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MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018 VOL. CXXXIV NO. 26

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

How MERT prepares for Spring Fling

It’s just a

FLING

25 students were taken to the hospital in 2016

COURTNEY BUTTERWORTH Contributing Reporter

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Students enjoyed the sunshine this past weekend as they attended long-awaited social events, including the University-sponsored music festival and Penn’s annual colorful celebration of Holi, a traditional Hindu festival at the start of spring. See the highlights on page 2.

While students made plans for this years’ “throwback” Spring Fling, Penn’s Medical Emergency Response Team prepared for what MERT Chief David Gordon calls its “busiest weekend.” MERT is assisted by members of Fling Safe, a group of students who volunteer to take a patrol shift during the Spring Fling festival to make sure that there aren’t any students in need of medical attention. While students in Fling Safe were not trained EMTs, they were taught how, and when, to get MERT involved. Members of Fling Safe did not patrol during the Fling concert. Although Fling is only one day this year, about the same number of people were selected to join Fling Safe as in previous years when Fling lasted two days. According to Social Planning and Events Committee Presi-

dent Austin Borja, this means that each two-hour shift had more students than in previous years. Twenty-five students were transported to the hospital during 2016 Spring Fling for alcoholrelated incidents. While the majority of students were sent to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, some students were sent to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. According to Gordon, MERT is able to decrease the number of students who are transported to local hospitals because students can be monitored in MERT’s observation area within Penn Park, where Fling was held this year. In the observation area, MERT volunteers care for students who are not feeling well without necessarily sending them to the hospital. During a training session led by SPEC, MERT, and the Office of Alcohol and Other Drug Program Initiatives, students learned how to call for help and what they can do SEE FLING SAFE PAGE 3

PennDesign faces challenge as tuition-dependent school

Report shows that University is improving its sustainability

65 percent of its 2017 budget came from tuition

Penn still doesn’t measure up to other institutions

DEENA ELUL Staff Reporter

YONI GUTENMACHER Deputy News Editor

Over the past few years, Penn’s School of Design has consistently been ranked one of the University’s most tuition-dependent schools, which means that tuition is its primary source of revenue. The costly space and expensive technology, in addition to the limited research funding and gifts, places PennDesign in a situation with unique challenges. PennDesign has consistently fallen in one of the top two spots for Penn’s most tuitiondependent schools for the past several years, placing first in 2017, according to the school’s Associate Dean for Administration Leslie Hurtig. Sixty-five percent of the school’s 2017 budget came from tuition and fees, and this number is projected to increase to 67 percent in the 2018 fiscal year, Hurtig said. In general, other major sources of funding for graduate schools include gifts, grants, and investment income, the University Operating Budget for 2018 stated. PennDesign Dean Frederick Steiner said that the school’s tuition dependence is an issue he is working to resolve.

According to a recent report released by the University, Penn has rapidly become a more sustainable and environmentallyconscious campus in the last decade. But experts say that Penn still does not measure up to many other American institutions. The report — which was published by Penn Sustainability, a “University-wide initiative” devoted to promoting sustainability on campus — suggests that the University has exceeded the goals set in 2014 by the University’s Climate Action Plan 2.0 to improve Penn’s environmental consciousness. It serves as a mid-way report to evaluate Penn’s progress. The report conducted an assessment of the University’s progress on seven fronts, including academics, utilities and operations, physical environment, transportation, waste minimization and recycling, purchasing, and outreach and engagement. In five out of these seven categories, Penn has made progress, the report states. Although the report notes strong progress in categories like Penn’s academic emphasis on environmental sustainability — with the University offering

MIN PARK | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite financial challenges, PennDesign’s annual budget has increased from $43.8 million in 2015 to $46.9 million in 2018.

“One of my goals is trying to diversify our funding because right now we’re very dependent on graduate tuition,” he said. For one, Steiner and Hurtig are discussing plans to expand their source of revenue to fundraising and gifts. Based on the University Operating Budget, PennDesign is projected to be ranked again as Penn’s most tuition-dependent school. It will likely be followed by the Graduate School of Education, which derives 66 percent of its budget from tuition, the School of Nursing (62 percent) and the School of Social Policy & Practice (61 percent). In contrast, tuition and fees account for only 15 percent of the School of Veterinary Medi-

cine’s budget for this year, Director of Communications and Marketing Martin J. Hackett reported. Based on the operating budget, other major sources of revenue for Penn Vet include sponsored programs and grants from the state of Pennsylvania. Tuition dependence can be dangerous. According to a 2016 article from Forbes.com, “colleges where tuition revenue accounts for more than 60 percent of core revenues tend to be at higher risk financially.” This is because these schools are vulnerable to annual fluctuations in enrollment — “enrollment shortfalls in a given year can mean budget misses, layoffs and cost cutting.” SEE PENNDESIGN PAGE 3

OPINION | Cost of ‘going out’ adds up

“Campus leaders should be wary of the financial strains that social events can place on some students.” -Jennifer Lee PAGE 4

SPORTS | Double Trouble

There are a lot of different factors that go into making the perfect doubles pair for Penn men’s tennis BACKPAGE FOLLOW US @DAILYPENN FOR THE LATEST UPDATES ONLINE AT THEDP.COM

NEWS OCR causes shift in when students study abroad PAGE 3

SAM HOLLAND | SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

The report conducted an assessment of the University’s progress on seven fronts, including academics, transportation, and purchasing.

nearly 300 courses with sustainability in their curriculum, a 140 percent increase from 2014 — there are several categories where Penn falls short. The sustainability report does not take into account Penn’s fossil fuel assets that it holds through its endowment investment in many companies, experts say. However, this is a metric that is used by the Sierra Club, the country’s largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization, in its annual “Cool Schools” ranking. According to Sierra Magazine Editor Katie O’Reily, who was involved in creating the organization’s ranking methodology, the ranking measures American universities and their commitment to sustainability

across a broad range of factors. Penn included several of these measures in its report, including transportation, innovation, waste, and water, while excluding others such as investment in fossil fuels. Penn’s investment in fossil fuels has sparked strong activism on campus over the last few years. Fossil Free Penn, a student group founded three ago, has consistently pushed for the University’s divestment from fossil fuels, staging multiple sitins on campus and protesting at University trustee meetings. But little has changed since its founding. Penn has continued to maintain $315 million in fossil fuel assets in equities SEE SUSTAINABILITY PAGE 6

NEWS Penn schools see a decrease in faculty diversity PAGE 6

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2 NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

PHOTO FEATURE

A COLORFUL WEEKEND ON CAMPUS Holi 2018 transformed College Green into a sea of colors Friday afternoon. The festival included music and dance performances from multiple student groups, including West Philly Swingers, Penn Masti, Penn Dhamaka, Strictly Funk, Penn Raas, and Penn Thillana.

Spring Fling concertgoers made their way to Penn Park for this year’s annual Spring Fling concert. In contrast to previous years, UPenn SPEC decided to host a “throwback show,” featuring a diverse lineup that originally received mixed reviews: The All-American Rejects, JoJo, Sage The Gemini, CupcakKe.

DAVID ZHOU | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

DAVID ZHOU | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

SON NGUYEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

BULLHEADED 12 P.M. - WEDNESDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

can be a compliment.

