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TARKINE FUNGI SURVEY: CORINNA, PHILOSOPHER FALLS & MCGOWAN’S FALLS Sarah Lloyd and Joy MacDonald June 2010

Practical Ecology

Pty Ltd

Contracting and Consulting in Ecological Restoration and Environmental Planning ABN 88 082 911 377 Phone: 6362 3830 Fax: 9484 9133 Email: enquiries@practicalecology.com.au Address: PO Box 428 Deloraine 7304


PRACTICAL ECOLOGY Pty Ltd ACN: 082 911 377 ABN: 88 082 911 377 PO Box 428 Deloraine Tas 3072 P: 6362 3830 F: 9484 9133 www.practicalecology.com.au Prepared for: Cradle coast Authority Contact: Jenny Evans Practical Ecology project number: Version control Version Date sent 1 2 3 Acknowledgments: Jenny Evans James Shaddick Colin Broughton Ron Nagorcka

CRA1180

Reviewed by:

Cradle Coast Authority Cradle Coast Authority - Mapping Practical Ecology P/L - Mapping Field Work

Copyright Unless otherwise agreed in writing, this report is the intellectual property of Practical Ecology Pty Ltd. It is designed to be used exclusively by the person or organisation that commissioned it. Permission must be sought prior to reproduction of any portion of this document, and every effort made to ensure proper referencing of this document. All images Š Sarah Lloyd Cover Photographs: Top left - right: Galerina unicolor, Castorea hypoxylon Botton left - right Clavaria miniata, Cystaderma amianthinum, Hygrocybe graminicolor

Cyptotrama aspratum


CONTENTS List of Illustrated Species 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Project Background 1.2 Aims 1.3 Study Sites 2. METHODS 2.1 Hygiene: Phytophthora cinnamomi Phytophthora 2.2 Existing Information 2.3 Limitations 3. RESULTS 3.1 Site Information 3.1.1 Corinna 3.1.2 Philosophers Falls 3.1.3 McGowan’s Falls 4. DISCUSSION 4.1 Ecolgical roles of fungi 4.2 Fungi surveys 4.3 Distribution of fungi 4.4 Fungi with a Gondwanan distribution 4.5 Further species associated with Nothofagus 4.6 Some conspicuous and noteworthy groups 4.7 Slime Moulds 5. THREATS TO FUNGAL DIVERSITY 5.1 Amanita muscaria 5.2 Forest Fragmentation 5.3 Wildfire & Disease 6. CONCLUSION 7. REFERENCES

4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 11 11 13 13 15 15 15 16

TABLES and FIGURES Appendix 1 Fungi observed April 2010 Appendix 2 Way points Appendix 3 Fungi observed April 2006 Appendix 4 Fungi observed April 2005

18 20 22 24

Tarkine Bird Survey

25

MAPS Map 1 Corinna Map 2 Philosopher Falls Map 3a McGowan’s Falls (west) Map 3b McGowan’ s Falls (east)

31 32 33 34 3


LIST OF ILLUSTRATED SPECIES FUNGI Amanita muscaria Amanita punctata Amanita sp. Amanita sp. Anthracophyllum archeri Artomyces austropiperatus Ascocoryne sarcoides Aurantioporus pulcherrimus Austroboletus novaezelandiae Bolete sp. Boletellus obscurecoccineus Castorea hypoxylon Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa (slime mould) Cortinarius armeniacovelata Cortinarius foetens Cortinarius metallicus Clavaria alboglobospora Clavaria amoenia Clavaria miniata Clavicorona piperata Cyptotrama aspratum Cystaderma amianthinum Cyttaria gunnii (beech orange) Disc fungus Fungus on slime mould Galerina unicolor Hericium corraloides Hygrocybe cheelii Hygrocybe astatogala Hygrocybe graminicolor Hygrocybe lewellinae Hygrocybe lilaceolamellata Hygrocybe sp. Laccaria species A Lanzia lanaripes

page 14 page 11 page 11 page 11 page 13 page 14 page 13 page 9 page 14 page 14 page 14 Front Cover page 13 page 10 page 10 page 10 page 14 page 14 Front Cover page 12 page 2 Front Cover page 10 page 13 page 16 Front Cover page 11 page 12 page 14 Front Cover page 14 page 14 page 12 page 11 page 13

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Leotia lubrica Marasmius sp M. austrororida Mycena cystidiosa Mycena epipterygia Mycena interrupta Mycena kuurkacea Mycena nargan Mycena toyerlaricola Mycena vinacea Mycena viscidocruenta Mycena sp. Mycoacia subceracea Plectania campylospora Podoserpula pusio (Pagoda fungus) Ryvardenia campyla Tremella mesenterica

page 13 page 13 page 10 page 12 page 12 page 10 page 12 page 12 page 11 page 12 page 12 page 12 page 13 page 10 page 10 page 9 page 13

BIRDS Bassian Thrush Black Currawong Black-headed Honeyeater Dusky Robin Eastern Spinebill Pink Robin (male) Pink Robin (female) Scrubtit Tasmanian Scrubwren Yellow-throated Honeyeater

page 27 page 27 page 27 page 27 page 30 page 25 page 26 page 26 page 26 page 27


1.

INTRODUCTION

1.1

Project Background

Practical Ecology Pty Ltd was commissioned by Cradle Coast Authority in May 2010 to undertake a fungi survey of three sites in the Tarkine. Sites included Corinna, Philosophers Falls and McGowan’s Falls. The survey was undertaken in April 2010 over three days. This report details the fungi species present (see appendix 1)

1.2

Aims

The scope of works proposed by Practical Ecology Pty Ltd (as outlined in our fee proposal) and agreed to by Cradle Coast Authority included: Field Component: •

One day of field survey at each of the target sites of Corinna, Philosopher Falls and McGowans Falls;

• Focus on species with a Gondwanan link which include Mycena interrupta, Aurantioporus pulcherrimus, Podoserpula pusio, Ryvardenia sp. which have been found during previous surveys in the Tarkine. Another interesting Gondwanan connection is the beech orange Cyttaria gunnii. All the Nothofagus (South America, NZ, New Caledonia) species have associated Cyttaria sp. •

Photos to be taken to aid identification of fungi species for inclusion in the report;

Map the survey locations to show areas surveyed and locations of fungi species.

