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advancing global skills ANNUAL REPORT 3


30 unique exchange programs offered each year

55 years of connecting Americans to the world

we are cultural vistas Founded in 1963, Cultural Vistas is a nonprofit exchange organization promoting global understanding and collaboration among individuals and institutions. We develop international professional experiences that create more informed, skilled, and engaged citizens. Our 30-plus unique exchange programs empower people to drive positive change in themselves, their organizations, and society. 2


7,500+ individuals and organizations served annually in 130 countries

150,000+ alumni and counting around the world

our mission To enrich minds, advance global skills, build careers, and connect lives through international exchange.

4 WELCOME 6

MEET OUR NEW CEO

8 A CATALYST FOR GROWTH 10 YEAR IN REVIEW 12

HIGHLIGHTS + ACHIEVEMENTS

14

FOSTERING A MORE WELCOMING NASHVILLE

20

BRIDGING A DIVIDED WORLD

22 PREPARING YOUTH FOR THE GLOBAL WORKPLACE 26

GLOBAL LEARNING BY DESIGN

30

INTERNSHIPS PROVIDE SEAT AT

THE TABLE FOR ASPIRING CHEFS

34 SPECIAL EVENTS 36 39

ALUMNI HAPPENINGS

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

40 FINANCIAL REPORT 42

SUPPORTERS HONOR ROLL

PHOTO: DARIUS CEPULIS, INDEPENDENT WORK ABROAD PROGRAM IN GERMANY, FUERTEVENTURA, SPAIN 3


welcome The nature of work as we know it is going through a major transformation. There are several drivers of this shift. One is the rapid proliferation of artificial intelligence that is automating traditional jobs at a brisk pace. In the United States alone, it is projected that by 2030 as many as one-third of American workers may need to change occupations and gain new skills due to automation. Another is the evolving view of how, where, and when work gets accomplished. Millennials now make up the largest share of the global workforce, and their tendency to prioritize mobility and flexibility in their careers compels employers to adapt their workplaces accordingly to attract the best and brightest. Finally, employers and workers alike have been embracing “alternative work arrangements,” such as freelance opportunities, that provide more flexibility and greater options. This has led to what is known as the “gig economy.” For more than a half a century, Cultural Vistas has been at the forefront of preparing young professionals from around the world to both adapt to and define the future of work through our international exchange programs. We help individuals develop a diverse set of global skills necessary to compete and succeed in today’s highly complex environment. Skills and competencies they gain through our wide range of programs include: empathy, creativity, social intelligence, adaptability, entrepreneurial abilities, as well as the facility to navigate ambiguity and difference. In addition to preparing young people to navigate an evolving workplace, we help thousands of employers in every sector access global talent. This brings a multitude of benefits to their organizations like introducing new innovations, penetrating international markets, globalizing their workforce, and helping them increase international sales.

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CULTURAL VISTAS EXECUTIVE TEAM. PHOTO BY LISA HELFERT

Looking ahead to 2018, we will celebrate the 55th anniversary of our founding. This milestone provides us the opportunity to celebrate our many accomplishments. It also causes us to reflect upon our own value and role in our ever-changing world. I am pleased to join Cultural Vistas at such a critical time in history when the challenges are significant, but so are the opportunities. The challenges include a growing skepticism of all things global both at home and abroad. There is a significant decline in Ameria's image overseas and a difficult political climate that instills a sense of uncertainty. These trend lines all signal toward the need for more of what we do–more dialogue, more understanding across cultures, more diplomacy. There are also many opportunities, including a generation that has ‘grown up digital’ and is more socially-responsible than any of its predecessors, a greater emphasis on skill-based models of education, a rising interest by Americans to travel, study, and work abroad; and the widespread utilization and availability of technology to strengthen connections and networks for good. The stakes are high. We are in a moment of transformation and we are committed to creating a better future by preparing a better workforce. The need for globally-competent individuals, organizations, and nations will only continue to grow. We can and must step forward in a significant way to galvanize our vast networks of alumni, partners, employers, supporters and participants towards fostering a future that provides opportunity, prosperity, stability, and peace for all. We will be calling on you to help us realize our vision and look forward to hearing how you can join us to redefine the future of work!

Jennifer Clinton, PhD CULTURAL VISTAS PRESIDENT AND CEO 5


a new era begins

Get to Know Our New CEO Jennifer Clinton November 2017 was a milestone month at Cultural Vistas as Jennifer Clinton, PhD, officially took the helm as its new President and Chief Executive Officer. With more than 20 years of experience, Clinton is a recognized leader across the fields of international education and exchange, nonprofit management, and government relations.

We invite you to learn more about Jennifer’s diverse background, her vision for Cultural Vistas, and discover some fun facts about our new CEO along the way. PHOTO: GEORGE RAY, CONGRESS-BUNDESTAG YOUTH EXCHANGE FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS, TURIN, ITALY 6


q+a

What inspired you to pursue a career in international relations? I am a naturally curious person who loves learning about new cultures and perspectives. As a young person, I grew up spending summers in Canada where my grandparents had a cottage. I was always intrigued by observing cultural, political, and linguistic differences between the two countries. This led me to study French language and culture and pursue a number of study and intern abroad experiences. Can you tell us some more about your personal overseas study experiences? I have both studied and interned abroad. As a sophomore in high school, I spent a summer abroad in Sweden competing to play basketball. During my time there, I lived with a host family with whom I am still in touch. As a junior at Marquette University, I spent a semester in Avignon France, where I lived with a host family. As a graduate student at UC Davis, I interned in a town outside of Bordeaux and worked in a tourist office helping visitors navigate the wine region. I have also traveled abroad pretty extensively for work primarily throughout Europe, Middle East, and Latin America. How do you see the field of international education and exchange continuing to evolve?

“Jennifer brings deep expertise, proven leadership, passion for the exchange mission, and a spirit of innovation that is well suited to lead the increasingly important work of Cultural Vistas.�

I think the field is getting more and more sophisticated with respect to intentionality behind program design that necessitates clear articulation of programmatic and learning outcomes. Because individuals are pursuing multiple exchange experiences during a lifetime, there is a need for organizations like Cultural Vistas to be clear about what each experience will bring to an individual that goes far beyond mutual understanding or a broadening of perspectives. Cultural Vistas has honed in on global skillbuilding as one of the key pillars of its programs. I do believe there is room for us to dig deeper into what specific global skills we are helping to develop and how we measure the successful acquisition of these skills through different models of exchanges.