NEW

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STATUE IN FRONT OF COLLEGE HALL

MIDDLE EAST GALLERIES

IN CONJUNCTION WITH COLLEGE PALOOZA

Opening Weekend:

APRIL

18

Kimberly Bowes

April 21 & 22

Associate Professor of Classical Studies The Bull-Headed Lyre, Ur, ca. 2450 BCE

Poverty and the Past Watch the livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS Watch past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second

FREE WITH PENNCARD | www.penn.museum/MEG

You’re invited to the 9th Annual

5-Minute presentations and 60-second lectures on a wide variety of fascinating topics

Thursday, April 19, 2018 • 10:00 AM–1:00 PM The Arch, Fireside Lounge (36th & Locust Sts., Room 200)


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

NEWS 3

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

Penn students opt to New org. to unite groups study abroad in summer against sexual violence The shift may be due to the change in OCR timing JULIE COLEMAN Staff Reporter

Since on-campus recruiting began its shift to the fall from the spring approximately two years ago, trends in Penn study abroad programs have shifted too. Data shows that there has been an increase in students studying abroad in the spring semester and in less conventional study abroad programs over the summer and during school breaks. Following the OCR timeframe shift, trends in studying abroad became more varied, with programs such as the Penn Global Internship Program and Penn Global Seminars increasing in popularity. Applications for GIP have also increased, and Penn Global reported receiving 621 applications for GIP, which is about three times more than they received last year. GIP placed 180 students in summer internships abroad, 61 more than last summer. Next semester, Penn will offer 12 global seminars, the highest number since the program’s inception in 2016. Penn Global reports that between 200 and 250 students will participate in the various global seminars next year, around double the 117 who participated this past year. The total number of students going abroad during the academic year does not seem to be changing despite the uptick in students traveling abroad in the summer. Before the 2016 OCR shift, most Penn students studied abroad during the fall semester. In 2014, 408 students studied abroad in the fall compared to only 76 in the spring, and in 2015, 439 students studied abroad in the fall and 105 in the spring. In 2016-2017 year, 236 students went abroad in the fall and 241 in the spring. This past year, 231 students studied abroad in the fall and 264 are currently abroad for the 2018 spring semester —

the highest spring study abroad number in recent years. Penn Global, however, estimates 200 students will study abroad in the fall of 2018 — the lowest number during the fall semester in recent history. Director of Penn Global Nigel Cossar attributes these changing trends in study abroad to the change in OCR dates, but also notes that more students are securing summer internships a year in advance and therefore do not feel as strong a need to participate in OCR. “Many students are getting internships earlier, so there is less pressure to be actively involved in OCR because they’ve already secured their junior summer internship,” Cossar said. “With that in mind, assuming that the dates are fine, there would be nothing stopping a student from going abroad their junior fall.” Wharton senior Landon Echols is one of those students who studied abroad at the University of New South Wales in Sydney during his junior fall after having already secured an internship for the next summer. “I decided to go [abroad] in the fall because I really wanted and need to step away from Penn for a little while and gain some perspective on everything,” Echols said. College junior Ariana McGinn, who studied abroad in Sweden last fall, also said she had not planned to participate in OCR, so her study abroad decision was based mainly on her preferred program. “It was honestly a Sweden-specific thing for me,” McGinn said. “I really wanted to go to Sweden, and in the spring semester it is extremely dark, the sun sets at 2 p.m.” Many students, like College and Wharton sophomore Maria Curry, however, continue to plan their study abroad around OCR. Curry is currently studying abroad in Barcelona. “When Penn moved OCR to fall, it kind of put people who want to study abroad in a tough

spot,” Curry said, citing junior events such as fall OCR, spring Hey Day, and extracurricular activities as reasons for her early depart from campus. “It made sense for me to go as a sophomore.” Like Curry, many other students have been deciding to forgo studying abroad their junior year entirely. College junior Mustafa Amjad chose to participate in GIP and work at a startup in Jordan instead of spending time abroad during the school year. “[GIP] made more sense for my academic requirements, and I could still immerse myself in a different culture and experience the country like a local,” Amjad said. “As an international student who eventually wants to work in either the Middle East or Southeast Asia, I wanted to use the summer to get a taste of working in the region.” Other students are reaping the rewards of short term abroad programs like PGS. College freshman Damon Duchenne took “The Middle East in Conflict—A Century of War and Peace” this spring and traveled to Jordan over spring break. He added that although he enjoyed the course, he still plans to study abroad in his junior year. “For me, the PGS cannot replace study abroad,” Duchenne said. “But, if someone finds it hard to spend all semester abroad, the PGS can be an alternative.” Cossar added that he is not yet sure if most students are using PGI and PGS programs as a replacement for traditional study abroad, and he hopes to keep collecting data and encouraging students to explore diverse study abroad options. He predicts that the spring semester will continue to grow in popularity alongside Penn’s less conventional study abroad options. “What we don’t want to see happen is students choosing an internship over study abroad,” Cossar said. “What we really want to see is that you can actually do both, and it’s very possible to do both.”

FILE PHOTO

While some students may have planned to study abroad around the OCR timeline, others had simply not planned to participate in OCR, so their study abroad decisions were based on their preferred program.

PENNDESIGN >> FRONT PAGE

While several other schools also face issues stemming from being too tuition-dependent, PennDesign faces specific difficulties for being the only studiobased school. “We’re the only studio-based school,” Steiner said. “That’s a fairly expensive way to deliver education.” Steiner explained that studios require a lot of space and technology but can only contain 10 to 15 students at any given time. Similarly, Hurtig noted that PennDesign spends a larger percentage of its budget on space than most schools at Penn. PennDesign also needs to keep up with the “ever-increasing technological advances,” such as 3D laser printing and robotics “to stay competitive with peer institutions,” Steiner added. Various faculty members also noted PennDesign’s distinct funding issues. “We’re a small school and have all the challenges of being primarily a tuition-supported school,” architecture professor William Braham said. He com-

pared PennDesign to other small graduate programs such as Penn Law and the Graduate School of Education. PennDesign’s relatively small amount of research also limits funding, Braham continued, as there are fewer opportunities to obtain external research grants. This is a stark contrast to several other small schools that incorporate research into its mission more. “There’s not as much obvious forms of research that get done in the school, just because of who we are,” he said. City and regional planning professor Eugenie Birch echoed Braham’s sentiment. “The potential for funding is not as great as it is, say in the sciences,” she said. However, Birch stressed that her own teaching has not been affected by the school’s financial situation. Similarly, PennDesign students do not appear to be affected, and many said they were not aware of the school’s funding issues. School of Design student Alexandra Zazula said that she “genuinely [doesn’t] know anything about funding issues in the

School of Design.” School of Design students Lauren Altman and Jessica Arias also said they were not aware of the school’s issues with funding. Despite financial challenges, Director of Communications Michael Grant said that PennDesign’s annual budget has increased from $43.8 million in 2015 to $46.9 million in 2018. He added that the new funds have been invested in “initiatives that enhance the student experience” such as new technological tools, new staff positions, and a multi-million dollar renovation of Meyerson Hall. Hurtig added that the school was also increasing its spending on financial aid. “I don’t think there’s what I would call funding issues,” Steiner said. “That doesn’t mean that like other places we don’t face budget challenges, but I don’t think it’s a big issue.” Similarly, Braham said that in his 30 years at PennDesign, the school’s financial situation has improved. “Things actually feel sort of better to me these days than they did a decade or two ago,” he said.

It will provide monetary support to student groups KAITLYN BOYLE Staff Reporter

Penn’s newest anti-violence group, the Consent Collaborative, has established to unite all sexual violence awareness organizations on campus. The goal of the student-led organization is to unite campus groups, such as Abuse and Sexual Assault Prevention, the V-Day Campaign, Penn Anti-Violence Educators, and Men Against Rape, which combat sexual-violence. The Consent Collaborative aims to act as an umbrella group for the various organizations which have operated independently until now. “What we really want to do is to create community among the members of those four groups, particularly because doing antisexual violence work is really challenging, a lot of emotional labor goes into it, and it’s work that is undervalued in a lot of ways and not recognized,” Caitlin Doolittle, co-founder of the group and College senior, said. Doolittle added that she would ideally want the group to also function as a support system for students involved in member organizations. Consent Collaborative was formed through a partnership between Doolittle and Director of Student Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Jessica Mertz. Mertz is the first person at Penn to hold this position since its creation in 2014. Doolittle said she has been involved with anti-sexual violence groups on campus since her freshman year and holds a work-study position at the Penn Violence Prevention Office. She explained

FLING SAFE

>> FRONT PAGE

until MERT arrives. Borja said that Fling Safe is not “a police at all for the people who are having fun at Fling,” but instead is “a way to make sure that they are safe and if they do need help, then we can direct them to where the help is.” The need for Fling Safe goes beyond students’ excessive drinking and partying, some say. “If you’re out having fun, not in your dorm room, you might forget something, like to just drink water,” said Borja, citing dehydration

GIOVANNA PAZ | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The goal of the student-led organization is to unite campus groups, such as Abuse and Sexual Assault Prevention and Men Against Rape.