Report Discussion: •

Brief discussion regarding significance of fungi taxa present;

Overview of previous survey results in the context of season and species located during this survey;

General overview of habitat values present at each site.

Mapping: •

Maps will include GPS locations of all species observed and areas surveyed

1.3

Study Sites

The study sites are located in the north-west of Tasmania in the area known as The Tarkine. (see maps page 6)

2.

METHODS

Native vegetation has been identified as per TASVEG (Harris and Kitchener 2005) and Tasmanian Vegetation Monitoring and Mapping Program (2009) groupings and groundtruthed during survey. All sites have designated defined paths. These were traversed on foot and an area approximately two meters beside the paths was surveyed for fungi. The Corinna survey took place on 27 April 2010, Philosophers Falls on 28 April 2010 and McGowan’s Falls on 29 April 2010.

2.1

Hygiene: Phytophthora cinnamomi Phytophthora

Phytophthora cinnamomi Phytophthora is a plant root pathogen which is thought to be introduced. It is difficult to detect and damage is often not observed until the pathogen is well established. Phytophthora can be easily transported on walking boots; therefore measures were put in place to minimise the risk of transference of Phytophthora into the study sites during the surveys. This involved the use of a foot bath containing bleach prior to entry at each site as per Rodman (2005).

2.2

Existing Information

Species lists from surveys conducted by mycologists in 2005 and 2006 are included (see appendices 3 & 4)

2.3

Limitations

The position of individual fungi were marked using a Garmin GPS1 or a Getac PDA. GPS points were then used to create a map of plant locations using GIS software. It was decided that a GPS point should be taken only once for each species in order to allow as much ground to be covered in the time allocated for each site. This was based on the fact that fungi may or may not be present in the same position over coming seasons as is the habit of fungi species in general, making this information difficult to utilise. 1Handheld GPS devices (Global Positioning System) have a positional accuracy of 10 – 30m, depending on satellite availability, tree canopy, etc, so all data collected with GPS is indicative only.

5


3.

RESULTS

There were 221 species of fungi mapped during the survey. Several species were recorded at more than one location.

3.1

Site Information

It should be noted that no in depth vegetation survey was undertaken as part of this project. The following descriptions are taken from rapid observation during the fungi survey and are intended to provide brief background information only.

3.1.1 Corinna Corinna is situated approximately 20km from the mouth of the Pieman River. The Corinna study site is mapped by TASVEG mainly as Nothofagus cunninghamii rainforest (undifferentiated) (RMU) interspersed in two places with Lagarostrobis franklinii Huon Pine rainforest and scrub (RPH). TASVEG RMU represents an amalgamation of TASVEG Nothofagus – Atherosperma rainforest (RMT) and Nothofagus – Pyllocladus short rainforest (RMS) (Tasmanian Vegetation Monitoring and Mapping Program 2009) and (Harris and Kitchener 2005). The area mapped as RMU consisted of mainly thamnic vegetation dominated by N. cunninghamii Myrtle Beech with Acacia melanoxylon blackwood, Atherosperma moschatum Sassafras and occasionally Eucryphia lucida Leatherwood; understory shrubs included Anodopetalum biglandulosum Horizontal, Anopterus glandulosus Tasmanian Laurel, Monotoca glauca Goldey wood and Leptospermum lanigerum Wooly Teatree. RPH was identified along the Pieman River as mapped by Harris and Kitchener (2005). Historically the Corinna area produced huge quantities of Huon Pine and remnants would be expected to be heavily modified.

6


3.1.2 Philosopher Falls The Philosopher Falls track is situated approximately one kilometer in from the Waratah – Savage River road approximately 11 km from Waratah. Philosopher Falls is also listed as RMU by TASVEG (Harris and Kitchener 2005); however the vegetation is more callidendrous in nature than the same community at Corinna. This may be due to higher levels of modification in this area, although many large N. cunninghamii remain the understory appeared to show less species diversity. Understory species observed included Atherosperma moschatum Sassafras, Phyllocladus aspleniifolius Celerytop Pine, and Zieria arborescens Stinkwood.

3.1.3 McGowan’s Falls McGowans Falls is situated just north of the Campbell Range west of Henrietta on the Relapse Creek Road. The area surveyed at McGowans Falls is mapped by TASVEG as a mix of Eucalyptus obliqua wet forest (undifferentiated) (WOU) and Nothofagus rainforest (undifferentiated) (RMU). Vegetation observed is consistent with TASVEG mapping considering the short distance covered in conjunction with ecotonal influences and would be described as a mixed forest. The area is modified and fairly open in the understory suggesting some level of logging has taken place however many large E. obliqua Stringybark trees remain with N. cunninghamii being co-dominant along with other associated rainforest species. Other species present include Zieria arborescens Stinkwood, Atherosperma moschatum Sassafras, Pittosporum bicolor Cheesewood, Phyllocladus aspleniifolius Celerytop Pine and Leptocophylla juniperina subsp. Juniperina Common Pinkberry.

7


4.

DISCUSSION

The Tarkine area of north west Tasmania is a mosaic of different vegetation communities that change depending on aspect, geology, fire history and human disturbance. Extensive areas of Nothofagus cunninghamii (myrtle beech) rainforest, the largest contiguous area of Gondwanan rainforest remaining in Australia, are interspersed with buttongrass plains and wet eucalypt forests. Each vegetation community, particularly the rainforests and wet eucalypt forests, supports a rich variety of fungal species. Because the Tarkine lies in the path of the ‘roaring forties’ and experiences rain throughout the year, fungal fruit bodies can appear in most months with the highest diversity observed in autumn and early winter. Tasmania’s myrtle beech rainforests have a low diversity of vascular plant species but are rich in fungi and other cryptogams (i.e. plants that reproduce by spores rather than seeds such as mosses, liverworts, lichens and ferns). Fungi are not only ecologically important but their rich variety of colours and shapes are an attractive and obvious feature of the forests. The sporadic and seasonal appearance of fungal fruits and the difficulty of studying specimens that deteriorate soon after collection have meant that the study of fungi in Australia has lagged behind the study of other organisms. Of the 250,000 species of macrofungi believed to occur in Australia only 10 - 20% have been scientifically described and named (Bougher & Syme 1998). Furthermore, many Australian species were ascribed names based on their superficial resemblance to northern hemisphere species. In the past several decades there has been growing interest in fungi and recent work, especially DNA studies, has determined that many of these species are different to their northern hemisphere counterparts. The distribution patterns of fungi and their taxonomy is currently the focus of much research. The main growing part of a fungus is composed of microscopic thread-like structures called hyphae that are usually unseen. Thus, while fungi are ever-present in the environment, certain factors stimulate the appearance of their reproductive structures (i.e. fruit bodies) and species do not necessarily appear every year. In some years, there may be a plethora of certain groups of fungi, while in other years these fungi may be absent. For example, in 2010 the prevailing conditions were favourable for the group of fungi known as boletes. (Boletes are fleshy fungi whose fertile surface is covered with pores rather than gills.) By contrast, in 2006, when a visiting Bolete specialist from the New York Botanic gardens, Roy Halling, visited the Tarkine, he found no boletes. (R. Halling pers. comm.) Given the unpredictable and sporadic nature of the appearance of fungal fruits, it will take many surveys over decades before a complete inventory of the fungi of the Tarkine will be compiled.