Karl Geercken CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 7


a catalyst for growth Immersion in the American Workplace

Amid an uncertain political climate in the United States and increasingly inward-looking policies around the world, the demand for global talent remains constant. In fact, in the United States, 7 out of 10 employers place critical importance on the value of a global workforce, citing in-demand skills sets, new perspectives, and knowledge of industries and practices as the key reasons. SOURCE: ENVOY GLOBAL IMMIGRATION TRENDS REPORT, 2018 The U.S. has, of course, long reaped the rewards of its openness–to a diversity of perspectives; to an entrepreneurial culture of idea generation and experimentation; and to the notion that innovation and the next big idea can come from anyone and anywhere. It is almost impossible to imagine how the U.S. would function if it closed itself off from the best and brightest students, researchers, emerging leaders, and newcomers who enrich our economic, scientific, and cultural life in immeasurable ways. The American people and its institutions have much to teach the world about open markets, democratic institutions, and the economic and cultural benefits of openness and tolerance. But we also have much to learn. As an organization dedicated to forging new connections and collaboration between Americans and the world, Cultural Vistas is well-positioned to answer this call. For over 50 years, in partnership with the Department of State and thousands of leading companies and organizations around the world, Cultural Vistas has helped bring international students and young professionals to the United States to learn and hone their skills under the J-1 Intern and Trainee categories of the Exchange Visitor Program While without the fanfare of other work-based visa categories, the non-immigrant J-1, created in 1961 under the Fulbright-Hays Act, continues to be a catalyst for growth. The 35,000-plus individuals that come for training opportunities in the U.S. annually are uniquely exposed to American values and business skills. Equipped with new abilities and expanded networks, which last long after programs end, they return home, where the benefits are magnified, often reshaping careers and communities. At the same time, American businesses, from Fortune 500 companies to startups to familyowned businesses and NGOs, benefit from access to the top emerging talent around the world. They bring international perspectives to their operations. Their knowledge and networks help to greatly ease and expand opportunities for U.S. companies overseas. The benefits are long-term. International interns and trainees exposed to American host organizations, products, and services regularly reach back for them when they’ve returned home, directly supporting the U.S. economy.

PHOTO: GREG RAFFERTY, ALFA FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM, NEW YORK, USA 8


Alumni of J-1 Intern and Trainee programs report a multitude of career-related benefits as a result of their U.S. exchange experiences, including improved problem solving, adaptability to cultural differences, and working more effectively in a team. Building Careers + Skills

88%

GAINED NEW EXPERIENCE IN THEIR FIELD INCREASED THEIR CAREER PROSPECTS UPON RETURNING HOME USED THE SKILLS THEY GAINED IN THE U.S. ON A DAILY BASIS INCREASED RESPONSIBILITY IN THEIR CURRENT JOB

74% 65%

50%

Bolstering Business

$662.6 MILLION

ENCOURAGED INNOVATION AND NEW MODES OF THINKING THAT RESULTED IN MORE COMPREHENSIVE SOLUTIONS TO BUSINESS CHALLENGES

ENHANCED BUSINESS FUNCTIONS AND THE PRODUCTIVITY OF AMERICAN STAFF WITH NEW PERSPECTIVES

OF ALUMNI REPORT THEY'RE MORE INCLINED TO BUY OR RECOMMEND AMERICAN PRODUCTS OR SERVICES AS A RESULT OF THEIR EXCHANGE

OF ALUMNI HELPED CREATE NEW BUSINESS CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THEIR U.S. HOSTS AND HOME COUNTRIES

AMOUNT CONTRIBUTED TO THE U.S. ECONOMY BY INTERNATIONAL INTERNS AND TRAINEES TAKING PART IN THE EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM IN 2017. SOURCE: EUREKA FACTS, 2018

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the year in review 6,099 individuals from 140 different countries, including the United States, participated in Cultural Vistas’ professional exchange programs in 2017.

PARTICIPANTS BY REGION

Who We Serve

36%

30%

29%

NORTH + CENTRAL AMERICA

ASIA

EUROPE

PARTICIPANT PROFILE

SOUTH AMERICA: 2% | AFRICA: 2% | OCEANIA: 1%

64%

MALE

36%

FEMALE

AVERAGE

AGE

23

18 - 68

AGE

RANGE

NO. OF PARTICIPANTS

Year by Year Participant Growth

3,981

2010

10

4,680

2011

5,205

5,373

2012

2013

5,720

5,945

5,942

6,099

2014

2015

2016

2017


This year marked the first time more than 6,000 individuals have taken part in our programs. Since 2010, participation in Cultural Vistas programs has now grown by nearly 35 percent.

PROGRAM LOCATIONS

Where We Work

87%

6.8%

6%

NORTH + CENTRAL AMERICA

ASIA

EUROPE

SOUTH AMERICA: 0.2%

A Diverse Approach to Advancing Global Skills (program model types) EXCHANGE PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES (TOTAL: 5,302)

5,302

PARTICIPANTS 88.4% SHORT-TERM PROFESSIONAL TOURS 10% TEACHER EXCHANGES 1.5% SEED GRANT PROGRAMS 0.1% INTERNSHIPS + TRAINING PROGRAMS

EXCHANGE PROGRAMS OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES (TOTAL: 797)

797

PARTICIPANTS 42% INTERNSHIP + WORK ABROAD PROGRAMS 40% SEED GRANT PROGRAMS 8% SHORT-TERM PROFESSIONAL TOURS 7% FELLOWSHIPS FOR PROFESSIONALS 3% REGIONAL WORKSHOPS + CONFERENCES

PHOTO: DONGGYUN YU, KOREA WEST, SUNCHEON, SOUTH KOREA 11


highlights + achievements Mutually Beneficial For Soonhwa (Suna Jo) Park, one of a record 233 South Korean students to take part in the Korea WEST (Work, English Study, Travel) exchange program with Cultural Vistas in 2017, interning at Ameriprise Financial in Washington, D.C. has provided her confidence needed to pursue a career in international finance, which had previously seemed unattainable. “The first thing I learned from coming to the U.S. is that I can get over anything,” said Park. While the insider view of what it’s like to work with a major player in the U.S. market for asset and wealth management acts as a career jumpstart for Suna, the firm has also benefited from the new perspectives international interns bring to the workplace as a recurring WEST host company. KOREA WEST PARTICIPANT SUNA JO SHARES THE VALUE OF HER U.S. EXCHANGE EXPERIENCE AT AN EVENT HELD AT THE U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. PHOTO: ANNA BOISSEAU

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“With the help of Korea WEST interns over the past couple of years, we have been able to obtain fresh eyes and unique perspectives on some of our practice’s existing processes, products, and services,” said Michelle M. Mancari of Ameriprise Financial. “What I have found to be especially beneficial is teaching and approaching topics unfamiliar to our interns in various ways to make them understandable, which in turn helps me discover new ways to convey and teach financial planning products and services with varying complexity to our clients.”


PHOTOS: ANNA BOISSEAU

Training the Next Generation of Book Conservators It takes years of practice to know how to treat a damaged manuscript or rebind a book that is falling apart at the seams. That’s why for Folger Shakespeare Library’s Conservation Lab, interns are crucial. The library contains the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and over 400,000 other works dating back to the 13th century. The Conservation Lab ensures we can enjoy these books for many more years while maintaining their historical structure. They also focus on training the next generation of conservators through its Advanced Internship Program. For over 30 years, the program has been one of the most prestigious in the book conservation field, attracting interns from all around the world. In 2017, they hosted Swiss national Kevin Cilurzo (pictured) through Cultural Vistas’ J-1 Visa sponsorship.

As an intern, Kevin did everything from uncrating Shakespeare’s First Folio to conserving a 16th-century book. He wanted to intern at Folger Shakespeare Library because of its hands-on approach to training. According to Renate, interns also benefit the Folger because, in addition to helping in the Lab, they go on to become spokespeople for the library.

“I give credit to the former head of conservation because he always believed in exchange,” said Renate Mesmer, the head of the Conversation Lab. “It’s almost like a tradition here.”

