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MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018 VOL. CXXXIV NO. 28

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

Penn considers creating a central diversity office U. will also launch an online bias reporting form NAOMI ELEGANT Staff Reporter

Officials say the prospect of creating a central diversity office is “under consideration” despite previously saying that Penn had no plans to create a physical space for a centralized office.

This comes amid a year-long student campaign led by the Graduate and Professional School Assembly, which introduced the proposal and also put forth another proposal to instate an online bias reporting form, which administrators say should launch by the end of April. “We have not changed the position that this is something that should be considered,” Senior

Vice President for Institutional Affairs and Chief Diversity Officer Joann Mitchell wrote in an emailed statement on March 29. “We have begun a process to determine whether creating a central diversity office or providing enhancing coordination of existing resources is best for Penn.” This, however, seems to diverge from Mitchell’s October 2017 statement to The Daily Pennsylva-

nian when she stated that Penn had no plans to create a physical office. “We said we would create a centralized chief diversity officer, and that’s what we did,” Mitchell said in October, referring to her appointment as inaugural chief diversity officer in March 2017. “It’s not an office.” In contrast, Mitchell’s most recent statement said that the University has already started re-

searching whether or not to create a central diversity office. She did not specify when this process began or when it is expected to reach a conclusion. Graduate students have been pushing for a central diversity office and a bias incident reporting form since February 2017, when GAPSA unanimously voted to establish an office with a full-time staff to help “underrepresented stu-

dents” across Penn. GAPSA’s Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, Access and Leadership Council, which put forth the resolution, has been campaigning for the past year. IDEAL Chair and sociology Ph.D. candidate Haley Pilgrim said that Mitchell’s recent statement was “really exciting.” “Even if vague, a statement of SEE DIVERSITY PAGE 2

How a ban on facultystudent relationships addresses campus issues Survivors identify other students as perpetrators AVNI KATARIA Staff Reporter

ALANA SHUKOVSKY | DESIGN EDITOR

Student Government budget will exceed $2.5 million SPEC will recieve $1 million in funding next year JAMES MEADOWS Staff Reporter

The annual budget for Penn Student Government will exceed $2.5 million for the first time in Penn’s history. The budget for the 20182019 financial year, which was determined by the Undergraduate Assembly, was recently approved. PSG saw an overall budget increase of 3.9 percent – or an approximate $96,000 – for the next year. While this has translated to increases in budget for the Student Activities Council, the Social Planning and Events Committee, MERT, Penn Labs, and Skimmerfest, there are several boards who have seen significant cuts to their funding. The budgets for the Class of 2020 and the Class of 2021 both saw cuts, though the sophomore class was more significantly affected with a loss of nearly $3,000 in funding. The board, which requested more than $6,000 for apparel, was allotted $0 for the costs. For the past two years, however, each sophomore class has requested and received over $5,000 for apparel, and now the incoming sophomore class will not be receiving any.

Sam Shea, Wharton senior and UA treasurer, said the UA Budget Committee believed that the sophomore class was reselling the apparel for a profit, thereby breaking UA budget policy. “There was essentially a fight and an argument on the floor of the UA when we were discussing this during the actual budgeting process,” Shea said. According to Wharton and Engineering sophomore Karim El Sewedy, president of the 2020 Class Board who was just reelected to serve another term, the money was used to buy class apparel which would be resold to fundraise for future events, with some of the money being used to subsidize the costs for low-income students. According to Shea, money used to fundraise should come out of a class’s event budget, rather than having its own separate item for event apparel. As such, while the $5,100 for apparel was cut, the class was given $2,075 more than requested for their event budget to account for apparel costs. Wharton sophomore Jack Stinger, the vice president of finances of the 2020 Class Board, did not respond to request for comment. Other committees that saw an

overall budget cut include the UA, the Nominations & Elections Committee, and the Student Committee on Undergraduate Education. SCUE saw a dramatic cut in costs from almost $24,000 this past year to $8,130 for the coming year. According to Shea, the committee will no longer be responsible for directly funding the school preceptorial training programs and that the $15,700 cut from SCUE’s budget will be awarded to the New Student Orientation committee instead. “In recent years, there was a preceptorial committee created and essentially SCUE was just used as the account that they would draw the money from,” Shea said. The UA, which had an operating budget of $6,085 for 20172018, cut its own budget to $4,850 for the 2018-2019 year. One of the largest cuts was made to the UA mentoring program which saw a decrease from $900 to $300 in funds. One of the only committees to see a significant increase in funding was SPEC, which was allocated $1 million, marking a $70,000 increase in budget from this past year. This is the first time that the SEE BUDGET PAGE 7

OPINION | Penn has a drinking problem

“Don’t get me wrong, drinking on college campuses is a difficult issue to navigate. No alcohol policy is perfect, but Penn’s doesn’t even try to be.” — Isabella Simonetti PAGE 5

SPORTS | End of Year Awards

Looking back on an eventful 2017-18, DP Sports honors Penn’s Athletes of the Year, the season’s best moments, matches, and more. BACKPAGE FOLLOW US @DAILYPENN FOR THE LATEST UPDATES ONLINE AT THEDP.COM

NEWS Survey highlights disparities in computer science PAGE 6

Penn recently joined a growing number of universities to completely ban sexual relations between undergraduates and faculty. While Provost Wendell Pritchett said at the time that this decision was made in an effort “to sustain a campus free of sexual violence, sexual harassment, and all other forms of sexual misconduct,” Penn students have questioned whether the policy change meaningfully addresses the issues around sexual misconduct on campus. Programming Chair of Penn Association of Gender Equality and College sophomore Tanya Jain said that while faculty-student relationships can contribute to the problem due to certain “power dynamic[s]” in such interactions, she thinks the larger issue around sexual misconduct remains unaddressed. “I think that [the rule banning faculty-student relationships is] definitely a way to deter, to some extent, the sexual assault, but I do think that the majority of sexual assault cases are student to student,” she said. The 2015 Association of American Universities Campus Climate Survey found that

a majority of undergraduate students who had experienced sexual assault or harassment identified another student as the perpetrator. Close to 97 percent of female undergraduate respondents and 96 percent of male undergraduate respondents indicated that their offender was another student. These rates were different for graduate students. Close to 23 percent of female graduate students identified faculty members, rather than students, as their offenders. Earlier this year, a public survey with over 2,300 responses revealed that five allegations of sexual harassment may have been perpetrated by members of the Penn community, specifically among faculty members. College junior Erica Rego said she is pleased that the conversation has begun around sexual misconduct policies at Penn, but that she still hopes to see greater change beyond the ban against student-faculty relations. “I don’t really think there’s been much of a change yet,” Rego said. “I think [the changes are] the right idea and starting to get a conversation going about it, but I don’t think it’s anything to commend until I see an actual change.” In March, Pritchett and Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli sent an email to students soliciting suggestions on

ways the University can improve policies around sexual harassment on campus. This latest policy change is presumably one of the efforts that the University is taking under this new initiative. “I personally think that sexual violence between students is a lot more common,” she added. “It’s the right idea, but I don’t know if they’re actually on target yet.” Jain agreed, adding that the University should continue to address the issues around sexual misconduct on campus with a specific focus on making it easier for victims to report instances of sexual assault. “I think that Penn does need to improve on making them, one, less complicated and, two, making students feels like they’ll be listened to,” she said. Wharton sophomore Shaunak Kulkarni expressed different concerns over Penn’s recent steps against sexual harassment at Penn. Kulkarni specifically noted issues with potentially making the reporting processes for sexual harassment at Penn easier and expressed concern over the prospect of Penn changing any methods. He said it could “open the gates to false accusations which is an equally large problem.” SEE SEXUAL ASSAULT PAGE 7

MONA LEE | NEWS PHOTO EDITOR

Majority of the female and male undergraduate respondents who experienced sexual assault or harrassment indicated that their offender was another student. These rates were different for Penn’s graduate students.

NEWS Read about this year’s Wharton Passion Projects PAGE 7

SEND NEWS TIPS TO NEWSTIP@THEDP.COM CONTACT US: 215-422-4640


2 NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Freshmen led walkout against ongoing gun violence Students had the opportunity to register to vote GORDON HO Contributing Reporter

On the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting, Penn students participated in a nationwide classroom walkout movement in protest of ongoing gun violence, mass shootings, and current gun laws. A group of nine College freshmen organized the April 20 event, which was held on College Green. The walkout started at noon with a moment of silence led by University Lutheran Church pastor Fritz Fowler. The brief moment was followed by several speeches and opportunities for students to sign petitions, write letters to congressmen, and register for voting. Penn students have participated in classroom walkouts throughout this semester. On Feb. 22, over 150 students stood on Locust Walk and held signs to show support for the victims of mass shootings.

DIVERSITY

>> FRONT PAGE

progressing forward is definitely a win for us in IDEAL,” Pilgrim said. “It’s exciting to know that there’s a potential.” In addition to a potential central diversity office, Mitchell wrote that Penn is introducing another suggestion from GAPSA’s February 2017 resolution — an online bias incident reporting form. According to Mitchell, the University-wide form will allow students to report events like discriminatory harassment and sexual misconduct. Mitchell wrote that the form is currently in a “test phase,” and should appear on the University’s diversity website by the end of April. Pilgrim – who will officially assume her role as GAPSA’s first

The day of the National School Walkout, established on March 14 in honor of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, over 30 Penn Law students and 150 employees of the Wistar Institute participated in walkouts. Organizer and College freshman Rachel Steinig emphasized that gun violence is an issue that extends past school shootings to include issues of police brutality and domestic violence as well. Co-organizer and College freshman Simran Chand said the group intentionally organized the event as nonpartisan so that anyone could join. While members of the group had first gotten to know each other through Penn Democrats, they did not want to be affiliated with any political organization. “We’re not viewing this as a partisan issue,” Chand said. “It’s a human issue. People are dying on the streets. It’s not about who’s in office. It’s not about what one party believes, what the other party believes.