The underside of a bolete showing the pores: their spore-bearing structures 4.1.

Ecological Roles of Fungi

As well as being attractive and colourful, fungi play extremely important ecological roles in the environment. Saprotrophic fungi are, along with invertebrates, the principal decomposers in the environment. With their powerful enzymes they break down organic material such as fallen leaves, small branches, logs and dead animals. In so doing they unlock the nutrients such as carbon and nitrogen in this material and make it available to other organisms. 95% of plant species have a symbiotic (mutually beneficial) relationship with mycorrhizal fungi where an exchange of nutrients takes place though contact between the fungi and the plants’ roots. These associations are important to the health of native plants and ecosystems, especially in Australia’s impoverished soils. Parasitic fungi obtain nutrients from living plants and animals, sometimes killing their hosts in the process. Parasites weed out the weaker members of a group and are therefore a normal and important component of any ecological system.

4.2

The fungi survey

From 24th until 26th April 2010 preliminary surveys of macrofungi were conducted by Ron Nagorcka and Sarah Lloyd at Wombat Flat, Magnet, Philosopher Falls and Corinna. From 27th April until 29th April 2010 further surveys were conducted at the Whyte River walk at Corinna, Philosopher Falls, west of Waratah and McGowans Falls west of Takone. All species observed while walking along the well made tracks were listed with the following proviso:

8


In many cases the identification of fungi can only be determined by examination of spores and other microscopic features. Thus, the identification of fungal fruits that could not be identified in the field based on their macro characteristics was beyond the scope of this survey. Only those species that have been scientifically named and could be identified based on their field characteristics were listed and mapped. All species that were identified are listed in appendix 1. Fungimap target species were noted and all information will be forwarded to Fungimap Inc for inclusion with their records

4.3

Distribution of fungi

Many species of fungi are common and have a worldwide distribution; others are restricted to certain habitats or are found only in association with particular plant species. Some fungal species have a Gondwanan distribution, reflecting Australia’s past connection with South America, New Zealand, India, New Guinea and New Caledonia. There are several fungal species that grow only in association with myrtle-beech.

4.4

Fungi with a Gondwanan distribution

Aurantioporus pulcherrimus (strawberry bracket fungus) is a large bright red fungus that, in Australia, grows on the trunks of myrtle beech and snow gums. It is also known from New Zealand and southern Brazil. Cytarria gunnii (beech orange) is a parasitic fungus that forms galls on Nothofagus cunninghamii. Other Nothofagus species in Australia, New Zealand and South America have associated Cytarria species. Galls were observed during the 2010 survey. However, as fresh fruit bodies only appear during spring and summer they were not observed during the survey. Mycena interrupta (‘Pixies parasol’) grows on logs and branches in South-east Australia, New Zealand and Chile. Mycena austrororida (Austral dripping bonnet) is characterised by an accumulation of glutinous material at the base of its stem. It has been recorded from New Zealand, Argentina and Chile. (Grgurinovic 2003) Plectania campylospora (Forest cup) is found in Australia, New Zealand and southern Asian including Sri Lanka. Podoserpula pusio (pagoda fungus) is found in east and west Australia, New Zealand and Venezuela. (http://www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/mycogeography-distant.html) Ryvardenia campyla is a polypore often found on stumps. It is characterised by exuding water droplets. Several species of Cortinarius (formerly known as Rozites) with a distinctive annulus were observed including C. metallicus, the unpleasant smelling C. foetens and C. armeniacovelata. These Cortinarius spp. are believed to have co-evolved with Gondwanan plants such as Nothofagus. (Bougher & Syme; http://www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/mycogeography-australia.html)

4.5

Further species associated with Nothofagus

Mycena toyerlaricola is a small red mushroom that grows in leaf litter on the forest floor. ‘Toyeyerlare’ is a northern Tasmanian Aboriginal word for myrtle beech. (Grgurinovic 2003) Laccaria species A is a large mushroom that grows only in myrtle-beech forests. Like other Laccaria spp it is mycorrhizal.

Aurantioporus pulcherrimus

Ryvardenia campyla

9


Cyttaria gunnii (beech orange)

Plectania campylospora

Mycena austrororida

Cortinarius metallicus

Podoserpula pusio (Pagoda fungus)

Cortinarius foetens

10

Mycena interrupta

Cortinarius armeniacovelata


Mycena toyerlaricola

4.6

Hericium corraloides

Laccaria species A

Some conspicuous and noteworthy groups

Amanita spp. are mycorrhizal. They usually have a distinctive volva and annulus (ring) on the stipe. The genus Mycena is a large group of small saprotrophic fungi that are often abundant on rotting logs, small branches and leaf litter. One of the tallest of the genus is M. cystidiosa that grows on the forest floor, often in association with masses of white, hair-like threads called rhizomorphs. Mycena aff. epipterygia is a yellow/green fungus with a faint cucumber odour common on logs and litter. Bright red Mycena viscidocruenta ‘ruby bonnets’ inhabits the litter on the forest floor. Mycena kuurkacea is a common red mycena that is often seen on mossy logs. Its name ‘kuurkacea’ is derived from ‘kuur’ which means blood in the Aboriginal language of the western district of Victoria. The name alludes to the red liquid that exudes from the broken stem. Hygrocybe species are small to medium sized fungi that grow mostly on the ground. They come in a range of bright colours including red, green, yellow and pink. They often have a watery appearance. Boletes were seen in abundance during the 2010 surveys. Boletes are large fleshy fungi that have pores rather than gills on their fertile surface. (see also page 7) Other eyecatching fungi include the corals, discs, jellys, toothed fungi and puffballs.

