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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 VOL. CXXXIII NO. 69

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The 16th PennApps featured keynote speakers from Quora and Nasdaq MICHEL LIU Staff Reporter

Over a thousand students from across the world gathered on Penn’s campus this weekend for 36 hours of digital innovation.

Back for its 16th iteration, the University’s biannual hackathon, PennApps, featured keynote speakers for the first time this year. Student hackers claimed spots all over campus to code and develop applications in the hopes of winning prizes, which had a total value of more than $77,000. The top three winning projects were Sorty McSortface, a recycling and trash bin which automatically sorts waste, PillAR, a virtual medicine

tracker and Todd: the inter-dimensional robot, which combines robotics and augmented reality in a twoplayer game. Unlike previous years, the event was bookended by two industry experts who addressed the crowd during the opening and closing ceremonies. They were co-founder of the forum site Quora, Charlie Cheever, and former Nasdaq President Alfred Berkeley, who is also a 1968 Wharton master’s graduate.

Vice Director of the PennApps Executive Committee and Engineering junior Sunia Bukhari said the keynote speakers were invited to provide perspective and experience that are “not just something you can find on Wikipedia.” Bukhari added that PennApps organizers purposefully selected keynote speakers with differing SEE PENNAPPS PAGE 7

Disability Services accidentally releases nearly 300 student emails

Students want more flexibility in leave policy

Students are calling this a ‘breach of confidentiality’

Leaves of absence are currently all one year

OLIVIA SYLVESTER Senior Reporter

Student Disability Services accidentally sent out an email on Sept. 6 revealing the email addresses of 299 students who receive accommodations from SDS. A Nursing senior who receives accommodations from SDS said the email, which was sent at 11:30 a.m., was just a “routine back-to-school email” that failed to Blind Carbon Copy its recipients, exposing the emails of students on the SDS email list. The next day at 4:48 p.m., SDS sent an apology email assuring students that their “confidentiality is very important to [SDS].” “We assure you that we are taking immediate steps to implement procedures to prevent this issue from happening again,” the email read, “including developing an appropriate listserv that does not disclose the identity of recipients and providing training to staff members on email communications involving sensitive

information.” SDS also asked students to delete the email in question without looking at the list or forwarding it to anyone else. In response to a request for comment, Jesselson Director of the Office of Student Disabilities Services Susan Shapiro forwarded the apology email sent to students and added, “We deeply regret this mistake and have taken steps to ensure that it does not happen again.” Penn’s Policy on Confidentiality of Student Records states that “personally identifiable information from education records may not be disclosed to other parties without the student’s prior written or electronic consent.” This applies to “documentation and disabilityrelated materials,” according to the SDS website. The Nursing senior mentioned above said that while she is open about her accommodations, this email was a “huge breach of confidentiality.” “While SDS has rules about not doing things like this, once that email is out to those 300 students, it’s really unclear what those stu-

dents could do with it,” she said. “It’s pretty hard to contain.” She said that she feels lucky that Nursing is so supportive because if she were in a more academically competitive program or major, she would be “really concerned that a disability status could be used against [her].” “The fact that Penn is so competitive definitely would concern some students,” she said. In addition to the breach of confidence, she said she was unhappy with how long it took SDS to send the apology email. “In that time, there was no direction to delete the original email, so that email could have been forwarded, and it still could be,” she said. “It doesn’t seem like they are taking it seriously as a breach of confidentiality. They are some students who probably scrolled past it and didn’t even read it — who had no idea there was a breach of their confidentiality for that long.” Harold Atlas, a corporate lawyer with Sherman Wells who specializes in intellectual property and

OPINION | Passing on our problems

“…the goal of your four years should not be to seek out the best things about Penn but rather to find the things that you think need changing.” PAGE 5

SPORTS | They’re over the hump

After a gruelling schedule to start their season, Penn field hockey finally registered its first win with a 2-0 victory over Villanova BACKPAGE

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SEE SDS PAGE 3

NEWS Maternity leave at Penn

Some clubs are more selective than the University itself. PAGE 2

KATIE BONTJE Staff Reporter

While there has long been a history of students taking leaves of absence, the discussion around the option to do so has largely been taboo. Now, student groups are working with the University to make the process of leaving and returning to campus more seamless and transparent. As of now, the standard leave of absence is one year. Students can request to return after one semester, but this request is handled by the student’s respective undergraduate school, which may deny their request for re-entry. Executive Director for Education and Academic Planning Rob Nelson said the curricula of some schools such as the School of Nursing, make it more

JULIO SOSA | SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The Undergraduate Assembly is making an effort to make the process of re-entry to Penn more seamless.

difficult for students to return before a year is up. He added that Penn does not categorize leaves of absence because students often need them for a combination of reasons. This is also why the policies surrounding them are standardized. The Undergraduate Assembly is making a con-

certed effort to ensure that the process of re-entry is handled on a more individual basis. “There might be some discrepancies between the schools’ evaluative measures and the student’s actual readiness to come back,” SEE ABSENCE PAGE 3

NEWS Remembering Nick Moya Over 100 attended the memorial service for the College senior PAGE 3

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2 NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Penn needs to improve maternity policies, student says Ph.D students must sometimes pause their funding NATALIE KAHN Senior Reporter

Penn describes its maternity leave options as “family friendly,” but some students disagree, reporting that Penn’s policies can be inadequate in supporting women with children. Gabriela Kattan Khazanov, a sixth-year School of Arts and Sciences Ph.D. student in clinical psychology, gave birth to her first daughter last year. She said Penn’s restrictive maternity leave policies led her to pay for an extra year of school, adding that she believes these policies place mothers at a disadvantage. Khazanov said she had two options for maternity leave: she could either remain enrolled and keep her stipend, returning in eight weeks, or

pause her funding for a longer maternity leave. She said she chose to return after eight weeks, explaining that her annual salary of roughly $30,000 made unpaid leave an unviable option. But even while she was on this eight-week break, Khazanov felt compelled to do work, she said. The assignments for Ph.D. students are not like undergraduate quizzes and homework, which usually have shorter timelines. Ph.D. students typically receive funding for a set period — for Khazanov, that’s five years — and they’re expected to complete a dissertation by the end of that period. Although Khazanov may not have had to attend classes or meet traditional deadlines during her maternity leave, she stressed over losing those eight weeks of paid work. Khazanov is not the only one in this position. Experts have found that unmarried, childless women

fare the best in academia compared to their peers. Not only are they 4 percent more likely to secure tenuretrack jobs in academia than unmarried childless men, they’re 33 percent more likely to earn those jobs compared to married women with young children. Khazanov wasn’t eventually able to finish her dissertation after her fifth year, which was her last year of funding. She is now paying her own way through a sixth year to complete her program while juggling other expenses such as those for “dissertation-status tuition” and health insurance. Taking on this extra year, she said, is only feasible for students with well-paid spouses or families willing to help. “Maternity leave doesn’t really mean anything [at Penn],” Khazanov said. “You would think Penn would want to give their grad students the biggest leg up to be successful as academics, and this makes

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it near impossible.” Khazanov doesn’t approve of existing policies, but both Title IX lawyer Avi Kumin and Penn Associate General Counsel Sean Burke said the measures abide by legal standards. In an emailed statement, Burke said the Title IX laws prohibiting sex discrimination in education do not require institutions to provide maternity leave, though those that offer it must grant the same policies to students taking time off for other medical reasons. Kumin added that these policies stem from the Family and Medical Leave Act, which requires employers to grant, at minimum, unpaid time off. Burke added that one of the maternity leave options — the eightweek “paid leave” — is exclusive to student-parents and unavailable to other medically-excused students, so in theory, Penn actually exceeds Title IX requirements. Kumin agreed with Khazanov that this structure may require students to work during leave but said it’s still in line with the law. “That’s not terribly fair,” he said, “but they’re not being discriminatory.” Some peer institutions such as

CAMILLE RAPAY | DESIGN EDITOR

Some Ph.D. students who leave to have children must then pay their own way for an additional year of schooling.