that the idea for the Consent Collaborative had been discussed for a few years. She noted that the new group will receive funding from the Vice Provost for University Life, adding that much of the money will be used to support the member groups. In addition to this monetary support, members of the constituent groups said they are excited for the potential collaboration. Sophia Griffith-Gorgati, director of The Vagina Monologues for V-day and College senior, explained that the group often needs assistance during production. The Vagina Monologues performance is V-day’s biggest fundraiser, and requires months of planning. “We will have the opportunity to receive support from other groups,” Griffith-Gorgati said. “The night of the show, we often need volunteers to help people get to their seats, check people in, and make sure they have a ticket.” College junior Salomon Vil-

and heat stroke as potential problems for students participating in Fling. Members of Fling Safe receive a free Fling concert ticket in exchange for their help. Borja said this adds a “financial aid” incentive to students who otherwise may not be able to afford a ticket to Fling. Many students also have a more personal reason for volunteering. “A lot of people have more personal stories as to how they, or maybe a friend or a peer, have felt unsafe during Fling … but then they had someone from Fling Safe help them,” Borja said. Borja continued that people who are selected for Fling Safe

latoro, the recruitment chair of MARS, hopes to use the Consent Collaboration partnership to gain feedback to improve his group. “The best way it will affect MARS is it opens up criticism of our group,” Villatoro said. “We are a mainly male, mainly CIS male organization, so any form of criticism is helpful in making sure we are inclusive of all communities.” In February, many Penn students voiced their concerns to the administration about sexual assault reporting guidelines during the biannual University Council Open Forum. The Consent Collaborative began meeting this past fall, and is in the process of structuring the group. “It’s something that I personally feel very proud to be a part of. It feels very necessary,” Doolittle said. “I think it’s a group that’s going to do a lot of good for the Penn violence community.”

generally have a “combination” of personal and financial reasons. According to Gordon, Fling Safe was started about seven years ago “in partnership with University administration and [the Office of] Alcohol and Other Drugs.” Gordon said he believes that Fling Safe is an example of “students helping students,” as people in Fling Safe can approach their peers to help while also having backup from MERT if need be. “I would say that [Spring Fling] is definitely our busiest time but it is also a time when [MERT is] of great value,” Gordon said.

Penn Association of Senior & Emeritus Faculty Annual Spring Lecture 2018

Kathleen Hall Jamieson Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor of Communication Director, Annenberg Public Policy Center

HOW RUSSIAN HACKERS AND TROLLS EXPLOITED U.S. MEDIA IN 2016 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 19, 2018 Agora, Annenberg Public Policy Center 202 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA Wine and Cheese Reception to follow. Please RSVP to pasef@pobox.upenn.edu


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OPINION The costs of Penn’s pervasive ‘going out’ culture can add up THE WALLFLOWER | Why saying ‘no’ to some social events might be better for your wallet

MONDAY APRIL 16, 2018 VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 26 134th Year of Publication DAVID AKST President

A

few weeks ago, I received a call from my very cross mother who told me that I had spent well beyond my allowance in the past 10 days. I sputtered, telling her

of the Transfer Student Organization, I know that most ticket revenue goes directly toward renting out a venue for events such as formal. Venue rental in Philadelphia is costly, so student organizations might incur

REBECCA TAN Executive Editor CHRIS MURACCA Print Director JULIA SCHORR Digital Director HARRY TRUSTMAN Opinion Editor SARAH FORTINSKY Senior News Editor JONATHAN POLLACK Senior Sports Editor LUCY FERRY Senior Design Editor GILLIAN DIEBOLD Design Editor CHRISTINE LAM Design Editor ALANA SHUKOVSKY Design Editor BEN ZHAO Design Editor KELLY HEINZERLING News Editor MADELEINE LAMON News Editor HALEY SUH News Editor

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that I had not tried to deliberately spend that much money and that I could not think of any major purchase I had made recently. After the revelational phone call, I checked my bank account at long last. When I read through the transactions, much of it was outgoing Venmo

losses if they did not charge ticket prices. Penn’s affinity for BYOs also adds costs to socializing. Penn follows the time-old BYO tradition of Philadelphia, one of the most prominent BYOB cities in the United States. BYOs grew popular in Philadelphia as a re-

MICHEL LIU Assignments Editor COLE JACOBSON Sports Editor THEODOROS PAPAZEKOS Sports Editor YOSEF WEITZMAN Sports Editor ALISA BHAKTA Copy Editor ALEX GRAVES Director of Web Development BROOKE KRANCER Social Media Editor SAM HOLLAND Senior Photo Editor MONA LEE News Photo Editor CHASE SUTTON Sports Photo Editor CAMILLE RAPAY Video Producer LAUREN SORANTINO Podcasts Producer

DEANNA TAYLOR Business Manager

Campus leaders should be wary of the financial strains that social events can place on some students.” and Uber payments (and a lot of food). I realized then that partaking in social activities at Penn can become a constant grab for your wallet, and that sometimes, it can feel like you need money to have friends. Significant social expenses for many Penn students include attending shows and formal parties on and off campus. The majority of these events require a fee for attendance. With prices ranging from $10-$25 for tickets, going out to events on a weekly basis can easily stack up over a semester. As the treasurer

sult of expensive alcohol licensing and wine wholesale costs for food service businesses in Pennsylvania. Penn’s embrace of Philadelphian food culture is great, but this also means that Penn students will need to pay out-of-pocket for food, alcohol, and transportation for student organization BYOs. For a working Penn student, a semester of attending such social outings and performances could potentially be months of part-time work or hours of taking Wharton Behavioral Labs. Being involved in various com-

munities is an essential part of college life, but frequent social events can rack up tremendous bills. I certainly have spent more money here at Penn than I ever did during my freshman year at the University of Virginia. BYOs were not nearly as prevalent at UVA as they are at Penn, and student organizations’ social events were often subsidized completely by the university or by club “slush” funds. With Penn’s urban location and social expectations, many students feel compelled to spend money. Passing on certain shows and events is certainly an option that students always have, and any stigma in making this choice should not exist. However, opting out may not be ideal to some students for several reasons. Mixers and BYOs can facilitate organization bonding, and students do often miss out on meeting new people by not attending. We should also strive to support our campus performing arts groups and cultural organizations who invest significant time and commitment to prepare for shows and events. And lastly, it can hurt when friends don’t celebrate birthdays or special occasions with you. To address overwhelming finances for Penn students, campus leaders should be wary of the financial strains that social events can place on some students. They should also utilize University funding from sources such as Students Activities Council, New Student Orien-

tation, and 5B organizations as often as needed. The only caveat is that funding sources like the Intercultural Fund, Wharton Council, Asian Pacific Student Coalition, and SAC are restricted from bankrolling any alcohol-related events, which means that organizations will often have to pay for BYOs and parties at their own discretions. Although sources can be circumscribed, funding from University resources is available to those who need it, so campus groups should be vigilant in applying for external funding to lift or minimize additional financial burdens on event at-

JENNIFER LEE TSO has to represent students from all financial backgrounds. We don’t want anyone to feel excluded from our events — as long as you’re a transfer you should feel welcome, and there shouldn’t be anything keeping

Being involved in various communities is an essential part of college life, but frequent social events can rack up tremendous bills.” tendees. Campus groups should also recognize that while making profits is justified, it should never be at the expense of members a -large or higher ticket charges. For example, a policy implemented by the Transfer Student Organization is to place a cap on formal prices. According to College junior and TSO Co-President August Gebhard-Koenigstein, “The transfer community is incredibly diverse, which means that

you from getting involved.” “I’m not sure how long it’s been our policy to cap prices,” Gebhard-Koenigstein said, “but since I’ve been here [in TSO], we’ve never charged more than $15.” University funding can be a bureaucratic and nebulous path to navigate, but what’s for sure is that attending Penn costs much more than simply tuition and room and board, which Penn estimates in its undergraduate cost of attendance as “personal expenses.” However, this figure isn’t accurate for everyone, as personal expenses can vary from student to student, especially in an expensive city like Philadelphia. So while it’s great to be involved on campus and form solid friend groups, it’s also OK to consider your wallet and skip a few social events.