4.7

Myxomycetes (Slime Moulds)

Slime moulds have similarities to fungi but are now placed in their own kingdam : the Protoctista. Several slime moulds were seen during the survey in the Tarkine. Like fungi, many slime moulds require microscopic examination to determine species.

Amanita sp.

Amanita punctata

11

Amanita sp.


Mycena epipterygia

Mycena viscidocruenta

Mycena sp.

Mycena kuurkacea

Mycena nargan

Mycena cystidiosa

Hygrocybe sp

Mycena vinacea

Hygrocybe cheelii

12


5

THREATS TO FUNGAL DIVERSITY IN THE TARKINE

The cool temperate rainforest of the Tarkine is the largest contiguous area of Nothofagus cunninghamii rainforest remaining in Australia. Many fungal species can only persist in climatic conditions favourable to Nothofagus or are obligate associates. If fungal diversity is to be maintained it is imperative that threats such as fungal weeds, forest fragmentation, wildfire and pathogens be managed.

5.1

Amanita Muscaria (Fly Agaric): A fungal weed

Amanita muscaria is a common, widespread and well known fungus. It is a northern hemisphere species that grows in association with exotic trees including Beech (Fagus sp.) and pines (Pinus radiata).

Anthracophyllum archeri

Marasmius sp.

Ascocoryne sarcoides

Mycoacia subceracea

Tremella mesenterica

Lanzia lanaripes

13

Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa (slime mould)

Leotia lubrica

Disc Fungus


Hygrocybe astatogala

Boletellus obscurecoccineus

Clavaria alboglobospora

Hygrocybe lewellinae

Bolete sp.

Clavaria amoenia

14

Hygrocybe lilaceolamellata

Austroboletus novaezelandiae

Artomyces austropiperatus


Amanita muscaria is a mycorrhizal fungus. It is known to be invading forests of Nothofagus in New Zealand and Australia and there is concern that this large vigorous fungus will displace native mycorrhizal species. Mycologist Dr Teresa Lebel from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne has been making annual visits to the Tarkine to track the spread of this fungal weed, particularly where visitor numbers are high such as at Philosopher Falls. The new track through the rainforest is a cause for concern. The fungus currently dominates the road to the Philosopher Falls car park. Work conducted by Dr Lebel in May 2010 indicates that it has not yet spread into the main area of myrtle-beech down the walking track to Philosopher Falls. (Dr Teresa Lebel pers. comm.)

5.2

Forest Fragmentation

Roading for either tourism or resource extraction (e.g. forestry or mining) that cut through the rainforest change the microclimate in the immediate area of the road. Such roads can become conduits to introduced pathogens and fungal weeds such as Amanita muscaria mentioned above. They increase visitor numbers to the area, thereby increasing the risk of wildfire.

5.3

Wildfire and Disease

Increased visitor numbers may increase the risk of wildfires. Fires have the potential to wipe out forests of N. cunninghamii as it does not regenerate readily after fire. N cunninghamii is highly susceptible to insect and fungal attack, which can result in the death of trees. It is particularly vulnerable to the fungal pathogen Chalara australis, a fatal disease that causes trees to become susceptible to attack by the mountain pinhole borer Platypus sp. The fungal spores of C. australis are normally wind-dispersed but human activity has increased the incident of the disease above the natural background levels in undisturbed forest. Most new sites of infection possibly result from stem and branch wounds caused by human activities. (http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/Attachments/LJEM-7CV742/$FILE/Nothofagus%20cunninghamii%20Notesheet.pdf. Viewed 4/6/2010)

6

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The cool temperate rainforest of the Tarkine area of northwest Tasmania is the largest contiguous area of Nothofagus cunninghamii rainforest remaining in Australia. Smaller patches of rainforest persist in other parts of Tasmania such as in the northeast highlands and in the south of the island where conditions are favourable. Many of the fungi found in the rainforests are yet to be scientifically described and named. While there is a growing awareness of the ecological importance of fungi, they have been mostly overlooked and are not included in conservation planning. It is not known if the conservation of vegetation communities are good surrogates for the conservation of fungi. In Victoria small remnants of rainforest persist in the wetter areas adjacent to rivers and creeks. These patches continue to be fragmented and threatened by wildfire. With the warmer climate and more frequent prolonged droughts it is feared that these areas may not survive beyond the next several decades. (Dr Tom May pers. comm.) A full inventory of the fungi that occur in the Tarkine will take decades or more to compile. It is recommended that further surveys be done by qualified mycologists.

Amanita muscaria

15


7

REFERENCES

Bougher, N l & Syme, K (1998) Fungi of Southern Australia, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands. Field Naturalists Club of Victoria Fungi Group (2009) The Fungi CD Fuhrer, B & Robinson, R (1992) Rainforest fungi of Tasmania and south-east Austrlia. CSIRO, Melbourne. Fuhrer, B (2005) A Field Guide to Australian Fungi Bloomings Books Pty Ltd, Melbourne. Grgurinovic, C A (2002) The Genus Mycena in South-Eastern Australia, Fungal Diversity Press & the Australian Biological Resources Study, Canberra. Harris S. & Kitchener A. (2005). From Forest to Fjaeldmark: Descriptions of Tasmania’s Vegetation. Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment. Rudman T (2005). Interim Phytophthora cinnamomi. Management Guidelines. Nature Conservation Report 05/7, Biodiversity Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. Tasmanian Vegetation Monitoring and Mapping Program (2009). TASVEG 2.0 Metadata. Release Date: 19th February 2009 Online: http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/Attachments/LJEM-7TB8XH/$FILE/TASVEG%202.0%20Metadata%20and%20 Release%20Notes.pdf http://www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/mycogeography-australia.html (viewed 1.6.2010) http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/Attachments/LJEM-7CV742/$FILE/Nothofagus%20cunninghamii%20Notesheet.pdf. Viewed 4/6/2010

Personal communication: Dr Tom May, senior mycologist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne Dr Teresa Lebel, senior mycologist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne Roy Halling, mycologist at the New York Botanic Gardens

