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CAMBRIDGE PRIMARY

Skills Builder Activity Book 3 consists of: A full range of activities which support the breadth of the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework at Grade 3. Carefully levelled activities which help gently raise a child’s mathematical understanding and performance to match that of their peers.

For the first time, this flexible resource offers motivational parents the Cambridge way for Maths work at home.

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Skills Builder

Moseley and Rees

Helpful guidance and tips to help teachers or parents explain key mathematical methods and concepts before each exercise.

Mathematics

PL

The Skills Builder Activity Books are carefully designed to provide consolidation activities for children who need extra teaching and learning opportunities in order to achieve success in the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework.

Skills Builder

Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder Activity Books are the latest addition to the Cambridge Primary Mathematics course. This is a flexible and engaging course written specifically for the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework Stages to 6. The course offers a discussion-led approach with problem-solving integrated throughout to encourage learners to think and talk about mathematics in place of rote learning and drill practice. The language throughout the course is pitched to EAL / ESL learners with illustrations supporting visual understanding and learning.

3

CAMBRIDGE PRIMARY

SA M

Skills Builder

Cambridge Primary Mathematics

Mathematics

3

Original material Š Cambridge University Press 2016

Cherri Moseley and Janet Rees

3


CAMBRIDGE PRIMARY

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Mathematics Contents

PL

Name:

Skills Builder

Length, capacity, weight and time.......... 36–38

SA M

Three-digit numbers (1) ............................... 4–5

3

Addition and subtraction (1) ...................... 6–7

Estimating ....................................................... 39

Doubling ....................................................... 8–9

Sorting and representing data ................ 40–41

Addition and subtraction (2) .................. 10–11

Ordering ......................................................... 42

Multiplication (1) ...................................... 12–13

Multiplication (2) ............................................ 43

2D shapes and symmetry ........................ 14–17

Fractions ................................................... 44–45

Position ...................................................... 18–19

Doubling and halving (2) ........................ 46–47

Money ....................................................... 20–21

Complements to 100 ............................... 48–49

Time (1) ..................................................... 22–23

Multiplication and division ...................... 50–51

Estimating length ..................................... 24–25

Time (2) ........................................................... 52

Three digit numbers (2) ................................. 26

Capacity ......................................................... 53

Multiplying by 10 ............................................ 27

Time (3) ..................................................... 54–55

Ordering, estimating and rounding ........ 28–31

Money ....................................................... 56–57

Doubling and halving (1) .............................. 32

Weight ............................................................. 58

Addition and subtraction (3) ........................ 33

Photocopiable resources ......................... 59–76

Multiplication ............................................ 34–35

Answers ..................................................... 77–79

Cherri Moseley and Janet Rees Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016


Introduction This Skills Builder activity book is part of a series of 12 write-in activity books for primary mathematics grades 1–6. It can be used as a standalone book, but the content also complements Cambridge Primary Maths. Learners progress at different rates, so this series provides a Skills Builder and a Challenge Activity Book for each Primary Mathematics Curriculum Framework Stage to support and broaden the depth of learning.

University Printing House, Cambridge cb2 8bs, United Kingdom Cambridge University Press is part of the University of Cambridge. It furthers the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence.

The Skills Builder books consolidate the learning already covered in the classroom, but provide extra support by giving short reminders of key information, topic vocabulary and hints on how best to develop maths skills and knowledge. They have also been written to support learners whose first language is not English.

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www.cambridge.org Information on this title: education.cambridge.org/9781316509159 © Cambridge University Press 2016 This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press. Printed in India by Multivista Global Pvt Ltd. A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library isbn 978-1-316-50915-9 Paperback Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.

The activities are for use by learners in school or at home, with adult mediation. Topics have been carefully chosen to focus on those common areas where learners might need extra support. The approach is linked directly to Cambridge Primary Maths, but teachers and parents can pick and choose which activities to cover, or go through the books in sequence. The varied set of activities grow in challenge through each unit, including: • closed questions with answers, so progress can be checked

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notice to teachers It is illegal to reproduce any part of this work in material form (including photocopying and electronic storage) except under the following circumstances: (i) where you are abiding by a licence granted to your school or institution by the Copyright Licensing Agency; (ii) where no such licence exists, or where you wish to exceed the terms of a license, and you have gained the written permission of Cambridge University Press; (iii) where you are allowed to reproduce without permission under the provisions of Chapter 3 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, which covers, for example, the reproduction of short passages within certain types of educational anthology and reproduction for the purposes of setting examination questions.

