. Ramadan said she hopes to use her position as treasurer — which gives her closer access to the administration — and membership with the Community Engagement and Sustainability Committee to focus on improving Penn’s relationship with West Philadelphia. She said she hopes to continue a project she worked on last semester that got Penn dining halls to donate excess food to Philabundance. “I really just want to make sure that any projects in the future minimize any negative impacts Penn has on its surrounding community,” Ramadan said. Ramadan said she also hopes to increase student awareness of the UA and the work it does with administration. “I really want to make sure that I continue bridging the gap between students and administrators,” she said.

LAUREN MELENDEZ Contributing Reporter

Study abroad programs restarted this fall — but with far fewer options than before the COVID-19 pandemic. Travel to seven countries resumed after Penn suspended study abroad programs in spring 2020 due to global travel restrictions and health risks. Students can participate in 14 programs in France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom. In a typical semester, Penn students can apply to study abroad at 99 different programs. In addition to limiting programs, Penn Abroad has restricted some travel components, such as trips to different cities or countries that are typically part of the study abroad experience, Penn Abroad and Global Programs Director Nigel Cossar said. Penn Abroad worked closely with the Committee on Travel Risk Assessment, which was created in response to the pandemic, to develop a list of countries to which Penn students could safely travel. The committee’s decisions were based on the status of the pandemic and travel guidelines in each country. Students are only permitted to study abroad in countries with in-person classes to maintain consistency with Penn students who are on campus, Cossar said. After compiling a list of programs, Penn Abroad filed petitions for each program students applied to, which were then approved or denied by the committee based on risk assessment and health guidelines. “Safety of Penn students was definitely paramount in any of the decisions that we were making,” Cossar said. “We have worked very closely with each of our partners around the world who [is] receiving Penn students for the semester to ensure that they understand what Penn is expecting of them and how we will support our students whilst on the ground at the program.” Resident Directors are in place at each program to support students, conduct check-ins, provide support during required quarantines, and ensure their overall wellness, Cossar said. In programs without existing resident directors, Penn placed employees in the countries to fill that role. All students studying abroad must receive the COVID-19 vaccine in accordance with Penn’s vaccine mandate, Cossar said. Students must also comply with their respective country’s rules and protocols. Despite the limited programs, students are still taking advantage of the opportunity to study abroad before graduation. Wharton senior Michael Arther just arrived in the United Kingdom to study at the University of Cambridge: Pembroke College’s international program. Arther originally planned to study abroad in spring

VANESSA HUANG

2020, but the program was postponed twice due to the pandemic. “It’s been a continuous challenge to figure out what the circumstances are going to be like, but I think Penn has done a good job of explaining what the expectations are and what the process is going to look like,” Arther said. While he is disappointed to spend part of his senior year away from campus, Arther said he believes the experience will be worth it. “I’m definitely going to miss being on campus, but I think the rationale for still going even after the study abroad [program] was pushed back a couple times was the fact that I really won’t have this opportunity again,” he said. Students who applied to study abroad programs that got canceled or postponed were required to reapply again this fall, Assistant Dean for Advising in the College Srilata Gangulee, who oversees Penn Abroad programs in Asia, England, and Wales, said. Gangulee added that there are a “considerable amount” of seniors planning to study abroad during their last semesters at Penn this spring. Cossar said he is optimistic that Penn Abroad will add more countries and programs for the spring semester depending on travel restrictions and the changing state of the pandemic. In the meantime, Penn Abroad is also working to safely resume its global seminars — with the first class expected to travel abroad over winter break — and restart its global summer internship program, Cossar said. “We’re hoping that the semester programming really kickstarts the rest of our global programs, because we are just as eager to bring it back,” he said.

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8 SPORTS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

REVISITING THE BREAKOUT:

ELITA VAN STADEN

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Penn gymnastics to join Gymnastics East Conference in 2022

CHASE SUTTON

Going into their 2022 season, the Quakers will be competing for the first time under Kirsten Becker.

SPORTS | The conference kicks off its inaugural season this coming year After coming to Penn in the fall of 2019, Elita van Staden became one of the top performers for Penn field hockey.