It’s about keeping our citizens safe and respecting the opinions of the constituents.” College freshman Sabrina Ochoa, who was a part of the walkout, said people need to keep up the conversation surrounding gun control and not only consider its importance “every time some senseless act of violence happens and dies down like a week or so later.” At the end of the hour, the group of organizers announced students could go to a table to register to vote and sign petitions advocating for gun control reform. The students also handed out flyers with contact information of Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), Sen. Bob Casey (DPa.), and Rep. Dwight Evans (D-Philadelphia). “I am thinking and I am hoping that the momentum on common sense gun reform is, you know, getting stronger and stronger,” College freshman Sam Kaufmann said following the event. “It’s really going to start to matter in the 2018 election and beyond.”

The freshman organizers also provided time for students to go to a table to register to vote and sign petitions advocating for gun control reform. They also distributed flyers that contained senators’ contact information.

black woman president on May 1 — said that IDEAL teamed up with student activists to create and publicize an earlier version of the form in 2016, after students at the University of Oklahoma created a racist GroupMe chat targeting black freshmen at Penn. IDEAL Advocacy Chair Brie Starks, who is in her final year at the School of Social Policy and Practice, said that despite the administration’s monthly meetings with IDEAL and the upcoming bias reporting form, many students — particularly students of color — still face “a plethora of challenges not addressed through the current centers and offices” at Penn. Starks said this was “disheartening” to see after “tirelessly” working on issues of diversity and inclusion at Penn this past academic year. “Our demand remains clear and

that is to create a central diversity office that not only addresses situations of implicit bias, but the many concerns that speak to the intersectionality of students at Penn,” Starks said. “As a soon-tobe alumni, I will continue to make this need for a central diversity office clear.” Currently, Penn offers various decentralized resources for members of the Penn community to either file complaints with resource officers, or utilize campus resource centers like Makuu, La Casa Latina, and the Penn Women’s Center. In addition, there is a hotline for making complaints about violations of University policy. “Over the last decade in different ways, different organizations on campus have been asking for a centralized diversity resource,” Pilgrim said. “It’s exciting to know that there’s a potential.”

In addition to a potential central diversity office, Penn is introducing an online bias incident reporting form that will allow students to report events like discriminatory harassment and sexual misconduct.

Center for the Study of Contemporary China

2018 Annual Conference

Reform and Opening:

40 Years and Counting

April 26-27, 2018 Silverman147, Penn Law School Penn China Center's sixth annual conference, scheduled for April 2627, 2018 will have as its theme “Reform and Opening: 40 years and Counting.” The conference will address China’s 40 years of reform and opening to the outside through examining the domestic economy, rural reform, SOEs and private enterprises, financial sector reform, trade and currency issues, as well as outbound and inbound foreign investment. There are four panels and ten papers presented by leading scholars, followed by comments from expert discussants and open Q&A. Free and open to all.

CAROLINE GIBSON | ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

PHOTO FROM HALEY PILGRIM


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

NEWS 3

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

Historic West Philadelphia building to undergo major renovations The renovations include a lobby and office space SETH SCHUSTER Staff Reporter

A West Philadelphia building designed in the 1870s by renowned Victorian architect Frank Furness will be uncovered and restored by Philadelphia real estate development firm U3 Ventures. The firm, helmed by CEO Omar Blaik and Senior Vice President Tom Lussenhop, purchased the three-story building, located at 22 S. 40th Street, for $2.5 million from the mental health care facility, The Consortium. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the group plans to restore the building to its former glory through $5 million renovations expected to last less than a year. Lussenhop said in an interview with The Daily Pennsylvanian that the renovations will include a ground floor lobby with offices for use above. “It is a great building with character that we think will be attractive to tenants who are seeking something different than your typical office space,” Lussenhop said. “It will be an ideal location for smaller companies seeking an interesting and distinctive home.”

Born in 1839, Frank Furness was an American architect who was responsible for the design of more than 600 buildings in the Philadelphia area. “Furness practiced in Philadelphia for his whole professional life — from the end of the Civil War to his death in 1912,” Frank Furness expert and professor of art history at Williams College Michael Lewis, who received a Master of Arts in art history from Penn in 1985 and a Doctor of Philosophy in art history from Penn in 1989, said. “His work is reflective of the values of Philadelphia, a very practical, empirical, and industrial city.” According to Lewis, Furness’ tendency to highlight a building’s unique functional aspects was much different from his American contemporaries. Lewis cites Furness as the first American architect to leave rivets and beams exposed in a civic building as an ode to the industrial nature of Philadelphia. “So much of University City’s older building fabric was lost during the course of University City’s redevelopment in the 60s and 70s,” Lussenhop said. “This is a great chance to bring back some of it and hopefully encourage more preservation.” According to Hidden City Philadelphia, a website dedicated

to highlighting some of Philadelphia’s “most remarkable places,” Frank Furness was asked to design the building on 40th and Ludlow streets in 1874 for the West Philadelphia Institute, a trade-like school dedicated to educating young men with labor and industrial skills. The building opened its doors in 1876. Over the course of the building’s history, it has served various groups and purposes — including the West Philadelphia branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Electric Company. According to the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, the building also underwent renovation during that time, notably in 1927. The building was also repainted by the Philadelphia Electric Company. The deterioration of the building continued when it became a mental health center in the 1970s. Following the Medicare and Medicaid bill signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, The Consortium was established in Philadelphia to provide health services to the city. The group covered up the original metal facade design, and only the Furness-style mansard and chimney remained exposed. “Most large urban American cities, during the period of ‘Urban Renewal’ [in the 1950s and 1960s], tore down the older buildings

stock, thinking that cities needed to look and behave like suburbs in order to survive,” Lussenhop said. “Philadelphia was not appreciated by Boston and New York that ran the architectural journals of the day,” Frank Furness expert George E. Thomas, who received a Doctor of Philosophy in the history of art from Penn in 1975, said. “It has taken 50 years of work to get him back into the canon of modern design.” Lewis explained that tearing down unconventional buildings designed by architects such as Furness began as early as the 1920s. What saved this particular building were metal plates that Lewis said acted as a “camouflage.” “These buildings tended to be loud and brash,” Lewis said. “As taste became more academic and polite in the early 20th century, his buildings started to look like thugs — a little rowdy, unruly, undisciplined, and unbuttoned.” Although U3 plans on restoring the building, Thomas explained the building will probably never return to the way it was due to the paint job and the altering of the window bays. Still, Lewis labeled the restoration effort “a good cause.” Furness’ architectural impact has made a lasting impression on Penn’s campus as well.

CINDY CHEN | ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

The building was designed by American architect Frank Furness, who was responsible for designing more than 600 buildings in Philadelphia.

In 1891, Furness designed the University of Pennsylvania Library, now known as the Fisher Fine Arts Library. Just blocks away on Drexel University’s campus, Furness designed the 1876 Paul Peck Alumni Center, which was formerly the Centennial National Bank. The architectural influence of Furness’ work stretches far beyond the Philadelphia area. Furness is cited as one of the major influences

of Louis Sullivan, who designed many historical structures in Chicago. Sullivan, who is credited with the phrase “form follows function,” studied under Furness in the summer of 1873. “He learned this radical new approach that the nature of the building would generate its major form,” said Lewis. “Sullivan gets credit for that phrase, but it was an idea he learned from Frank Furness.”

Cast of ‘Creed II’ spotted on campus The film is slated to be released on Nov. 21

MADELEIENE LAMON News Editor

The stars from the upcoming film “Creed II” are on campus and Penn students could not be more excited. Students quickly swarmed the production trailers located on the block of 37th and Sansom streets as the news spread in the early afternoon of April 20 that the actors of the sports drama film were on campus.

Other news reports confirm that the crew is in Philadelphia filming the sequel to “Creed,” which was released in 2015 and received critical acclaim. Students first learned about the film crew after spotting the trailer that belongs to the film’s main character, “Adonis Creed,” who is played by Michael B. Jordan. Around 5:30 p.m., Jordan was spotted driving by some students around 37th and Walnut streets. He lowered his window to wave to some fans. Earlier this week, Jordan and

his co-stars, Sylvester Stallone and Tessa Thompson, were spotted in various locations across Philadelphia, Penn Live reported. Cast members reportedly shared a meal at the awardwinning Israeli restaurant Zahav late last month and Jordan has been recently spotted running on the Schuylkill Banks and working out at Sweat Fitness in Old City. Stallone has also posted several pictures and videos of himself on Instagram at locations in Philadelphia.

The sequel to “Creed,” which is a spinoff of the Rocky Balboa franchise, follows Adonis – a recently successful lightweight boxer – as he trains to face off against a new rival. For his performance in “Creed,” which was also filmed in Philadelphia, Stallone received his first Oscar nomination since the original Rocky film. He also won the Golden Globe Award and Critcis’ Choice Award for Best Supporting Actor. “Creed II” is slated to be released on Nov. 21.