Cornell University and Columbia University, do not grant additional benefits for student-parents, but others such as Princeton University and Yale University do. Yale grants an extra funded semester, as does Princeton, which provides one additional term per child. Given that students planning to have children while continuing their education at Penn may face additional challenges, some work to avoid this by waiting to have children only after completing their degrees. 2014 School of Arts and Sciences

Ph.D. graduate Ruth Erickson said she planned for the birth of her first child to coincide with the end of her dissertation. In fact, she wound up giving birth just two weeks after she handed it in. She said most of her peers made similar decisions and that her academic advisor was understanding of her pregnancy. “Any time, having a career and having children is some type of balance,” Erickson said. “It feels like there’s sacrifices made on both sides, but you just do the best you can.”


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NEWS 3

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

Family and friends gather for Nick Moya memorial Moya’s former professors, friends spoke about him ALIZA OHNOUNA Senior Reporter

More than 100 students gathered on Sept. 8 outside Van Pelt Library to commemorate the life of Nicholas Moya, a College senior and former president of Sigma Alpha Mu, who died by suicide on Aug. 31. After the Penn Glee Club opened with a performance of “Amazing Grace,” University Chaplain Reverend Chaz Howard led the ceremony. Members of the fraternity Sigma Alpha Mu and the sorority Sigma Delta Tau were most represented among the audience and speakers. Moya’s mother, Ruth Sannell, and Mathematics senior lecturer Nakia Rimmer, who was a favorite math instructor of Moya’s, also shared memories they had of him. Rimmer, who taught Moya and mentored him in his role as a

JUIO SOSA | SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Over 100 students met outside of Van Pelt Library. Most of the people in attendance belonged to either the fraternity, Sigma Alpha Mu, or the sororority, Sigma Delta Tau. The Glee Club also performed “Amazing Grace.”

data analyst for Penn’s basketball team said he remembered Moya most for his perpetual smile. “Why was he smiling? Because he loved what he was do-

ing,” Rimmer said. Between tears and hugs, students chuckled as Rimmer described how Moya, who was very excited when a Penn basket-

ball player scored but also very eager to record the shot for his data collection, would often do a combined “cheer and then a jotdown shot.”

Sannell, through tears, spoke of her son as “an old soul — intuitive and inquisitive.” “He had a laugh that was contagious,” she added. College senior Phillip Huffman who was in the same Sigma Alpha Mu pledge class as Moya remembered him for the life lessons he imparted to those around him. “He was the person who taught me how to ask for help,” Huffman said. Sigma Alpha Mu brothers also presented Sannell with a plaque describing Moya as a wonderful brother, friend and classmate. At the end of the ceremony, Howard called for a moment of silence and commended the love and care the Greek community has expressed this past week. He acknowledged that the death of a student is just as painful to administrators as it is to classmates and friends. “We grow to love you all,” he said, “A lot of us are heartbroken, too.”

CAMPUS RESOURCES

Penn Democrats redefines its goals following the 2016 election Group plans to focus less on identity politics ZIHAN XIONG Contributing Reporter

In the wake of the 2016 United States presidential election, the Democratic Party has faced a widening split within its own ranks as it struggles to reclaim its voter base in time for the next election. On campus, members of Penn Democrats have also been reflecting on national events and working on ways to strengthen and unify their organization. In light of the criticisms that Democrats are fixated on identity politics, Penn Dems Vice President and College junior Ari Goldfine said the group is simplifying its platform, advocating for more party-wide ideologies and focusing less on identity politics. They hope this will help the organization appeal to a broader demographic, said Goldfine, who is a podcast host for The Daily Pennsylvanian. Penn Dems President and College junior Rachel Pomerantz said this is a way to return to

ABSENCE

>> FRONT PAGE

Speaker of the UA and College junior Michael Krone said. “We just want to make sure that students who want to and are ready to come back after six months have the opportunity to do so.” The UA is working with various departments across campus, such as Dining Services, Penn Transit and the academic advising offices to create a centralized website that would answer all questions regarding leaves of absence. College senior Kathryn Dewitt, chair of Penn Wellness and former president of Active Minds, took a leave of absence and was denied re-entry after six months. However, she added that for her, this decision was likely the right one. Dewitt, like Krone, said all students’ experiences with mental health are unique and should be treated as such. “The six-month leave of absence makes it more appealing for stu-

SDS

>> FRONT PAGE

technology transactions, said the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act ensures that student records remain confidential for all federally funded schools. “It wouldn’t surprise me at all if this type of information, this release of emails, violates that type of law,” Atlas said. He said he would call this email list “highly sensitive information” because it is likely personallyidentifiable information given the nature of email addresses, which typically includes users’ first ini-

the mission of the organization so that, even after the election, members of Penn Dems can stay active and committed to its central causes. “At its core, we’re people who are really passionate about democratic and progressive values,” Pomerantz said. “All the issues that [students] joined Penn Dems for, they’re still passionate about.” Goldfine added that Penn Dems has historically followed the platform of the national Democratic Party by advocating for the issues that it deems important, but the group is now changing its approach by pushing its own platforms and policies. “We hadn’t used our club in a while, at least for as long as I have been on campus, to shape the party,” Goldfine said. “We’ve taken ‘top-down’ structure, where we follow what the party expects or follow what national organizations expect, instead of saying, ‘No, this is what we want,’ to push from within to get to this point.” The group is also shifting its focus from national politics by

becoming more active in local politics. In May, the group worked extensively in the Democratic campaign for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office. During the DA primaries, Penn Dems hosted a debate for five of the seven Democratic candidates, voting afterwards to endorse Larry Krasner, who subsequently won the nomination to become the Democratic candidate. Krasner will face off against the Republican candidate, Beth Grossman, in November. Goldfine also added that the group has been careful in navigating Penn’s political space after the election. Following President Trump’s victory, there has been an increased interest among members of Penn Dems to get involved with more progressive individual causes, but the group’s leadership has had to think twice about how to act on these new proposals. “Penn has a lot of protest-oriented organizations on campus,” Goldfine said. “We don’t want to step on their toes, take up the space they claimed.”

dents to take leaves and that in and of itself should be a reason why administrators should be open to it,” Dewitt said. “I think it’s more of an image issue,” she added. “People don’t know that you can take a six month leave because it’s not done very often.” Director of Counseling and Psychological Services Bill Alexander said CAPS works as a consultant to the four undergraduate schools when a student takes a leave of absence for mental health reasons, but that CAPS almost always supports the recommendations of the student’s doctor, regardless of when the student requests to come back. In an effort to make the transition back from leaves of absence more seamless, Penn Wellness hosted the first Returning Students Orientation on Sept. 8 in collaboration with the Vice Provost of University Life, CAPS, Weingarten Learning Resources Center, Student Intervention Services and Active Minds.