Fungus on slime mould

16


Philosopher Falls

17


Agaricus (small)

x

Coral (purple/brown)

Agaricus sp. aff augustus

x

Cortinarius (deep purple)

Aleuria aurantia

x

Amanita (brown)

x x

Amanita aff umbrinella x

Amanita muscaria Amanita punctata

x

x

x

Cortinarius (red)

x

Antrodiella zonata

x

Cortinarius spp.

x

Craterellus cornucopiodes

x

Crepidotus (yellow)

x

Armillaria x

Cyptotrama aspratum Cystoderma amaranthinum

Artomyces austropiperatus

x

x

Cyttaria gunnii (not fruiting)

x

x

x

Discs (white)

x

Discs (yellow)

x

Aurantioporus pulcherrimus

x

x

Discs( green)

x

Austroboletus novaezelandiae

x

x

Entoloma (blue cap and stipe)

Austropaxillus infundibuliformis

x

Entoloma (blue)

Bisporella citrina

x

Entoloma (fawn cap, blue stipe)

x

Bolete (black cap/white stipe)

Entoloma (yellow)

x

Bolete (brown edge pink stipe)

Entoloma (dark blue)

x

x x

Flammulina velutipes

Bolete (brown)

x

Fomitopsis hemitephrum

Bolete (lilac stem with scales)

x

Galerina unicolor

Bolete (large purple)

x

Ganoderma applanatum

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

Hapalopilus nidulans

Calocera sp.

x

Hericium coralloides

Campanella oliveonigra

x

Heterotextus miltinus

x

Hygrocybe (green)

x

Hygrocybe (yellow)

x

Hygrocybe astatogala

x

x

Hygrocybe chellii

x

x

Hygrocybe chlorolimonea

x

Hygrocybe coccinea

x

1 x

Clavaria alboglobospora Clavaria miniata

x

Clavicorona colensoi

x x

Clavulina cristata

x

Clitocybe (?clitocyboides) Collybia butyracea

x

Collybia eucalyptorum

x

x

x

x x x x x x x

Hygrocybe graminicolor

x

x

x

Hygrocybe lilaceolamellata

Hygrocybe lewellinae

x x

x

Hygrocybe mavis

x x

Coltricia cinnamomea

x

Hygrocybe miniata

Coral (white)

x

Hygrocybe (red)

18

x

x

Gymnopilus sp.

x

x x

x

Clavaria amoena

x

x

Geoglossum sp.

Bolete (orange cap)

Corinna x

x

Entoloma sp.

Bolete (pink)

Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

Magnet Road

x

x

Castorea hypoxylon

x

Descolea recedens

x

Boletus obscurecoccineus

Wonbat Flat

x

Ascomycetes (grey & yellow discs)

Bolete (white)

Waratah

Philosopher Falls

x x

Ascomycetes (white discs)

Bolete (crimson cap/yellow pores)

x x

x

x x

Cuphocybe sp. x

x

x x

x

x

Ascocoryne sarcoides

x

Crepidotus variabilis

Armillaria novaezelandiae

Armillaria hinnulea

x

Cortinarius rotundisporus x

x

Cortinarius (purple)

Cortinarius lavendulensis

Anthracophyllum archeri Antrodiella zonata ? (White)

x

Cortinarius archeri

x

Amanita sp.

McGowans Falls

Fungi survey 2010 Corinna

Magnet Road

Wonbat Flat

Waratah

Philosopher Falls

Fungi survey 2010

McGowans Falls

Appendix 1

x

x


x

Hypholoma brunneum x

Omphalina chromacea

Hypholoma sublateritium

x

Panellus longinqua

x x

Pholiota malicola

Hypoxylon polymorpha

x

Piptoporus portentosus

Inocybe australiensis

x

Laccaria (Species A)

x

Laccaria masoniae Lachnum virgineum

x

x x

x

Postia lactea

x

x

x

Postia lactea

x

x

Pulveroboletus aff ravenelii

x

x

x

x

Ramariopsis crocea

Lanzipes lanaripes

x

Resupinate (mustard with spines) x

x x x

Rickenella fibula

x

Rigidoporus laetus

Lepiota haemorrhagica

x

Rozites foetens

x

x

Lepiota sp.

x

Rozites metallicus

x

x

x

x

Marasmius sp.

x

x

Mycena (tiny pink)

x

Russula (brown)

x

x x x

x

Russula (white)

x

Russula lenkunya

x

x

Russula persanguinea

x

x

x

Mycena albidocapillaris

x

Mycena austrororida

x

Mycena (brown)

x

Mycena carmeliana

x

x

Russula (purple cap/white stipe) x

x

x

x

x

x

Russula purpureoflava

x x

Ryvardenia campyla

x

Sirobasidium brefeldianum

x x x

x

x

Stereum ostrea

Mycena epipterygia

x

x

x

Stropharia aff semiglobata

Mycena interrupta

x

x

x

Stropharia formosa

x

Mycena kuurkacea

x

x

x

Toriendiella eucalypti

x

x

x

Trametes versicolor

x

Tremella fuciformis

Mycena nargan

x x

Mycena sp.

x

x

x x x x

x x

Tremella mesenterica

Mycena spp.

Trogia straminea

x x

x

Tubaria rufofulva

Mycena vinacea

x

x

Tyromyces merulinus

Mycena viscidocruenta

x

x

White discs on wood

x

Mycoacea subceracea

x

Xylaria polymorpha

x

Zelleromyces sp.

x

Mycena toyerlaricola

Neolentiporus

x

19

x

Steccherinum sp.

x

x

x

Stereum hirsutum

Mycena cystitiosa

Mycena mulawaestris

x

Russula (cream)

Marasmius elegans Mucronella pendula

x

Rozites (purple)

x

Marasmius ‘angina’

x

x

Laetoporus portentosis

x

Corinna x

x

Ramaria ochraceosalmonicolor

Marasmiellus affixus

Magnet Road

x

Postia

x

Lycoperdon pyriforme

Wonbat Flat

x

Podoserpula pusio

x

Lepiota sp. (reddish umbo)

Waratah

Philosopher Falls x

x

x

Leotia lubrica

x

x

x

Lactarius eucalypti

Lentinellus (brown)

x x

Podoscytha petaloides

x

Lactarius (brown)

x

Pluteus atromarginatus x

Laccaria canaliculata

x

Plectania campylospora

x

Laccaria (long stipe)

x

Panellus stipticus

Hypoxylon bovei Inocybe sp.