Need An Interview Outf it? HERE IS HOW TO GET ONE FOR FREE!

1

Email Anne Marie Gercke at Career Service (agercke@ upenn.edu). Let her know of your interest in a free professional outfit and your FGLI identification.

2

Wait for Anne Marie’s response, which will include instructions for contacting Career Wardrobe.

PHOTO FROM ANNIE SUN

Earlier this week, Michael B. Jordan, Sylvester Stallone, and Tessa Thompson, were spotted in various locations across Philadelphia.

3

Once you have received instructions - call to schedule an appointment with a staff member at Career Wardrobe! You will receive a full professional outfit, accessories, and shoes (if you find a pair that fit!)

A special thanks to Career Services and VPUL for coordinating and funding this opportunity! Please Note: You will be responsible for coordinating transportation to and from Career Wardrobe.


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OPINION

MONDAY APRIL 23, 2018 VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 28 134th Year of Publication DAVID AKST President REBECCA TAN Executive Editor CHRIS MURACCA Print Director

No, you aren’t too busy to volunteer

JULIA SCHORR Digital Director HARRY TRUSTMAN Opinion Editor

FRESH TAKE | Inside drinking culture at the ‘Social Ivy,’ and what the administration can do to fix it

SARAH FORTINSKY Senior News Editor JONATHAN POLLACK Senior Sports Editor LUCY FERRY Senior Design Editor GILLIAN DIEBOLD Design Editor CHRISTINE LAM Design Editor ALANA SHUKOVSKY Design Editor BEN ZHAO Design Editor KELLY HEINZERLING News Editor MADELEINE LAMON News Editor HALEY SUH News Editor MICHEL LIU Assignments Editor COLE JACOBSON Sports Editor THEODOROS PAPAZEKOS Sports Editor

I’

m ashamed to say I only started volunteering at Penn at the beginning of my sophomore spring. It had been a huge part of my pre-Penn life, but as soon as I stepped foot on Locust Walk for the first time, I fell victim to the insidious bubble on campus that emanates the facade of self-absorbed busyness. By sophomore fall though, my formerly surging sense of civic responsibility crept back. I decided to sign up to tutor for the West Philadelphia Tutoring Project. My first time tutoring hit me like a bag of bricks. We drove 15 minutes into West Philadelphia to arrive at a local middle school, but it may as well have

YOSEF WEITZMAN Sports Editor ALISA BHAKTA Copy Editor ALEX GRAVES Director of Web Development BROOKE KRANCER Social Media Editor SAM HOLLAND Senior Photo Editor MONA LEE News Photo Editor CHASE SUTTON Sports Photo Editor CAMILLE RAPAY Video Producer LAUREN SORANTINO Podcasts Producer

DEANNA TAYLOR Business Manager ANDREW FISCHER Innovation Manager

been a different country. As I sat down with my tutee, I was ready to work on read-

ing comprehension. I wanted to show her how to pick out the main arguments of a passage, or how to read between the lines. But I realized, I had to teach her

was my only concern. We hopped back into the van, and 10 minutes later, we were back at Penn. I felt as if I had been re-injected back into a

Are our consulting clubs so important that we don’t have time to help a middle-schooler learn how to read?” how to read. We ended up working on sounding out words. During those 45 minutes, I

sealed community of oblivious, selfish inhabitants. I felt guilty. I felt guilty that I had educational opportunities that my tutee didn’t. I felt guilty that 20 minutes ago, I was teaching a middle-schooler how to read, and now, I was sitting in my dorm room in one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Whether you should feel “Ivy League-guilt” is debatable, but Penn students’ unrelenting civic CATHERINE LIANG | DESIGN ASSOCIATE responsibility is not. It is undenihad no midterms, research work, able that you had the opportuor club involvements to stress nity to attend a well-resourced about. My tutee’s ability to read university. Therefore, you have

a massive responsibility to use your position and means “to serve mankind,” the premise on which Benjamin Franklin founded our university. Firstly, Penn students are an amazing resource for West Philadelphia. Everyone has unique and diverse experiences to bring to wherever we want to volunteer. Penn students are smart and ambitious. It is indisputable that we have the potential to positively impact many community groups, if only we tried. But many don’t. We flock to West Philadelphia from over 100 countries across the world, only to stay within a 10-block radius, not venturing past 45th Street. Ironically, our selfishness is communal. As we keep trying to one-up each other’s resume padding, our herd mentality of busyness attempts to vindicate our lack of civic engagement. But, are our consulting clubs so important that we don’t have time to help a middle-schooler learn how to read? It’s absolutely arrogant and downright self-absorbed to believe that we are so extremely caught up in our world of exams, board meetings, and coffee chats that we cannot squeeze in time to help someone who could really use it. It’s so selfish to come to West Philadelphia, stay in the Ivy League bubble, and think that our busyness is beyond giving back to the community. It’s time to shed the arrogance and realize that the importance of volunteering is on par with, if not more important than, all our

LUCY HU resume-building activities. Secondly, if helping others is not enough of a reason, do it for the personal rewards of civic engagement. Volunteering for West Philadelphia Tutoring Project exposed me directly to the School District of Philadelphia’s education system. I gained insights into education that I otherwise would not have. I became less self-absorbed. We are so self-centered; it is killing us. We place unhealthy importance on Penn life, forgetting that the world is much bigger. We think that Monday’s midterm is the entire world. Stress levels rise in our world of club elections. Volunteering gives perspective; helping others places our frustrations in a grander scheme of societal struggles. Check out Civic House. Or find an organization independent of Penn. We all know that Penn students have the initiative. It’s just about caring a little. LUCY HU is a College sophomore from Auckland, New Zealand, studying political science. Her email address is lucyhu@sas. upenn.edu.

DAVID FIGURELLI Analytics Director JOY EKASI-OTU Circulation Manager

My #MeToo moment during Fling

REMI GOLDEN Marketing Manager

THIS ISSUE

GUEST COLUMN BY JAMIE GOBRESKI

GRACE WU Deputy Copy Editor NADIA GOLDMAN Copy Associate SAM MITCHELL Copy Associate FRED LU Copy Associate TAHIRA ISLAM Copy Associate LILY ZEKAVAT Copy Associate NICK AKST Copy Associate RYAN DOUGLAS Copy Associate ZACH SHELDON Photo Associate CARSON KAHOE Photo Associate NICOLE FRIDLING Photo Associate JULIO SOSA Photo Associate

L

ike so many other women, I learned early on that we should only walk alone at night if it is not a desolate area, if there are eyes and witnesses that can see me. But on the Friday night of Fling, walking alone down Locust Walk, a walk I have taken so many times during my time at Penn, I felt the least safe I’ve ever felt walking through campus. Around 3 in the morning, I was walking home from a friend’s dorm across campus. It was late, but it was one of the most exciting weekends of the school year, and my route took me straight down

rassed by four men. These men, members of a fraternity, physically and verbally assaulted me as I walked down Locust Walk. They made me feel unsafe, upset, and angry. And when I called them out on it, they justified their actions and told me I was wrong for being upset. Here’s what went down: One of the men came up not two inches behind me, gyrating and brushing his body against mine while his three friends looked on, keeling over with laughter. I turned and looked at him with a look of obvious disgust, and this guy ran to catch up with his friends ahead,

LIZZY MACHIELSE Photo Associate

LETTERS Have your own opinion? Send your letter to the editor or guest column to letters@thedp.com. Unsigned editorials appearing on this page represent the opinion of The Daily Pennsylvanian as determined by the majority of the Editorial Board. All other columns, letters and artwork represent the opinion of their authors and are not necessarily representative of the DP’s position.

I continue to be angry today as I write this. I’m angry that I don’t get to feel safe walking down my own campus, that, in that moment, I had to worry if I would get home safely.” Locust Walk where hordes of raucous students filtered through. I’ve walked home from the library at the same time, on the same route, and always felt safe because I know the area is well lit, has many security cameras, and is constantly patrolled by campus police. On Friday night, I felt even safer because the walk was populated by so many of my peers. And then, I was sexually ha-

laughing and jeering at me. I called after them, “Excuse me. That’s NOT a good thing to do to a woman walking by herself at night.” “You’re not in the Fling mindset then, if you don’t get it,” they responded. I tried to explain to them how they made me feel threatened and intimidated, and they proceeded to laugh at me, telling me in more

words that my feelings were not legitimate. They proceeded to make a joke about me being a hooker, laughing with each other that they should “hire me out for their whole pledge class.” Upon hearing how they spoke about my body, objectifying me and stripping away my agency, I felt violated. That deep violation quickly gave way to an even deeper anger. I continue to be angry today as I write this. I’m angry that I don’t get to feel safe walking down my own campus, that, in that moment, I had to worry if I would get home safely. I’m angry that because I wasn’t okay with being accosted, it means I’m not “fun.” I’m angry that these men think treating their own classmate like this is okay, let alone funny. I’m angry at every other man who has laughed instead of calling this behavior out, at everyone who has fueled the flames of rape culture. I’m angry that these men feel protected at our university, and I don’t even feel protected walking home. We have to question why these men felt so comfortable so blatantly threatening and intimidating me. We have to question the attitudes that allow rape culture to thrive on our campus. We have to question the systems that implicitly condone and normalize these pernicious, violent behaviors. This is not the worst act of sexual violence I’ve experienced, nor was it the only act of harassment I experienced that day. For most women, acts like this are normal

parts of our day, normal parts of our life. Women who identify as LGBTQ or who are disabled are even more likely to experience sexual violence on campuses and

call into question the sexist power dynamics that dominate our campus. While Penn has implemented many safeguards, the students themselves must be committed