College junior Sam Kook who took two separate leaves of absence, the first for six months and the second for a year, attended the Returning Students Orientation. “I can say I’m a junior, but it’s weird because I’m 23 years old,” Kook said. “The things that I expect of people socially are different than what they’re expecting of me. It’s hard to know what to tell people.” Kook added that initiatives like the Returning Students Orientation are examples of Penn’s efforts to make the transition as easy as possible. Nelson said the University is working hard to de-stigmatize leaves of absence. “Often times, students understand the leave process as punitive or as something that is interrupting their study,” Nelson said. “And while that might be true in the sense that it is interruption, the whole purpose of a leave of absence is to put students on a path to success.”

tial and full last name. “When you have information that is personally-identifiable and highly sensitive like this, it creates problems,” Atlas said. “People have an expectation that it will be kept private, and the school likely has an obligation to keep it private.” Atlas said SDS should work with their technology department to devise a system to make sure this information is kept private, even if that means not sending emails to listservs going forward. “You hear about credit card information a lot, but I’ve never heard of this type of student data

being released,” Atlas said. “It’s very unusual and unfortunate.” In a written statement following her interview, the Nursing senior expressed concern about those in need of accommodations feeling discouraged from registering with SDS in the future. She wrote that she already knows some people who choose not to register “because they do not want to be seen as different.” “I worry that this breach in our confidentiality will cause students to not register for the accommodations they need because they feel they cannot trust the institution,” she said.

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As a result, Penn Dems has begun to work together with other progressive organizations on campus to help promote the causes they believe in as an institutation. For example, at the end of last semester, for example, Penn Dems sent an email to its entire network of students when Fossil Free Penn organized a multi-day sit-in to protest against the University’s investments in the fossil fuel industry. “We invite our members to every opportunity there is to participate in local activism,” said Dylan Milligan, Wharton sophomore and the political chair of Penn Dems. “The majority of our members are happy to know about these events, and they do show up.”

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Penn Democrats endorsed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Now, the group will focus on local politics.

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4

OPINION

We need some chill

ROAD JESS TRAVELLED | On the maximizing culture at Penn and why we should probably take a second to breathe MONDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 VOL. CXXXIII, NO. 69 133rd Year of Publication CARTER COUDRIET President DAN SPINELLI Executive Editor LUCIEN WANG Print Director ALEX GRAVES Digital Director ALESSANDRO VAN DEN BRINK Opinion Editor REBECCA TAN Senior News Editor WILL SNOW Senior Sports Editor CHRIS MURACCA Design Editor CAMILLE RAPAY Design Editor JULIA SCHORR Design Editor LUCY FERRY Design Editor VIBHA KANNAN Enterprise Editor SARAH FORTINSKY News Editor

Just a few months ago, the announcements of newly minted Wharton internal transfers, coordinated and uncoordinated dual-degree students of every school at Penn flooded my Facebook News Feed. To all my peers who have successfully switched into the programs that they wanted, I applaud them and admire them. There’s excitement and anticipation behind their cheers, for sure, but also — and this might just be me — an underlying exhaustion. Don’t get me wrong — there’s nothing wrong with transferring or adding degrees if the value of doing so is clear. There’s nothing better than people following their passions or pursuing the perfect education to achieve their dreams. However, I sometimes wonder about people who do this not because they want to, but because they feel they have to — whether it’s to frantically gain a competitive edge, or because they feel pressured by Penn’s culture as a whole. A friend of mine once

noted that everyone at Penn is a “maximizer.” From fighting to take as many classes as possible in one semester to fighting for extracurricular leadership roles to fighting for prestigious jobs, everyone here is aiming to do the most, academically, socially, and professionally. But at what cost, I wonder? At the cost of our mental and physical health? It’s clear that this maximizing culture is toxic and unhealthy in many ways. For the sake of our sanity, we must realize that it’s not necessary to overexert ourselves for resume-building activities we don’t actually care that much about. In many ways, it’s a battlefield out there. My mother told me the other day to start compiling a list of places I wanted to intern next summer. My friend wondered if he should’ve tried transferring to Wharton, someone not even remotely interested in business. As a sophomore, I’ve truly been affected by the pressure to start “excelling”

or setting myself apart in every aspect of my life. Through my own personal experiences at Penn, I realized that Wharton yields a powerful influence in creating a culture in which students feel like they must constantly be doing something to advance their careers. Be-

classes I’m interested in — that’s where the need to maximize and overexert kicks in. During the first week of school, I sat in on four more classes than I was registered for, fearing that I would be missing out on the value of other classes (academic FOMO?). When we’re sur-

For the sake of our sanity, we must realize that it’s not necessary to overexert ourselves for resume-building activities we don’t actually care that much about.” cause of this, many students feel that Wharton is the endgoal, giving them a “necessary” competitive edge even if their passions or missions do not align with this pre-professional business education. Sometimes, it feels like it’s not enough to just be a kid in the College trying to take

rounded by a collective culture that somehow seems to say we’re not doing enough, we feel like we aren’t, even if we’re pushing ourselves to the limit already. At the end of last semester, during the class selection period, I felt myself feeling more overwhelmed than

usual. Over and over again, I went through the classes I wanted to take in my head and on paper, wondering if they were good enough. Would they satisfy the requirements I would need to graduate with two majors? Did they have high enough ratings on Penn Course Review? Would this class mean something to me in the long-run? As the end of freshman year drew to a close, I felt like a period of my life somehow ended — a period in which I could say, “I have no idea what I want to do with my life, and that’s okay.” I’m sure I’m not alone in feeling like this, but I wanted to remind myself — and others — that we still do have the power to be confused, to be unsure and to take a breath every once in awhile. Our maximizing culture may tell us that we can’t ever take a break, that we must keep going even if we’re unsure of where we’re going. We may feel like the road to exhaustive degrees, prestigious internships and an out-

JESSICA LI standing resume is the only way to achieve our dreams, but it’s not as straightforward as this. There are breaks in the road, detours to be taken, space to be filled with things that matter much, much more. There are many paths to success. There are many ways to go on a road that includes a fulfilling education (even without the maximization), a fulfilling career and a fulfilling life that allows plenty of breathing room. JESSICA LI is a College sophomore from Livingston, N.J., studying English and psychology. Her email address is jesli@sas.upenn.edu. “Road Jess Travelled” usually appears every other Monday.

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Embracing the inefficiencies in our lives MERICAN IN AMERICA | Efficiency is our strength but also our weakness A few evenings ago, my group of friends walked from Wishbone, carrying boxes of takeout. Party music and chatter drifted from the houses along Walnut. Groups of students stroll past us, ready for the night out. The early autumn breeze picked up, and we wrapped our jackets around a little tighter. When we arrived at our friend’s apartment, we chomped down our late dinner, made citron tea and a friend picked up her ukulele and started to sing. We lazed around, sometimes chatting, sometimes scrolling through our phones. We played a few games of Bananagram and decided to head home around 2 a.m. As I walked across campus back to my room, I tried to find words to describe the contentment I felt. Yes, I felt accepted, I felt comfortable, I loved the company and I loved how beautifully inefficient everything was. I sometimes forget how wonderful inefficiency is, in a fast-paced environment like Penn’s. Sit at the back of lectures or seminars, and you will see rows after

rows of classmates’ Macbooks lighted up with all sorts of windows and tabs obviously unrelated to the course. These are sometimes opened to Facebook or boredpanda.com, but also to math problem sets, coding homework and Anthropology readings. The minute the class we are in starts prodding us towards the slightest feeling of boredom or non-productivity, we turn to our computers and fervently open new windows and tabs. We write our English papers in history class, code in anthropology class and design marketing material for our start-up in art history class — the environment must have been inspiring. We give our classes ten minutes to prove their relevance, worth or entertainment before descending into our pursuit of maximum productivity, with occasional feeble half-stabs at listening to the ongoing lecture. We slowly begin to reduce each class into a list of papers to write, problem sets to complete and exams to study for, which will at the very end, hopefully add

up to the grade we desire. “Is what the professor is saying now going to appear in the midterm or help me in writing my paper?” We suddenly lose sight of the process. Learning is a process and it often isn’t efficient. It involves meanders and detours, planting and waiting, pruning and correcting. The

means giving your professor the undivided attention and respect he deserves, even though what he may be saying is sometimes not of “urgent relevance” to you right there and then — especially in comparison to your English paper which is due by tonight 11:59 p.m. Our chronic efficiency is most pronounced in our ac-