x

Neolentiporus maculitissimus

Hypholoma sp. Hypocrea rufa

McGowans Falls

Fungi survey 2010 Corinna

Magnet Road

Wonbat Flat

Waratah

Philosopher Falls

McGowans Falls

Fungi survey 2010

x

x x


Appendix 2 Corinna

Way point

Philosophers Falls

Way point

McGowan’s Falls

Way point

Trametes versicolor

1

Mycena interrupta

81 Rozites foetens

154

Hericium coralloides

2

Mycena epipterygia

82 Mycena interrupta

155

Entoloma (fawn cap, blue stipe)

3

Mycena toyerlaricola

83 Ramaria ochraceosalmonicolor

156

Hygrocybe (red)

4

Ganoderma applanatum

84 Pholiota malicola

157

Mycena kuurkacea

5

Clavaria amoena

85 Agaricus (small)

158

Mycena interrupta

6

Crepidotus variabilis

86 Mycena epipterygia

159

Marasmius sp.

7

Armillaria novaezelandiae

87 Discs (yellow)

160

Lactarius (brown)

8

Mycena (brown)

88 ?Mycena (tiny pink)

161

Lactarius eucalypti

9

Hygrocybe (green)

89 Mycena albidocapillaris

162

?Mycena (tiny pink)

10

Ryvardenia campyla

90 Armillaria hinnulea

163

Postia lactea

11

Austropaxillus infundibuliformis

91 Mycena kuurkacea

164

Cyptotrama aspratum

12

Russula persanguinea

92 Lepiota sp.

165

Clitocybe (?clitocyboides)

13

Hypholoma sublateritium

93 Gymnopilus sp.

166

Rigidoporus laetus

14

Aurantioporus pulcherrimus

94 Mycena viscidocruenta

167

Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

15

Mycena austrororida

95 Lanzipes lanaripes

168

Bolete (pink)

16

Mycena mulawaestris

96 Marasmiellus affixus

169

Ganoderma sp.

17

Mycena sp.

97 Marasmius sp.

170

Ryvardenia campyla

18

Russula (purple cap/white stipe)

98 Hypocrea rufa

171

Discs white

19

Clavaria miniata

99 Laccaria ‘enormous’

172

Russula (white)

20

Bisporella citrina

100 Clavicorona colensoi

173

Descolea recedens

21

? Inocybe sp (Fuhrer 143)

101 Mycena nargan

174

Collybia eucalyptorum

22

Collybia eucalyptorum

102 Mycena sp.

175

Cortinarius (purple)

23

Hygrocybe astatogala

103 Collybia eucalyptorum

176

Morganella pyriforme

24

Rozites foetens

104 Entoloma (dark blue)

177

Hygrocybe lewellinae

25

Mycena cystidiosa

105 Toriendiella eucalypti

178

Cortinarius metallicus

26

Lepiota sp. (reddish umbo)

106 Mycena sp.

179

Hypoxylon polymorpha

27

Hypholoma sp.

107 Mycena toyerlaricola

180

Armillaria hinnulea

28

Postia sp.

108 Heterotextus miltinus

181

Armillaria novaezelandiae

29

Clavicorona piperata

109 Mycoacea subceracea

182

Russula (cream)

30

Stropharia aff semiglobata

110 Antrodiella zonata ? (white)

183

Bolete (white)

31

Cortinarius spp.

111 Crepidotus (yellow)

184

Bolete (large purple)

32

Armillaria hinnulea

112 Mucronella pendula

185

Panellus stipticus

33

Pluteus atromarginatus

113 Resupinate (mustard spines)

186

Russula persanguinea

34

Coral (white)

114 Lachnum virgineum

187

Clavaria miniata

35

Hygrocybe chlorolimonea

115 Mycena vinacea

188

Cortinarius metallicus

36

Discs grey & yellow

116 Tubaria rufofulva

189

Craterellus cornucopiodes

37

Lycoperdon pyriforme

117 Russula (brown)

190

Cortinarius sp.

38

Hygrocybe miniata

118 Lepiota haemorrhagica

191

Stereum ostrea

39

Laetoporus portentosis

119 Amanita punctata

192

Mycena mulawaestris

40

Laccaria masoniae

120 Tremella fuciformis

193

Hygrocybe graminicolor

41

Hygrocybe coccinea

121 Cortinarius (red)

194

Hygrocybe chellii

42

Piptoporus portentosus

122 Cortinarius lavendulensis

195

Mycena nargan

43

Bolete (brown)

123 Stereum ostrea

196

Podoserpula pusio

44

Mycena albidocapillaris

124 Boletus obscureococcineus

197

Toriendiella eucalypti

45

Coltricia cinnamomea

125 Clavaria miniata

198

Hygrocybe lilaceolamellata

46

White discs on wood

126 Trogia straminea

199

Hypholoma brunneum

47

Entoloma (fawn cap, blue stipe)

127 Podoserpula pusio

200

Clavaria amoena

48

Laccaria canaliculata

128 Ganoderma sp.

201

Cuphocybe sp.

49

Laccaria (long stipe)

129 Hygrocybe (red)

202

20


Artomyces austropiperatus

50

Rozites metallicus

130 Hygrocybe lewellinae

203

Austroboletus novaezelandiae

51

Russula lenkunya

131 Hygrocybe graminicolor

204

Laccaria (long stipe)

52

Russula purpureoflava

132 Collybia butyracea

205

Boletus obscureococcineus

53

Austroboletus novaezelandiae

133 Flammulina velutipes

206

Marasmius elegans

54

Postia lactea

134 Discs white

207

Mycena viscidocruenta

55

Amanita (brown)

135 Lactarius eucalypti

208

Calocera sp.

56

Amanita sp.

136 Ryvardenia campyla

209

Tremella mesenterica

57

Crepidotus (yellow)

137 Discs green

210

Mucronella pendula

58

Aleuria aurantia

138 Ascocoryne sarcoides

211

Amanita sp.