The #MeToo movement has brought forth stories from women across lines of industry, race, class, religion, and education level, shedding light on the pervasiveness of sexual violence.” in our society at large. The #MeToo movement has brought forth stories from women across lines of industry, race, class, religion, and education level, shedding light on the pervasiveness of sexual violence. It remains clear that women face near-constant threats of sexual violence, be it at the workplace, in the classroom, or even while in transit. Even in spaces where access is predicated on privilege, women are not removed from the constant threat of assault: A journalist last weekend interviewed 54 women at Coachella, all of whom had been sexually harassed at the festival. It is time to reconcile what the #MeToo movement means for us at Penn, on both an institutional level and an interpersonal level. That means that we must

to ensuring all of their peers feel secure. So, to my fellow students, I implore you: Call out this sexual violence when you witness it, especially if you are in a position of power. Attend PAVE training, and then act on what you’ve learned. Listen to the voices of the women around you. Believe those women that you listen to. Change won’t occur unless all of us — especially men and those who benefit from Penn’s patriarchal power structures — are committed to the safety and inclusion of every person on the campus. JAMIE GOBRESKI is a College junior studying urban studies from Philadelphia. Gobreski is the editor of Word on the Street for 34th Street Magazine. Her email address is jamiego@sas.upenn.edu.


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Penn has a drinking problem. Let’s acknowledge it. SIMONETTI SAYS | Inside drinking culture at the ‘Social Ivy,’ and what the administration can do to fix it

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orld-class professors, a rich array of extracurriculars, engaging classes, and countless career opportunities — these are probably the things that come to mind when most people think of a Penn education. These are the qualities of this university that you will find on campus tours and admissions packets. What is less discussed is the real drinking culture at the “social Ivy,” and how, as it stands, Penn’s alcohol policy fails to protect its students from the dangers of binge drinking. Last semester, in a separate column, I broke down numbers: Approximately 20 percent of college students meet the cri-

696,000 students are assaulted by another who has been drinking, and 97,000 experience date rape or alcohol-related sexual assault. A lot of us are numb to these statistics. We already know that Penn, and many of its peer institutions, drink in excess. Whether we like it or not, that isn’t going anywhere. But it’s time we think more critically about the effectiveness of the administration’s approach to Penn’s drinking problem. Possession and consumption of alcohol by students under 21 is prohibited on Penn’s campus. This

Don’t get me wrong, drinking on college campuses is a difficult issue to navigate. No alcohol policy is perfect, but Penn’s doesn’t even try to be.” teria for alcohol use disorder. Researchers estimate that 1,825 college students die per year from alcohol-related injuries,

ignores the fact that underage drinking will persist on campus. Penn isn’t immune to college drinking habits.

Stanford University has a much different alcohol policy, which allows all students to consume alcohol, provided that they leave their doors open. This is intended to promote more responsible drinking habits and prevent alcohol-related deaths and injuries. In a statement to The Stanford Daily, Ralph Castro, the director of Stanford’s alcohol education office, said, “We take an educational approach, wherein we educate students about accountability for bad choices, and expect them to make legal and healthy decisions … The opendoor label is an unofficial term used by students; our intention

met with criticism, data shows that it resulted in a significant drop in freshman drinking and hospital transports. Our Ivy peer, Dartmouth College, instituted a similar ban. Last semester, the Penn administration announced the Task Force on a Safe and Responsible Campus’ recommendations. These included a shot ban, as well as a fourmixed-drinks limit. SEYOUNG AN | DESIGN ASSOCIATE Unlike Stanford, however, this strict is to build community in resi- alcohol policy is not suppledences that encourage respon- mented by an open-door rule sible behaviour among peers.” that acknowledges the occurPenn’s adoption of a similar rence of underage drinking. policy would result in a safer What’s more, Penn students are drinking environment. By tak- able to circumvent these poliing a more active role to address cies with sophisticated fake IDs binge drinking early on in stu- purchased on the internet. dents’ careers, the administraA university’s primary retion could potentially avoid the sponsibility should be to its escalation of recreational drink- students. After all, administraing to a more serious issue. An tors are not police officers. It is open-door policy would also Penn’s job to prepare us in our promote a more healthy, honest educations and social lives for relationship between residential the challenges and decisions we advisors and their residents. will be forced to make in the In 2016, Stanford also imple- real world. Banning the conmented a hard-alcohol ban that sumption of all alcohol among banned shots at on-campus par- students under 21 is unrealistic. ties. Although this was initially The administration’s focus on

ISABELLA SIMONETTI prohibition isn’t doing us any favors. It inevitably has resulted in binge drinking in unsafe environments. Don’t get me wrong, drinking on college campuses is a difficult issue to navigate. No alcohol policy is perfect, but Penn’s doesn’t even try to be. There aren’t a whole lot of concrete things that can be done to change this school for the better. Revising the University’s stance on alcohol consumption offers the unique opportunity to have an honest conversation about how Penn drinks, and reform our drinking culture. The Class of 2022 could have a much healthier relationship with alcohol than students in my own year and our predecessors. But it’s up to the administration to make that happen. I S A B E LL A S IM O NE T T I i s a College freshman from New York studying English. Her email address is simonetti@thedp.com.

CARTOON

VERONICA FENTON is a College freshman from Penn Valley, Pa. Her email address is fentonv@sas.upenn.edu.

How the Cardi B contest got me banned from Tinder

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ince I became aware of Penn’s standing in the Cardi B “Swipe-Off” competition, I suppressed my shame and reinstalled my less-than-savory Tinder account. While I had an account before the competition, I used it more as a tool to occasionally spy on male undergraduates at Penn who use Tinder rather profusely.

THE WALLFLOWER | Disappointment in the Fling lineup led to the misuse of a legitimate dating app use Tinder on a daily basis. Partly fueled by my disappointment with the Spring Fling lineup, I became so invested in bringing Cardi B to Penn that I even purchased the premium version of Tinder for one month so I could swipe without limits. Before beginning my right-swipe bonanza, I left a small disclaimer in my bio that I was only using

er, my inbox was full of greetings and dull pickup lines from 18- to 22-year-old Tinder users within a one-mile radius. While I did not respond to 98 percent of the messages, I did take it upon myself to read some of them. A good hand-

But putting aside the objectifying, inappropriate, and/or racial commentary, many of the incoming messages were from ordinary men just shooting their shots. At this point, I started to feel bad about the whole thing. I knew

This competition gave many regular Tinder users false hope and took a hit on many egos given the lack of responses from new matches.” Like myself, many students did not even realize that Penn was in the running for this competition until the contestant schools were narrowed down to the Top 16. Our unknowing success is a testament to how much Penn students

the app to partake in the competition. It was my hope that those who happened to match with me would realize that I was not seriously using the app. But unfortunately, this was out of my control. A week and 1,171 matches lat-

ful of them were comments on my ethnicity, some of the funnier ones I recall being “Asian Persuasion” and “What ethnicity are you? It is beautiful (sic).”

that I was wasting a lot of people’s time trying to win a competition unknownto anyone outside the Penn bubble. Other Penn students even ridiculed users’ ap-

pearances online, in an attempt to elicit reactions on the Facebook meme page. And to only add to my guilt, several users followed up with me asking whether we won the concert, even after Penn was long eliminated from the final round. Much of the blame should be on Tinder for devising a marketing strategy like a “Swipe-Off” competition, which would inevitably lead to students swiping right only for the sake of winning the concert. It’s unfortunate that a group of college students essentially hijacked a legitimate — although sometimes disparaged — dating app that many people use as a medium to actually meet partners. This competition gave many regular Tinder users false hope and took a hit on many egos given the lack of responses from new matches. The only benefit I see from this competition was that it brought together Penn students during a stressful time with midterms and summer internship application deadlines. Swiping on Tinder was also an entertaining study break, especially as it seemed that half

JENNIFER LEE the undergraduate population was on it at the same time. Nonetheless, Penn ended up losing the Cardi B competition. In the process, I personally lost $9.99 and was reported and blocked indefinitely from Tinder. So if you ask me whether it was worth swiping for Cardi, I would certainly say it was not. Editor’s Note: A representative from Tinder reached out to Jennifer the day after this column was published online, informing her that her account has now been reinstated. JENNIFER LEE is a College sophomore from Fairfax, Va. studying economics. Her email is leej@dailypennsylvanian.com.