… streamlining the flow of information between professors and students — and between students themselves — can act effectively as an investment from Penn in its students … ” mind is laboriously sharpened and slowly refined. It accumulates various unconnected thoughts and facts, and brings them into dialogue sometimes immediately, sometimes later, sometimes never. Choosing the “process”

ademic life, but also seeps into other areas. Some of us don’t like eating in dining halls not just because of the quality of food, but also because it “takes too much time”. We leave our friends mid-meal and midconversation once we are

done with our own lunch to run off to finish a problem set. We attend talks because “hey, Penn has many opportunities and we should take full advantage of them” but end up doing our work within the first ten minutes there. We go for meetings late and leave early. Our days, weeks, months are a mad chase to tick items off our growing, exploding checklist of to-dos and do-not-forgets. We are ruthlessly efficient, we do and accomplish many things and yet, we perhaps learn very little. We don’t give the process of learning, or friendship or developing relationships the chances they deserve. Of course, on the flipside, it doesn’t mean we indulge in inefficiency all the time and in everything we do. Efficiency may be our problem, but it is also our strength. Time is finite and efficiency helps us cope with that. What I’m arguing for is for us to slow down a little, and give each moment, each process its opportunity to unfold and bloom. Hold back on other work

SARA MERICAN and focus on the class you are in. Let the dining hall meal with your friend spill over the hour. Choose to walk the long, “inefficient” route back home, if it allows you those extra minutes to stroll and chat with your friend on his way. Slow down on Locust Walk, watch the squirrels, and go beyond the basic “Hi” when you recognize someone. Some of our best college memories will come from the most inefficient moments. Slow down. Be present. It’s worth it. SARA MERICAN is a College sophomore from Singapore. Her email address is smerican@ sas.upenn.edu. “Merican in America” usually appears every Monday.


5

Passing on our problems THE CONVERSATION | Why we need to introduce freshmen to Penn’s many issues We face a lot of difficult questions during our time at Penn. We’re prompted by professors, tasked with problem sets; our families ask us what we’ll do after graduation and we likely ask that of ourselves. Recently, however, I was struck by a question that didn’t come from any of those sources. Instead it came from a fellow Penn student, a freshman. She asked me if I had any advice for someone who was just starting out. And after taking a second to think it over, I had to admit that I didn’t. Even as a senior, I feel out of place telling someone how best to navigate Penn. I’m still trying to figure that out for myself. But what I do feel confident speaking about — and what I’d wish I’d told this freshman in particular — are all the issues I have with Penn. The problems that cannot be alleviated or avoided with a few words of wisdom. Rather than tell her which classes to take or how many clubs to join, I wish I’d let her know just how isolating and

anxiety producing this place can be. And how the primary method for alleviating these feelings — that play hard mentality the tour guides joke about — can often exacerbate that pain rather than ease it. I also wish I’d told her that, despite the fact that Penn says it will give you the tools to change the world, Penn itself is extremely resistant to change. The great irony of being a senior is that the moment when you’re the most invested, most ready to tackle these issues is also when you have the least amount of time left to do so. It can feel extremely daunting, impossible even, to leave a lasting positive impact on Penn in only a short four years. But what we can all surely do is impart our grievances to the next generation so they can be better prepared to combat the issues we all face. When a prospective student is first introduced to Penn, they’re given the rosiest perception possible. That includes the beautiful tour, the glossy brochure, all of which are meant to

highlight Penn’s merits and obscure its faults. Even after they step foot on campus, we, the current students, continue to paint this institution in the best light. We try to sell them on our clubs, our greek organizations, our athletic teams. Very rarely

opportunities and experiences to offer its students — I’ve certainly had my share of them. But it’s because of all the positive experiences I’ve had and the inspiring people I’ve met, that I feel so strongly about wanting to change the things

… if I’ve learned anything from my peers, it’s that the goal of your four years should not be to seek out the best things about Penn but rather to find the things that you think need changing.” do we let them know how trying their Penn experience may likely be or how disenchanted they’ll soon become. Of course that isn’t to say that those commendatory messages are invalid. It’s true that Penn has a lot of amazing

about this institution that are anything but positive. If we truly want to ensure that each new crop of students has the best possible experience at Penn then we should waste no time in introducing them to its faults. Initiatives such as

the student created Disorientation Guide — which describes histories of racism and sexism along with legacies of activism at Penn — are a crucial first step in this endeavor. I couldn’t agree more with one of the authors of the guide, Miru Osuga, who told The Daily Pennsylvanian that disorientation guides, “covered a huge amount of topics that I wish I had access to when I was a freshman.” If I could have another opportunity to speak with that first year student, I’d tell her that my favorite thing about Penn is that we have so many students who are dissatisfied with the status quo. Students who care about the fact that the board of trustees won’t seriously consider proposals to divest from the fossil fuel industry — as evidenced by their tweet long response on the matter. Or that Penn still refuses to support Philadelphia public schools by making PILOTS (payments in lieu of taxes), which other Ivy League institutions have made for years.

CAMERON DICHTER I’d tell that freshman that, if I’ve learned anything from my peers, it’s that the goal of your four years should not be to seek out the best things about Penn but rather to find the things that you think need changing. And to my fellow upperclassmen, let me say this: When you find yourself speaking to a new student, don’t just impart words of wisdom, impart a call to action. Don’t tell them how great this institution is, tell them how much better it can become. CAMERON DICHTER is a College senior from Philadelphia, studying English. His email address is camd@ sas.upenn.edu. “Real Talk” usually appears every other Thursday.

On the end of the beginning THE CONVERSATION | Cheers to the Class of 2018 As I begin my last year at Penn, the world seems filled with more uncertainty than ever. I spent my summer working and hoping that the words of an incompetent president on the other side of the world didn’t begin a nuclear war in my country. The recent tragic events around the globe including those in Charlottesville, Va., Barcelona and Turku, Ukraine deepen an ongoing sense of fear, instability and entropy. Things fall apart — the center cannot hold. On a personal level, I’ve real-

ized that never before has my own future been so unclear. I’ve never been one of those people to lay out a five- or 10-year-plan, but then I didn’t really need to be. For most of my admittedly privileged life, I just needed to do one thing: go to school. Now, whether to receive any more schooling is just one of infinite options — a potential decision to be made along with where to live, what to do for a job, and so on. Yet, I suspect that I will not be the only one who feels that 16 years of schooling has led us

to no certain answers. The freedom and focus on individuality that defines our generation also means that there’s less pressure on us to study certain things, socialize with certain people or choose certain lifestyles. The age in which a young person is expected to travel, maybe spend some time in the military, get a job and marry at an acceptable age is mostly over. Many people, including myself, are surely grateful for this expanded range of opportunities. But this also means that we have

JULIA McGURK | DESIGN ASSOCIATE

less defined milestones by which to judge how well we’re doing. This causes many of us to worry that we’re not taking full advantage of all that we have been given, that we’re not living up to standards set forth by others and ourselves. At Penn, students in the College of Arts and Sciences experience this even more, since there are no defined or expected paths for students to embark on post graduation. A liberal arts education is more conceptual rather than skill-based. Wharton students are expected to go into some form of commerce, and Engineering and Nursing students similarly have more traditional fields to go into. College students, on the other hand, rarely have such certainty. This, I believe, contributes profoundly to the recent increase in the amount of insecurity in young people across the country, as well as the seemingly contrary pattern of professionalization of education. It may seem strange to many that despite having all the opportunities in the world, the

thing we choose to do is make slide sets and update spreadsheets. We care less and less about finding our work personally fulfilling or meaningful, and instead are content to pursue stability and certainty. But it makes sense that since we ourselves are unsure of what to pursue and value in life, we would follow a risk-averse strategy of placing ourselves in positions with famous brands whether that be Goldman Sachs, McKinsey, Teach for America or Harvard Law School, even if we’re not certain that that’s the right path for us. Even in on-campus recruiting, the biggest firms appeal to potential recruits by pointing out how well “alums” have done after spending a couple of years working for them, rather than convincing them that they are permanent jobs. None of this is inherently bad per se, but I nonetheless believe that it’s worth observing and thinking about, especially at this point in my time at Penn. It’s mildly terrifying to realize that despite having lived the first

JAMES LEE quarter or so of our lives preparing for the future that no definite form of it has emerged. But surely such a phase in our life is primarily for considering and pondering such potential paths, deciding and figuring out how to live, in addition to how to make a living. So cheers to all fellow members of the Class of 2018, and to realizing that we are merely at the end of the beginning, rather than vice versa. JAMES LEE is a College senior from Seoul, South Korea, studying English and philosophy, politics and economics. His email address is jel@ sas.upenn.edu. “The Conversation” usually appears every other Monday.