How to use the books

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First published 2016

notice to teachers in the uk The photocopy masters in this publication may be photocopied or distributed (electronically) free of charge for classroom use within the school or institution that purchased the publication. Worksheets and copies of them remain in the copyright of Cambridge University Press, and such copies may not be distributed or used in any way outside the purchasing institution.

This book is part of the Cambridge Primary Maths project. This is an innovative combination of curriculum and resources designed to support teachers and learners to succeed in primary mathematics through best-practice international maths teaching and a problem-solving approach. To get involved, visit www.cie.org.uk/cambridgeprimarymaths.

• Hints prompt and assist in building understanding, and steer the learner in the right direction. • You will need gives learners, teachers and parents a list of resources for each activity. • Photocopiable resources are provided at the end of the book, for easy assembly in class or at home. • Links to the Cambridge International Examinations Primary Mathematics Curriculum Framework objectives and the corresponding Cambridge Primary Mathematics Teacher’s Resource are given in the footnote on every page. • Calculators should be used to help learners understand numbers and the number system, including place value and properties of numbers. However, the calculator is not promoted as a calculation tool before Stage 5. Note: When a ‘spinner’ is included, put a paperclip flat on the page so the end is over the centre of the spinner. Place the pencil point in the centre of the spinner, through the paperclip. Hold the pencil firmly and spin the paperclip to generate a result.

1

2

5

3 4

• questions with more than one possible answer

Tracking progress

• activities requiring resources, for example, dice, spinners or digit cards

Answers to closed questions are given at the back of the book; these allow teachers, parents and learners to check their work.

• activities and games best done with someone else, for example, in class or at home, which give the opportunity to be fully involved in the child’s learning

When completing each activity, teachers and parents are advised to encourage self-assessment by asking the students how straightforward they found the activity. When learners are reflecting on games, they should consider how challenging the mathematics was, not who won. Learners could use a ✓/ ✗ or red/ green colouring system to record their self-assessment anywhere on each activity page.

• activities to support different learning styles: working individually, in pairs, in groups.

How to approach the activities Space is provided for learners to write their answers in the book. Some activities might need further practice or writing, so students could be given a blank notebook at the start of the year to use alongside the book. Each activity follows a standard structure. • Remember gives an overview of key learning points. They introduce core concepts and, later, can be used as a revision guide. These sections should be read with an adult who can check understanding before attempting the activities. • Vocabulary assists with difficult mathematical terms, particularly when English is not the learner’s first language. Learners should read through the key vocabulary with an adult and be encouraged to clarify understanding.

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016

These assessments provide teachers and parents with an understanding of how best to support individual learners’ next steps.


Marching ants

resource 1, pages 59–61, a 1–6 dice, a counter

You will need:

Remember In a three-digit number, the first digit tells you how many hundreds there are, the second digit how many tens and the third digit how many ones. So, for 327, the 3 represents 300, the 2 represents 20 and the 7 represents 7 ones.

Put your counter on START. Throw the dice and move that number of spaces. Follow the direction the ants are walking. Write the number you land on in any position on your score card. Once you have written the digit, it cannot be changed.

Vocabulary hundreds, tens, ones, units, place value, digit

Complete one score card at a time.

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The highest number I made was __________. The smallest number I made was __________.

Hint: Think about

where to place 1 when making a high number. How will that change when making a low number? Use place value cards to support reading each number.

_____________________________________________________________________

START

1

SA M

4

9 5 1

4

2

3

7

highest

Score cards

4

1

Highest hundreds

8

3

5

1

0

5

6

8

7

2

3

3

3

ones

tens

ones

2 3

6

0

4 Smallest

8

1

tens

1

1

9

2

4

5

0

6

smallest

5

2

0

1

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These are all my numbers, in order.

7 5

hundreds 1 2 3 4

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn2, 3Nn5, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 1.1, 1.3

Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn2, 3Nn5, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 1.1, 1.3

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[A] Title chains Making

Write + 10 or – 10 to make your own chain. Then complete this chain. resource 1, pages 59–61

You will need:

Hint: Use place

56

Remember Remember When you add text or subtract 10 from a two-digit or three-digit number, the ones digit does not change. For example, 152 + 10 = 162 152 – 10 = 142.

value cards to make the numbers. Change the tens card to add or subtract 10.

hundreds, tens, ones, units, add, subtract, digit

Complete each chain.