6 NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

‘The % Project’ It surveyed 300 students enrolled in computer science ETHAN RANDAZZO Contributing Reporter

A host of Penn students, particularly those studying computer science, are posting photos to social media about Penn’s diversity statistics in the field. The Penn Women in Computer Science student organization is sponsoring a social media movement called “The % Project,” aimed at increasing awareness for diversity issues in Penn’s computer science field. This initiative involves students posting pictures on social media displaying statistics from a recent diversity census conducted by WiCS in coordination with the Computer and Information Science Department last month, which approximately 300 students enrolled in computer science at Penn replied to. The survey asked questions about demographics, feminism, student culture, harassment, and engagement in both class and online homework forums. Engineering sophomore Lucia Huo said that after looking at the data from the diversity census, she figured, “Why not just make this an art project?” to draw more attention to the important data. Engineering junior Stephanie Tang, who serves as advocacy

chair on the WiCS board, organized “The % Project,” along with fellow members Huo and Engineering sophomore Alice Deng. Tang emphasized that the project is about “putting a face to these statistics.” The diversity census presented significant disparities in representation of minority and female students and teaching assistants in computer science. Beyond that, responses also demonstrated uncertainty toward feminism, with 50 percent of students saying they would not consider themselves as feminists. The survey shed light on the experience of being a minority in the classroom. A question on the survey asking students to agree or disagree with the statement, “I generally feel comfortable asking questions during lecture,” showed a disparity between students of different races and genders. While over 40 percent of Asian and white students agreed, only 17.65 percent of “black or African American” students agreed. Meanwhile, 23.76 percent of female students said they felt comfortable asking questions in class compared to over 60 percent of male students. The survey also showed a “confidence gap” in Piazza, an online classroom forum for students to raise and answer questions to their professors, TAs, and classmates. The data showed a significant dispar-

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Women in Computer highlightsScience U. gender disparities Diversity Survey ity between how willing female and minority students are to post un-anonymously to a homework site like Piazza. Another question asked if students would be likely to report incidents of harassment and “micro-aggressions.” Of respondents, 53 percent answered they would likely use a form to report such incidents anonymously. Engineering and Wharton junior and WiCS President Andrea Ning said “The % Project” was necessary to shed light on the rather unapparent diversity issues in Penn’s Computer and Information Science Department. “Awareness is huge,” she said. “I think at Penn people assume there is not as much discrimination, especially not gender-based.” The most recent numbers indicate that, of the total 800 Engineering students majoring in computer science at Penn, only 46 percent, which is less than 6 percent of Penn’s undergraduate body, self-identified as an underrepresented minority. Comparatively, according to Penn’s diversity statistics, 7 percent of Penn undergraduates are black, and slightly over 10 percent are Hispanic. WiCS circulated a Google Form for volunteers to sign up to have their photos taken. The organization encouraged volunteers to choose a statistic to represent and change their profile picture on April 19. On

Prefer not say 2% Non-Binary 2%

Female 43%

Black or African American 7% American Indian Other or Alaskan Native 3% 1% Prefer not say 3%

Self-Describe 1%

Gender Identity

Male 52%

Racial Identity

Asian 43%

White 43%

If Piazza didn’t allow for anonymous questions, I would not likely post on the platform. Race

Gender Identity

Ethnicity

70.59% of Black or African

79.21% of Female students

36.36% of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish-origin students

53.72% of Asian students

40.00% of Non-Binary students

45.80% of Non-Hispanic students

50% of White students

35.43% of Male students

ERIC ZHANG | DESIGN ASSOCIATE

that date, WiCS also posted a collage of the participants on Facebook. The results of the survey were presented on March 30 at the first annual CIS Diversity Summit. Ning said that the CIS Diversity Summit committee is creating a roadmap of action-

able steps to present to faculty based on the census results, ideas, and stories shared at the summit. A follow-up on the action items will begin in the fall. WiCS Vice President of Marketing and College and Engineering sophomore Sneha Advani said social media cam-

paigns like “The % Project” are important to not only raise awareness, but also to encourage females studying computer science to achieve tremendous success. “While women in computer science may be underrepresented,” she said, “they are not alone.”

Conservative columnist tells students why to vote for Trump He cited Trump’s achievements during his first year AVNI KATARIA Staff Reporter

The conservative columnist Michael Knowles discussed the “ge-

nius” of President Donald Trump in an event held on Penn’s campus this Thursday. The 28-year-old Yale graduate, known for his satirical book “Reasons to Vote for Democrats: A Comprehensive Guide,” told students in Huntsman Hall that Trump “has had perhaps

the most successful first year of any president.” Referring to Penn as “Trump University,” Knowles said one reason to vote for Trump was because “it makes Democrats cry, and their salty, delicious, leftist tears give [him] joy.” He also discussed for-

The Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy Annual Conference

States of Religious Freedom Friday, May 4, 2018 | 9 a.m.–5 p.m. | Houston Hall, Bodek Lounge Reception to Follow. Free and open to all.

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hat is religious freedom? Can it truly be universal? What are the rights of religious minorities when set against a nation’s popular majority? And when religious liberties seemingly conflict with gender and sexuality rights, which should prevail if the conflict cannot be resolved? In its 2018 Annual Conference, the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy will address these challenging questions and discuss how the U.S. accommodates, or hinders, religious expression, culture, and the practice of religious freedom. This year’s panelists will include: Lori G. Beaman (University of Ottawa), Heiner Bielefeldt (University of Erlangen) W. Cole Durham (Brigham Young University), Mayanthi Fernando (University of California, Santa Cruz) R. Marie Griffith (Washington University in St. Louis), Joshua Matz (Gupta Wessler PLLC), and Daniel Philpott (University of Notre Dame). Co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies. For more information, please visit the Andrea Mitchell Center website at: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/andrea-mitchell-center

mer presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s “deplorable nature.” “She called half of her country irreparable and irredeemable,” Knowles said, adding that Clinton was representative of the present state of the Democratic Party. “Hillary’s never been a wonderful candidate or terribly competent on running campaigns or federal agencies.” Knowles, the managing editor of the conservative publication The Daily Wire, also specifically criticized what he described as Clinton’s attempts to “gut the first and second amendments” during her campaign. Knowles was invited by Penn College Republicans and the conservative campus publication The Statesman to discuss “Reasons to Vote for Trump.” Prior to the April 19 event, The Statesman tweeted that posters around campus advertising the discussion with Knowles had been torn down. College sophomore Dominic Gregorio, an opinion editor at The Statesman, called the event “an absolute, outstanding success.” “It was beyond our greatest expectations,” Gregorio said. “It was really thought provoking, it was truth seeking, it was conversational, it was polite, it was fantastic.” At the event, Knowles said to students that he has not always been a Trump supporter, but that Trump’s first year in office had alleviated any fears he initially had on election day. “Immediately my fear subsided, I learned to stop worrying and love the Don,” Knowles said to a laughing crowd. “It worked out very, very well.” College junior Christian Petrillo said the talk was “pretty interest-

BUDGET

>> FRONT PAGE

group’s funding has reached seven figures. SPEC consists of nine different branches which are responsible for organizing events throughout the academic year. These include speaker events, concerts, and the annual Spring Fling celebration. The two SPEC branches that saw the greatest budget increases were SPEC Concerts and Spring Fling committees, both of which have been the subject of controversy this semester after implementing a series of significant changes to the annual Fling celebrations. The new budget also reflects a drop in revenue that Spring Fling has endured over the years. In the 2014-2015 budget, SPEC Concerts was anticipated to bring in $300,000

MEGAN JONES | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Knowles said to students that he has not always been a Trump supporter, but that Trump’s first year in office had alleviated any fears he had had.

ing” despite the fact that he wasn’t familiar with Knowles’ work. “I agree with a lot of things about 2016,” Petrillo said. “I voted for Trump, and was reluctant to do so at first because of a lot of things that were going on, but I think I was happy at the result.” Turning to the 2020 election, Knowles cited Trump’s achievements during his first year in office as reasons to support the 1968 Wharton graduate. Among these achievements, Knowles listed deregulation, tax reform, “a decent foreign policy,” pulling America out of the “absurd” Paris Climate Accord, and “a wonderful Supreme Court Justice” as some of the many changes that make Trump deserving of a second presidential run in 2020. He added that while the “hys-

terical left” cites Trump’s demeanor as something which will “send us careening into World War III and into nuclear holocaust,” he believes that Trump’s latest discussions with the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signal the possibility of peace after 70 years of aggression. When addressing the negative press surrounding the president, Knowles said that Trump supporters should ignore it and “enjoy the exuberance of this moment.” “What we must do is build our culture and politics back up,” Knowles said. “We have to build on the victory in 2016, we have to build on it in 2018, we have to build on it in 2020, and we must make America great again and again and again and again and again and again.”

of ticketing revenue. This year, the budget anticipated $235,000 of ticketing revenue – a $65,000 drop. This year’s Spring Fling was shortened to one day instead of two. Daytime activities were moved out from the Quadrangle for the first time, the number of student performances was cut down, and the Fling concert featured four artists instead of two. These changes were all met with mixed reviews from students and alumni. SPEC Concerts, the division of PSG tasked with organizing the Fling concert, was given an additional $47,000 compared to this past year – a 19.14 percent change. The branch received a total of $292,500 in funding, around $50,000 less than the the group requested. Over 90 percent of its budget is designated for the group to organize the Fling concert in 2019.

SPEC Spring Fling, the group’s branch presiding over carnival-style events that traditionally took place in the Quad, received a total of $203,000 for 2018-2019, marking a $14,800 increase from this past year. For the previous two years, the cost for “Fling Proper,” which include the costs for venders, marketing, security, and operations, was $191,900. This year, however, despite Fling being shortened to a single day, the infrastructure cost for the day was $202,700 mainly due to an additional $10,500 in “Facilities Fee” to move the Quad events to Penn Park. In previous years, holding events in the Quad did not incur a facilities fee. Wharton junior and co-chair of SPEC Concerts Elizabeth Goran said that “SPEC does not comment on individual committees” budgets.