Should Penn change its legacies policies? GROUP THINK GROUP THINK is The Daily Pennsylvanian’s round table section, where we throw a question at the columnists and see what answers stick. Read your favorite columnist, or read them all. This week’s question: Based on a recent DP report, legacy students make up a sixth of the entire undergraduate student population at Penn. What do you make of this? Should Penn’s Admissions Office change its policies regarding legacy students? If so, what should it do? If not, why? Spencer Swanson | Spencer’s Space I do not personally think that Penn’s policy for admitting legacy students is necessarily bad, as it serves a useful purpose. In 2008, alumni donations accounted for 27.5 percent of all donations to higher education in the United States. Without legacy admissions, Penn would not be able to have its enormous $10.72 billion endowment, which fundamentally supports its students, allowing them access to amazing facilities, professors and research opportunities. Although I do not have extensive knowledge on the topic, it seems as though legacy admissions benefit the student body and the University more than it detracts from them. Cameron Dichter | Real Talk Before we begin to debate the relative unfairness of legacy admissions, I’d like to ask why anyone thought this process was a meritoc-

racy to begin with. Sure the advantage given to legacy students is especially egregious — no one earns their alumni parents — and therefore an easy target for critique, but are we really going to pretend that it’s so different from the advantages all wealthy students possess? Expensive SAT tutors and private schools clearly give students a leg up in the admissions process, otherwise parents wouldn’t pay for them. And that isn’t to say that wealthy students — legacy or otherwise — didn’t work hard to get into Penn. They just had some advantages that other students didn’t. Rather than debating whether certain students “deserve” to be here we should instead be focusing on the economic disparities that the college admissions system has institutionalized. The real issue is that the economic and racial inequalities in our University demographics reflect the inequalities in our country. And for all of the backlash that affirmative action faces, the reality is that even with it, black and Hispanic students are more underrepresented at top colleges than 35 years ago. Isabella Simonetti | Simonetti Says So A university has numerous important responsibilities: caring for its students, providing an excellent education, cultivating a sense of community and offering resources for mental and physical health. Donations from the parents of legacy students allow Penn to give many

of these things to its students. Additionally, giving preferential treatment to legacy applicants strengthens the connection between alumni and Penn. But I believe Penn should stop giving legacy applicants a leg up in the admissions process. If a legacy student wants to attend Penn, he has the opportunity to apply and be accepted on his own merit. The admission of less qualified students due solely to their family’s connection to the school, weakens the academic environment, and, some could argue, preserves a sense of entitlement on Penn’s campus. Furthermore, it is disingenuous to accept money from alumni who are donating solely so their children or grandchildren will be accepted. Instead, the administration should work to make Penn a place where its students are proud to attend. That is the ultimate way to guarantee alumni loyalty through donation. Penn has a rich history, and the generations of families who will continue to attend Penn can contribute to that if they meet the admissions standards set for all students. Lucy Hu | Fresh Take There is no question that morally, legacy applicants do not inherently deserve any advantage in elite institutions’ admissions policies. But whether Penn should uphold preferential admissions for legacies is not a moral issue. This is really a question of data;

what’s necessary is a cost-benefit analysis to evaluate whether the net benefit is positive. We need to look at the sources of Penn’s funding. Ideally, we could also categorize donations by multi-generation Penn families, versus single-generation alumni. However, Penn’s information is not so specific. According to Penn’s annual financial report from 2015-2016, 2.3 percent of Penn’s operating revenue came from contributions and donor support (for comparison, 10.5 percent was from tuition and fees). Seemingly negligible, this totaled $200 million. The question then becomes whether or not you want to assume a positive correlation between generations at Penn and likeliness to donate. I believe it to be a fair assumption, and most would agree. As attachment to Penn grows, so does willingness to contribute resources. So where does Penn’s money go? In 2016, 51 percent of endowment expenditure went towards instruction, and 18 percent went towards student financial aid. It’s apparent that money from donors comes back to improve education and help other students afford a Penn education. Then what are the costs? Perhaps the sacrifice of meritocracy? Maybe the replacement of more “deserving” students? But is there any data proving that acceptances were undeserved? Is it really plau-

sible that 16 percent of the student population is unqualified? Do not forget that Penn has high standards of admission, without substantial exception. This perceived “cost” is negligible. Given the arbitrariness of college admissions, it’s unfair for anyone but Dean of Admissions, Eric Furda, to make claims that a student does not deserve to be here. Additionally, Penn takes the chance that accepting one additional legacy student paves the way for a multitude of beneficial resources for more students in the future. At the end of the day, donor contributions only make up 2 percent of operating revenue and are not relatively significant to Penn’s funding and ability to provide financial aid to other students. However, in absolute dollar terms, donors benefit Penn and legacy families are more likely to contribute to that. Penn should not give any severe advantages to these applicants, but leveraging legacy students in order to provide more students with better opportunities is wise and warranted. Ultimately, the benefits outweigh the costs and Penn’s policy displays the foresight required of an elite learning institution. Amy Chan | Chances Are My first thought was, “That’s exorbitant.” In a way, though, it fits the expectations of an elite, exclusive university, and I am not surprised. Universities and higher education have always existed as this great paradox. Nowadays, they claim

themselves as the equalizing force, institutions that actually enable citizens to achieve the ideal democracy that American government and legislation have never been able to fully realize. Studies have shown that people of both low and high-income families have approximately the same success rates upon college graduation. Simultaneously, higher education has had a history of exclusion from the very beginning, building a list of resentments and “not-good-enough”s, which include people of color and women. After all, the very first colleges were founded primarily to educate clergymen, excluding all the rest. As universities and higher education continue to be pulled between these two extremes, I believe that they should continue to try to draw themselves toward the democratic end. What I would suggest is slowly but surely lowering the number of legacy students admitted each year. Instead, if the school admits students primarily focusing on merit and properly educates them, these students will eventually gain a considerable level of success and, out of gratitude, give back. There are other factors involved in alumni contribution besides just a quid pro quo theoretical legacy. There is nostalgia, affection for the school and appreciation for all the school has done. In turn, we would reduce the materialistic, business side of universities and approach that egalitarian ideal.