28

–10

0

+1

0

–1 0

–1

+1

0

+10

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38

+10

+10

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18

+10

I started on 18 and ended on __________.

+10

Make a chain for your friend. You can add or subtract 10, 20 or 30 but you must know the answer!

+10

0

+1

Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn2, 3Nn3, 3Nn5, 3Nn6, 3Nc9, 3Pt1, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 2.1

0

–1

+10

+10

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I started on 56 and ended on __________.

–10

+10

0 +1

+10

I started on 23 and ended on __________.

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Vocabulary

+10

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn2, 3Nn3, 3Nn5, 3Nn6, 3Nc9, 3Pt1, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 2.1

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Robot doubles Remember There are different ways to double a number. You can add it to itself (4 + 4) or you can multiply it by 2 (4 × 2).

This is a game for two players. Cut up the cards and put them in the feely bag. resource 2, pages 62–63, a feely bag, 20 counters each

You will need:

10 26 4

8

32 38

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If your answer has already been covered up by a counter, miss a go.

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40 22

36

Discard the card.

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double, twice, add, multiply

20

Work out the answer. Put a counter on the answer on your robot. The first player to cover all 20 numbers on their robot is the winner.

Vocabulary

2

Take turns to take a card from the feely bag.

6

34 18

28 24 16 14

30

12

Hint: Use cubes or

Base 10 apparatus to help you work out the double.

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Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nc3, 3Nc6, 3Nc7, 3Pt1, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 4.1

Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nc3, 3Nc6, 3Nc7, 3Pt1, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 4.1

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Tricky triangles You will need:

page 64

resource 3,

Put the numbers 1–9 in the circles so that the numbers along each side have the same total.

Find a different way to do it. Now for a challenge!

Put the numbers 1–12 in the circles so that the numbers along each side have the same total.

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cubes, counters

Vocabulary add, subtract, fact family, related,

ten, ones, number pairs or

number sentence

bonds for 10, near pairs, doubles, near doubles, add,

There is a fact family living in each of the houses in this row.

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Complete each house.

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Hint: Cut up the

numbers in the number strip. Place the numbers in the circles then move them around to find a solution. Start with the corner numbers.

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Find a different way to do it.

You will need:

Vocabulary

addition, total, strategy

Put the numbers 1–6 in the circles on each triangle so that the numbers along each side have the same total.

Remember Fact families are 3 numbers that are related. 4, 6 and 10 are related: 6 + 4 = 10, 4 + 6 = 10, 10 – 4 = 6 and 10 – 6 = 4.

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Remember When you add several single-digit numbers, look for number pairs for 10, near pairs, doubles and near doubles to help you. Make tens then add the tens and ones to find the total. For example 6 + 3 + 1 + 4 = (6 + 4) + 3 + 1 =10 + 4 = 14 Or (3 + 1) + 4 + 6 = 8 + 6 = 14

Fact families

7

3

7 + 3 = 10 +

=

10 − 3 = 7 −

=

9 5

13

11

4

8

= 9

5 +

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

=

=

=

− 4 =

=

=

+

+ 5 =

9 −

Write a different fact family in each house. Use the numbers 1 up to 20.

5

6

5

Hint: Use counters or cubes to check

that each number sentence is correct.

+

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

+

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nc1, 3Nc12, 3Nc16, 3Pt1, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 3.1

Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nc1, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 5.1

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Can you see the ship? Hint: Look up or down a column or across a row

Remember A multiple is the number we get when we multiply a number by another number. 8 is a multiple of 2 because it is 2 multiplied by 4.

a dice, a counter for each player

You will need:

to find a multiple of the number you threw. Use the multiples chart to find multiples of the spinner numbers.

multiple, row, column

This is a game for two players.

Move your counter to a number in the row above that is a multiple of the number you spun. If there is no number, miss a turn. Keep moving towards the top of the mountain.

10 5 4

1

2

3

4

5

1

1

2

3

4

5

2

2

4

6

8

3

3

6

9

4

4

8

5

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Play the game a second time, but now cover up the multiplication table. 6

7

8

9

10

6

7

8

9

10

10 12 14 16 18

20

12 15 18 21 24 27

30

12 16 20 24 28 32 36

40

5

10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

50

6

6

12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54

60

7

7

14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63

70

8

8

16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72

80

9

9

18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

90

100 1

5

2

3

The first player to reach 100 is the winner.

×

1

PL

You each need to climb the iceberg to find the ship stuck in the ice. Place your counters at the bottom of the iceberg. Take turns to spin the spinner.