SPORTS | The field hockey standout will look to follow up on her 2019 success this season

her teammates to train for the 2021 season. While Penn and the rest of the Ivy League practiced for 2021, other schools across the country had resumed playing games in 2020 while the Quakers were sidelined. JOEY PIATT “We actually watched other schools play Sports Associate against each other, and we weren’t able to do it In the “Revisiting the Breakout” series, The ourselves, which is very frustrating,” van Staden Daily Pennsylvanian looks back at some of the said. “As a team, we used that as our fuel as well, athletes that burst onto the scene for the Quakers to know that we have to be as prepared as posin 2019. Due to COVID-19, these breakout play- sible going into the coming season because a lot ers, along with the rest of their teammates, sat on of schools are ahead of us right now.” the sidelines in 2020 after the Ivy League canTo avoid falling behind, van Staden and Penn celed fall and winter sports. Now, with the 2021 did whatever they could to simulate playing live fall athletics season upon us, this series looks to field hockey. Often, this meant intersquad scrimcheck in with these athletes as they get ready to mages designed to mimic the pace of play in a build on their standout 2019 campaigns. regular season competition. When Elita van Staden came to Penn in the fall “In the spring, we really put in the hard work,” van Staden said. “We were really focused on improving ourselves to be ready when the season comes. We had full matches against ourselves, so that really helped get that competitiveness going and [get] that feeling of playing a game.” Van Staden is confident that the Red and Blue have done a good job making the best of their season on the sidelines. She thinks that the extra time has allowed the Quakers to get a leg up on their Ivy counterparts, who may not have gone through such rigorous offseason training. “I think we were one of the only Ivies that actually tried to do a bit more even though we couldn’t play,” van Staden said. “So, I think out of all the Ivies we trained together the most, which I think is going to be a big thing going into Ivy play.” She also feels more confident in her own preparation for the season, as she no longer has the same learning curve that she did in 2019, when ELITA VAN STADEN she had to adopt to a whole new playing style and environment. of 2019, the South Africa native had a lot to ad“I feel a bit more relaxed than I did in my just to. She was in an entirely new country play- freshman year because I know what to expect ing with new teammates, coaches, and playing now,” van Staden said. “I know the coaches a lot styles. It did not take van Staden long to settle in, better, and I know the team very well by now. however, as she quickly became one of the Quak- For me personally, I’m very excited to play.” ers’ top performers. The 2019 second team AllVan Staden will look to pick up where she Ivy selection led Penn with seven goals and 14 left off in 2019, where she became one of points in only 13 starts. Penn’s biggest contributors toward the end The Ivy League’s decision to cancel the 2020 of the season. She will also look to help the fall athletics season prevented van Staden from Quakers improve on the 4-3 conference record not only having the chance to repeat her break- they had in 2019. The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation York Times Syndication Sales out freshman campaign, butThe alsoNew from being with Red and Blue have their sights set on a 620 Eighth Avenue, New The York, N.Y.Corporation 10018 Eighth New York, 10018 her teammates. Van Staden was620 unable toAvenue, comeCall: trip to N.Y. the Ivy League title game in 2021, and For Information 1-800-972-3550 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, September 9,will 2021play a large part in the team’s to Penn for the entirety of the fall semester, it September van Staden For Releaseand Friday, 3, 2021 wasn’t until the spring that she was able to rejoin ability to reach that goal.

“ I know the coaches

a lot better, and I know the team very well by now. For me personally, I’m very excited to play.

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MATTHEW FRANK Deputy Sports Editor

In a move that will shift the structure of Penn gymnastics’ upcoming seasons, the team announced that they’ll be joining the Gymnastics East Conference in 2022. The brand-new conference will be made up of eight different schools, each of which will compete in a conference championship meet on Saturday, March 19 in Providence, R.I. The meet itself will be done in two sessions, with qualifying teams ranked 5-8 competing in the afternoon and teams ranked 1-4 competing in the evening, based on National Qualifying Scores. In the world of gymnastics, this goes against the norm of conference championship meets that include all teams in one session and do not factor in prior rank. Among the conference’s members are three oth-

FORMER PENN QUARTERBACK RYAN GLOVER TRANSFERS TO BERKELEY SPORTS | Glover played at Penn for three years before transferring WCU for his senior season MATTHEW FRANK Deputy Sports Editor