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ANDREW FISCHER Innovation Manager DAVID FIGURELLI Analytics Director JOY EKASI-OTU Circulation Manager

CARTOON

REMI GOLDEN Marketing Manager

THIS ISSUE GRACE WU Deputy Copy Editor NADIA GOLDMAN Copy Associate SAM MITCHELL Copy Associate SAM MITCHELL Copy Associate FRED LU Copy Associate TAHIRA ISLAM Copy Associate LILY ZEKAVAT Copy Associate NICK AKST Copy Associate RYAN DOUGLAS Copy Associate ZACH SHELDON Photo Associate CARSON KAHOE Photo Associate NICOLE FRIDLING Photo Associate JULIO SOSA Photo Associate LIZZY MACHIELSE Photo Associate

LETTERS Have your own opinion? Send your letter to the editor or guest column to letters@thedp.com. Unsigned editorials appearing on this page represent the opinion of The Daily Pennsylvanian as determined by the majority of the Editorial Board. All other columns, letters and artwork represent the opinion of their authors and are not necessarily representative of the DP’s position.

CASSANDRA JOBMAN is a College freshman from Garland, Texas. Her email address is cassiejobman@gmail.com.

JENNIFER LEE is a College sophomore from Fair fax, Va . s tu d y ing in t e r n a t i o n al relations. Her email is leej@ dailypennsylvanian.com.


5

Penn should follow others’ lead and offer ‘startup grants’ for FGLI freshmen CONVOS WITH CARLOS | Low-income freshmen at Harvard and Yale receive $2,000 grants to ease their financial burdens

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n The Daily Pennsylvanian editorial addressed to the future students of the Class of 2022, there was a reference to first-generation, low-income students and that they account for one-sixth of the incoming class. The editorial claims that “there’s never been a better time to attend Penn” if you’re FGLI. With last week being GENWEEK, a week-long national event celebrating FGLI students, and my first year at Penn coming to a close, I would like to shed light on my perspective as a FGLI freshman. Looking back, I benefited from various resources this year that were the result of the work of the Vice Provost for University Life and the Penn First student group. Since 2016, the First-Generation, Low-Income program was housed in the Greenfield Intercultural Center at 3708 Chestnut St. In this

for some of the popular classes at Penn. If there aren’t any in stock, purchasing requests can be made. In the GIC, there is also free printing, a food pantry, and a kitchen. On the more academic side, the GIC established a partnership with the Weingarten Center to create study groups with a tutor for subjects such as PSYC 001 and ECON 001 (fall) and CHEM 102 and ECON 002 (spring). Some other helpful resources offered by the program include emergency funds, grants for commencement regalia, career and internship assistance, and help with summer storage. The GIC and its programs are overseen by Valerie De Cruz, who I believe cares a lot for all of the students and is very involved with the FGLI community. FGLI students are also eligible to arrive on campus early and take part in the Pre-Fresh-

These startup grants are beneficial because they help FGLI students offset some costs such as purchasing a new laptop, buying winter clothing, and travel expenses.” building, I am able to receive free textbooks from the FGLI Lending Library, where it has a collection of donated books

man Program, a “four-week academically-focused summer program that introduces students to the array of intel-

lectual and social opportunities at Penn.” Students in the program who receive grant aid also receive an additional grant that covers 80 percent of their summer earnings expectation. I personally did not participate in PFP, but many of my FGLI peers did. Additionally, there have been initiatives such as the Thanksgiving, Winter, and Spring Break meal programs that have been established to help highneed students who aren’t able to travel home during these academic breaks. According to an emailed statement from Senior University Director of Student Financial Aid Elaine Papas Varas, “[Student Registration and Financial Services] and

There is a mutual understanding of the struggles FGLI students have to go through every day on this campus. This is one primary reason why conferences like 1vyG, which was held at Penn in February, exists: to promote the advancement of FGLI students during college and beyond. However, there is still room for improvement. Penn lags behind some of its Ivy peers when it comes to FGLI financial aid strategies. Penn should follow the examples set by Harvard University and Yale University by offering a freshman CARSON KAHOE | SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER “startup” grant of $2,000. Penn Dining have offered meal At both schools, freshmen break programs for the past two are eligible for $1,000 grants in years.” All of these resources the fall and spring semesters if and programs have been tre- their household income is less mendously beneficial for my than $65,000. Families in this first year. income bracket are generally The FGLI community at not expected to contribute any Penn is very supportive, in- money at all to their child’s clusive, and helpful when it education. At Yale, low-income comes to academic and per- students receive $600 supplesonal issues. Two organiza- mental grants in their remaintions that are meant for FGLI ing college years. In 2016, the students include Penn First editorial board of The Daily and Seven|Eight, which serves Princetonian called on PrincAsian-American students that eton University to adopt a simiidentify as FGLI. There is also lar program. a FGLI community GroupMe These startup grants are benchat in which students help each eficial because they help FGLI other out by answering one an- students offset some costs such other’s questions, promoting as purchasing a new laptop, upcoming campus events, and buying winter clothing, and announcing various mentorship travel expenses. As a freshman, and work-related opportunities. there have been many hidden

CARLOS ARIAS VIVAS costs that I did not account for when moving to Penn including dorm furniture and school supplies. Having a startup grant would have eased some financial stress. While a part-time or workstudy job could serve a similar purpose, some FGLI students contribute some or all their earnings to help their family survive during the summer and the school year. Although Penn has a greater financial aid budget than both Harvard and Yale, Penn’s freshman class has nearly 1,000 more students than both schools do. Penn’s many existing FGLI programs speak to its commitment to its students. However, adopting Harvard and Yale’s startup grant program would be an innovative way to ease the financial burden each new class of FGLI students undergo every academic year. CARLO S ARIA S VIVA S is a College freshman from Stamford, Conn., studying communication. His email address is cariasv@ sas.upenn.edu.

CARTOON

KRISTEN YEH is a College freshman from West Covina, Calif. Her email address is kristeny@sas.upenn.edu.

Israeli apartheid: real, brutal, and deadly

L

ast week, Penn Students for Justice in Palestine held our annual Israeli Apartheid week in order to raise awareness for the system of Israeli laws and policies that marginalize Palestinians. A day before any Israeli Apartheid Week events took place, a guest column by College sophomore Ariela Stein was published in The Daily Pennsylvanian labeling our events as “lies and half-truths” and a cover for “masked anti-Semitism.” It also accuses SJP of intentionally scheduling our events during the Jewish holiday of Passover. These claims are misleading and unfounded. The dates for our events were chosen based on the availability of College Green for demonstrations, the availability of guest speakers, and because it coincided with Penn Political Coalition’s Policy Week (a group which we are a part of and required to host events for). As an organization, SJP strongly condemns anti-Semitism. Our events critique Israeli policies, not Judaism or the Jewish community. As a state, Israel is open to the same critical lens as other nations, and as residents of the United States, the Israeli military’s largest financial supporter, we have a unique obliga-

GUEST COLUMN BY AJJIT NARAYANAN tion to scrutinize its unjust policies. Some are also troubled by our use of the term apartheid. To be clear, the label of apartheid has been applied to Israel’s policies by former Israeli politicians, human rights organizations, the United Nations, and South African leaders like Desmond Tutu and Mandla Mandela. The African National Congress, South Africa’s ruling party, actively took part in this year’s Israeli Apartheid week. The real story isn’t about the timing or language behind our events, it’s about the apartheid policies that Palestinians are subject to. For Palestinians in the occupied West Bank, the system of apartheid is enacted through a 50-year long military occupation and the Israeligovernment-promoted practice of building illegal settlements (Jewish-only towns). Settlers and Palestinians live completely different lives, with separate road systems and legal systems. Settlers are tried in Israeli courts under Israeli civil law while Palestinians are tried in military tribunals under martial law-where the conviction rate is 99.74 percent. Over 100 military checkpoints severely restrict Palestinian movement, employment, and society in the West Bank. Our event

last Tuesday sought to bring awareness to the “apartheid wall” erected between the West Bank and Israel, which allows further takeover of Palestinian land, as 85 percent of the wall does not lie along any internationally recognized borders. Within Israel, 35 laws specifical-

citizens are withheld the same levels of access to utilities, schools, building permits, and other crucial social services. In 2016, the Israeli government voted against a proposal to include equality into Israel’s Basic Law . For Palestinians in Gaza, apart-