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Fostering a More Welcoming Nashville Detroit. Los Angeles. Nashville. Salt Lake City. Over the course of a whirlwind 10-day spring U.S. tour, 25 German community leaders and public officials from the cities of Düsseldorf, Freiburg, Kreis Düren, Leipzig, and Münster learned firsthand about how American cities welcome and integrate immigrants and refugees as part of the Welcoming Communities Transatlantic Exchange (WCTE). The visit was reciprocated later in the year, as 16 Americans from the aforementioned communities headed to Germany to learn firsthand about local approaches and challenges to reception and community integration. For Stephanie Teatro, Co-Executive Director of the Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition and part of a four-member team of professionals representing Nashville, this U.S.-German exchange of information and ideas, has provided new inspiration and concrete strategies to implement at home. GERMAN WCTE PARTICIPANTS VISITED COUNTERPARTS IN 5 U.S. CITIES IN SPRING 2017. PHOTO: CULTURAL VISTAS STAFF 14


By Stephanie Teatro, Guest Contributor Nashville and Tennessee have one of the country’s fastest growing immigrant populations. These quickly changing demographics have presented both opportunities and challenges. At first, many communities do not have the service infrastructure in place to meet the needs and support the successful integration of new immigrants. Similarly, many communities do not have the context to process these demographic shifts and are susceptible to farright messages that increased immigration is something to be feared and stemmed.

We even had a drumming lesson from the Global Education Center who uses arts and music to bring communities together.

In this context, Nashville and Tennessee have been on the frontlines of both antirefugee and anti-immigrant movements, as well as some of the most innovative welcoming work in the country.

We hope the German communities learned how powerful it can be when immigrants themselves are engaged in advancing integration and creating more welcoming and equitable communities.

SHOWCASING NASHVILLE’S CULTURE OF COLLABORATION

INSPIRED BY GERMANY’S BOLD VISION

We were so excited to host German practitioners from several communities in Nashville last May. During their three-day visit we hoped they would learn new models of collaboration, the importance of shifting culture and public narrative, and how to invest in the leadership and civic engagement of immigrant communities. To highlight the innovative collaborations that have made integration in Nashville successful, we learned about initiatives between the Mayor’s Office, the public school system, and immigrant-serving organizations to identify and train “parent ambassadors,” more established immigrant parents who could connect with recently arrived parents to navigate the school system. We also created visits and panel discussions to show how we use arts and culture to transform our community. We learned how organizations are using traditional media, photography, documentary film, and other formats to tell the stories of immigrants. We took part in an initiative called “A Seat at the Table” that uses dinner parties to facilitate dialogue on race, religion, and migration.

We taught participants about initiatives like MyCity Academy, a program that trains immigrant leaders to be ambassadors between their communities and city government, about immigrant-led policy campaigns to improve the lives of immigrant families, about efforts to increase citizenship and voter registration, and the experience of immigrants running for office in Nashville.

I was blown away at how bold of a vision the German government and communities had set for welcoming refugees. In community after community, we met leaders and organizations who responded to the arrival of thousands of new immigrants with a spirit of “anything is possible,” especially when it came to the challenge of securing housing. In each case, this bold vision was enabled by a huge amount of political will among civic leaders. One of the most important perspective shifts I gained from this trip was thinking bigger and with a greater sense of possibility for my community. I was impressed and intrigued by the systemic responses that the German government and communities have created. The level of coordination and wrap-around services provided in local communities was really incredible. This was especially apparent in the systems designed for German language instruction. To create sufficient entry points and pipelines for migrants to quickly learn German, a robust system of language classes and certification was put in place in schools and adult education centers in every community we visited. More so than in the United States, learning German was the first and central focus for integration efforts. 15


Another perspective I gained from the program was of the diverse approaches to engaging receiving communities in the work of integration. Out of necessity, German communities responded to the influx of refugees by leveraging and aligning community resources and creating ways for receiving communities to offer strategic support and build relationships with refugees through volunteerism. The team from Nashville identified several ways that a more intentional and scaled approach to volunteers could support integration services as well as deepen relationships and connections between communities. We also picked up very concrete new ideas from the German communities we visited to support integration and build more welcoming communities. For example, the “welcome points” in Düsseldorf that created one-stop shops for immigrant communities to access resources, and the “welcome boxes” from Leipzig that offered new Leipzigers guides to the city, both to critical services and cultural activities. The Nashville team also left Germany with new ideas for how to more directly engage receiving community members in “community consultations” at the neighborhood level where we could share about the refugee resettlement program and more directly address questions and concerns. As a result of this experience, I am thinking bigger and bolder about transformative integration and the imperative to engage receiving communities in the process. GUEST CONTRIBUTOR STEPHANIE TEATRO IS CO-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE TENNESSEE IMMIGRANT & REFUGEE RIGHTS COALITION. THE WELCOMING COMMUNITIES TRANSATLANTIC EXCHANGE IS FUNDED BY THE TRANSATLANTIC PROGRAM OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY THROUGH FUNDS OF THE EUROPEAN RECOVERY PROGRAM OF THE FEDERAL MINISTRY OF ECONOMICS AND ENERGY, AS WELL AS THE ROBERT BOSCH STIFTUNG, THE HEINRICH BÖLL FOUNDATION, AND BMW GROUP.

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INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS, LIKE ZHONGYI WANG OF CHINA (ABOVE), BRING VALUABLE PERSPECTIVES TO CLASSROOMS ACROSS THE U.S. PHOTO: ZHONGYI WANG

Bringing the World to American Classrooms The importance for students to be able to understand and value diverse perspectives and understand how current events around the world are interconnected continues to grow. Through its Teach USA program, Cultural Vistas brings new ideas, new cultures, and new ways of thinking to K-12 classrooms across the United States. As often is the case, the teaching-learning process is a two-way street. As best put by one of our Filipino educators, “After teaching for 15 years back in my home country, I thought I knew everything about teaching. However, coming here to the U.S. showed me there’s so much more to learn. I encourage you to always keep your cup empty, leaving space to take in more.” For the 2017-18 school year, Cultural Vistas provided visa sponsorship and support that’s brought 77 teachers to schools in 16 states and Puerto Rico.


Talkspace Partnership Puts Participant Well-Being First Experiencing a new culture and living overseas is often a life-changing experience, but we know that it is also not without its challenges. When you encounter a different way of doing things and are cut off from the cultural cues you know so well at home, it is easy to feel overwhelmed. As part of our unwavering commitment to participants’ health and well-being, Cultural Vistas began an exciting new partnership in September 2017 with Talkspace, an online therapy and counseling platform, to provide participants free, on-demand access to counseling services as they navigate life away from home. Talkspace is now available as part of the standard health insurance plan offered for Cultural Vistas participants. The service offers access to over 1,500 licensed therapists who can help with stress, anxiety, depression, and other emotional needs. Talkspace users can engage in counseling with an individual licensed therapist through unlimited text, audio, and video messages in private, secure chat rooms. Cultural Vistas was recently named the recipient of the GoAbroad.com Innovation Award for the Most Innovative Use of Technology for its new partnership with Talkspace.