6 NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Still in litigation, Fresh Grocer wants to stay ‘forever’ The supermarket was supposed to vacate last March NATALIE KAHN Senior Reporter

Nine months after Penn’s initial announcement that Fresh Grocer was to evacuate its location at 4001 Walnut St., the supermarket is still open 24 hours a day. “It’s business as usual,” Fresh Grocer store manager Dawn Goldstein said. “We’re here forever as long as we’re concerned.” In early December 2016, Penn (Fresh Grocer’s landlord) argued that the supermarket was too late to renew its lease and called for the store to leave its space by March 31, 2017. The University officially announced in April that the store would be replaced by a new Acme

supermarket. But Fresh Grocer has fought the claim, entering into a legal battle with the University that isn’t likely to end anytime soon. The Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas website lists April 2, 2018 as the “projected settlement date” for the ongoing lawsuit. May 7, 2018 is the “projected pre-trial confirmation date” and June 4, 2018 as the “projected trial date.” Goldstein said any information regarding Fresh Grocer’s departure is “hearsay,” because the decision is in the court’s hands. Heidi Wunder of Facilities and Residential Services echoed this, stating in an email that there isn’t news of a transition until the legal proceedings end. Fresh Grocer employees say they aren’t too concerned about

the suit. Terry Cooper has been working at the location at 40th and Walnut streets for the past seven years. He lauded Fresh Grocer’s fight to save its location and added that he enjoys his job. Cooper said even if this Fresh Grocer closes, he remains employed — he has the option of working for Acme or relocating to another Fresh Grocer, likely at the supermarket’s location at 69th Street. Maureen Gillespie of Wakefern Food Corporation, which owns Fresh Grocer, agreed with Cooper. “We are heartened by the community’s support as we continue to operate our Walnut Street store and provide healthy foods and a first class grocery store experience,” she said in an emailed statement.

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perspectives and backgrounds. They hoped that Cheever, the co-founder of Quora would be more “relatable” to young hackers because of his familiarity with modern technologies, while Berkeley could provide students with “what companies or what other people think about and are looking for.” In the opening address, Cheever touched on his time in college and his experiences working at Facebook and Quora. He also talked about creating Expo.io, a free and open-source platform which facilitates the creation of mobile software. While recounting his first hackathon experience at Facebook, Cheever reminded the audience to be aware of the inter-personal side of creating technology. “When you do a hack-type thing, the programming and the building of the thing is only half the battle,” he said. “The other half is doing the politics or talking to people.” Hannan Zubair, a fifth-year McMaster University student, said he appreciated Cheever’s “life lessons,” and particularly enjoyed his story about meeting Mark Zuckerberg at Harvard University’s Ultimate Frisbee club. “I thought it was interesting that in his general interactions, he met

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Mark Zuckerberg and Evan Spiegel, who are now founders of big companies,” Zubair said. “It’s like, anyone here can be the next Mark Zuckerberg.” Tom Wojtczak, a third-year at McMaster University, worked with Cheever on a project that used expoi. io. “It wasn’t like meeting a celebrity. It was really chill. He was just chilling in his room eating cheesesteaks,” Wojtczak said. He added

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Charlie Cheever

Co-founder of Quora & CEO of Expo.io

WeissLabs also worked with PennApps to provide resources and mentorship to the top hacking projects by Penn students. “All these hackers have such potential and they make such amazing things but sometimes they just leave it at PennApps,” said Bukhari. “We want to let them be able to take it beyond a weekend-long hackathon.”

GET READY FOR CAREER FAIR WEEK!

Alfred Berkeley

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that Cheever was one of the mentors who stayed the latest at the event to help students build their app. Bukhari said other new additions to PennApps this year include collaboration with Penn Center for Health Care Innovation, Penn Center for Innovation, Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship and the School of Nursing. The introduction of these collaborations was part of a larger effort to encourage health care technological innovation.

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Film Film Film polled polled polled you you you totofitond fifind nd out out out how how how you you you are are are getting getting getting your your your Sunday Sunday Sunday afternoon afternoon afternoon BY BY ANTHONY BY ANTHONY ANTHONY KHAYKIN KHAYKIN KHAYKIN movie movie movie fi xes. fi fi xes. xes. Here’s Here’s Here’s what what what we we we learned. learned. learned. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

8 NEWS

TT T Rank website a ‘joke’ Frat leaders call popular Greek

Site allows users to rate chapters on ‘looks’ MICHEL LIU Staff Reporter

Ahead of the rushing process in the spring semester, various students are going online to learn more about the numerous Greek institutions on campus. One of the most popular sites they turn to is Greek Rank — a website where anonymous users rate fraternities and sororities by the criteria of “looks, popularity, classiness, involvement, social life, and sisterhood/brotherhood.” On the site, fraternities and sororities are given a number grade that classify them as an

34TH STREET Magazine December 1, 2011 34TH STREET Magazine December 1, 2011 34TH STREET Magazine December 1, 2011

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SPORTS 9

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

Volleyball wins one of three in co-hosted tournament Quakers beat Sienna, fall to two tough teams CARTER THOMPSON Associate Sports Editor

VOLLEYBALL PENN Sienna

VOLLEYBALL NAVY PENN

VOLLEYBALL LA SALLE PENN

3 0

3 1

3 2

Penn volleyball came close to vastly improving on its impressive opening weekend. But unfortunately for them, the Red and Blue went 1-2 over the weekend in the Valley Forge Sports Invitational, a tournament co-hosted by Penn and La Salle that included Navy, Robert Morris, and Siena.

In game one, the Red and Blue (3-3) flexed their superiority and defeated a lesser opponent in Siena (0-8) by a score of 25-12, 25-15, 25-21. In set one, the Quakers attacked the Saints’ defense and used multiple service runs to distance themselves from their opponent. Kendall Covington, who continued her strong season and was named to the all-tournament team for the second week in a row, was set up for huge kills all game long after quality assists from setter Sydney Morton. Siena attempted to battle back in a tightly contested second, preventing the Quakers from pulling away early on. However, following a Siena service error at 15-14, Penn began to assert itself. Courtney Quinn grabbed two quick service aces that jump-started the Red and Blue to a 10-1 run to close out the set, and they never looked back. In the third set, the Saints adjusted and the Red and Blue fell behind early. Down 11-8, Coach Katie Schumacher-Cawley called time-

out to allow her team to regroup. The coaching move paid off as the Quakers came out firing from that point on. Parker Jones, the reigning DP Sports Player of the Week, and Covington were dynamic, registering blistering strikes en route to earning 11 and eight kills respectively for the game. The third set also saw some key kills from Hayley Molnar and Brooke Behrbaum, both of whom finished with six kills each. “We have a great squad,” Schumacher-Cawley said. “They’re getting better with each opportunity.” Although that win got the weekend off to a good start, the Red and Blue could not quite keep it up in their next two matches. In its second game, Penn fell to Navy in four sets with a score of 22-25, 17-25, 25-19, 22-25. Despite the loss, the Quakers still enjoyed some strong individual performances. Parker Jones registered yet another double-double with 12 kills and 12 digs, and Mor-

ton continued her strong start to the season with a double-double on 39 assists and 13 digs. Schumacher-Cawley was quick to credit Navy (9-1) after the loss. “Navy is a good team. They played hard and competed,” she noted. “They took us out of our game, and we need to learn from it.” Match three saw a Quaker comeback against La Salle come agonizingly short. After dropping the first two sets, the Red and Blue forced a fifth set against the Explorers (93), but ultimately lost 18-25, 17-25, 25-21, 26-24, 15-17. “We got off to a slow start today,” Schumacher-Cawley explained. “We were uncomfortable, and we need to be more ready to go.” Indeed, after shaking off that slow start, Penn played to its potential. Unfortunately it was too little, too late. That match’s Quaker was led by the usual suspects, Covington and Jones. Jones logged 14 kills on the day and Covington, starring once

FILE PHOTO

Behind senior Kendall Covington’s kills, Penn volleyball was able to win one match easily, and almost take another this weekend.

again, was not far behind with 13. “[Kendall] played great all weekend,” Schumacher-Cawley said. “She plays with high energy and brings all of that energy [to the court].” The Quakers do have some work to do to be ready for Ivy League competition in a few weeks, however. “We made too many service errors,” Schumacher-Cawley ex-

plained. “We have to learn from this to be prepared for Ivy League competition.” Although they’ll certainly be looking to improve, the Red and Blue won’t be dwelling on their missed opportunities. “It’s a short week for us,” Schumacher-Cawley noted. “We’re gonna work hard these next two days and be ready to go at Robert Morris next weekend.”