PHOTO FROM PENN STUDENTS FOR JUSTICE IN PALESTINE

ly allow for discrimination against non-Jewish and Palestinian citizens of Israel. For example, an Israeli citizenship law expressly bars Palestinian spouses of Israelis from living in Israel. The Law of Return gives any Jewish person the right to live in Israel but excludes 7 million Palestinian refugees from returning to their homes. Palestinian-Israeli

heid takes the form of a crippling siege that is now entering its 11th year. Israel maintains exclusive control of Gaza’s airspace, and territorial waters and imposes a full blockade by air and sea. By land, Israel controls the flow of water, food, electricity, medicine, construction supplies, people, and imports/exports into the region. Be-

cause of these restrictive policies, Gaza has been described by the U.N. as “an open air prison.” Four out of five residents depend on foreign aid, and half are unemployed. U.N. reports conclude that by 2020, Gaza will be uninhabitable. Israel, despite its legal responsibilities as an occupying power, has done little to address the ongoing humanitarian crisis. This is the backdrop for recent protests. Over the past two weeks, 30,000 Palestinian protesters took part in the Great Return March and marched towards the Israel-Gaza border. They are protesting the Israeli blockade and for the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their villages after the forcible Israeli expulsions of 1948 and 1967. The vast majority of protesters demonstrated peacefully. A few were armed with stones and Molotov cocktails. Israeli forces were armed with tanks, tear gas, and snipers. In advance of the protest, over 100 snipers were deployed to the border and given authorization to use live ammunition. So far 31 Palestinians have been killed, including children and marked journalists wearing press vests. Over 1,000 have been injured from gunshot wounds, tear gas, and tank

shells. Zero Israeli soldiers were injured or killed. The next day the Israeli Defense Forces, in a now deleted tweet, said that “Nothing was carried out uncontrolled, everything was accurate and measured, and we know where every bullet landed.” The protests are set to continue today. This current wave of violence is why SJP hosted a Gaza memorial on College Green last Thursday. Through examination of Israeli policies in these contexts, it’s clear that the legal definition of apartheid, as set by the Rome Statute, is met: inhumane acts such as murder, forcible transfer, imprisonment, or persecution of an identifiable group on racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious, or other grounds “committed in the context of an institutionalized regime of systematic oppression and domination.” To quote Desmond Tutu, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” AJJIT NARAYANAN is a College junior studying in urban studies and economics. He is the cochair of Penn Students for Justice in Palestine. His email address is ajjit@wharton.upenn.edu.


6 NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Four Penn schools see decrease in faculty diversity The schools saw a decrease in overall minority faculty DEENA ELUL Staff Reporter

While faculty diversity has been improving at most of Penn’s twelve schools, the School of Dental Medicine, School of Design, Wharton School, and School of Social Policy and Practice have experienced a trend in the opposite direction. Since the University announced in 2011 the “Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence,” which aimed to build a “more diverse faculty” and “more inclusive campus community,” these four schools have experienced a decrease in their number of diverse faculty members, according to a Faculty Inclusion Report published in 2017. Meanwhile, schools including the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School

of Education, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science all reported a notable increase in their faculty diversity numbers. The percentage of overall minority faculty decreased in both PennDesign and the School of Social Policy and Practice, while that of underrepresented minority faculty decreased in Wharton, the Dental School, and the School of Social Policy, the report showed. Additionally, the percentage of female faculty had decreased in the Dental, Design, Nursing, and Wharton schools between the years of 2011 and 2016. The report defined “minority faculty” as those who identify as Latino, black, Asian, or Native American. “Underrepresented minority faculty” were defined as those who identify as Latino, black, or Native American. The Dental School faced the largest declines, with the percentage of female faculty falling from 28.9 to 19.5 percent and that of

underrepresented minority faculty decreasing from 11.1 to 4.9 percent. Dental professor and Director of Faculty Diversity Hydar Ali said that the school is particularly vulnerable to fluctuations in these metrics because it only has 42 standing faculty members. The Dental School also has a high faculty turnover rate — the school replaced almost 30 percent of its faculty between 2011 and 2016. “Obviously we want to move up. We want to rectify the issue,” Ali said. He added that since the Faculty Inclusion Report was published in 2017, a new female professor has been hired. Two more women, one of whom is Asian and one of whom is black, have also been hired as instructors, which Ali said is a “stepping stone to becoming faculty.” All three are graduates of the schools’ Doctorate of Science

in Dentistry program, which Ali said is a promising pipeline for improving faculty diversity. “[The DScD program] is going to be our best way of making sure that we have a diverse faculty,” he added. Ali also said that the Dental School has been trying to increase diversity by involving diversity search advisers in all aspects of the hiring process, including in the selection of a search committee. He also discussed ways to “improve climate” for faculty members already on campus, including a diversity retreat for Penn Dental faculty and staff held this past fall and plans to expand to faculty mentoring programs. He added that Penn Dental’s junior faculty is much more diverse than the senior faculty, and that almost all departments in the school have at least one female or minority junior faculty member. School of Social Policy and Practice Dean John L. Jackson,

Jr. also wrote in an email to The Daily Pennsylvanian that because they have a small faculty, “every single faculty member we add or lose has a marked and noticeable impact on our overall percentages.” Between 2011 and 2016, the percentage of underrepresented minority faculty in the School of Social Policy and Practice decreased from 17.6 to 15.4 percent. Wharton also faced decreasing diversity. While the percentage decline was smaller than the other schools, it also boasts a total of 224 standing faculty members — a significantly higher number than that of other schools. Based on the report, Wharton’s percentage of female faculty fell from 21.1 to 20.5 percent, and its percentage of underrepresented minority faculty fell from 5.3 to 5.0 percent. Wharton Media Relations Director Peter Winicov said that

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alone, or roughly 4 percent of the total endowment, according to FFP. “Our metrics mirror the Sierra Club’s priorities so investment is one of the categories that we weigh pretty heavily,” O’Reily said. “That is one of the most important things we think you could do to prevent climate change.” Penn’s lack of change in its fossil fuel investments means that the University has not been in the top 200 schools of the Sierra Club’s “Cool Schools” rankings in recent years. The University also only saw “mixed success” in the category of utilities and operations. Even though the overall amount of greenhouse gases emitted from Penn buildings has decreased relative to the size of the school, Penn’s energy consumption has risen due to the installment of new steam-driven chillers meant to cool off Penn’s facilities. Maddy Schuh, the sustainability analyst for Penn’s Facilities and Real Estate Services, who led the collection of data for this report, said the installment of these chillers, though, will eventuallyw lead to the usage of more efficient energy. Julian Dautremont-Smith, the director of programs for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education — a company that seeks to help universities achieve better sustainability practices — said that the 13 percent decrease in greenhouse gas emissions from Penn buildings since 2014 is a “significant” accomplishment. “It’s not necessarily like ‘amazing, never been done before,’ but it’s a solid achievement and they definitely deserve credit for the work they’ve done,” Dautremont-Smith said. “There are campuses that are reporting larger decreases in their emissions over time.” O’Reily also noted the extent to which other universities have set goals far higher than Penn in terms of reducing greenhouse

currently, 58 out of Wharton’s 224 standing faculty members are female, comprising 24 percent of its body. Wharton declined to comment on the number of minority faculty members. Students acknowledged that faculty diversity is important to their academic experience. Wharton senior Laura Luo said that in her four years at Wharton, she has had only two or three female professors. She added that in departments such as finance and statistics, there are “very few” female faculty members. Wharton sophomore Puti Cen, however, said that she has found Wharton’s faculty to be diverse, adding that her professors’ different perspectives added to her experience. “I do feel like having a female professor or a professor of color does help with us both conceptualizing what we’re learning, but also just in general as people I think it’s important,” she said.

gas emissions. “That [13 percent] seems commendable but some of our top schools have put in goals to put out zero emissions by 2020 or 2025,” O’Reilly said. “That tends to be impressive.” The 4 percent increase in overall energy use, despite being temporary, also sets Penn offtrack and could prevent it from reaching its intended goals by 2019. While the report primarily suggested that Penn is on track to meet or exceed the goals set in CAP 2.0, it did note a surprising decrease in the overall recycling rate at Penn from 27 percent in 2014 to 20.2 percent in 2017. Schuh said this decrease is not likely to indicate reduced recycling at Penn. Since the recycling rate is determined by the total weight of the recycled products, a commercial shift to lighter materials has simply decreased that weight. “This decrease is in part due to the diminishing weight of recyclables, industry trends toward lighter packaging, and the efforts of Penn Purchasing to reduce packaging material brought to campus,” Schuh said. Jisoo Kim, a student coordinator of Penn’s Eco-Rep program, pointed out that despite the massive changes occurring at an institutional level reflected in this report, the most effective changes have occurred on a smaller scale. “There are so many smaller changes that fly under the radar and people don’t really notice,” Kim said. “These are small impact changes — not necessarily flashy — but students work really hard and they make real change.” Penn’s Undergraduate Chair for the Environmental Sciences Department Alain Plante said that Penn has shown serious commitment to fulfilling its environmental goals. “This is not green-washing or all talk. There are really serious efforts being made to continually improve green efforts on campus,” Plante said. “The University is acting as a model citizen.”