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

NEWS 7

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

A look into this year’s Wharton Passion Projects The program grants up to $300 per student project

able preparing in bulk, so I look forward to making it for my friends.” Wharton senior Allyson Choi chose rock climbing as her Passion Project, taking trips to Nevada and across Pennsylvania to various mountain sites. After being introduced to the sport by friends in her sophomore year, she became almost immediately passionate about climbing, saying “I really feel

ETHAN RANDAZZO Contributing Reporter

Many gathered at Baker Forum in Huntsman Hall for the annual Wharton Passion Projects Showcase, where students presented their projects that ranged from focusing on Halal food recipes to teaching students about the responsibilities of working on a farm. Every year, the Wharton Passion Projects Program selects 10 to 15 students who are interested in pursuing a passion outside of the classroom that is not a startup or club project. The Wharton Dean’s Undergraduate Advisory Board began the program in 2015 and grants up to $300 per project for students to explore their interests throughout the course of the semester. This initiative seeks to inspire creativity and innovation among Wharton students along with general wellness. Wharton freshman Griffen Croft, one of the selected applicants, traveled to Henry C. Lea Elementary School to teach second grade students about the responsibilities of working on a farm and cultivating crops for his Passion Project. He had helped raise sheep, chickens, and pigs on his family’s farmland, and felt that younger students in the city had most like-

SEXUAL ASSAULT >> FRONT PAGE

“More important than encouraging people to report or making it easier to report is inculcating a sense of responsibility within people,” he said. “Be responsible to not misuse that power.” Jain also expressed doubt over the Penn’s motivations for enacting this change and solic-

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in the zone and in the moment when I am climbing.” Choi added that the varying degrees of difficulty involved in rock climbing is strenuous on the mind as well as the body. “For me, each climb is like solving a puzzle, and it takes a lot of thinking to accomplish,” she said. Other projects involved playing the electric violin, podcasts, and DJing.

Live music • Film • Dance • Theater Art Education • Community

CULTURAL CENTERS

G.Calvin Weston aka Old Man Jenkins Free Birds Improv Groove (FREE) April 24 @ 8:00 PM BIRUK TIBEBE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Wharton Dean’s Undergraduate Advisory Board began the Wharton Passion Projects program in 2015. It funds 10 to 15 students and allows them to explore their interests throughout the semester.

ly never been exposed to such a rural environment and lifestyle. Once a week for three weeks, Croft gave interactive demonstrations at the school, teaching the elementary students about poultry and horticulture and even showing them how to milk a cow using doctor’s gloves. “It was really fun for me to bring some of my background into Philly, and share my experienc-

es with other people that they probably wouldn’t normally get exposed to,” he said. Another student, Wharton sophomore Abhi Motgi, decided to convert his love of local Halal food trucks into a Passion Project, exploring healthier, but still tasty, recipes. As he explained, “I thought, what if I tried making these dishes? But then I felt like just remaking

the dishes wasn’t enough, so I wanted to add my own healthy touch to it.” While Motgi estimated a meal from a Halal cart could be around 1400 calories, his own chicken over rice was only just over 600 calories. He concluded that he hopes to further explore Middle Eastern cuisine and added, “I have a good goto dish now that I feel comfort-

FRIDAY, MAY 4TH

G.Calvin Weston aka Old Man Jenkins brings the creative sounds of improv transcending emulating the music of some of his mentors like Bill Cobham, Narada Michael Walden, Jeff Beck, and others.

Paul Metzger & John Saint Pelvyn pres. by Fire Museum (FREE) April 25 @ 8:00 PM Paul Metzger has been experimenting, playing his various artinstruments including his distinct heavily modified 23 string banjo. John Saint Pelvyn, guitarist, thereminist, singer, and player of some species of dismantled electrified folk.

The Gathering Admission $3 before 10:00 PM, $5 after 10:00 PM April 26 @ 9:00 PM Established in 1996, The Gathering is the longest-running Hip Hop event in Philly. DJs spin all night, open cyphas, a tag wall, and a featured performance and graffiti panel each month.

Spring Vegan Potluck (FREE) April 28 @ 5:00 PM Please bring a small vegan dish of your choosing, a card or sheet of paper listing your ingredients, and a serving utensil. No animal ingredients. Bring dishes ready to serve.

don’t expect too much because 12:00 - 2:00PM at least with me and a lot -of The ARCH Building

iting ideas. “I think it’s good that they’re trying to make a change I just don’t know if it’s because of public image or because they are trying to protect students more,” Jain said. Rego indicated that she thought the University would not follow through to create meaningful change on campus. “A lot of change needs to be done, and I’m hopeful but I

other women, Penn has consistently let us down,” she said. President of Men Against Rape & Sexual Assault and College junior James Hiebert, former Chair of Abuse and Sexual Assault Prevention and College senior Caroline Ohlson, and current ASAP Chair and College junior Kara Hardie declined to comment on this story.

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Philly MAC-Down 3: Return of the MAC April 29 @ 5:00 PM

Vegan mac & cheese contest is back. Watch the local competitors vie to win the GOLDEN TROPHY! Online tickets are $15, tickets at the door $20, and children younger than 5-years-old are FREE

As an alcohol-free/smoke-free venue, The Rotunda provides an invaluable social alternative for all ages.

4014 Walnut • TheRotunda.org

FRIDAY, MAY 4TH

12:00 - 2:00PM - The ARCH Building

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MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018 VOL. CXXXIV NO. 28

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

ATHLETES OF THE YEAR

I

t’s not every year that Penn Athletics produces a national champion. But junior Reeham Sedky of women’s squash became the program’s first individual to top the nation since 1996 when she won the 2018 CSA Individual National Championship in March. Sedky, who also reached the final in both 2016 and 2017, finally took the crown by defeating Harvard’s Gina Kennedy in a convincing four-game triumph. She dropped just two games all season long, winning each of her 20 matches against collegiate opponents. After the college season ended, however, Sedky continued on to play two tournaments on the professional circuit. In her first professional appearance, she went on to beat the tournament’s top seed and world No. 20 in the first round, advancing all the way to the finals of the Texas Open and falling to world No. 16 Amanda Sobhy in the championship.

Just two weeks later, ‘The Hammer’ traveled to Richmond for her second pro tournament. She marched straight to the finals to take on world No. 31 Rowan El Araby for the title. Sedky beat El Araby in four games to win her first professional championship and shoot up 150 places in the world rankings. It was undoubtedly the best season yet for Sedky, already a recipient of the 2016 US Olympic Committee’s Athlete of the Year. With one season left in her collegiate career, she has already won everything in the game except a team title. Regardless of result in 2019, Sedky will enjoy having reached the peak of Penn Athletics this spring. Runner-up: Gabby Rosenzweig (lacrosse) Honorable mention: Alexa Hoover (field hockey), Michelle Nwokedi (basketball), Kyra Levi (gymnastics), Maura Kimmel (track & field)

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atson’s 2016 campaign was historic. He broke Penn’s records for single-season receptions and receiving yards, while also leading the Ivy League in receiving touchdowns, receiving yards, and yards per game. For his efforts, he was named the runner-up for Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year for the second time. So how could he follow that up in his final season, especially after losing his quarterback to the NFL? By putting in arguably his best season yet. Watson set the program-record for single-season receiving TDs with 14, hauling in at least one score in all 10 of Penn’s games. He ripped off six games of 100+ receiving yards, capped by a 192-yard performance in his final game against Cornell. He accounted for over half of Penn’s receiving yards and twothirds of its receiving TDs. He led the Ivy League in

yards per catch, receiving touchdowns, and finished second in receptions and yards. And he did all of this while breaking a bevy of alltime Penn and Ivy records. He now owns the triple crown of Penn receiving records (career receptions, receiving yards, and receiving TDs), he became the first Ivy player to catch a pass in all 40 of his career games, and the first to catch a touchdown in every game in a season. Watson leaves Penn as its most decorated receiver ever, with a legitimate chance of being taken in the NFL Draft. He’s been Penn’s ultimate weapon for the past four years, and this year, he was at his most lethal. Runner-up: AJ Brodeur (basketball) Honorable mention: Frank Mattiace (wrestling), Mark Andrew (swimming), Sean Clarke (track & field), Sean Phelan (baseball), Connor Keating (lacrosse)

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ROOKIE OF THE YEAR (W)

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ROOKIE OF THE YEAR (M)

ZOE BELODEAU

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

ANDREW DOUGLAS

NICOLE FRIDLING | ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

You know you’re having a good season when the conversation includes things like “of all time”, or “program history.” That is exactly what has happened for freshman attack Zoe Belodeau. Belodeau obliterated the Penn women’s lacrosse freshman points and assists records earlier this season, and her totals keep climbing. Even with two games left in the regular season, her 60 points put her in the top-10 most prolific seasons in program history — 15 ahead of the previously standing school’s rookie record. She has already been named a women’s lacrosse National Player of the Week by the Baltimore Sun and has been Inside Lacrosse’s Rookie of the Week once, earning two thirdplace votes for that distinction as well.