“As the first international exchange program to implement an online therapy offering of this kind, Cultural Vistas sets the standard for mental health awareness in its field. Talkspace is proud to be partnering with Cultural Vistas and their leadership in ensuring that individuals in international exchange programs have access to convenient online therapy.” Lynn Hamilton TALKSPACE CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER

PHOTO: HYEWON HONG, KOREA WEST, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 17


Diversity as a Source of Potential Like much of Europe, Austria’s demographics are quickly shifting. While the nation has a proud history of helping those fleeing war and poverty, calls for closed borders and anti-immigration sentiment continues to fester. While there are no easy answers ahead in Austria or elsewhere, one thing is clear: today’s youth will play a significant role in shaping the future of their communities. In 2017, Cultural Vistas and the U.S. Embassy in Vienna teamed up to equip 20 passionate Austrian young leaders with the skills and networks to advance their work supporting refugees and creating more tolerant communities through the Generation Next Youth Leadership Initiative. For three weeks in July, the group gained a multicultural perspective on community leadership during a four-city U.S. tour, which included leadership seminars and training, job shadowing, and site visits with community leaders and organizations in Baltimore, Des Moines, San Diego, and Washington, D.C. “A generation of open-minded and strong people will crystallize and they will be able to solve issues much easier than the generation before them,” said Derai Al Nuaimi, a Generation Next participant who was born in Baghdad and has grown up with both Austrian and Arab culture. “Diversity as a source of potential–I think this will be the motto of future generations.” MEMBERS OF THE GENERATION NEXT YOUTH LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE VISIT IOWA. PHOTO: BRYAN YANNANTUONO

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THE 2017 YSEALI SUMMIT IN MANILA BROUGHT TOGETHER YOUNG LEADERS FROM ACROSS SOUTHEAST ASIA FOR FOUR DAYS OF ADVANCED LEADERSHIP TRAINING. PHOTO: JOEY SENDAYDIEGO

Never Too Young to Lead Affecting change knows no age limit. The future of the U.S.-ASEAN relationship is bright, and the YSEALI network is a major reason why. Since its inception in 2013, the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative, the State Department’s preeminent youth leadership program, has provided over 110,000 young people with a platform to discuss and address the region’s most pressing issues.

Cultural Vistas has experienced this phenomenon firsthand in its implementation of seven YSEALI projects over the last three years, including three in 2017. The largest to date took place in October 2017 as 250 alumni came together in Manila for the third annual YSEALI Summit.

Building Resilience Among Cities and Local Leaders Around the World As cities work to keep themselves safe, strong, and resilient, exchanges are proving to be a valuable platform for sharing information and best practices. Launched in 2017, the Community Leadership in Preventing Violence Exchange brought 41 American and British community leaders, including local city and police officials, NGO leaders, and educators to each other’s cities to learn from each other’s experiences in promoting acceptance and preventing radicalization in their respective communities.

These two-way exchanges, sponsored by the U.S. Embassy in London and administered by Cultural Vistas, paired communities of similar size and with relatable challenges, including Denver and Birmingham; Los Angeles and London; and Boston and Manchester. “It’s really motivating and encouraging to see the work Birmingham is doing because we face the same challenges in a different manner in our communities,” said Yoal Kidane Ghebremeskel, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Denver’s nonprofit youth center Street Fraternity. “It has been a great learning experience.”

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PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER ROMAN, CONGRESS-BUNDESTAG YOUTH EXCHANGE FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS, DAINTREE RAINFOREST, QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA 20


Exchanges: Bridging a Divided World By Adam M. Hunter Following the news in 2017 could have left you with the impression that citizens were more divided across many democratic societies. A concerning rise in nationalist populism, amplified skepticism of international engagement, and strained longstanding alliances. Retreating democratic norms coincided with greater hostility toward facts and expertise. Citizens turned inward and shielded themselves with like-minded peers. Many were left feeling more divided from others, whether fellow citizens across town or people around the world. By this analysis, you might think it’s an inopportune time to be in the international exchange business. We disagree. We believe the need and desire for people to connect is as great now as it has ever been in our 55-year history. At Cultural Vistas, our business is bringing people and cultures together. And we think exchange programs are key to bridging divides, both locally and globally. They work on two levels: EXCHANGE PROGRAMS ADVANCE GLOBAL SKILLS AND BUILD CAREERS. Despite recent inward-looking trends, the pace of globalization, technological advancement, and interconnectedness in the world is ever increasing. This means that any given field’s knowledge and innovation are more global than in the past. Some of the best opportunities to learn and advance one’s career occur abroad, such as by gaining insight into new markets or practices. The thousands of young people for whom Cultural Vistas arranges international experiences each year have their fingers on the pulse of globalization and return home with industry knowledge, local understanding, and expanded networks.

I have witnessed this myself as a Robert Bosch Foundation Fellow in Germany. I dove deeply into German approaches to immigrant integration and forged relationships with policymakers and practitioners. These experiences changed the way I managed integration programs for the U.S. Government, allowed me to lead a working group among U.S. and German government officials, and helped in the creation of a new platform for local communities to share immigrant integration practices and jointly action-plan across the Atlantic. EXCHANGE PROGRAMS ENRICH MINDS AND CONNECT LIVES. Exchanges also help us to deepen our empathies. This process often starts with an attribute we rarely focus on in exchange, but which provides a critical component to global understanding: gaining valuable perspective about ourselves and our place in the world. As German philosopher Hermann von Keyserling wrote nearly a century ago, “The shortest path to oneself leads around the world.” With this perspective established, we can develop the intercultural competencies to both better understand and apply the skills and knowledge that advance our careers, as well as become able to better engage across difference of various stripes. These competencies can improve our daily lives for the better not only during the abroad experience, but also at home, and can ripple positively across an organization or community. Recognizing the multiple benefits of exchange programs–and how critical they are in the current climate–Cultural Vistas aims to see more people share in these benefits.

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As an alum and board member, I am proud of Cultural Vistas’ efforts on this front. It creatively designs programs to engage on emerging issues and draw new partners and sectors into the exchange space. It seeks to recruit and better support a more diverse participant base hailing from more varied places. It provides financial support for certain underrepresented and first-time exchange participants to foster their participation. And it works to provide participants with broad country experiences, outside of well-worn pathways. While 2017 certainly left us with some challenges, Cultural Vistas is as committed as ever to its exchange mission and belief that citizens are our best ambassadors. And we will continue to develop more ambassadors knowing that each will bring our communities and our world a tiny bit closer. ADAM HUNTER IS A ROBERT BOSCH FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP ALUMNUS (2003-’04) AND CURRENTLY SERVES ON THE CULTURAL VISTAS BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

Americans

300 + STUDENTS Going Abroad

Expanding opportunities for young Americans to develop competencies demanded in today’s global economy remains an ongoing priority. In 2017, 402 U.S. students and professionals interned, received intensive language training, and took part in our professional skill-building offerings in a record 35 different countries around the world.

TOP DESTINATION

Top Destination Region: Europe 2018 saw the highest number of individuals we have sent to Germany, the top destination country.

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preparing youth for the global workplace Research continually shows that well-designed educational and work-based international experiences strengthen student employability and career prospects upon graduation.

However, while the number of Americans studying overseas continues to increase and diversify, less than 2% of all students enrolled at U.S. higher education institutions study or intern abroad every year, and even fewer are members of minority communities. On the employer side, the demand for a globally-competent and mobile workforce continues to show no signs of slowing down. The task ahead remains vast, but not insurmountable. Every year, Cultural Vistas continues to expand its offerings so that more young Americans of all backgrounds can broaden their worldview and have greater access to in-demand skills provided through overseas and immersive learning experiences.