After spending time at both Penn and Western Carolina University, Ryan Glover announced earlier this summer that he is continuing his college football career at The University of California, Berkeley. Through a graduate transfer, Glover is using his final year of eligibility to suit up for the Golden Bears this season. Glover competed for the starting quarterback job against Chase Garbers and some other players that Berkeley has on the roster, ultimately losing out on the week one job to Garbers. Glover played at Penn for three years before transferring to WCU. In 2017, his freshman year, he only appeared in one game and completed just two passes, but during his second season, Glover started all 10 games. Through those 10 games, Glover racked up 1,482 yards, seven touchdowns, and six interceptions, while leading the Quakers to a 6-4 record. Additionally, Glover demonstrated his capability as a mobile quarterback by running for 300 yards and two touchdowns. That year, he was also the only Black Ivy League quarterback to start every game under center. His junior year in 2019 consisted of him playing in half of Penn’s games, including a homecoming win against Cornell. During the game, he threw a 40-yard touchdown immediately after entering the game in place of the injured Nick Robinson. Despite the win, Glover wasn’t named the permanent starter afterwards. Glover’s senior season was supposed to be the one where he took the reins of starting quarterback yet again, but the Ivy League chose not to play football in either the fall or spring. As a result of the Ivy League’s halt on play, Glover transferred to WCU to have any chance to play his senior year. “It was a pretty complex process I went through,” he said. “I graduated a semester early and traditionally, Penn doesn’t allow grad students to play football. That’s one of the main reasons I needed to transfer from Penn after the Ivy League canceled their season

SUDOKUPUZZLE

CHASE SUTTON

The Ivy League chose not to play football in both the fall and spring of Glover’s senior year at Penn.

in the fall as well as spring. “I transferred to WCU for the spring and started the season in February. There were only eight games scheduled and we only played six, with the last two games dropping off due to [COVID-19]. So a lot has happened pretty fast.” While at WCU, Glover played in six games, completing 86 of 147 passes for 832 yards, three touchdowns, and four interceptions. Now, Glover’s heading to his most premier football program yet, given the Golden Bears’ membership in the Pac-12. This fact is not one that has been lost on him amid the transition. “Everything was super nice,” Glover said. “Obviously it’s a step up from what I’m used to with [Berkeley] being a Power Five school. Everything seemed very new and organized and I liked how they had all the football facilities in one place.” Ryan Glover begins his career with the Golden Bears this fall, as he prepares for what could be the final season of his college career. Berkeley lost its first game of the season to the University of Nevada, Reno by a score of 22 -17. Garbers went 25 of 38 for 177 yards, one touchdown, and one interception in the loss.



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© Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

SON NGUYEN

er Ivy League schools, which include Brown, Cornell, and Yale, in addition to Bridgeport, Southern Connecticut State, West Chester, and William & Mary. The conference, which is independent and gymnastics-only, includes both regional Division I and Division II schools because of the NCAA’s policy of not recognizing division classification in gymnastics competition. “I am thrilled for our team to be a part of this inaugural year in the GEC and for the years to come,” coach Kirsten Becker said via Penn Athletics. “We are anxious to kick the season off in just a few short months, and look ahead to a competitive conference championship!” Going into their 2022 season, the Quakers will be competing for the first time under Becker, who was promoted from assistant coach in May of 2020. Before the rest of their 2020 season was canceled, the Red and Blue placed first at the Ivy Classic, besting three of their Ancient Eight opponents.

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

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SPORTS 9

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

PENN CROSS COUNTRY GETS OFF TO A SOLID START AT LEHIGH INVITATIONAL SPORTS | The men’s and women’s teams finished third and fifth, respectively COBY RICH Sports Reporter

CHASE SUTTON

Ariana Gardizy placed 36th as Penn women’s fastest runner during this weekend’s meet.

Field hockey falls to reigning national champions North Carolina SPORTS | Junior Sydney Huang scored the Quakers’ lone goal JOYCE DAVIS Sports Associate

SON NGUYEN

Senior captain Gracyn Banks assisted junior Sydney Huang to spoil the UNC shut-out.