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NEWS 7

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

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8 NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Penn Law professor Amy Wax awarded for ‘academic courage’

A conservative advocacy group presented the award AVNI KATARIA Staff Reporter

Controversial Penn Law School professor Amy Wax was presented with an award for her “academic courage” in wake of “continued harassment for speaking uncomfortable truths” by the National Association of Scholars in New York City on April 12. The NAS is a conservative advocacy group that strives to combat a “liberal bias” in education. Peter Wood, the president of the NAS, presented Wax with the Peter Shaw Memorial Award for her “remarkable service of American higher education.” The award is usually given to someone who has demonstrated exceptional academic freedom, but

Wood explained the criteria was tweaked to accommodate academic courage, as the two are mutually dependent. After receiving the award, Wax spoke to a packed room of more than 100 supportive audience members. Titled “The Price of the Push for Equality of Result,” Wax’s talk touched on the widespread backlash she received after coauthoring a controversial op-ed praising bourgeois values and discussing the implications of the domination of the “progressive left” at Penn and at universities nationwide. Wax questioned the motivations of her colleagues and Penn Law Dean Ted Ruger in “categorically rejecting” her views. She specifically took issue with Ruger’s recent decision to ban her from teaching a mandatory first-year class. “He offered no data to back

it up,” she said about his email announcing the decision. “He said I violated confidentiality but cited no authority for this.” “He speculated that black students assigned to my class may be adversely affected— what does that mean?” she questioned. “Any claim that I deliberately downgrade minority students is a non-starter; first-year grading is blind.” Wax argued that majority of the allegations and actions being taken against her are based on feelings and depict a larger, more worrisome shift in civil discourse on college campuses. “Rules like engaging in civil debate, giving reason justification, not calling name or using slurs and being honest and forthright are routinely violated at my institution and other institutions,” she said. Calling academia today a “utopian equalitarian fantasy

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that depends on denial and banishment of those who dare to notice reality,” Wax contended that the progressive left was responsible for these violations. She said the left’s domination over popular discourse has rendered students and faculty silent and unable to stray from the popular opinion in fear of being labelled racist. “By requiring us to tell social untruths on pain of social death, this regime is humiliating and unfair and generates its own resentment and mistrust which often finds its way to the ballot box,” she continued. Wax argued that marginalized groups have been given “veto power” over “what can be said and who can teach.” Citing their inability to function when faced with opinions that contradict those of their own, Wax further contended such groups “advertise their own psychological weakness” and fail to prepare themselves for future leadership roles in their professions. “This cannot be called an education; it is a capitulation,” she said. During the Q&A session, audience members, including Penn alumni, rose to support Wax, calling her “an inspiration” and a “national ornament.”

AVNI KATARIA | STAFF REPORTER

Wax’s speech touched on the widespread backlash she received after co-authoring a controversial op-ed praising bourgeois values.

Audience member Carol Iyanone said she was impressed by Wax’s talk, but was surprised to hear of the lack of support and extent of animosity coming from Wax’s colleagues at Penn. “I felt that there was a kind of tyrannical mind-set in that, that if someone is made a social

outcast, everyone has to shun them,” Iyanone said. Audience member and former columnist for the National Review John Derbyshire said he agreed with Wax’s views, and that her courage was truly commendable and that overall “she was splendid.”

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SPORTS 9

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Barry outscores Columbia, wins DP Player of the Week W. LAX | The sophomore’s six points tie a career high WILL DiGRANDE Associate Sports Editor

Penn women’s lacrosse had many shining stars this weekend in its 19-4 win over Ivy League rivals Columbia. But none shined brighter than sophomore midfielder Erin Barry, this week’s DP Sports Player of the Week. A perfect mirror of the Red and Blue’s utter dominance on the field on Saturday, Barry led all scorers with a season-best five goals and one assist for a total of

QOSTAL

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be very different than that of her classmates, and her path into Penn was also very different. This didn’t prevent her from feeling like she belonged and making close friendships, but it did provide some difficulties along the way. “Being at Penn, in many ways you just don’t feel those differences in socioeconomic background, but

GOLF

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ence contending in a tournament or winning a tournament, I think there’s a lot to learn,” Poria said. “So I definitely think the fact that we won a couple years ago is pretty momentus

six points on the day. Three of her goals came in the first half and two came in the second, where Penn put up 11 goals and held the Lions scoreless. The sophomore had goals five through seven for the Quakers and they came when the team needed it most, in the middle of strong play by Columbia. Her third goal ended a run and kickstarted a 13-0 run Penn used to cruise until the end of the game. Nationally awarded in high school, the Manhasset, N.Y. native has been an influential force since her arrival at Penn. Barry was the only freshman to start in all of last year’s games and

earned all-league awards in her first few weeks of college play. Her 24 goals last season were good enough for fifth on the team, but she already eclipsed that mark this season, scoring 33 goals from 12 games. Of players who have attempted more than three shots on goal, Barry has the highest accuracy, successfully converting just over half of her 65 attempts. Barry’s success is only more impressive considering she has two seasons left with the Quakers. Based on her performances so far, Penn fans have reason to be excited to see her in years to come.

in other ways … they are felt. For example, the types of things that you are looking for in your Penn education or the types of things you’re interested in can also sort of be driven by your socioeconomic status,” Qostal explained. While Penn isn’t the perfect place to launch a pro career and isn’t the easiest place to be a lowincome student either, there are a lot of positive things it has provided for Qostal:

“There’s so much appreciation from me for all of the resources I get here. I definitely am looking forward to getting to a place where I’m in a position to give back to this university.” If she’s given a chance, that path toward being able to give back to Penn could be as a tennis pro. If Qostal has made it this far, there’s no reason to believe she can’t make it all the way.

for us. And even though Carter, Josh, and [Zareh] weren’t there with us, they know how it feels to contend … so we all feel like [another Ivy title] is attainable here.” With a championship, the program would effectively complete the rebuilding process that

it has undergone over the last couple of years. In the way of this fulfillment are seven other teams also fully capable of making a run at the title. This weekend is sure to be a grind for all involved, but the Red and Blue are confident that they will be ready for the challenge.

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10 SPORTS

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Baseball notches first Ivy series win over Princeton

Offensive explosions bring when it is able to string some team within one game of .500 hits together and convert with ISAAC SPEAR Sports Reporter

When the sun comes out and the weather gets warm, Penn baseball really gets going. A schedule change provided nothing but positive outcomes for the Quakers, as they enjoyed two days of fantastic weather and a series win over Princeton (8-16, 5-4 Ivy) at the Tigers’ Clarke Field. Coming off of a slew of disappointing conference outcomes, it was important for the Quakers (10-19-1, 5-6-1) to start hitting more, improve defensively, and keep the pitching consistent to pick up two key conference wins. Originally scheduled for Sunday, but moved to Friday because of weather concerns, game one of the series began as a closely contested pitching duel. But then, the Quakers’ bats exploded in the sixth inning, giving them a five-run lead and keeping them in front for good. Penn’s offense is successful

first win of the season, but he only lasted three and two-thirds innings, giving up three runs, before being replaced by freshman Brendan Bean. Bean tossed four and one-third shutout innings, but the damage was already done and the Quakers’ offense wasn’t able to put any runs on the board. Both the pitching and the hitting made a complete turnaround in the second game of the doubleheader. A double by senior Daniel Halevy gave Penn its first run in what would be a five-run first inning. Accompanied by a shut-down pitching performance from sophomore pitcher Christian Scafidi, the Quakers never looked back. In the end, they beat the Tigers 10-1 while amassing an impressive 18 hits. So what changed in between games on Saturday that provided such an offensive disparity? “I felt like our focus was a little bit better at the plate,� Yurkow said. “The good thing after [going up by five runs] is we still kept having good atbats, we tacked a couple more [runs] on, and we did a good job throwing strikes pitching with

runners on base. This is exactly what it did in the sixth inning of game one, hitting singles and doubles on the way to a sixrun outburst. The pitching also showed up in game one, featuring senior Gabe Kleiman finally picking up his first win of the season. “I feel like [Kleiman] has pitched a lot better than his record indicates,� coach John Yurkow said. “We haven’t played great defense behind him and we haven’t really given him a lot of run support.� Improved defense was a big factor in this series and the run support was provided, albeit a little late, in the contest on Friday. The first game of the doubleheader on Saturday, however, was a different story for the Red and Blue offensively. Freshman Ben Gross delivered a complete game shutout for the Tigers, striking out seven. “We just didn’t do a good job swinging the bats,� Yurkow said. Sophomore Mitchell Holcomb was trying to follow in Kleiman’s footsteps and get his