DOUG ROMAN, A MEMBER OF THE INAUGURAL CLASS OF CULTURAL VISTAS FELLOWS IN 2013, USES HIS SPANISHSPEAKING SKILLS TODAY IN HIS JOB WITH A GLOBAL WIND TURBINE COMPANY. PHOTO: DOUG ROMAN

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THE 2017 CLASS OF THE CULTURAL VISTAS FELLOWSHIP. PHOTO: PETER PLOTICA

Cultural Vistas Fellowship The fifth cohort (pictured) of the Cultural Vistas Fellowship spent summer 2017 living and interning in Buenos Aires, Berlin, and Bangalore. Selected from a nationally competitive pool, the 12 American students received full funding to pursue internships with focuses ranging from international business in Germany to an NGO that runs school lunch programs in India. Since its inception in 2013, Cultural Vistas has reinvested $225,000 directly from its own revenue to provide over 50 American students with an otherwise unobtainable opportunity to gain valuable work experience abroad. In 2017, our alumni community joined the effort to pay it forward as the experience of two fellows was directly supported by generous donations in honor of Tom Hagemann and Patricia Monter.

“I came to Argentina with hopes of learning how to advocate for vulnerable communities internationally and I was not disappointed. Every day in Buenos Aires I grew as a person, every day at work I learned something new.” KIMBERLEY RAMIREZ GONZALEZ (LEFT) TRAVELED ABROAD FOR THE FIRST TIME AS A 2017 CULTURAL VISTAS FELLOW. SHE HAS SINCE USED THIS EXPERIENCE TO CREATE GIRLS UNITED, A HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM FOCUSED ON EMPOWERING AT-RISK YOUNG WOMEN. PHOTO: PETER PLOTICA

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“To me, traveling is a catalyst.

A catalyst that helps discover who you are. Through Cultural Vistas I have been to four countries and each time I come back a different person. Through these experiences I am able to understand myself in a way only traveling brings about. I was transformed by travel. Traveling exposed me to different cultures and made me realize how beautiful and different everybody is.” Samuel Robbins, a Midlothian, Virginia native and two-time alumnus of Cultural Vistas programs first as a high schooler and in 2017 interning in Vietnam through IAESTE.

<2 percent of all students enrolled at U.S. higher education institutions study abroad every year. Source: NAFSA

402 U.S. students and professionals took part in our professional skill-building offerings in 35 countries

> 85 percent of Americans taking part in our programs receive paid internships or are awarded full or partial scholarships to support their experiences. PHOTO: SAMUEL ROBBINS, IAESTE UNITED STATES, VIETNAM 25


(LEFT TO RIGHT) DALIA MOHAMMAD, KATELYNN ZIEGLER-HALL, AND SHAMS ABDULLAH AT GENSLERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WASHINGTON, D.C. OFFICES. PHOTO: ANTHONY NAGLIERI 26


Global Learning by Design By Katelynn Ziegler-Hall Elation. Gratitude. Pride. These were the emotions Dalia Raad and Shams Qais, two architecture students from Al-Nahrain University in Baghdad, felt when they learned they won the Bridging the Gap design studio competition and earned internships in Washington, D.C. at Gensler, a leading global architecture, design, and planning firm. It was the culmination of four months of video conferencing, social media, early wake up calls, hard work and collaboration, which paired fourth-year architecture students from Al-Nahrain with graduate students from the University of Maryland’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. The semester-long design studio and competition, sponsored by Gensler, began in the spring of 2016. Students at each institution were challenged to design a project in a place they had never seen within the other’s capital city. Relying on the help and input of their peers 6,000plus miles away, the Maryland students took on Baghdad’s Tahrir Square, while Dalia, Shams, and their classmates developed projects for the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington. The program was spearheaded by Zahraa Alwash, an Iraqi-born architect working for Gensler, and Marlene Shade, an Associate Principal at Dewberry Associates. According to Zahraa, the competition was about much more than just architecture. It served as a means to challenge assumptions, and explore the commonalities, differences, and challenges of each city. “Architecture is an important tool that can bridge the gaps that exist between cultures,” said Zahraa, who herself faced many misconceptions of her country when she came to the U.S. “In many respects, DC and Baghdad are similar cities with similar challenges, which the students had

to research and explore to complete this project. Through design, they learned the intimate details of daily life in both countries.” The students began to see the world through a different set of eyes. In the process, they developed new skills and grew as young architects. “This experience reduced the distance between us—bridged that gap—in turn allowing us to find new strategies in the design we had not used before,” said Shams The unique follow-on opportunity for Dalia and Shams to see and intern in the city they spent a semester studying helped accelerate this learning and growth exponentially. LEARNING THE BUSINESS OF ARCHITECTURE A long-sought dream became reality for Dalia and Shams in September 2017 as they arrived in Washington, D.C. through Cultural Vistas’ visa sponsorship to begin their internships. The program continued cooperation between Gensler and Cultural Vistas dating back to the early 1990s. The 12-week internships were structured so Dalia and Shams would better understand the design profession and be exposed to experiences they wouldn’t normally have access to. This included learning new software like Revit and AutoCad. They took to it immediately and were excited to share it with their peers back home. In addition to technical skills, they gained confidence in their abilities as young architects and made impressive strides in their English language fluency. “I learned to trust myself, set a goal and see it through to completion,” said Shams. “This experience has made me more confident in myself and my abilities. I plan to use everything I learned here when I get back home.”

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PHOTO: SHAMS ABDULLAH

Gensler’s cross-studio training approach exposed them to different projects, work styles, and team members. As a result, they learned the importance of teamwork and collaboration. “In Iraq, architects mainly work alone on their specialized projects,” said Dalia. “At Gensler and in the U.S., there was collaboration across all levels of expertise. Everyone helps each other. Everyone learns together. The office was like a family.” The learning and benefits extended to Gensler staff as well. “Shams and Dalia were able to learn the business of architecture and were very active and involved in all aspects of our team here at Gensler,” said Zahraa. “They had a great willingness to learn and excel. Supervising them was more of a family effort, with so many architects working with them, teaching them new skills and perspectives, and learning from them just the same.” This sentiment was shared by Sumita Arora, a studio director in Gensler’s D.C. office. “It was a privilege having Shams and Dalia join our studio this fall,” said Sumita. “They gave us the unique opportunity to experience Iraq through their eyes. We were very impressed by their eagerness to learn, their technical

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savvy and their ability to become proficient in new platforms very quickly. They brought a wonderful can-do attitude.” A NEW FAMILY TO LEAN ON The three-month internships laid a strong foundation for future career success. The young women’s learning experience, however, extended far beyond the workplace. A few weeks into their stay, Dalia and Shams took the unique opportunity to live with local host parents, Tom and Jeanne Clarkson. The six weeks they spent together would enrich their U.S. experience in ways they never expected. Dalia, Shams, Tom, and Jeanne came together around the dinner table, enjoying both American and Middle Eastern homecooked meals–and nightly conversations about culture, family, current events, and daily highlights. “Some nights we spent hours looking through photo albums and talking about life and family,” said Shams. “It was so nice. We grew to love them and will keep in touch forever.” Together they took trips to experience the accomplishments of America’s most famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright–including PopeLeighey House in Alexandria and Fallingwater


in Pennsylvania; and went on regular outings to the movies and shopping around the Greater DC area.

Growing Partnerships Growing Impact

Living with Tom and Jeanne exposed the young architects to the intimate details of daily American life, even including what it’s like to live alongside the family dog (Finn), who Dalia befriended after some initial fears.

Cultural Vistas’ array of customized internship placement programs across Europe and South America continue to grow in size and scope, with program participation increasing by 51 percent since 2012 - thanks much in part to new and expanding university partnerships with James Madison University, University of Cincinnati, and Princeton University, among others.

It was an experience neither the Clarksons nor the young ladies will forget. “We hadn’t realized how close we had become in the six short weeks we stayed together,” said Tom, recounting their teary airport sendoff. “They were truly part of the family. That is what made the experience so rewarding. If you have the time and the means to be a host, you will gain sons and daughters whom you will remember, and who will remember you for the rest of your lives.”