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Vocabulary

12 20 2

25 35

4 27

45 5

10 24

6

24

30

14

5

7

15

24 50

32 9

16 PLAYER 1 START

28 16 12 35

8 70

21 40

15 15

10 45 3 28

PLAYER 2 START

18 40

10 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

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Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn4, 3Nc3, 3Nc4, 3Pt1, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 6.1, 6.2, 6.3

Unit 1A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn4, 3Nc3, 3Nc4, 3Pt1, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 6.1, 6.2, 6.3

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Straw models art straws, pipe cleaners (or modelling clay or dough), ruler, scissors

You will need:

Vocabulary square, rectangle, cube,

Cut some straws into 3 cm lengths.

Cut some straws into 5 cm lengths.

4, page 65

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Make different sized squares and rectangles with your straws. Can you make a pentagon, or a hexagon? How many sides do they have?

resource

Vocabulary symmetry, symmetrical, line of symmetry

Hint: Use a mirror to

Hint: Join 6 identical

squares together to make a cube. Use 3 pairs of rectangles or squares to make a cuboid. Cut some straws into 8 cm lengths.

You will need:

A line of symmetry splits a shape or pattern into two halves that are mirror images of each other. Shapes and patterns can have more than one line of symmetry.

PL

cuboid, right angle

Remember

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Remember Rememberand Squares textrectangles have four straight sides and four right angles. Cubes have 6 square faces. Cuboids can have square or rectangular faces. A net is what a 3D shape makes when it is opened out flat.

Squares, squares and more squares

find and check the lines of symmetry.

Use 4 tiles from resource 4 to make a 2 by 2 square.

What symmetrical patterns can you make? The first one has been done for you. Draw the line or lines of symmetry for each 2 by 2 square. 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Use small pieces of bent pipe cleaner (or small balls of modelling clay or dough) to join straws together.

Use your squares and rectangles to make different-sized cubes and cuboids.

Carefully open your cubes to see the nets. Now, join 6 squares together so that this net will not make a cube. Find more than one way to do this.

14

Which patterns have: 1 line of symmetry

2 lines of symmetry

more than 2 lines of symmetry?

Use 6 square tiles to make a 2 by 3 rectangle. What symmetrical patterns can you make? Draw the line or lines of symmetry. 1

2

3

4

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gs1, 3Gs2, 3Gs3, 3Gs4, 3Pt8, 3Pt9; CPM Teacher’s Resource 7.1, 7.2, 7.3

Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gs5, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 8.1

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Remember In a regular polygon, all the sides are the same length and all the angles are the same.

resource 5, page 66, 12 red counters, 12 yellow counters

You will need:

Vocabulary triangle, square, quadrilateral, pentagon, hexagon, polygon, regular, irregular

In an irregular polygon, the sides and angles are different sizes.

This is a game for two players.

Take turns to spin the spinner. The number you spin tells you the number of sides of the shape. Place a counter on the shape with that number of sides, next to the riverbank on your side of the river. Continue, building a path with your coloured counters to the other side of the river.

6

4 5

Miss a turn if the new shape does not join on to your path.

Hint: Copy the shapes in

When you complete your path, take one animal across the river. Remove your path and start a new path for the next animal. The first player to get all their animals to the other side of the river is the winner.

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the river. Label each shape with the number of sides. Check your shapes each time you use the spinner.

How many of your shapes are regular? How many are irregular? Compare with your partner. PLAYER 2 STARTING ROCK

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PLAYER 1 STARTING ROCK

3

Choose three animals and a colour each. Place them on your chosen starting rock.

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Cross the river

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Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gs2, 3Pt8; CPM Teacher’s Resource 7.1

Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gs2, 3Pt8; CPM Teacher’s Resource 7.1

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Building the wall Remember Position words tell you where something is or where to place something.

resource 6, page 67, a set of brick cards for each player, a set of position cards to share

You will need:

Cut out the bricks and position cards. Place the position cards in the box above the wall, face down. Take turns to take the top position card. Place a brick in the matching position in the wall. ‘Beside’ could be used to put one brick beside another, beside the edge of the wall or beside the pile of cement. Return the position card to the bottom of the pile.

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Vocabulary

This is a game for one or two players.

under, middle, edge, above, between, up, below, next to, down, top, beside, left, right, bottom, side,

Continue until the wall is complete.

SA M

PL

In a two-player game, the winner is the player who places the last brick in the wall.