Belodeau leads the Ivy League in assists per game and is in the top five for points per game. She has earned two Ivy Offensive Player of the Week nods and is on the Tewaaraton Award Watch list, given to the best women’s lacrosse player in the nation. Belodeau is the best freshman on one of Penn’s most nationally competitive teams. She is a lock for All-Ivy recognition in her first season, making her a good choice for Female Rookie of the Year. Runner-up: Eleah Parker (basketball) Honorable mention: Parker Jones (volleyball), Danielle Orie (cross country), Quinn Scannell (swimming), Darby Nelson (gymnastics), Uche Nwogwugwu (track & field), Ashley Anumba (track & field)

ANANYA CHANDRA | SENIOR PHOTODRAPHER

Penn men’s basketball had the best story this year. But when it comes to dominance on the national stage, there’s no match for Karin Corbett’s women’s lacrosse program. The team has long been a juggernaut, having won 10 of the past 11 Ivy League championships, including three NCAA Final Four appearances in that span. That dynasty has only continued in 2018. Holding an 11-2 record, including an unblemished 5-0 Ivy League mark, the No. 10 Quakers own quality non-conference wins over schools like Johns Hopkins and Duke to match their Ivy League dominance and look well on their way to Corbett’s 11th conference title. But just as impressive as the

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team success have been the individuals behind it. Freshman midfielder Zoe Belodeau has put up outrageous numbers in her debut season, already 15 points ahead of Erin Brennan’s previous Penn single-season rookie points record of 45. As if that wasn’t impressive enough, sophomore Gabby Rosenzweig is on pace to break a bigger school record, only 24 points shy of Nina Corcoran’s single-season record of 85 with a minimum of four games remaining. With elite star players and the team results to match, Penn women’s lacrosse is the top squad of the year in Penn sports. Runner up: Men’s basketball Honorable mention: men’s fencing, women’s track & field

PAULINE COLAS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Freshmen usually aren’t expected to contribute much on the court, let alone be the best player on the team and one of the best in the whole Ivy League. But that’s exactly what Andrew Douglas did this year in his first season with Penn men’s squash. After finishing the season with a 14-6 record in the No. 1 slot, including a 5-2 record in the Ivy League, Douglas earned every honor that was available — and there were plenty. Not only was he named first-team All-Ivy and first-team All-American after qualifying for the CSA Individual Tournament, but according to his coach Gilly Lane, “he has the opportunity to be the best American player ever.”

Douglas is already playing at the level of most upperclassmen, and he will surely be a force at the CSA Tournament for years to come. On the season, Douglas led Penn to an 11-7 record and a No. 7 national ranking as part of another solid season. The Quakers haven’t won an Ivy championship in over 40 years, but they may have a shot for the next three seasons with Douglas leading the way. Runner-up: Michael Li (fencing) Honorable mention: Matt Gorman (sprint football), Jake Kohlbrenner (soccer), Eduardo Malinowski (baseball), Marvin Morgan (track & field), Gianni Ghione (wrestling)

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10 SPORTS

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

BEST MOMENT

BEST BREAKTHROUGH ATHLETE (M)

MEN’S BASKETBALL TOPS HARVARD TO WIN IVY LEAGUE

EDDIE JENKINS

It’s pretty exciting whenever a team wins a do-or-die game to make March Madness. It’s even more exciting when a team does it for the first time in 11 years. But for a team to do that on its own home court in front of its raucous student body? It doesn’t get much better than that — and that’s exactly what happened when Penn men’s basketball beat Harvard in the Ivy League Tournament championship this year. The game itself was phenomenal, but the celebration after was perhaps even better. Within seconds of the final buzzer going off, hundreds of

students had swarmed the team at half-court as the loudspeakers blasted DJ Khaled’s “All I Do Is Win.” Eventually, the players and coaches made their way to one of the baskets and cut down the net; but it turned out that even after the net had been completely cut down, the party was only just getting started. In a fitting blast from the past, senior captain Darnell Foreman hoisted himself up so that he was sitting on top of the rim as the crowd below him erupted into applause. It was the last game of Foreman’s career at the Palestra, and he truly got to go out on top.

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

FILE PHOTO

Entering the 2017 season, Penn sprint football faced a big question. How would the Quakers replace the best player in program history? During the previous four years, Mike McCurdy was the man in charge under center, but after his graduation, an obvious void had formed. The Quakers were coming off of a perfect 7-0 season, in which they won the Collegiate Sprint Football League (CSFL) Championship and McCurdy took home his second league MVP award. So, in stepped sophomore Eddie Jenkins, who appeared briefly in two games in the 2016 season. Jenkins wasted no time in proving that he was more than ready to take the reins from McCurdy. The sophomore from Pittsburgh started the 2017 season with a superb performance in a 69-6 win at Caldwell, passing for 191 yards and three touchdowns, while adding 91 yards and a touchdown on the ground. He continued to play at this level through the rest of the year,

BEST BREAKTHROUGH ATHLETE (W)

ASHLEY RUSSELL There comes a time when putting your body in harm’s way on a regular basis pays off, and this was the season that such behavior did for junior guard Ashley Russell. In her sophomore year, Russell was regarded as a key role player coming off the bench for the Quakers who demonstrated hustle like no other. But in her junior season, where Russell started 29 out of 30 games for Penn, she regularly contributed to each game’s outcome while still frequently hitting the hardwood. Despite being a guard, Russell regularly pulled down offensive boards using her aggressive style, averaging almost two per game. She also racked up the second-most steals on her team, boasting yet another stat displaying her all-out style.

Her most memorable performance of the year had to be away against city-rival Temple where she set a career high in rebounds with nine and points with 19 – which she later broke again with 21 at Dartmouth – along with four assists. Russell also lit it up from behind the arc, splashing home three treys. Her stellar performance allowed Penn to claim the Philadelphia Big 5 championship this season. A final, embodying stat of Russell’s was the seven chairs she managed to knock over while diving for a loose ball during the Quakers’ game against Villanova. The guard certainly doesn’t know how to give up, and for this reason, she’s earned the honor of Best Female Breakthrough Athlete.

ZACH SHELDON | SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

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finishing with 1424 passing yards, 11 touchdowns, and just four interceptions. Jenkins also managed to keep defenses on their heels with his ability to tuck the football and run. He was second on the team in both rushing yards (265) and rushing touchdowns (6). He averaged 241.3 total yards of offense per game, more than 60 yards ahead of any other player in the league. Along with his pure talent, Jenkins’ poise and leadership on the gridiron was a central reason why the Red and Blue played in the inaugural CSFL Championship against Army. Even though they lost in that one, the Quakers and Jenkins put together a season to remember, finishing 6-2 on the year. With Jenkins remaining at the helm, it’s hard to imagine Penn not competing for more CSFL Championships in the next couple of years. Runner up: Karekin Brooks Honorable mention: Caleb Wood (basketball), Mitchell Holcomb (baseball), Jack Soslow (football)

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SPORTS 11

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

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12 SPORTS

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

BEST CHAMPIONSHIP PERFORMANCE DARNELL FOREMAN IVY LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Icon. That’s what senior guard Darnell Foreman became after his performance in the Ivy League Tournament. Against Yale, Foreman’s game was efficiency and defense. He shot 80 percent from the floor for 11 points, grabbed eight rebounds, and helped shut down the Elis guards in the dominant win. But the real magic came against Harvard in the final. Foreman took over late in the first half, scoring 19 points and missing just one shot. His hot shooting spurred Penn’s 24-0 run that would put the Quakers back in the game after trailing by double-digits in the first half. The iconic moment came in the waning seconds in that half, where a doubleteamed Foreman nailed a deep three at the buzzer and ran directly down the court to the locker room. Great performances often come with a memorable highlight, and Foreman supplied a huge one on that play. Foreman’s first half forced a defensive adjustment from the Crimson, and with top defender Justin Bassey following Foreman around in the second 20 minutes, the floor opened up for the rest of the dangerous Penn offense; AJ Brodeur, Ryan Betley, and Caleb Wood all had great halves. Foreman’s performance made it all possible. He supplied the grit, emotion, and spark the Quakers needed to beat Harvard in what was the Best Individual Championship Performance all year long.

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Penn women’s track and field ran over the opposition at this year’s Ivy League Indoor Heptagonal Championships in February, capturing the team’s first Heps win since 1996. With a total of 137 points, the Quakers completely outperformed the seven other Ivy teams, beating second-place Harvard by 32 points. The victory came both on the track and in the field events, as the Red and Blue notched six individual event wins, the most by a Penn team at the Heps since 1988. The Quakers benefited from strong performances up and down the roster, aided by both veterans and rookies. The big winner of the weekend was superstar Abby Hong, who won both the 3000-meter and 5000m races for the Red and Blue. The senior continued her dominance in the long distance contests, setting a school record by four seconds in the latter. For the first time since 1985, the Red and Blue won the 4x800m relay. The team of senior Gina Alm and sophomores Mikayla Schneider, PHOTO FROM THE IVY LEAGUE Nia Akins, and Katie DeVore put up a time of 8:47.87 to outpace the competition and earn the win. Freshman Uchechi Nwogwugwu took first in the 500m with a time of 1:13.09, good enough for fifth in program Flexible Leasing • Single and Double Rooms • history. In the field, Penn took first in two events Individual Leases • All Amenities and Utilities for the firstIncluded time in program history, with two juniors claiming the victories. Rachel Lee Wilson took first in the weight throw with a mark of 18.70m, and Anna Peyton Malizia set a new Call school record with her high jump height of 1.80m. 215.662.0802 With big efforts from athletes of from years, the entire women’s track and field team came FILE PHOTO Email together for a historic and dominant win.