The Penn men’s and women’s cross country squads kicked off their respective seasons at the Lehigh Invitational at the home of the Mountain Hawks in Bethlehem, Pa. this weekend, each putting on strong showings to start the year. Each team ran 6,000 meters, with average finishing times of 18:15 for the men, and 23:26 for the women. The men for the Red and the Blue finished third as a team out of seven competing universities, while the women took fifth place out of eight universities. Princeton and home team Lehigh took first and second place for the men, respectively, while Monmouth, Princeton, and Lehigh rounded out the podium for the women. Princeton swept the top three places for the men’s race, with sophomore Matthew Farrell, sophomore Joshua Zelek, and senior Kevin Berry taking gold, silver, and bronze, re-

Despite the loss against No. 1 North Carolina, Penn field hockey showed some progress as it closed out its opening weekend in New Jersey. The Quakers (0-2), having lost their season opener against Louisville, hoped to get their first win in the Ivy League/Atlantic Coast Conference Crossover at Bedford Field on Princeton’s campus. Going up against a nationally ranked team would be difficult, but Penn hoped to impress on the field with their new players and new plays. Despite the Tar Heels (2-2) defeating the Red and Blue soundly 9-1, the loss did not deter the Quakers on the field, who were facing off against the three-time defending National Champions. North Carolina took the lead in the first four minutes with a corner strike by senior forward Erin Matson, with assists from junior back Madison Orobono and senior midfielder Eva Smolenaars. The Tar Heels added two more goals to establish a 3-0 lead going into the second quarter. An additional pair of goals in the second quarter gave UNC a five-goal lead. Desperate to chip away at this deficit, Penn fought back as junior forward Sydney Huang scored a deflection off a penalty corner to put Penn on the board, notching her first collegiate goal wearing the Red and Blue. Captain Gracyn Banks came through with her first assist of the year to help Huang. “Sydney Huang’s goal was highlight worthy,” coach Colleen Fink said. “She’s been playing extremely well and coming into her own. I’m so proud of her.” With the fourth quarter came strong moves from the underclassmen players. Sophomore goalkeeper Sabien Paumen pushed back against North Carolina with a strong defensive save, while sophomore goalkeeper Hayley Hayden played hard in her collegiate debut. Freshman midfielder Sophie Freedman also contributed with the first defensive save of her collegiate career. In the end, North Carolina fought back and scored four unanswered goals, the last coming on a penalty stroke. Despite the lopsided end result, the newest Quakers displayed their skills in their debuts, while the returning players demonstrated the work they have put in during the team’s extended off season.

spectively. Penn’s top finisher was sophomore Will Shaughnessy, who was followed closely by junior Zubeir Dagane, senior James Lee, and sophomore Oliver Stewart. All four of these Quakers finished within milliseconds of each other, and placed 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th overall out of 130 finishing competitors. Many other Penn men’s runners were not far behind, with several finishing within a second of Shaughnessy. As for the women, Monmouth junior Sammi Ragenklint, West Virginia fifth year Hayley Jackson, and Rutgers graduate student Olympia Martin finished in the top three positions. The Quakers’ fastest runner was senior Ariana Gardizy, with senior Niamh Hayes, junior Lizzy Bader, sophomores Fabianna Szorenyi, Phoebe White, Olivia Morganti, Laura Baeyens, Zoe Shetty, and freshmen Katie Pou and Bronwyn Patterson all finishing immediately behind her. Places 36-45 all belonged to Penn. Both the men’s and women’s teams will look to build on their Friday performances at Haverford College in two weeks at the Main Line Invitational.

“Every game, we identify ways to get better,” Fink said. “Despite the score, honestly there were the same two or three issues occurring, so we can address those and improve dramatically.” Putting the loss into perspective, Fink notes that it takes persistence to build chemistry, especially given the large amount of underclassmen taking the field for the first time.

“ The freshmen and

sophomores are incredibly talented and will continue to develop, but that development doesn’t happen overnight. COLLEEN FINK

“I learned we are young and inexperienced,” Fink said. “It’s going to take time and patience from our staff and teammates. The freshmen and sophomores are incredibly talented and will continue to develop, but that development doesn’t happen overnight. You can’t expect them to know what they don’t know. They bring a great energy and are contributing in major ways.” The Quakers will have a chance to address the issues they saw throughout the game ahead of Friday’s home opener against Drexel, where they will aim to secure their first win of the season.

PENN WOMEN’S SOCCER’S FIRST LOSS OF THE SEASON COMES AT HOFSTRA SAMANTHA TURNER

Sophomore goalkeeper Laurence Gladu finished with six saves in the match.