Hint: Use the position card to say where you are putting

your brick – for example, ‘I am putting my brick on the bottom row’.

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Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gp1, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 8.2

Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Gp1, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 8.2

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Collecting money

This is a game for two players. Place all the money in the bank. Put your counter at the beginning of the track.

You will need: a collection of Vocabulary 10-cent, 50-cent and dollar

Player 1 I collected $__________ and __________ cents. Player 2 I collected $__________ and __________ cents.

Vocabulary coins or notes, a Text 1–6 dice, a tray or dish to use as a bank

Vocabulary cent, dollar, money, coins, value

If you land on an amount of money, take that amount from the bank. If you land on a star, take a dollar from the bank.

PL

Take turns to roll the dice and move that number of spaces.

E

Remember There are 100 cents in every dollar.

Hint: Put 10 cent

How much money did you collect?

coins in piles of 10 to make a dollar. Two 50-cent coins make a dollar.

100c

60c

When you have collected 100 cents, exchange them with the bank for a dollar. The winner is the player with the most money at the end of the track.

50c

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START

10c 70c

10c

70c

70c

20c

40c

20

50c

40c

100c

FINISH

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn3, 3Nc9, 3Nc18, 3Mm1, 3Pt1, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 9.1

Unit 1B Geometry and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn3, 3Nc9, 3Nc18, 3Mm1, 3Pt1, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 9.1

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Match the time 50 At o’clock times, the minute 10 hand points to 12 on an 45 9 analogue clock and a digital 8 40 clock shows 00 minutes.

11

45

7

6

12

1

10 3

4

8

25

0

11

1

10 3

9 4

8 35

15 20

5 25

At quarter to, the minute hand points to the 9 on an analogue clock and the digital clock shows 45 minutes.

50

0

45

40

11

12

1

4

8

30

7

5

6

50

25

30

Vocabulary time, clock, analogue, digital,

5

50

o’clock, half past

55

11

50

45

5

12

1

4

8

7

35

5

6

35

15 20

45

50 45 40

When all the clocks have a counter on them, the winner is the player with the most counters on the clocks.

11

Hint: Move the hands

12

5 1

50 45 40

12

4

8 7

6

1

10

2 3

9 4

8 7 35

6 30

4

8 7

5

6

45

15

12

5 1

3

9 4

8

40

7

25

30

0

30

5 25

15 20

12

5 1

10

2 3 4

8 7

6

35

30

0

55

5 25

15 20

50 45 40

11

5

12

1

10

2

10

3

9 4

8 7 35

5

6

15 20

25

30

25 0

40

11

12

5 1

10

2

10

3

9 4

8 7 35

6 30

5 25

15 20

0

55 50 45 40

11

12

5 1

10

2

10

3

9 4

8 7 35

6

5

30

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1C Measures and problem solving CPM Framework 3Mt2, 3Pt2; CPM Teacher’s Resource 10.1

15 20

5

6

35

20

10

2

10

25

30

9

20

5

45

5

10

10 3

10

40

15

3

9

45

10

2

50

11

1

9

11

50

55

0

50

5 2

35

10

35

55

12

10

40

0

55

25

If there are no clocks left showing that time, miss a turn.

11

50

55

20

on a geared clock or paper plate clock to match the time on the spinner. Find a clock with the minute hand in the same position.

0

55

11

25

30

15

Take turns to spin the spinner. Place one of your counters on the matching analogue time and another on the matching digital time.

0

55

25

30

25

30

20

5

6

4

8

quarter to

10 3

9

15 20

5

6

15

3

9

7 35

2

7

4

8

40

10 3

9

1

10

1 2

5

12

11

11 10

half past

o’clock

5

12

10

2

10

This is a game for two players.

22

0

55

0

0

55

20

10

3

9

35

4

8

40

2

6

15

3

9

5

10

7

2

10

40

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30

55

10

40

2

6

45

quarter past

5 1

45

5

10

7

15 20

5

30

12

50

12

11

35

2

6

0

55

45

9

40

20

5

10

7

15

counters in 2 different colours

25

0

55

45

10

5

30

35

50

1

4

11

40

At half past, the minute hand points to 6 on an analogue clock and the digital clock shows 30 minutes.

You will need: 3

55 50

5 2

35

At quarter past, the minute hand points to 3 on an analogue clock and a digital clock shows 15 minutes.