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Sophomore right fielder Peter Matt went 4 for 5 in the second half of Saturday’s doubleheader against Princeton and hit his first home run of the season. He finished the series with a total of four RBI and two runs.

the lead.� Going into the second half of the doubleheader, the pressure was on the Red and Blue to finally pick up their first conference series win. The quick scores in the first inning knocked Princeton freshman pitcher Andrew Gnazzo out of the game and allowed Scafidi to work with a comfortable lead. “A lot of the weight is lifted

off of your shoulders and it’s really easy to pitch with the lead and just be aggressive and attack the hitters,� Scafidi said. Penn will be looking to establish a trend of improvement along with the weather. It certainly played its best series with the best weather it has seen up to this point. “It was very refreshing, playing in that kind of weather,�

Yurkow said. “Hopefully we can just keep getting better from here on out.� The Quakers will try to stay hot this week, with a single game coming up against La Salle and a series against Cornell all being played at Meiklejohn Stadium. Penn is now 2.5 games out of an Ivy League Championship Series spot with nine conference games to go.

With Ivy hopes on the line, Penn men’s lacrosse came up with a big win Quakers overcome early penalties in commanding win ISAAC SPEAR Sports Reporter

Penn men’s lacrosse delivered when it mattered most. In a must-win game for the Quakers to keep their Ivy League Tournament hopes alive, they performed well in every facet of the game on their way to an 11-7 win over Harvard (7-4, 2-2 Ivy) on Senior Day. The first quarter was all about the Crimson. Penn’s penalty woes continued, providing Harvard with multiple extra man opportunities early on. Surprisingly, none of these resulted in

goals, thanks to stellar play in net from junior goalkeeper Reed Junkin. But Harvard jumped out to an early 3-1 lead despite the resilient Penn defense, initially sparked by a lightning fast, unassisted strike from senior Carney Mahon. The leading scorers for the Crimson, senior Morgan Cheek and sophomore Kyle Anderson, each notched one of their respective three goals in the first quarter. Once the Quakers (6-6, 2-3) finally got on the board late in the first quarter, they started to get going offensively. The Red and Blue continued playing strong defense and were able to capitalize on increased possession to go on a run of seven

straight goals. Possession was key for Penn throughout the course of the game, and they were able to gain control of the ball because of face-off dominance by junior Richie Lenskold. His stellar play delivered the ball to the Red and Blue offense, which allowed them to be patient and take better shots in the second and third quarters. Lenskold provided the offensive spark, but only after Junkin kept the Red and Blue in the game with some tough saves. On offense, the Quakers seemed to change their shooting approach after not finding much success against Harvard senior goalkeeper Robert Shaw in the first quarter. They quickly

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the doubles court; the top two singles players are not always the team’s best doubles duo. For Geatz, the nuance of doubles only complicates the selection of his doubles lineup. “They’ve got to get along. If you don’t like each other, you’re not gonna play good doubles,â€? Geatz said. “You’ve got to rotate [the teams] around, because it takes a little bit of time. I bet you there’s not a team in the country that has their doubles team picked out in the fall and they’re playing the same teams now.â€? Geatz went on to justify the science that goes into creating the perfect doubles lineup, which represents one of seven available points in tennis. “The doubles point is more than a point ‌ If you win the doubles point you believe you can win. It’s

CHASE SUTTON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Junior midfielder Tyler Dunn scored two goals, the second stopping a Harvard comeback with just five minutes left in the fourth quarter.

plete the comeback, goals from Dunn and leading goal scorer junior Simon Mathias gave the Red and Blue enough breathing room to close out their home conference schedule with a win. The Quakers suit up for the final time at Franklin Field this

season against Saint Joseph’s on Tuesday, before finishing up Ivy play against Dartmouth on Saturday. Penn will need to win that game and get some help in order to make it into the Ivy League Tournament, which begins on May 4.

worth a point but it’s also worth momentum.� It makes sense that the only team aspect of an otherwise individual sport can provide a team with the most momentum. For senior captain Josh Pompan, playing doubles holds special significance in his Penn career. After never playing doubles during his time on the junior tour before coming to Penn, Pompan learned to adapt his baseliner style of play to more aggressive doubles tactics. Last season, Pompan debuted in the doubles lineup with 2017 graduate Thomas Spratt. Working with Spratt demonstrated to Pompan that a contrast in playing styles makes for a potent doubles pairing. “[With Spratt and current doubles partner Nicholai Westergaard], there were a lot of similarities,� Pompan said. “They were both all over the net, closing hard, putting away volleys. I, on the oth-

er hand, I’m better form the back [of the court]. I think that we compliment each other well, Nicholai and I.� This year, Pompan and Westergaard have proven to be a consistent force in the Quakers’ doubles roster, securing a team-high 10 wins at No. 2 doubles. For Pompan, he and Westergaard exemplify the notion that doubles partners need to share a bond off the court. “He’s my best friend,� Pompan commented. “Me and Nicholai, we actually live next to each other, and so we’re able to talk about things, and get enthused before the match. We have a good bond, and that’s a huge advantage that we as a team have.� For all the famous doubles pairings in tennis history, there is no one mold that shapes what a successful pairing looks like. But for Penn men’s tennis, the squad members can look to their senior captain for a pretty good blueprint.

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recognized his weakness of not being able to stop high shots and attacked the upper reaches of the net. Penn’s second and third goals are perfect examples of this, with freshman Mike Lamon bouncing a goal into the top of the net and junior Tyler Dunn smoking a shot into the same area. Shaw was only able to save one shot above his chest in the entire game, and this is one of the big reasons the Quakers were able to pull off the muchneeded victory. At one point, it looked as if the Quakers were going to run away with the game when they took a 7-3 lead, but a goal by Anderson just before time expired in the third quarter, followed by two goals, including an impressive falling down shot by Cheek to begin the fourth quarter, brought the Crimson within one goal. Before Harvard could com-

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THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

SPORTS 11

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

With winter over, Quakers look ahead to postseason GOLF | Indoor practices hopefully thing of a past MICHAEL LANDAU Sports Reporter

Spring officially started a few weeks ago, but don’t tell that to the members of Penn golf. The men’s and women’s teams have been affected significantly by the bad weather that has plagued the Northeast recently. Rain, snow, and cold temperatures have wreaked havoc with the spring golf season in several ways, forcing Penn to find a way to adjust. Some of the effects, like the shortening of the men’s Princeton Invitational from 54 to 36 holes last weekend due to inclement weather, have directly impacted tournament play. Others, as junior Josh Goldenberg noted, have

affected the teams’ preparation. “Our ability to practice is heavily dependent and predicated on the weather being good, and as of late, it hasn’t been,” he said. “That’s forced us to really utilize our indoor facility as much as possible and take advantage of the incredible opportunity that area has provided.” This indoor practice, which has gone on for much of the spring season so far, has allowed the Quakers to keep their games sharp. However, it’s still certainly far from ideal. “It makes it a little harder to get ready for tournaments and to prepare to get to the level that we are striving for,” Goldenberg said. “I think bad weather ultimately hinders us and forces us to change our plans and call certain audibles, but at the end of the day there’s nothing we can do about it.”