For the fifth consecutive spring, Cultural Vistas teamed up with Morehouse and Spelman colleges in Atlanta to inspire students and faculty members to internationalize their educational and career paths through STEM LAUNCH, a two-week immersive tour of Berlin and Munich’s science and tech sectors, generously funded by The Halle Foundation.

A LASTING IMPACT Dalia and Shams’ time in the States was brief, but its impact on their personal and professional lives figures to be lasting. “I always dreamed of visiting the U.S.,” said Shams. “I had experienced it through stories from friends and movies. Now, I can say I have experienced it through my own eyes.” The talented young architects returned to Baghdad at the end of 2017 with sharpened design skills, a newfound confidence, and joint aspirations to start an architecture practice focused on rebuilding their country. The ‘dream team’ of Dalia and Shams have already taken their first steps toward making that entrepreneurial goal a reality. Their experiences at Gensler helped them each to land full-time design and engineering positions upon returning home.

“Partnering with Cultural Vistas has been excellent. Their customer service, professionalism, and level of organization is top notch. We began our collaboration with a JMU Internship in Germany program last year. Even though we had small numbers, they treated us as a top partner and provided our students with personalized attention and service. They visited our campus for pre-departure orientation, arranged lodging for our group, and provided us with a special on-site orientation. Based on the quality of our experience, we have added a JMU Internship in Ireland program this year and have plans to consider other options in the future to diversify our portfolio. I highly recommend Cultural Vistas!” Dr. Jason Good DIRECTOR OF STUDY ABROAD JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

KATELYNN ZIEGLER-HALL IS A PROGRAM OFFICER FOR THE TRAIN USA J-1 EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM AT CULTURAL VISTAS. 29


GERMAN VISITORS TAKE PART IN A HOMESTAY DURING A 2017 VISIT TO NASHVILLE AS PART OF THE WELCOMING COMMUNITIES TRANSATLANTIC EXCHANGE. PHOTO: CULTURAL VISTAS STAFF 30


Internships Provide a Seat at the Table for Aspiring Chefs One of the best ways to discover a new culture is through its food. And while there’s countless cuisines across the world, few things are as universal—or as intrinsically human—as sharing a meal. Food can even transcend borders by bringing people together around the same dinner table. For those with a career in the food industry, culinary exchange programs have even more tangible benefits. When training in another country, chefs use new techniques and cook with ingredients they haven’t seen before. They also learn to navigate foreign kitchens, sometimes without a common fluent language. This experience equips aspiring chefs with a global skill set that prepares them to work in any kitchen.

AFTER GETTING HIS START AS A TRAINEE AT EPCOT CENTER NEARLY 25 YEARS AGO, CHEF KHALID BENGHALLEM IS NOW AN ESTABLISHED CHEF. PHOTOS: KHALID BENGHALLEM

Tale as Old as Time Cultural Vistas has facilitated culinary internships and work-based exchange programs of all stripes since the early 1970s. Participants have done everything from cook in American fine dining restaurants, to learn the wine trade in Southern France, to flip cheeses in a small creamery in the Alps. They even contributed to the launch Euro Disney in the early nineties. Moroccan national Khalid Benghallem first came to the United States in 1993 at the age of 23. He trained at the Morocco Pavilion at Disney’s Epcot Center. His American experience was a game-changer. Several years down the line, he would go on to open two restaurants, work with Chef Emeril Lagasse, and earn numerous culinary honors along the way. He attributes this success to his first internship in the United States. “I think [international training] gives you opportunity to see different companies and different worlds,” he said. “It’s been really good for me.”

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International Cooks in the Kitchen Excepting certain Thomas Keller mainstays, you’ll see a different menu every time you walk you through Per Se’s blue doors. This creativity is in part due to the diverse staff of the restaurant including international trainees, like French chef Pierre Pouplard, that come to Per Se through Cultural Vistas’ J-1 Visa sponsorship. With Chef de Cuisine Eli Kaimeh at its helm, the three Michelin-starred New York restaurant writes a new nine-course tasting menu daily. While the overall vision of the restaurant is Thomas Keller’s, the whole kitchen staff of 40 is involved in planning the next day’s dishes. “[It’s] usually a discussion by everybody sitting around a table. And that [really] includes everybody,” said Kaimeh An idea is often suggested by one chef and then changes after input from the rest of the kitchen to what you see on the final menu. “There have been hundreds of ideas and FROM TOP: CHEF DE CUISINE ELI KAIMEH HAS WORKED WITH MANY INTERNATIONAL TRAINEES THROUGHOUT HIS YEARS AT PER SE. PIERRE POUPLARD MANS THE SAUCIER STATION AT PER SE. HE’S USING CHERRY TOMATOES THAT HE PICKED OUT HIMSELF AT A LOCAL FARMER’S MARKET. TRAINEE CHEF POUPLARD JOINED THE PER SE TEAM AFTER WORKING AT PRESTIGIOUS KITCHEN. PHOTOS: PETER PLOTICA

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beginnings of ideas by all the [chefs] and from all of their backgrounds,” said Kaimeh of their daily planning meetings. “And that diversity really plays into the strength of that creative process.” It’s this collaborative planning process that shows why international trainees like Pouplard have been such an asset to Per Se. They bring experience from global kitchens into the Manhattan-based restaurant and, even more importantly for Kaimeh, an attitude that mirrors his seriousness about food. Pouplard joined the Per Se team after working in top restaurants in Paris. According to Kaimeh, he exemplified what Per Se looks for in its trainees. Along with cooking expertise, the soft-spoken young French chef brought an eagerness to learn. As a native of Northern France, he fit seamlessly into the kitchen, which uses classic French cooking techniques with a New American twist. In addition to learning technical skills, Pouplard said he benefited from Per Se’s creative reimagining of dishes. “Sometimes it’s like Indian style or Chinese style and it’s really interesting to see that in a three Michelin-starred restaurant,” he said of the innovative tasting menus. Like other trainees in the past, Kaimeh said Pouplard’s value to the restaurant extended beyond his time there. Because of all the international chefs they’ve hosted, Per Se’s network expands into dozens of other countries. Kaimeh said this cross-training is something that makes the culinary world unique. It’s very common in the industry to spend time learning in other restaurant’s kitchens.

CHEF ROBERT AND A RECENT CLASS OF MALAYSIAN TRAINEES AT THE RENAISSANCE ROSS BRIDGE RESORT IN BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA. PHOTO: ROBERT JAMM

A Host's Perspective “Basically every year we say these are the best J-1 [trainees] we’ve ever had,” said Executive Chef Robert Kamm, who runs the culinary program at Renaissance Ross Bridge Resort, in Birmingham, Alabama. For the past 12 years, Kamm has hosted trainees from Malaysian culinary schools through Cultural Vistas’ J-1 Visa sponsorship. He said that he likes the work ethic and competitive spirit the trainees bring to his kitchen. The experience is beneficial for the trainees too. “It’s the thing that sets you apart on your resume,” said Chef Robert, “It’s extremely important as a cook when you’re developing that you have international experience. Every time that will you put you to the front of the line.”

“Relationship building is really important to us,” said Kaimeh. “We have a spider web of past [trainees] who have gone back and have gone on to do their own things and are still a part of this restaurant.”