12

E

0

55

PL

Remember

Unit 1C Measures and problem solving CPM Framework 3Mt2, 3Pt2; CPM Teacher’s Resource 10.1

15 20

25

23


[A] Title garden Miniature You will need:

Estimate Measure

a ruler

Estimate the height of each plant.

a

Now use a ruler to measure the height of each plant.

Vocabulary

b

Compare your estimates and measurements.

height, length, tall, long,

c

My estimate was the same as the measurement for ________.

short, centimetre, cm

d

E

Remember Remember When estimating text a length, use what you already know about measures. 1 cm is about the width of your finger; 10 cm = a tens stick from place-value apparatus.

e

Hint: Line up the

g

PL

beginning of the plant with 0 on the ruler.

f

h

My estimate was longer than the measurement for ________. My estimate was shorter than the measurement for ________.

i j

a

24

b

c

SA M

This stick insect is 4 cm long.

d

e

f

g

h

i

Draw 3 stick insects, 6 cm, 9 cm and 12 cm long.

j

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 1C Measures and problem solving CPM Framework 3Ml1, 3Ml3, 3Pt2; CPM Teacher’s Resource 11.1, 11.2

Unit 1C Measures and problem solving CPM Framework 3Ml1, 3Ml3, 3Pt2; CPM Teacher’s Resource 11.1, 11.2

25


Abacus numbers

Remember When you multiply by 10 the digits move one place to the left. The value of every digit becomes 10 times bigger.

Vocabulary Vocabulary place value,Text hundreds, tens, ones

H

T

Hint: Count the beads

O

on the abacus. Make sure you have used all 6 beads every time.

T 1 2

O 2 0

1

PL

Draw six beads on each abacus to make a three-digit number. Write the number. The first one is done for you. What is the smallest three-digit number you can make? What is the largest?

H

Choose whether you want to travel vertically , or horizontally  across the board. Throw both dice.

T

600

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

26

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

H

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

SA M

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

Unit 2A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn2, 3Nn5, 3Pt3, 3Ps3, 3Ps6; CPM Teacher’s Resource 12.1

H

T

O

_____________

H

T

O

_____________

You will need:

dice, counters

Choose whether to add the numbers or subtract the smaller number from the higher number. Multiply your answer by 10. Put a counter on that number in the grid. Aim to make a line of counters from side to side or from top to bottom.

two 1–6

Vocabulary add, subtract, multiply,

E

Remember An abacus uses beads to represent numbers. Each stick has a different value. On these abacuses, they are hundreds, tens and ones.

Hexalines

Don’t forget your zero place holder.

digits

20

80

20

100 70

20

60

30

60

40

90

120

50 60

10 50

90

90

100

120

40

50

120

50

50

40

50

20

100

70

110

20

70

120

30

40

110

110

60

100

90

80

100

10

50

100

60

70

80

70

90

20

60

90

10

80

110

30

120

40

30

100

100

70

Hint: Play the game with a friend. Each different coloured counters.

The first player to make a path from top to bottom or side to side is the winner.

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 2A Number and problem solving CPM Framework 3Nn5, 3Nn7, 3Nc3, 3Pt3, 3Ps3, 3Ps6 ; CPM Teacher’s Resource 12.3

27


Weight

Resource 1 Place-value cards

Remember 1000g = 1 kg

Vocabulary grams, kilograms, weight, scales

58

8

9 5

_______________

4

950 g

If the skin weighs 850g, how much melon can be eaten? 3 kg

7

_______________

3

If the peel and top weigh 350g, how much pineapple can be eaten?

SA M

160 g

6

If the apple weighs 70g, what does the pear weigh?

_______________

2

3 kg

_______________

If the bowl weighs 220 g, what is the weight of the grapes?

650 g

_______________

1

_______________

If one parcel weighs 900g, what does the other parcel weigh?

PL

e

R ic

1 kg

Mum cooked 350g of rice. How much rice was left?

E

Read the scales and answer the questions.