Red and Blue lose early lead in tough 2-1 defeat to Seton Hall

M. SOCCER | Swenson’s

goal failed to get result

REINA KERN Associate Sports Editor

Penn men’s soccer fell to Seton Hall in a disappointing 2-1 loss Sunday night at home on Rhode’s field. With senior captain Joe Swenson scoring the first goal during the first half of play, the Quakers (0-3) looked to continue to utilize their home field advantage against the Pirates. However, Seton Hall (3-2-1) responded immediately to Penn’s first-half goal to tie the game and later scored a goal to put them

ahead. The Red and Blue found themselves at a loss when the final buzzer went off. “We don’t have results so we are disappointed as a group. I think we are making progress. It gets frustrating when you don’t get rewarded for the effort you are putting in,” Coach Rudy Fuller said. With much of the early second-half play happening in the midfield, the match seemed to be almost at a stalemate with some attempts to enter into the offensive third. Later in the second half, the Quakers were forced to play defense with the Pirates pressing to earn a second goal. “I think tonight stung because of how that second goal hap-

pened. To give away a restart, we knew they were dangerous around the box, and they punished us for it. We have to be better in those moments, but the team is coming along, and our time will come.” Senior captain Sam Wancowicz agreed that these small errors made a big impact on the outcome of the game for the Quakers. “I thought we were pretty strong overall but had some lapses with free kicks and set pieces. I think there is a lot to look forward to and a lot to take away from the game.” Although Penn produced some shots on goal in the final minutes of play, Seton Hall’s goalie made some key saves to secure the win

for the Pirates. According to Fuller, with this loss there comes positives that the team can walk away with as they head into their upcoming games. “I think they came out and put a good performance in. When you take a close look at the goals against Monmouth, Bowling Green, and Seton Hall, they are all preventable goals,” Fuller noted. “You walk away being able to zero in on things on the defensive end, but on the offensive end I’d like to see the forwards have more opportunity in front of the net.” It was a disappointing loss for the Red and Blue as they sought to score back on what became the winning goal for the Pirates.

The Quakers were aware of Seton Hall’s previous game that set them on a high for this weekends game at Penn. “We wanted a result at home and that’s what we hoped to do.It was a tough game with Seton Hall coming off a win against Princeton and scoring a lot of goals, so it was unfortunate.” With only four days until their next game against the Lehigh Mountain Hawks, the squad is looking to work on set pieces to

hopefully come out with a more successful result on Thursday night. “We were hungry for a result and these guys wanted to score the equalizer, but I feel like our defense effort and our sharpness on the ball picked up at the end of the game, so hopefully we will build on that going into Lehigh on Thursday,” Fuller added. The match will take place at home on Rhode’s Field at seven o’clock.

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ASHLEY PARKER C’05 is a White House reporter at the Washington Post. Previously, she worked at the New York Times for 11 years, where she covered politics (including the campaigns of Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush and Donald Trump). She started at the paper as Maureen Dowd’s research assistant. She has also written for The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Glamour, The Huffington Post, The Washingtonian, The New York Sun, Philadelphia Weekly, and Chicago Magazine, and is an MSNBC political analyst. JOE PINSKER C’13 is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he writes and edits stories about business and economics. The pieces he writes typically focus on the intersection between money and culture, usually involving topics such as food, advertising, technology, and entertainment. JESSICA GOODMAN C’12 is a senior editor at Cosmopolitan magazine. Previously, she was a digital news editor at Entertainment Weekly and an Entertainment Editor at Huff Post. STEPHEN FRIED ’79 (moderator) is an award-winning author and journalist who teaches non-fiction writing at Penn and Columbia. He is the author of 6 books and a former contributing editor at Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Philadelphia Magazine.

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10 SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

SPRINT FOOTBALL >> BACKPAGE

Unlike last year’s 26-21 nailbiter, this year’s game was a onesided affair from the beginning. Penn opened up the scoring with rushing touchdowns from both junior running back Jake Klaus and sophomore quarterback Eddie Jenkins to take an early 14-0

FIELD HOCKEY >> BACKPAGE

ship. The Quakers mostly dominated play in the first half, but went into halftime down 1-0. Shortly thereafter, the Quakers got on the board thanks to senior captain Alexa Hoover’s first goal of the season. That momentum led to Penn picking up a flurry of chances. At one point, it looked like the Quakers would take over

lead just 15 minutes into the game. The quick start bodes well for the Quakers, as scoring early was one of the hallmarks from last year’s title run. “I thought the alums were really showing up with some solid returning players,� Wagner said. “But our kids came out right in the beginning and really hit them right away. And we blocked

around the ball well, executed on both sides of the ball, we even did really well kicking.� The Red and Blue’s defense stood tall for most of the first half, but an alumni drive late in the half, capped off by a 13-yard rushing touchdown from 2015 graduate Mike Beamish cut the current squad’s lead to 14-6, which remained the score at the

halfway point. In the second half, Penn came out strong again, with Klaus scoring his second touchdown of the day on the opening drive. Penn continued to tack on more points, and the alumni scored again late in the half to cap the scoring for the day. As always, the alumni game is about far more than just the score.

The weekend represents a great opportunity for continued growth of the culture around the program, which is something Wagner has emphasized for years. “It’s keeping a family atmosphere of giving back,� he said. “They do it in a lot of different ways, it’s not just financially. They do give finances to us, but it’s so important for that camara-

derie, the mentoring, the relationships.� The game also represents the first time freshmen suit up for the Red and Blue. With the coaching staff’s emphasis on having everyone play in this game, the alumni game allows the young Quakers to get valuable, game-like experience right before the start of the season.

the game. Unfortunately, the Red and Blue ran into a spell of bad luck — in the form of penalties. The Blue Hens were awarded four straight penalty corners, one of which led to the game-winning goal. That said, it was another impressive day for the Quakers defense, and the offense showed plenty as well. Some of that strong play on Friday could be attributed to the Quakers’ one major lineup adjust-

ment — the return of captain Jasmine Li. A staple at left back last season, Li was poised to step in at 2016 graduate Claire Kneizys’ former post of center defensive midfield. However, just a few days before the season opener against Rutgers, Li suffered an injury in practice, leaving her unable to take the field. Her return was a welcome addition to a lineup that previously had junior forward Sofia Palacios

playing out of position in the back of the diamond. “She stepped up into that role with zero experience with two days’ notice,� Fink said of her versatile junior. “She is really one of those players who we look to force corners and she did an impeccable job of that.� For Li, her season debut was “absolutely amazing,� despite the loss. “I’m so happy to be out there with the team and contribute any way that I can.�

On Sunday, the Quakers, in search of their first win of the young season, played their fourth straight home game, this time against Villanova. Their quest was more than completed, as Penn not only won but also shut out the Wildcats (1-5), 2-0. “It literally feels awesome,� Hoover said of the win. “Even though it was a bit of a choppy game, we kept our cool, and I think we did pretty well with what we were given.� The Red and Blue controlled

play for the duration of the game, never leaving Villanova the opportunity to make a play. Hoover picked up two goals, bringing her total to three, and senior goalie Liz Mata recorded a well-deserved clean sheet. The Quakers arduous schedule continues with another rivalry game on Friday against Drexel. Hoover believes that Sunday’s win has provided the team could spark a change in fortune. “It’s going to give us all the momentum we need.�

W. SOCCER

Sands totalled six shots on the night, catching the eyes of fans and Van Dyke alike. “Emily Sands came to play,� Van Dyke said. “She worked defensively, offensively...she was great tonight.� Ultimately, her performance wasn’t enough to secure her team a win. As the game wore on, and the Quakers grew more frustrated, things tensed up with the Bison sensing they were one lucky shot or successful counter-attack away from stealing a victory. Bucknell did score a goal at the very end of the first half — though it was disallowed as the forward was offsides. The Bison’s attack kept riding the line all night, however, and one ball put a forward through with just over 10 minutes left in the game. Her resulting looping shot over rookie keeper Ashley Gabor gave the visitors the lead they would not relinquish. It was cruel fate for the hosts, who were the better side all night. Several players impressed over the 90-minute affair. One rookie in particular sliced

and diced defenders for much of the night, creating several chances through her take-ons and crosses. Freshman Katharine Larson started the game on the bench, with last season’s leading scorer Emma Loving being favored over her in the right wing position. But Van Dyke saw the need for a change in tactics mid-game, and Larson, once given the chance, didn’t disappoint. In her 50 minutes on the pitch, she created about as much as anyone else did in 90 — even if no chance was ever finished. “We’ve won our 50-50s, we’ve worked hard during practice, now it’s just a matter of putting the ball in the back of the net,� Larson said. Penn will have another chance to find its second goal and first win of the season against Delaware. With a loyal crowd at Rhodes Field to support them against the Blue Hens (2-2-2), all eyes will wait to see if the Quakers can break their duck in the seven o’clock Monday night fixture.

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curled an effort from outside the 18-yard box inches wide of the far post just three minutes into the game. It was the first of several chances for her on the night — and it wasn’t the closest she came to scoring. In the 27th minute, Penn earned a corner and creatively fed the ball into the box via the ground, finding Sands at the top of the penalty area. The sophomore ripped a shot headed straight for goal, but a Bison defender blocked the effort just before it hit the target. The ball bounced out for another corner, and the Quakers tried the same thing — this time, Sands’ attempt wasn’t blocked, but it was flashed just wide once again. That one minute just about summed up the whole match and maybe even the season thus far for the Red and Blue: whether through last-ditch defending or narrowly-missed shots, they just haven’t been able to find the back of the net.

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THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

SPORTS 11

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

Field hockey’s Alexa Hoover takes Player of the Week

Senior star scored all three of Penn’s goals MARC MARGOLIS Associate Sports Editor

In what’s been a tough start for Penn field hockey, one of the bright spots has been senior Alexa Hoover. After a two-goal performance in a 2-0 defeat of Villanova for its first win of the season, Hoover has more than earned this week’s edition DP Sports’ Player of the Week. After dropping close games against strong opponents — including Delaware and UNC, last

year’s NCAA champs and runners-up, respectively — Penn (1-3) needed to come out of the weekend with a win. Unsurprisingly, it was the Quakers’ star and leader who provided the offensive spark. Hoover’s first goal came off a deflected shot from sophomore Alexa Schneck. Her second goal came after she intercepted a pass from Villanova’s defense in the 57th minute. Hoover also paced the Quakers with seven total shots, with four of them on goal. On Friday, Hoover also provided Penn’s only goal in a 2-1 defeat against Dela-

ware. In a valiant effort despite defeat, Hoover pounded Delaware with five shots. Hoover has three of Penn’s four total goals this season. Moreover, the lone goal that did not come off her stick came off one of her shot attempts against North Carolina, which fellow senior Rachel Huang then deflected in. Hopefully for Penn, Hoover can get more support on the offensive end. For now, though, her elite performances have been enough to carry her team through the first part of its season — and in the process, stand above everyone else in Penn Athletics.

Scored both goals in Penn's 2-0 win over Villanova Scored all 3 of Penn's goals last week

Player of the Week: Alexa Hoover

Has scored 3 of Penn's 4 goals all season* *assisted the only goal she didn't score

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 VOL. CXXXIII NO. 69

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

FIELD HOCKEY | After incredibly

tough start to schedule, Quakers notch first win WILL AGATHIS Associate Sports Editor

FIELD HOCKEY

2 1

DELAWARE PENN

FIELD HOCKEY

2 0

PENN VILLANOVA

I

n a weekend of two impressive showings, Penn field hockey notched its first win of the season, beating Villanova, 2-0, on Sunday after falling to Delaware, 2-1, just two days prior. The Quakers’ 1-3 record is as deceiving as it gets, as two of their losses were to the 2016 NCAA national champion, Delaware, and to national runner-up, UNC. In each contest, despite the final scores, the Red and Blue proved that they belonged. Coach Colleen Fink said that the early season schedule featuring one tough contest after another provides a good test of what is to come. “We are just trying to take that next step in the right direction in terms of trying to play really quality opponents that will prepare us for midway, late into the season, and hopefully the postseason,” Fink said. On Friday’s contest against Delaware (5-1), one would have been hard-pressed to identify which team had just won the national championSEE FIELD HOCKEY PAGE 10

ANANYA CHANDRA | PHOTO MANAGER

Young blood beats the old folk in sprint football’s annual alumni game

Women’s soccer, unable to convert chances, left frustrated in 1-0 loss

Alum’s pregame injury ruined their chances

The Quakers outshot Bucknell 14-8

JONATHAN POLLACK

WILLIAM SNOW

Sports Editor

Senior Sports Editor

SPRINT FOOTBALL PENN PENN ALUMNI

W. SOCCER

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Penn sprint football is back, and just like always, the season started with a blast from the past. The current Quaker squad walloped a team of alumni by the score of 31-14 in the annual Alumni Weekend showdown this Saturday. The game was followed by a BBQ for friends and family to cap a weekend of celebration for Quakers past and present. The game was robbed of one of its marquee players — 2017 graduate Mike McCurdy — just minutes before kickoff. McCurdy, a two-time CSFL MVP and the record-holder

BUCKNELL PENN

PETER RIBERO | ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

Penn sprint football opened the scoring against the alumni on Saturday with a rushing touchdown from junior Jake Klaus.

for most passing yards in program history, went down with a knee injury while warming up, and didn’t touch the field for the entire game. McCurdy’s absence changed the entire dynamic of the contest, as a talented alumni squad was left to play without its star.

“It’s a shame,” coach Bill Wagner said. “He was warming up, he took a bad step. I mean he was ready to go, he had a bunch of receivers. That’s what we were scared about, that they were going to test our secondary.” SEE SPRINT FOOTBALL PAGE 10

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They need the ball to get into the back of the net. Bad. Penn women’s soccer failed to convert any of the chances it created in a 1-0 loss to Bucknell Sunday night, leaving the team goalless in four of its first five games of the season. The loss was remarkably frustrating for the Quakers, precisely because they’re so desperate for a goal. They outshot the Bison (2-5) by a margin of 14 to eight, and they earned 10 corner kicks compared to the Bison’s one. Penn (0-3-2) put the pressure on Bucknell all night long. For long periods of time, chance

ANGEL FAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore Emily Sands registered a match-high six shots against Bucknell — but couldn’t convert in her team’s 1-0 loss to the Bison.

after chance gave the Quakers hope that they would secure their first win of the season. Unfortunately for them, no one could convert the several golden opportunities they produced. “I think we started feeling like we had to rush things,” coach Nicole Van Dyke said. “We obviously have to have a little bit

more maturity in the game… you have to score goals.” Most of the Quakers’ attacking moves either started or ended with Emily Sands. The sophomore, who was fielded at the start of the game at the front of the Quakers’ attack, SEE W. SOCCER PAGE 10

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September 11, 2017  
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