The bad weather problem is not that surprising considering the makeup of the spring golf schedule. The end of the season is marked by the Ivy League Championships from April 20 to 22, and both the men’s and women’s teams play in multiple tournaments before then. Late March and early April are rarely ideal times to play golf in the Northeast, and this year has been no different. The lack of opportunity to practice outdoors has provided a unique set of challenges that transcends the physical part of the game. “I think what the weather affects most is the mental aspect, because being outside and playing as much as possible really allows you to get reps in and get comfortable before a tournament,” Goldenberg said. “While it does affect the physical aspect

of playing, it affects more the mentality that we have.” Irrespective of the weather, however, the Quakers’ approach to tournaments themselves largely remains constant. “We always have a game plan in place, and we discuss as a team how we are going to attack a course and what our goals are,” Goldenberg said. “Regardless of the weather, it’s really up to us to put that plan in place and execute it to the best of our abilities.” In fact, the weather issues may have actually had a positive impact on the golfers’ mindset going into events. “If anything, it really forces us to strive to achieve our goals even harder because we have another obstacle in the way,” Goldenberg said. So cold or warm, rain or sun, Penn golf will be ready for the challenges ahead.

FILE PHOTO

With competitions and practices being impacted by poor weather, junior Josh Goldenberg and the rest of Penn golf have been forced to adjust.

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MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018 VOL. CXXXIII NO. 26

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

M. TENNIS | Opposites attract for Penn tennis’ doubles pairs MOSES NSEREKO Sports Reporter

The in-bounds area of a doubles court measures to be only nine feet wider than that of a singles court, but, in fact, that may be the least significant difference between the two games. “Singles is more a game of mis-

takes, where doubles is more a game of winners,” coach David Geatz points out. “In singles you can wear people down and just never miss balls, but in doubles I don’t think that’s enough.” Even the fact that doubles matches are only one set in NCAA tennis changes the dynamics. “You can lose the doubles point in 19 minutes, you’ve got to be ready from the very first ball,” Geatz warned. “The first big point is the first point.”

FOUNDED 1885

Where singles matches are a bout of wills, pitting one player alone against another, doubles can be thought of as a clash of tactics. Matches in doubles are won by the team who takes advantage of court position, and the team that controls the net more often. What this means is that singles success will not simply translate onto SEE DOUBLES PAGE 10

VARUN SUDUNAGUNTA | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER & BEN ZHAO | DESIGN EDITOR

Qostal considers turning pro as Penn career winds down W. TENNIS | Moroccan native faces several hurdles SAM MITCHELL Associate Sports Editor

Penn’s rich alumni network often provides valuable networking opportunities for students looking for a leg up during the job search. But what if your entire chances of getting hired hinged upon whether or not alumni believed in you? For women’s tennis senior Lina Qostal, turning pro after graduation basically boils down to that. Going pro in tennis isn’t like going pro in team sports like football and basketball. In those sports, players will either be drafted and sign a rookie deal or go undrafted and negotiate a deal independently with a team. They’ll start getting paid as soon as they start playing. But in tennis, things aren’t so easy. “Especially at the very beginning of your career, it’s really hard to find the money to travel and train because since it’s an individual sport it’s kind of a catch-22 where sponsors will only sponsor you if you have a high ranking but in order to get that high ranking you need the money to get to it,” Qostal said. While Penn provides substantial support for students looking to pursue traditional professional trajectories, it’s fairly uncommon for student-athletes to pursue their sport post graduation, so there’s not as much that the University can do to help. It’s very rare for a member of Penn tennis to make a serious run at the pros. The most recent and notable example was in 2011, when then-freshman Connie Hsu left after a stunning first year on

Penn’s team to play professionally. Not only does Penn not have the structure already in place to help someone like Qostal, there’s an added strain that comes from going to a school as competitive and academic as Penn. However, that isn’t stopping Qostal from trying to pursue her dream. She believes in herself, and she knows if she gets a shot, she can be great. The senior hails from Morocco and went to high school in France. Having now lived in the United States for four years and with hopes to live here for many more as a professional athlete, there are lots of aspects of this country that might draw Qostal to want to stay after college. For one, the culture surrounding professional sports is more developed and supportive of pro athletes in all sports in the U.S. than in much of the rest of the world. Additionally, tennis training facilities are generally top-notch around the country. However, for Qostal, there’s more to it than just the professional opportunities America provides. “From Morocco, seeing the Disney channel [I had] this idea of this America where you can make your dreams come true,” Qostal said. “So to be able to come here … it just helps you feel that you are in the process of working towards your dream. I think that intangible motivational aspect can go a long way in reminding you what you’re doing, why you’re doing it.” In the years since Qostal has come to Penn, there have been huge shifts in the political state of the country. The election of President Trump has been linked to a rise in anti-immigrant sentiment and rising hate crimes around the

country. While she has been lucky to have come to a part of the country where this is relatively rare, the political and legal implications are still potentially an area of concern. “What’s great about Penn is that it’s a community where people just make you feel welcome wherever you come from. That may not be the case everywhere in the U.S. but then again, the diversity that you get here … I’ve been exposed to so many people in my life that I have developed this understanding of where everyone is coming from,” Qostal said. Despite being a philosophy, politics, and economics major, it was clear that Qostal’s focus wasn’t on politics. It was on tennis. Tennis is often considered a sport that people play at private schools and country clubs, but that hasn’t been Qostal’s experience. Despite not coming from the same wealth that many future pro tennis players do, she still hopes that she’ll be able to be successful. To do so, though, she’ll need some help. “The International Tennis Federation has been trying to get more and more people from third-world countries and developing countries by providing some sorts of grants but those resources are still super small and there’s still not enough,” Qostal said. If Qostal is going to be able to become a pro, it is likely that she’ll need a sponsor to support her while she establishes herself on the tournament circuit. Her hope is that a Penn alum or Penn-affiliated tennis lover with the money to support her will want to help her dream come true. Qostal’s path after Penn will SEE QOSTAL PAGE 9

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With plenty of depth, Quakers have Ivy title in their sights M. GOLF | Veteran leadership key for title DANNY CHIARODIT Associate Sports Editor

Penn men’s golf hasn’t won an Ivy League Championship in three years. This team is trying to change that. The Red and Blue will be competing for the program’s fifth conference championship this upcoming weekend at Stonewall Golf Club in Elverson, Pa. This tournament comes after a couple of tune-up weekends for the group, namely the Princeton Invitational two weekends ago and the Yale Invitational this past Saturday. The team did well in each of these two tournaments, coming in second out of 12 at Princeton and fifth in the 15-team field at Yale. In their second and final round at Yale, the Quakers notched the second-lowest team total out of the 15 schools. They hope to carry that momentum into the 54-hole competition this weekend. “That was really a positive for us, just to sort of battle through the rougher conditions in the second round there,” senior Amay Poria said. “I don’t think the weather’s supposed to be great next weekend, so the fact that we can play well in those conditions is pretty reassuring for us.” Not only would a championship be an important achievement for the program, but it would also be a tangible result of the change in culture that coach Jason Calhoun has brought to Penn men’s golf. Calhoun was hired in June 2017 and has already made his mark on a team that finished fifth in the Ivy Championship last spring.

PHOTO FROM CARTER THOMPSON

Penn men’s golf hasn’t won an Ivy title since 2015, but the Quakers have a strong roster capable of making a run at the title this weekend.

“The program has definitely changed a lot [since Calhoun’s hiring],” Poria said. “Jason’s personality is very much one of a gogetter, so he’s very ambitious with goals for the program, goals for the team. He’s done a phenomenal job of reaching out to the alumni, just sort of taking advantage of the connections that we have in our community … things are looking really solid for the program.” One way that Calhoun has taken advantage of Penn golf’s connections is by scheduling several tournaments throughout the year to ensure that the players get as many reps as they can. This has been especially important this spring season, since the often inclement weather has made it difficult for the team to get out on the course.

This element is also what makes the upcoming Ivy Championship so interesting. Many of the other Ivies have not recently been able to play as much as the Red and Blue, so it remains to be seen how polished each of the teams will look this weekend. For Penn, the only golfer who was on the championship team in 2015 was Poria. His experience as an Ivy champion will be invaluable as the team prepares to capture another title this weekend at Stonewall. Of the remaining four starters, Carter Thompson is a senior, Josh Goldenberg and Zareh Kaloustian are juniors, and Mitchell Cornell is a freshman, so the group is an experienced one. “Anytime you get any experiSEE GOLF PAGE 9

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