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Unit 3C Measure and problem solving CPM Framework 3Ml2, 3Ml5, 3Pt2, 3Ps3; CPM Teacher’s Resource 32.1, 32.2

© Cambridge University Press 2016

Photocopiable resources

59


0 0 9 0 5

0

0 0 8 0 4

0

0 0 7 0 3

0

0 0 6 0 0 2

0 0 1

0 4

0

0 3

5

0 2

E

PL

0 9

0

0 1

SA M

8

0 7

0 6 60

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Photocopiable resources

© Cambridge University Press 2016

© Cambridge University Press 2016

Photocopiable resources

61


Resource 2 Number cards

62

double 3

double 4

double 5

twice 1

twice 2

twice 3

twice 4

twice 5

1+1

2+2

3+3

4+4

2×1

2×2

2×3

2×4

double 6

double 7

double 8

double 9

twice 6

twice 7

twice 8

6+6

7+7

2×6

2×7

double 11

double 12

E

double 2

twice 11

twice 12

PL

double 1

double 13

double 14

double 15

twice 13

twice 14

twice 15

11 + 11

12 + 12

13 + 13

14 + 14

15 + 15

5×5

2 × 11

2 × 12

2 × 13

2 × 14

2 × 15

double 10

double 16

double 17

double 18

double 19

double 20

twice 9

twice 10

twice 16

twice 17

twice 18

twice 19

twice 20

8+8

9+9

10 + 10

16 + 16

17 + 17

18 + 18

19 + 19

20 + 20

2×8

2×9

2 × 10

2 × 16

2 × 17

2 × 18

2 × 19

2 × 20

SA M

5+5

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Photocopiable resources

© Cambridge University Press 2016

© Cambridge University Press 2016

Photocopiable resources

63


3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12

PL

2

SA M

1

Resource 4 Square tiles

E

Resource 3 Number strips 1–12

64

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Photocopiable resources

© Cambridge University Press 2016

© Cambridge University Press 2016

Photocopiable resources

65


Resource [A] Title 14 two lines Time cards

Answers Answers are not supplied for open-ended activities and games.

1

Page 6 Making chains

30 seconds

10 seconds 35 seconds

15 seconds 40 seconds

20 seconds 45 seconds

25 seconds 50 seconds

I started on 18 and ended on 48. 18 ➞ 28 ➞ 38 ➞ 48 ➞ 38 ➞ 28 ➞ 38 ➞ 48 ➞ 58 ➞ 48 I started on 23 and ended on 93. 23 ➞ 33 ➞ 43 ➞ 53 ➞ 63 ➞ 73 ➞ 83 ➞ 93 ➞ 83 ➞ 93 ➞ 103 ➞ 93 56 learners’ choice.

E

5 seconds

11

1 minute

5 minutes

10 minutes

15 minutes

5

3

20 minutes

25 minutes

30 minutes

35 minutes

40 minutes

7 hours

76

3 hours 8 hours

55 minutes 4 hours

60 minutes 5 hours

1 hours

9 hours

10 hours

4

10

11 hours

2

5

9

3

6

11

7

5

2

4

7

12

6

8

9 4

9

11

6

6

11 7

6 10

8

2 9

2

4 4

7

12 10

8

1

2

5

© Cambridge University Press 2016

5

8

7 3

4

9

19

2 5

2 23

5

7 5

2

7

9

4

5 3

3 + 7 = 10

4 + 5 = 9

10 − 3 = 7

9 − 5 = 4

10 − 7 = 3

9 − 4 = 5 House 4

8 8

13 6

4

5 + 4 = 9

4

1

9

7 + 3 = 10

House 3

21 5

House 2

10

1

6

7

6

4

House 1

6 5

11

5

5 + 8 = 13

6 + 5 = 11

8 + 5 = 13

5 + 6 = 11

13 − 8 = 5

11 − 6 = 5

13 − 5 = 8

11 − 5 = 6

6 1

8

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Photocopiable resources

3

31

1 11

4

Page 11 Fact families

3

7

9

5

30

3

20

3

2

10

3

9

3

2

8

12

5

1

5

17

1

4

2

3

3

1

3

8

4

1

6

9 10

12

7

29

5

6

2

2

6 hours

SA M

2 hours

50 minutes

6

4

3

45 minutes

9

12

28

1

PL

55 seconds

6

8

Page 10 Tricky triangles

1

1

Answers

77


Page 24 Miniature garden

Squares: 3 cm by 3 cm, 5 cm by 5 cm, 8 cm by 8 cm Rectangles: 3 cm by 5 cm, 3 cm by 8 cm, 5 cm by 8 cm Cubes: 3 cm by 3 cm by 3 cm, 5 cm by 5 cm by 5 cm, 8 cm by 8 cm by 8 cm Cuboids: 3 cm by 3 cm by 5 cm, 3 cm by 3 cm by 8 cm, 5 cm by 5 cm by 3 cm, 5 cm by 5 cm by 8 cm, 8 cm by 8 cm by 3 cm, 8 cm by 8 cm by 5 cm, 3 cm, by 5 cm by 8 cm