59

Castorea polymorpha

139 Sirobasidium brefeldianum

212

Campanella oliveonigra

60

Lactarius eucalypti

140 Entoloma (yellow)

213

Aurantioporus pulcherrimus

61

Entoloma (dark blue)

141 Cortinarius (purple)

214

Pluteus atromarginatus

62

Hygrocybe mavis

142 Bolete (brown)

215

Piptoporus portentosus

63

Bolete (white)

143 CAstorea hypoxylon

216

Austropaxillus infundibuliformis

64

Laccaria (Species A)

144 Bolete (orange cap)

217

Clavulina cristata

65

Hapalopilus nidulans

145 Coral (purple/brown)

218

Annulohypoxylon bovei

66

Lentinellus (brown)

146 Entoloma (fawn cap, blue stipe)

219

Bolete (black cap/white stipe)

67

Gymnopilus sp.

147 Leotia lubrica

220

Bolete (lilac stem with scales)

68

Pholiota malicola

148 Inocybe australiensis

221

Cortinarius violaceus group

69

Lactarius (brown)

149

Agaricus sp. aff augustus

70

Mycena carmeliana

150

Russula lenkunya

71

Panellus longinqua

151

Amanita aff umbrinella

72

Amanita muscaria

152

Cortinarius archeri

73

Flammulina velutipes

153

Mycena epipterygia

74

Neolentiporus maculitissimus

75

Agaricus (small)

76

Bolete (crimson cap/yellow pores)

77

Neolentiporus maculitissimus

78

Mycena toyerlaricola

79

Pulveroboletus aff ravenelii

80

21


Appendix 3 Fungi survey 2006 Amanita grey brunneum group

Corinna

4/24/06

Amanita ochrophylla

Corinna

4/24/06

Armillaria novae-zeelandiae

Corinna

4/24/06

Austropaxillus

Corinna

4/24/06

Clavicorona piperata

Corinna

4/24/06

Clavulina amoena

Corinna

4/24/06

Clavulina miniata

Corinna

4/24/06

Cortinarius myxacium (lilac gills, brown top)

Corinna

4/24/06

Cyptotrama aspratum

Corinna

4/24/06

Entoloma (Blue/brown cap; blue stipe)

Corinna

4/24/06

Entoloma (brown)

Corinna

4/24/06

Entoloma (brown zoned)

Corinna

4/24/06

Galerina

Corinna

4/24/06

Grey corticoid

Corinna

4/24/06

Gymnopilus (tiny)

Corinna

4/24/06

Gymnopus

Corinna

4/24/06

Hygrocybe (bright red)

Corinna

4/24/06

Hygrocybe lewellinae

Corinna

4/24/06

Hygrocybe (yellow)

Corinna

4/24/06

Hypholoma (cream - yellow gills)

Corinna

4/24/06

Hypoxylon sp.

Corinna

4/24/06

Laccaria lateritia

Corinna

4/24/06

Lycoperdon sp.

Corinna

4/24/06

Marasmius crinis equi

Corinna

4/24/06

Marasmius elegans

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena austrororida

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena (black zoned)

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena (Brown)

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena cystidiosa

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena epipterygia

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena interrupta

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena kuurkacea

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena (radish pink)

Corinna

4/24/06

Mycena (tiny white sub cap group)

Corinna

4/24/06

Orange bracket soft

Corinna

4/24/06

Panellus stipticus

Corinna

4/24/06

Pluteus atromarginatus

Corinna

4/24/06

Russula aff nigricans

Corinna

4/24/06

Russula (all white yellow tint on cap)

Corinna

4/24/06

Russula (purple pileus, pink stipe)

Corinna

4/24/06

Ryvardenia campyla

Corinna

4/24/06

Stereum illudens

Corinna

4/24/06

Stereum ostrea

Corinna

4/24/06

Trametes versicolor

Corinna

4/24/06

Amanita muscaria

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Arantioporus pulcherrimus

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Armillaria

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Armillaria

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

22


Fungi survey 2006 Armillaria novae- zeelandiae

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Ascocoryne sarcoides

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Austropaxillus infundibuliformis group

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Calostoma rodwayi

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Cantherellus (pinkish/orange)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Clavaria amoena

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Clavaria miniata

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Clavaria miniata

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Clavulina cristata group

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Cortinarius myxacea group (white stem, lilac tint in cap)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Cortinarius small mycenoid (brown)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Cortinarius cuphocybe

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Crepidotus

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Crepidotus

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Cystaderma muscicola

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Dermocybe (mustard, bright yellow stipe, yellow/ orange brown gills)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Dermocybe (purple/brown)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Descolea phebifora

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Descomyces

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Entoloma (creamy white)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Entoloma (green)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Entoloma (light brown)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Fomes hemitephrus

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hebeloma

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hygrocybe astotogala

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hypholoma (apricot form)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hypholoma brunneum

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hypholoma brunneum

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hypholoma fasciculare

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Hypoxylon archeri group

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Inocybe (dark brown shaggy cap)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Inocybe scissa

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Laccaria

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Laccaria enormous

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Laccaria (Species E)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Leotia lubrica

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Marasmius angina

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Marasmius sp.

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Melanotus hepatochrous

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena austrofilopes

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena austrorodia

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena epipterygia group

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena hispida

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena interrupta

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena sanguinolenta group

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Mycena toyerlaricola

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

23


Appendix 3 (cont.) Fungi survey 2006 Mycena viscidocruenta

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Orange bracket

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Panellus longinquus

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Pholiota multicingulata

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Rhodocybe

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Rigidoporus rigida

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Russula purpureoflava

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Ryvardenia campyla

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Sebacina (flat jelly fungus)

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Sirobasidium brefeldianum

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Trametes

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Yellow disc on old fern

Philosopher Falls

April 2006

Appendix 4 Philosopher Falls 2005 Hygrocybe graminicolor

Philosopher Falls

Dermocybe sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Craterellus cornucopioides

Philosopher Falls

?Hygrocybe sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Inocybe sp.

Philosopher Falls

Inocybe sp.

Philosopher Falls

Laccaria canaliculata

Philosopher Falls

Polyporaceae sp.

Philosopher Falls

Leucopaxillus eucalyptorum

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cortinarius sp.