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MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

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SPORTS 13

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14 SPORTS

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Men’s lacrosse outlasts Dartmouth in double OT Quakers hold onto postseason responded with two goals of its own just 37 seconds apart to tie hopes with 10-9 victory

a while until Richie Lenskold developed into a player we could rely on.� Winning faceoffs is key to winning any lacrosse game, but in close contests the importance of an advantage at the faceoff X cannot be overstated. Today, Penn won the close contest in large part due to success on faceoffs. However, in the Quakers’ last Ivy League loss, against Brown two weeks ago, they dropped a one-goal contest in which they outshot their opponent by a large margin. The difference: they were beat 14-7 on faceoffs. Moving forward, Penn must continue to thrive at the faceoff X if it wants to compete with the nation’s best. Close games have been a theme for Penn this season. Three of the Quakers’ last four contests have been decided by one goal, and eight of their 14 on the season have been decided by less than three goals. Managing players emotions down the stretch to avoid this issue is one of the most important jobs of a coach. “First I just try to remain calm myself,� Murphy said. “Then I just try to make sure guys stick to what they know how to do. Timeouts are use-

the game up. Penn again took the lead with just 1:13 remaining on a laser shot from senior midfielder Reilly Hupfeldt. But once again, Dartmouth struck to knot the game up with only 27 seconds left to force overtime. The first overtime period was evenly matched and included a nice save from junior goalie Reed Junkin. Still, there was no separation between the two teams. That separation came in the second overtime from the stick of newly-drafted senior attackman Kevin McGeary for his only goal of the game. Though the score indicates differently, the statistics show that Penn deserved to win the game. Penn outshot Dartmouth 42-26, and clearly had the edge on faceoffs, winning 15 of 23. Junior faceoff man Richie Lenskold continued his hot streak and will be crucial to Penn’s chances of making a run in the Ivy League Tournament and/or NCAA tournament. “Our biggest improvement from day one to now is faceoffs,� coach Mike Murphy said. “We really struggled for

JOSH STONBERG Sports Reporter

60 minutes was not enough to decide a winner in Penn men’s lacrosse epic matchup with Dartmouth. Nor was a full overtime period. But when it was all said and done, the Quakers (7-7, 3-3 Ivy) picked up a 10-9 double overtime victory over the Big Green (2-10, 0-5), a win that is crucial for Penn’s postseason hopes. After starting 1-3 in Ivy play, Penn has fought their way back into contention for the Ivy League Tournament. While Penn is done with its regular season, the rest of the league plays next weekend. The Quakers currently sit ahead of a trio of 2-3 teams, and depending on next weekend’s results, could very well find themselves in the postseason. What started as a low scoring affair opened up in the fourth quarter, with the two teams combining for nine goals. Penn scored four straight to take a 8-6 lead with just eight minutes left. However, the Big Green

the outside looking in, as the 2015-16 team went on to suffer a losing streak that extended from the end of one season into the start of another without his electric scoring and playmaking. Woods dedicated his time to working late nights at Temple University Hospital, transporting patients and volunteering with the Philadelphia Youth Basketball Association. Forced to take a year off from school and basketball and live on his own, Woods took everything in stride, working on his game and acting as an informal assistant coach for the team. Coming back into the 201718 season, it wasn’t clear what

COMEBACK ATHLETE antonio woods There was a lot more to Antonio Woods’ comeback than just basketball. In January 2016, Woods found himself in an unenviable position. Not only was he ruled ineligible for the remaining games in the 2015-16 season, but he was also disqualified from the first half of the following season and temporarily suspended

from the University itself for academic ineligibility. After an impressive freshman season, during which Woods led the team in assists and minutes, things were looking up for the then-sophomore and the program itself, following the addition of Steve Donahue as head coach. But then, Woods found himself on

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Woods’ role would be. With strong freshman seasons from AJ Brodeur, Ryan Betley, and Devon Goodman, there was reason for concern. But Woods earned his way back onto the court, starting 32 of 33 games, and didn’t waste a single minute. Sharing ball-handling responsibilities with senior star Darnell Foreman, Woods averaged 7.7 points and 3.6 rebounds per game, while also providing elite defense on other team’s star players — even ones as big as Harvard power forward Seth Towns — and crucial leadership on a talented but young team. By all accounts, Woods isn’t just a better basketball player; he’s embraced the lessons he learned during his

postseason. There should be no lack of confidence for this Penn team though — they took down No. 1 Duke in a one goal comeback thriller earlier in the

season. In a season that already possesses one of the biggest wins in program history, there may be even bigger ones in store.

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

suspension and is a grateful, wiser player with a broader perspective on life and basketball. Runner up: Lauren Whit-

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CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Penn men’s lacrosse senior attackman Kevin McGeary kept the Quakers’ postseason hopes alive on Saturday, scoring the game-winning goal to down Dartmouth in double overtime, 10-9.

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THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

RECORD-BREAKING PERFORMANCE

BEST COACH

JUSTIN WATSON

STEVE DONAHUE

The question isn’t, “who was the most impressive record-breaker in Penn sports?” Rather, it’s “which one of Justin Watson’s records was best?” Let’s look at the school records first. There are the all-time Penn marks for single-season receiving TDs (14), career receptions (286), career receiving yards (3,777), career receiving TDs (33), and career all-purpose yards (4,116). The only player in Ivy League history with more career receiving yards than Watson is 1990s Brown star Sean Morey, who won a Super Bowl and made a Pro Bowl at the professional level. Then one can get into the all-time Ivy League records. For instance, Watson beat out Morey for the most career receiving yards in Ivy play (2,675). And Watson is also the only player in the con-

SPORTS 15

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018

ference’s history to secure at least one catch in all 40 of his career games. This season, Watson also became the only player in Ivy League history to catch a touchdown pass in every single game — 10 straight games with at least one score. Opposing teams didn’t knownhow Watson would beat them, whether it would be his speed, size, athleticism, or skill that would allow him to shred their defense to pieces. The only certainty was that he would be unstoppable for Penn football. Runner up: Mark Andrew (swimming) Honorable mention: Alexa Hoover (field hockey), Quinn Scannell (swimming), Sean Clarke (track & field), Anna Ross (basketball), Maura Kimmel (track & field), Zoe Belodeau (lacrosse)

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

A coach usually wins an end-of-year award when they win a championship or vastly improves their team’s performance. Penn men’s basketball coach Steve Donahue did both. In just his third year, he led the Quakers to their first Ivy League championship since 2007 after fourth and fifth-place finishes over the last two seasons. In fact, since its 0-6 start in Ivy play last year, Penn has won 18 of 23 Ivy League games. However, it is not just the improvement in overall record that speaks to why Donahue deserves “Best Coach.” He is also a master at manipulating the rotation. While the starting lineup remained the same, Donahue often experimented with whom he brought off the bench. In many games, unexpected contributors propelled Penn to victory. Whether it was senior Sam Jones’ 15 point outburst against Dayton, junior Jake Silpe’s timely threes at Dartmouth, or sophomore Devon Good-

man’s 23 points at Columbia, Donahue was never afraid to give seldom-used players big minutes when they earned it. Constantly changing the rotation allowed Donahue to find the perfect bench combination come tournament time. By the end of the year, Penn arguably had the most talented bench in the Ivy League. Goodman and sharp-shooting senior Caleb Wood consistently provided instant offense and were instrumental throughout Penn’s run to the NCAA tournament. Furthermore, he also led the Quakers’ resurgence largely without a freshman class. Guards Jelani Williams, a projected starter, and Eddie Scott missed most of the season with injuries while forward Jarrod Simmons fell out of the rotation. Donahue may not be the only Penn coach to win an Ivy League championship this year, but none was more responsible to his team’s success than the reigning Ivy League Coach of the Year.

BEST GAME MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. HARVARD IVY LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP Was there even a question that this game wouldn’t win this award? With all due respect to a few other games that were amazing in their own rights (field hockey vs. Syracuse, men’s lacrosse vs. Duke), this was the biggest game in Penn Athletics in at least the past five years. In front of a boisterous Palestra crowd that undoubtedly gave the Quakers a boost, Penn and Harvard played an all-timer, with so many different incredible moments. It was back-and-forth the whole way, with the game coming down to the final seconds. Early on, it was the Darnell Foreman show for the Quakers. He scored 11 of Penn’s first 13 points, and kept the Red and Blue in the

game when the offense was stagnant. But after a 13-0 run by the Crimson, Penn was in a big hole. That’s when the shots started falling. From 3:02 remaining in the first to 16:35 left in the second, Penn went on a 24-0 run to take a double-digit lead. Each bucket sent the crowd further and further into a frenzy, but no shot more so than Foreman’s incredible three before the half that will live forever on the walls of the Cathedral of Basketball. But Harvard wasn’t done yet. After matching Penn for much of the second half, the Crimson busted out another 13-0 run in just a two-minute span to regain the lead, 58-55, with a little more than five minutes left.

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Enter Caleb Wood. The senior sharpshooter scored Penn’s next eight points, including the gametying and go-ahead threes, to put the Red and Blue ahead for good. After four minutes of lockdown defense and a few clutch free throws from Ryan Betley, it was over: Penn had reached the NCAA Tournament for the first time in 11 years. For a tournament branded as Ivy Madness, this game more than lived up to the hype.

Monday - Thursday 10 am - 11 pm Friday 10 am - 12 am Saturday 11 am - 12 am Sunday 11 am - 10 pm

Runner up: Football vs. Columbia Honorable mention: Field hockey vs. Syracuse, men’s basketball vs. Monmouth, men’s lacrosse vs. Duke, women’s lacrosse vs. Johns Hopkins

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