SPORTS | Sophomore Madison Liebman scored Penn’s only goal in a 3-1 loss against the nationally ranked Pride KATHRYN XU Sports Associate

Despite the best efforts of Penn women’s soccer’s newest athletes, the Quakers were unable to stave off their first loss of the season at the hands of No. 25 Hofstra. With this result, Penn moves to 2-1-1 on the season, after building a two-game win streak at home. Hofstra (5-1) dominated Penn in shots throughout the entire match, starting off with an early rush. Pride freshman Georgia Brown scored the first goal of the game in the 26th minute, heading a cross pass from teammate Lucy Shepherd out of the reach of sophomore goaltender Laurence Gladu.

Gladu was one of a few rookie Quakers who shined, especially in the first half. She was tested in the early minutes, with most of Hofstra’s seven first-half shots coming before Penn found its footing. After giving up the first goal for the third time this season, Penn rallied and managed to find the back of the net just before the first half ended. Sophomore Madison Liebman got Penn on the scoreboard with a corner kick that ricocheted off of the Hofstra goalposts that she was able to one-time into the upperright corner. Her goal, which doubled as her first collegiate point, was assisted by freshman forward Isobel Glass, whose assist also was her first collegiate point. However, the Red and Blue were unable to keep the momentum through the break. Hofstra dominated the second half, even after sophomore forward Ginger Fontenot prevented a Hofstra

chance by deflecting a corner kick. Pride junior Ellen Halseth’s impressive individual effort resulted in a goal as she charged in from the left sideline and put the ball past the reach of a diving Gladu early in the second half. This time, the Quakers were unable to rally, with only two secondhalf shots as Hofstra racked up 10. Pride senior Miri Taylor scored the dagger in the 86th minute, one-timing the ball over Gladu’s head, off the crossbar, and in. Gladu ultimately finished with six saves in a match where Hofstra outshot Penn 17-7, and the Quakers avoided a shut-out off of Liebman’s first collegiate point. With their two wins so far coming against winless teams, Penn women’s soccer will hope that their young players will continue to play well against stronger opponents. The Quakers hope to regain momentum this week at College Park, as they take on Maryland (4-1-1) on Thursday.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII NO. 18

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

JOEY BHANGDIA HAS CAREER DAY IN MEN’S SOCCER HOME OPENER KYLIE COOPER

Midfielder Joey Bhangdia picked up right where he left off as the leader of the Quaker attack.

SPORTS | The Red and Blue coasted past Colgate 3-0 in the teams’ first matchup since 1974 NICKY BELGRAD Deputy Sports Editor

In its first match at Rhodes Field since Nov. 16, 2019, Penn men’s soccer dominated Colgate 3-0 as the Red and Blue’s upperclassmen paved the way. Graduate student Joey Bhangdia and senior midfielder Ben Stitz spearheaded the Quaker attack, combining for three goals and an assist.

The meeting marked only the second-ever matchup between Penn (2-0-0) and Colgate (0-4-0), with the first one taking place in 1974. The match also marked the Quakers’ first appearance at Rhodes Field since Nov. 16, 2019, when the Red and Blue defeated Harvard 2-0. After narrowly beating Fairleigh Dickinson in an away opener, the Quakers felt the comfort of home as the team limited Colgate to just one shot on goal, which was saved by junior goalkeeper Nick Christoffersen. However, the first half was a tight, physical contest with 11 total fouls being called, five whistled on Colgate and six on Penn. In the 27th minute, Bhangdia established Penn’s 1-0 lead after shaking his defender

PENN WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL SWEEPS COMPETITION AT THREE WEEKEND MATCHES

SPORTS | The Quakers, led by captain Autumn Leak, swept their matches at the Sheraton University City Invitational ANDREA MENDOZA Sports Associate

SAMANTHA TURNER

Penn women’s volleyball celebrates on the sidelines as their teammates score against Bucknell on Friday, Sept. 3. “