Philosopher Falls

Cheimonophyllum candidissimum

Philosopher Falls

Conchomyces bursiformis

Philosopher Falls

24


TARKINE BIRD SURVEY by Sarah Lloyd 999 Denmans Road, Birralee 7303 sarahlloyd@iprimus.com.au

June 2010

Pink Robin

25


Spring and summer are the most productive seasons for conducting bird surveys. This is because birds are easier to detect during the breeding season when they are most vocal and active. In addition, migratory species that return to the Australian mainland for winter are in Tasmania during this time. Thus, autumn, which is the peak season for the appearance of fungal fruit bodies, is not an ideal time for conducting bird surveys. Bird surveys have been done previously in the Tarkine by Sarah Lloyd. A list of the species observed during comprehensive surveys conducted at various locations in the Tarkine in 2003 & 2004 is included at the end of this report (Lloyd 2004). Below is a description of the various forest habitats in the Tarkine and the birds that are commonly found in these habitats.

Pink Robin (female)

Myrtle beech rainforests have a depauperate bird fauna because they provide few resources for birds. The species that are commonly seen in the rainforest include Yellow-tailed Blackcockatoo, Bassian Thrush, Pink Robin and Olive Whistler and endemic species including the Scrubtit, Tasmanian Thornbill, Tasmanian Scrubwren and Green Rosella.

A higher number of bird species occur in the wet eucalypt forests, especially those that have a diverse understorey with flowering plants such as waratah (Telopea truncata). Nectarfeeding honeyeaters such as the Crescent Honeyeater and Eastern Spinebill are found in these forests as is a group of endemic honeyeaters that are primarily insectivorous. They include the Yellow-throated, Black-headed and Strong-billed Honeyeater and the largest honeyeater in Australia, the Yellow Wattlebird. These birds are usually found in association with Eucalyptus spp. where they forage for insects and other invertebrates on the branches or trunks and in the foliage. Other insectivorous birds that are usually absent from pure stands of Nothofagus forest but are found in association with Eucalyptus spp are the Grey Shrike-thrush and Golden Whistler. Three additional endemic species that are frequently encountered in the Tarkine include the Black Currawong, Tasmanian Native-hen and Dusky Robin. REFERENCES: Green, R.H. (1995) The fauna of Tasmania: birds. Potoroo Publishing, Launceston Lloyd, S.J. (2004) Rhythms of the Tarkine: a natural history adventure. Lloyd, Birralee Ridpath, MG & Moreau, RE (1965) The birds of Tasmania: ecology and evolution. Ibis Vol 108, No 3, pp. 348-393.

Tasmanian Scrubwren

Scrubtit

26


Yellow-throated Honeyeater

Black Currawong

Bassian Thrush

Dusky Robin

Black-headed Honeyeater

27


Philosopher Falls

Wombat Flat

Tiger Bend

Milkshake Hills

Hellyer Gorge

Magnet

Corinna

Walk to Balfour

Balfour campsite

Lake Chisholm

Sumac

King’s Run

Tarkine bird surveys 2003 & 2004 Non-passerines Brown Quail

* *

Black Swan

*

Australian Wood Duck Pacific Black Duck

*

Chestnut Teal

*

* *

Australasian Grebe Little Penguin

*

Albatross sp

*

Australasian Gannet

*

Little Pied Cormorant

*

Great Cormorant

*

Australian Pelican

*

White-faced Heron

*

White-bellied Sea-Eagle

*

Swamp Harrier

*

Brown Falcon

*

Australian Hobby

*

* *

* *

Brown Goshawk *

Grey Goshawk Wedge-tailed Eagle

*

Tasmanian Native-hen (e)

*

Pied Oystercatcher

*

Sooty Oystercatcher

*

Ruddy Turnstone

*

Red-capped Plover

*

Hooded Plover

*

Masked Lapwing

*

Pacific Gull

*

Silver Gull

*

*

*

*

*

Brush Bronzewing Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo

*

*

*

*

*

*

Ground Parrot Swift Parrot (be)

*

*

*

Green Rosella (e)

*

*

*

*

Blue-winged Parrot

*

*

*

*

Pallid Cuckoo

*

Fantailed Cuckoo

*

Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo

*

Shining Bronze-Cuckoo

*

Southern Boobook

*

*

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

* * *

*

*

*

* * * *

*

* *

*

* *

* *

Australian Owlet-nightjar

28

*

*


Philosopher Falls

Wombat Flat

*

Tawny Frogmouth White-throated Needletail

Tiger Bend

Milkshake Hills

Hellyer Gorge

Magnet

Corinna

Walk to Balfour

Balfour campsite

Lake Chisholm

Sumac

King’s Run

Tarkine bird surveys 2003 & 2004

100

* *

Laughing Kookaburra (i)

* *

*

*

Passerines Superb Fairy-wren

*

Southern Emu-wren

*

Striated Pardalote Tasmanian Scrubwren (e)

*

Scrubtit (e)

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

Striated Fieldwren

*

Brown Thornbill

*

Tasmanian Thornbill (e)

*

*

Yellow-throated Honeyeater (e)

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* * * *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

New Holland Honeyeater

*

Tawny-crowned Honeyeater

*

Eastern Spinebill

*

*

*

*

*

White-fronted Chat

* *

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

Olive Whistler

*

*

*

Golden Whistler

*

*

*

Grey Shrike-thrush

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

Dusky Robin (e)

*

*

Black-headed Honeyeater (e)

Flame Robin

*

*

Crescent Honeyeater

Pink Robin

* *

*

*

Strong-billed Honeyeater (e)

*

*

*

*

*

*

Satin Flycatcher Grey Fantail

*

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

*

*

*

Grey Butcherbird

*

*

Black Currawong (e)

*

Forest Raven

*

Richard’s Pipit

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

Beautiful Firetail Welcome Swallow

*

*

Tree Martin

*

Silvereye

*

*

Bassian Thrush

*

*

Common Blackbird (i)

*

*

Common Starling (i)

*

*

* *

*

(e) = endemic (be) breeding endemic (i) introduced

Source: Lloyd, SJ, (2004) Rhythms of the Tarkine: a natural history adventure. Lloyd, Birralee

29


Eastern Spinebill (juvenile)

30


Site 1: Corinna


Site 2: Philosopher Falls


Site 3a: McGowans Falls (west)


Site 3b: McGowans Falls (East)

Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

Tarkine Fungi Survey  

Tarkine Fungi Survey_Lloyd and MacDonald_2010_Report

Tarkine Fungi Survey  

Tarkine Fungi Survey_Lloyd and MacDonald_2010_Report