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special events Celebrating the Transformative Power of Travel Liana Manukyanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photo of the Great Aletsch Glacier earned her the grand prize in our 2017 #TransformedByTravel photo contest, and as a result, a free roundtrip to Washington, D.C.

PHOTO: LIANA MANUKYAN, TRAIN USA J-1 VISA PROGRAM, ALETSCH GLACIER, SWITZERLAND 34


At our November gallery event and silent auction, Liana, a 2014 alumna of our Train USA program, shared the story behind the winning shot. “We have beautiful mountains in Georgia, but when I was growing up in the post-Soviet era, people were mostly concerned about everyday life and getting food for dinner, thus recreational mountain and outdoor activities were not very common. It was only when I moved to Switzerland I started hiking and developed the great love for mountainswhich I try to reflect with my photography. This photo is a bit of a special memory for me, as I took it the night after my birthday. Some people celebrate their birthdays with cakes and champagne, I go to the mountains. “While I was getting old, and thinking how small we are compared to the infinite time and scale of the universe, the glacier was saying it out loud. If you’d sit there, every few minutes you’d hear the thunder-like sound of cracking ice, that goes through whole body and echoes inside. I could have easily stayed there the whole night and admire the stars and mountains. I’ve put my heart and some effort into this photo, so I was very happy to hear it won the grand prize.”

OUR WASHINGTON, D.C. COMMUNITY CAME TOGETHER ON NOVEMBER 16 TO WELCOME OUR INCOMING PRESIDENT AND CELEBRATE THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF TRAVEL DURING A SPECIAL GALLERY EVENT AND SILENT AUCTION. PHOTOS: LISA HELFERT

FROM L TO R: ALUMNUS AND CURRENT HOST STEVEN KRATCHMAN; TAMARA HENDERSON, A J-1 ARCHITECTURE INTERN FROM SOUTH AFRICA; JAMIE WITHORNE, A TWO-TIME ALUMNUS WHO MOST RECENTLY INTERNED IN VIETNAM; AND KRISTEN HENKEL, A RECRUITER FOR HEALTH START-UP NOOM, A RECURRING NYC HOST COMPANY, SHARED THE MANY REASONS WHY EXCHANGES MATTER TO THEM AT A MAY RECEPTION TO RALLY SUPPORT FOR CULTURAL VISTAS’ WORK IN NEW YORK CITY. PHOTO: PETER PLOTICA

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SARAH HALE SMITH, RBFAA AT-LARGE BOARD MEMBER WITH 2017 BOSCH ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR, DENIS MCDONOUGH AT THE 2017 RBFAA ANNUAL GALA. PHOTO: RUI BARROS 36


Alumni Happenings Cultural Vistas continues to invest in and advance its efforts to connect, support, and engage its everexpanding roster of 150,000-plus alumni worldwide. Over the course of 2017, the Cultural Vistas Alumni Network connected and teamed up with alumni in new and exciting ways: as speakers, partners, internship hosts, advocates, and ambassadors for our work to bring the world closer together. Cultural Vistas, with seed funding from the U.S. Department of State, led efforts to launch the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Alumni Association (CBYXAA) in 2017 to create a strong network of people who have experienced this life-changing U.S.-German exchange. The inaugural year saw more than 1,100 active members with chapters in Atlanta, Boston, South Florida, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. Alumni continue to give back and stay engaged in our work in many ways, including our programming. At October’s Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative Summit in Manila, Cordell Carter, (right) a Bosch Fellowship alum (‘07-’08) and Cultural Vistas Alumni Council member, was among the featured speakers, leading an energizing design charrette, for an audience of 250plus young ASEAN leaders.

PHOTO: JOEY SENDAYDIEGO

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PHOTO: ASHLEY KOWALSKI

Two New Firsts Ashley Kowalski (above) a 2012-2013 alumna of the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals, was one of 10 Americans to win an Alfa Fellowship award for 2017-2018. She is both the first aerospace engineer and CBYX alumna to participate in this prestigious professional program in Moscow. In her work placement at SPUTNIX, a microsatellite manufacturer, she is expanding her knowledge of international science and technology policy and markets. Denis McDonough, (pictured previous page) who served as President Obama’s Chief of Staff from 2013 until he left office, received the Robert Bosch Foundation Fellowship Alumni of the Year Award at the annual meeting of the fellowship’s alumni association in Washington, D.C. from June 23-25. Denis, a Bosch Fellow from 19992000, delivered the keynote address urging his fellow alumni to remain engaged in the U.S.-German transatlantic relationship.

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Christine A. Elder, a 1994 alumna of the Robert Bosch Foundation Fellowship in Germany, who has served as the U.S. Ambassador to Liberia since 2016, was admitted into the Star of Africa, with a Grade of Knighthood, for her invaluable services in improving already existing bilateral relations between Liberia and the United States of America. Kristine Angell (CBYX, ‘97-’98) and Ron Bee (Bosch, ‘87-’88), hosted a networking and community-building event in San Diego attended by 60-plus current exchange participants and alumni from Cultural Vistas programs.


board of directors CHAIR:

Mr. Karl Geercken VICE CHAIR

Mr. Jeffrey Reinke TREASURER

Mr. Charles Meier SECRETARY

Mr. James Thomas MEMBERS

Ms. Linda Boughton (ex officio) Ms. Jennifer Clinton (ex officio) Ms. Lisa Cohen Ms. Helga Flores Trejo Mr. Kevin Gully Mr. Adam M. Hunter Mr. Martin Levion Mr. Aslam Masood Ms. Kendra Mirasol Ms. Jacqueline Renner Mr. Howard Wallack

AS OF JANUARY 1, 2018

PHOTO: JEREMIAH BERGER 39


financial report Where Did It Come From?

Where Did It Go?

$19,678,462

$20,387,748

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL SUPPORT + REVENUE

39% U.S. GOVERNMENT GRANTS 33%

PROFESSIONAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS TO THE UNITED STATES

PROGRAM SERVICE FEES

OUTBOUND + RECIPROCAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

FOUNDATION + INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT OF PROGRAMMING CONTRIBUTIONS, INVESTMENT RETURNS, + OTHER

19%

8%

MANAGEMENT + GENERAL FUNDRAISING

67%

19%

12%

1%

Cultural Vistas is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization headquartered in New York, N.Y. and is classified as a publicly-supported organization under Section 509(a). Its financial statements are audited on an annual basis by Marks Paneth LLP. Marks Paneth LLP conducted an audit of and issued an unmodified opinion on Cultural Vistas’ financial statements (summarized above). Percentages are rounded and may not add up to 100. Completed audited statements are available at culturalvistas.org, or upon request.