Page 15 Squares, squares and more squares 1

2

Heights: 4 cm, 14 cm, 9 cm, 1 cm, 7 cm

31 2

Pages 48–49 Complements to 100

cm, 5 cm, 12 cm, 2 cm, 6 cm,

Page 52 Cooking times

Page 26 Abacus numbers These numbers can be made: 600, 501, 510, 420, 402, 411, 330, 303, 321, 312, 222, 231, 213, 204, 240, 105, 150, 114, 141, 123, 132, 033, 042, 024, 051, 015, 006

Page 29 Spots, squares and stars 48

3

Pages 34–35 Tiles

5

These numbers will be left uncovered: 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 19, 21, 23, 27, 29, 31,, 33, 37, 39, 41, 43, 47, 49, 51, 53, 57, 59, 61, 63, 67, 69, 71, 73, 77, 79, 81, 83, 87, 89, 91, 93, 97, 99 Encourage the children to look at the pattern when thinking of a reason.

6

The children may need to discuss why these two are the same. 7

8

Page 39 Estimating length Pencil

a

Estimate

Learners’ own estimates

Measure 12 cm

b 10 cm

c

d

Cake into the oven at 10.00. Takes 40 minutes. Take cake out at 10.40. Bread rolls take 40 minutes. Put in at 8.00. Take out at 8.40. Small cakes take 30 minutes. Put in at 3.30. Take out at 4.00. Casserole takes 1 hour 30 minutes or 1½ hours. Put in at 5.45. Take out at 7.15. Biscuits take 10 minutes. Put in at 11.55. Take out at 12.05. Chicken takes 1½ hours. Put in at 12.00. Take out at 1.30. Scones take 20 minutes. Put in at 2.40. Take out at 3.00. Apple pie takes 40 minutes. Put in at 4.20. Take out at 5.00. Vegetable pie takes 55 minutes. Put it in at 6.05. Take out at 7.00. Meringues take 2 hours 30 minutes or 2 ½ hours. Put in at 4.50. Take out 7.20. Oven chips take 25 minutes. Put in at 5.05. Take out at 5.30. Cheese straws take 10 minutes. Put them in at 6.10. Take them out at 6.20.

PL

4

36 + 64 = 100; 42 + 58 = 100; 85 + 15 = 100; 27 + 73 = 100; 71 + 29 = 100; 59 + 41 = 100 Learners’ own answers

E

Page 14 Straw models

e

15 cm 9 cm 5 cm

f

14 cm

Pattern

78

Lines of symmetry

1

2

2

1

3

1

4

4

5

1

6

4

7

1

8

1

SA M

Page 53 Cans of lemonade 750 ml

1500 ml 2500 ml 3000 ml 4500 ml

3 4

11 l

l

2

21 l 2

3l

41 l 2

Page 58 Weight 1 kg, 650 g; 3 kg, 2 kg 100 g; 160 g, 90 g; 950 g, 600 g; 3 kg. 2 kg 150 g; 650 g. 430 g

Original material © Cambridge University Press 2016 Answers

Answers

79


CAMBRIDGE PRIMARY

3

Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder Activity Books are the latest addition to the Cambridge Primary Mathematics course. This is a flexible and engaging course written specifically for the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework Stages to 6. The course offers a discussion-led approach with problem-solving integrated throughout to encourage learners to think and talk about mathematics in place of rote learning and drill practice. The language throughout the course is pitched to EAL / ESL learners with illustrations supporting visual understanding and learning.

The Skills Builder Activity Books are carefully designed to provide consolidation activities for children who need extra teaching and learning opportunities in order to achieve success in the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework.

CAMBRIDGE PRIMARY

Mathematics

Skills Builder

3

Skills Builder

PL

E

Skills Builder

Cambridge Primary Mathematics

Mathematics

SA M

Skills Builder Activity Book 3 consists of:

A full range of activities which support the breadth of the Cambridge Primary Mathematics curriculum framework at Grade 3. Carefully levelled activities which help gently raise a child’s mathematical understanding and performance to match that of their peers.

For the first time, this flexible resource offers motivational parents the Cambridge way for Maths work at home.

Original material Š Cambridge University Press 2016

Moseley and Rees

Helpful guidance and tips to help teachers or parents explain key mathematical methods and concepts before each exercise.

3

Cherri Moseley and Janet Rees

Preview Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder 3  

Preview Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder 3

Preview Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder 3  

Preview Cambridge Primary Mathematics Skills Builder 3