SEND STORY IDEAS TO DPSPORTS@THEDP.COM

and sending a strike past Colgate’s goalkeeper Andrew Cooke for an unassisted goal. The remainder of the first half was close, but Penn came out shooting in the second. In the 53rd minute, senior forward Matt Leigh headed a pass from graduate student RC Williams, right to the feet of senior Ben Stitz. The midfielder found the back of the net to add another goal to Penn’s tally. The game was effectively ended in the 70th minute when Bhangdia added another goal to increase the Quaker lead to 3-0, this one assisted by Stitz and freshman forward Charlie Gaffney. Both of Bhangdia’s goals found their way into the

This weekend, the women’s volleyball team swept the competition at the Sheraton University City Volleyball Invitational, compiling a 3-0 record. The Quakers participated in three matches at the Palestra, going against Bucknell, Canisius, and Coppin State on Friday and Saturday. In the first match of the season and of the tournament Friday night, the Red and Blue secured an exhilarating victory over Bucknell with a 3-0. Penn had a .297 hitting percentage as a team, racking up 38 kills and just 11 errors on 91 total attacks. The Quakers started off well, going up 6-5 in the first set, and continued to lead by five points following that. Junior Elizabeth Ford sealed that first set with a final kill, sealing the 25-15 score. During the second set, the Quakers and Bucknell went back and forth — that is, until the Bison committed three straight attack errors. As Penn was leading 2320, junior Autumn Leak made a kill to make it 24-20, and sealed the set soon after, making the score 25-21. Penn started off the third set 5-1. Although the teams traded points, the Quakers mostly led the set. Eventually, a Bison attack error and senior captain Margaret Planek’s final kill sealed the Quakers’ first victory of the season. There were some clear standout performances Friday night. Leak hit a career-high 16 kills; sophomore Madison Risch notched nine digs, four kills, and a block assist. Freshman Sydney Ormiston started at the setter position and racked up 28 assists. The second match took place Saturday morning against Canisius. Like Friday, the Quakers only needed three sets and finished off 3-0. In the first set of the match, the Quakers fell behind 9-4, and then 12-5. Penn’s coach Meredith Schamun then called a timeout for the Quakers, after which Penn tied the Golden Griffins at 13-13. Canisius then took the lead again, but committed

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right corner of Cooke’s net. Bhangdia, the leading scorer for the Quakers in 2019, picked up right where he left off as leader of Penn’s offense. The Quakers finished the match with six shots on goal to Colgate’s one, and the Red and Blue controlled the pace of play throughout. The Quakers have won both of their games this season, causing them to jump to ninth place on the United Soccer Coaches regional poll. Penn hosts No. 17 Penn State and Loyola (Md.) on Friday and Monday, respectively, as they hope to increase their win streak to four games.

three attack errors. Risch and senior Daniela Fornaciari both had kills that put Penn in the lead by one. Each team tied it up multiple times, until a Planek kill and Ormiston service secured the 25-23 win. The second set was also a back-and-forth affair, with the teams tying on 14 occasions, until Canisius started committing errors. Eventually, Penn took the win, 2523. The Quakers started to fall behind in the third set, but eventually gained control to keep the lead to win the set — and the match — with a score of 25-20. Saturday night, the Red and Blue faced the Eagles, who forced four sets, yet the Quakers still emerged as the victors, winning 3-1. Coppin State started off the first set fast and kept their lead through the whole set, ending with a score of 25-19. The Red and Blue came back strong in the second set, maintaining their own lead to finish the set with a 25-15 win. The third set had multiple instances where the teams were tied, and the lead changed six times. The match culminated in a 25-25 tie; however, Planek and Leak iced the match to eke out a 27-25 decision. The last set was also incredibly nerve wracking. There were 10 more ties, and three more lead changes. Penn collected four straight points from Risch, sophomore Emerson Flornes, Risch again, and then a combined block by Flornes and junior Madeline McGregor. McGregor later added another kill, and Leak finished the match with her 21st kill of the night. The Quakers had an amazing weekend to start off their season and Schamun’s coaching era. Two players received awards from the Ivy League Weekly Awards. Leak was named MVP of the tournament and Ivy League Player of the Week, after she set her career-high in kills twice (16, 21). This weekend, Leak had 50 total kills and a .311 hitting percentage. Additionally, Ormiston was named to the all-tournament team and named Ivy League Rookie of the Week. The Quakers will be headed to Chicago this weekend to add to their win streak at the DePaul Invitational.

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September 9, 2021  

September 9, 2021  

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