“I now know so much more about the issues that I’m passionate about. This fellowship has enabled my postgraduate career to have broader horizons than I ever could’ve imagined. I’m so grateful to have had the opportunity to go to India. Everyone should get the gift of an international experience.” RAIGON WILSON, RECEIVED FULL FUNDING TO INTERN IN BANGALORE, INDIA THIS PAST SUMMER AS A 2017 CULTURAL VISTAS FELLOW. PHOTO: LISA HELFERT

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bay Area has always been home to so many different communities. We have members who are born in foreign countries, people who adhere to various religious and spiritual traditions, and individuals who speak different languages. As the representative of the 17th district of California, I have the honor to serve in one of the most diverse congressional districts. It is hard to overstate the importance of the work that organizations like Cultural Vistas do. They play a vital role in our international community to help foster mutual understanding and collaborations.â&#x20AC;? Congressman Ro Khanna (CA-17)

PHOTO: PAVANI KONDA, UPDATE AMERICA STUDENT JOURNALIST EXCHANGE, PARIS, FRANCE 41


Supporters Honor Roll Funders + Institutional Partners

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AFS-USA AGREA AIRINC ALFA-BANK ALLIANCE FOR INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE AMERICAN CAREER OPPORTUNITY AMERICAN COUNCIL ON GERMANY AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY GERMAN STUDIES ANGLO EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ARTBOUND INITIATIVE ASSOCIATION FOR INTERNATIONAL YOUTH INITIATIVE ATLANTIK-BRÜCKE BMW CENTER FOR GERMAN AND EUROPEAN STUDIES, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY BMW GROUP BRAZILIAN NATIONAL CONFEDERATION OF INDUSTRY CARL DUISBERG STIFTUNG CI EXPERIENCE BRAZIL CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION AND WORKINTEGRATED LEARNING CANADA COUNCIL ON INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE COINED COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON DREXEL UNIVERSITY ENVISAGE GLOBAL EUROPEAN YOUNG INNOVATORS FORUM EXPERIENTIAL TRAVELS EXPOSURE FRANCE LANGUE FREIE UNIVERSITÄT BERLIN EUROPEAN STUDIES PROGRAM (FUBiS) GERMAN EMBASSY IN WASHINGTON, DC GERMAN FEDERAL FOREIGN OFFICE GERMAN FEDERAL MINISTRY FOR ECONOMIC AFFAIRS AND ENERGY GIZ: DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FÜR INTERNATIONALE ZUSAMMENARBEIT GLOBAL ACCESS PIPELINE GLOBAL SITUATION ROOM GLOBAL INTERN TEAM, SOUTH KOREA GLOBAL TIES U.S. GOETHE INSTITUT HEINRICH BÖLL STIFTUNG NORTH AMERICA HONG KONG-AMERICA CENTER IAESTE, A.S.B.L. INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR POLICY STUDIES INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE INSTITUTE IRISH EDUCATION PARTNERS THE INSTITUTE FOR JAPAN INTERNATIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY JOACHIM HERZ STIFTUNG KAPLAN INTERNATIONAL KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY THE MCCAIN INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL LEADERSHIP MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, REPUBLIC OF KOREA METLIFE ALICO MOREHOUSE COLLEGE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEW YORK UNIVERSITY ONE TO WORLD PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL RAUS VON ZUHAUS ROBERT BOSCH STIFTUNG GmbH SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY SINGA DEUTSCHLAND SPELMAN COLLEGE SOUTH KOREAN MINISTRY OF EDUCATION TALKSPACE TECNOLÓGICO DE MONTERREY THE HALLE FOUNDATION THE TOMODACHI INITIATIVE THESE NUMBERS HAVE FACES UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY OF GUADALAJARA UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO U.S. CONSULATE GENERAL CHENNAI U.S. CONSULATE BELFAST U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, E. ASIAN AND PACIFIC AFFAIRS U.S. EMBASSY, ASTANA U.S. EMBASSY, BANGKOK U.S. EMBASSY, BERLIN U.S. EMBASSY, CANBERRA U.S. EMBASSY, JAKARTA U.S. EMBASSY, LONDON U.S. EMBASSY, MANILA U.S. EMBASSY, MOSCOW U.S. EMBASSY, NEW DELHI U.S. EMBASSY, REYKJAVIK U.S. EMBASSY, SEOUL U.S. EMBASSY, TOKYO U.S. EMBASSY, VIENNA U.S. MISSION TO ASEAN U.S.-ASEAN BUSINESS COUNCIL U.S.-INDIA BUSINESS COUNCIL U.S.-JAPAN BRIDGING FOUNDATION U.S. JAPAN COUNCIL WANHUA CHEMICAL GROUP WELCOMING AMERICA


We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it by ourselves. Our work to advance global skills, international collaboration, and understanding is made possible through funding and the financial support of corporations, foundations, governments, and individuals investing in our mission. What we accomplish each year with these contributions is immense, and we are thankful in equal measure.

Donors $5,000 +

Up to $249

Linda Boughton Karl and Monica Geercken Jeffrey Reinke

Chloe Adcock Edward Adutwum Osayande Aihie Omar Allam Kathy Artus Roselle Avergonzado Annoshirvan Batmanghelidj Ben Becker Milena Bingre Richard Bobo Christophe Bright Brett Bruen Alexandra Cain Kent Calder Gabriela Campos Barrantes Marianne Carus Logen Casella Xiang Chen Alina Clough College of Southern Idaho Benjamin Conard Gerald Craft Scott Curry David Detjen Andrew Dowd Dr. Gary and Helene Eith Brad and Bailey Feldman Helga Flores Trejo Verginia Angela Fiori Marchio Josh Freedenberg Yoshiaki Fujuki Anastasiia Futrell Sergey Galaktionov Mariana Gallesi Daniel Gerry Frederick Glucksmann Nathaly Gonzalez Renteria Melania de Guzman Austin Haeusser Patricia Harrison Matthias Hartmann Ryan Hasmatali Alexander Hawley Lucia Hedke Jane Herzig Ethan Higgins Kevin Higgins Mike Hoffman Katerina Holubova Melania de Guzman

$1,000 - $4,999 John Bersia Jennifer Clinton Kevin Gully Robert Fenstermacher, Jr. Adam Hunter Aslam Masood Charles Meier Kendra Mirasol Aiden Mossop Anna Oberle-Brill Jacqueline Renner $500 - $999 Megan Bah Sylvia Becker Benjamin and Tonya Durkin Envisage Global Insurance Elizabeth and Vivek Kumbhari Wolfgang Linz Ellen Ritter Hallie Galen Wallack and Howard Wallack $250 - $499 Connie Askin Diego Baena Ian Bolin Lisa Cohen and Hershel Kleinberg Hans Decker Katherine Dodel Dan Ewert Andrew Laub Cheryl Matherly and Steven Wilson Ronda Rutherford Roger Sola-Sole

Yujiro Kameyama Shaina Katz Solbyol Kim Noel Kreicker Michael Lee Coco Lei Li Fe Lobiano Lubrizol Foundation Rosemarly Macario Vladimir Makaric Bruce Marsh Meredith Marsh John Marum Renee (McLaughlin) Manning Dorian Mead Jonathan Medina Marvin Meincke Joshua Moreno Mosaic Naoto Murai Murai Antonio Naglieri Jennifer Nina Takayuki Niwa Pavel Novak Tina Nowak Maria Nunez Neha Pannuri Elizabeth Perry George Ray Wilson Rickerson Maria Ruzic Sarah Ries Scarbrough Nur Shazwani Ramli Stephen Schueler Yangin Shieh Bradley Shingleton and Sherburne Laughlin Brent Soloway Michelle Spencer Akihiro Takino Tenzin Tashi Aaron Thompson Paul Thompson Nial Tilson Nicole Uehara Kevin Vasquez Tim and Susan White Dawn Wooten Michelle Wyman

Learn more about how you can support our mission at culturalvistas.org/donate 43

Profile for Cultural Vistas

Advancing Global Skills | Cultural Vistas Annual Report  

Learn more about our nonprofit's work to advance global skills and understanding at http://WeAreCulturalVistas.org

Advancing Global Skills | Cultural Vistas Annual Report  

Learn more about our nonprofit's work to advance global skills and understanding at http://WeAreCulturalVistas.org

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