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Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy December 2010

Cradle Coast Regional Weeds Advisory Group


Acknowledgements The Cradle Coast Regional Weeds Advisory Group is grateful to all who assisted in the updating of this document. Thanks also to the DPIPWE Weeds Section, the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management (NRM) staff and committee members and Greening Australia for their efforts in creating the original strategy in 2005 on which this updated document is based. The original Strategy was supported by Greening Australia and Australian Government Natural Heritage Trust funding made available through the Cradle Coast NRM Committee. The 2010 review was undertaken with the support of the Cradle Coast Weeds Advisory Group, through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country. Cover photographs/ illustration: Front cover top row: Karen Stewart Front cover bottom photograph: Greg Taylor Cover layout concept: Andrew Winkler Rear cover illustration: Georgina Davis Photographs throughout: Tim Rudman (DPIPWE) and Matt Rose (Cradle Coast NRM) Original strategy prepared by Natalie Conod, Greening Australia, (Tasmania) Inc. March 2005.

Publication Details This document may be reproduced in whole or in part for the purpose of study or training, subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgement of source and it not being used for commercial purposes or sale. Reproduction for purposes other than those given above requires the prior permission of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee.

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Contents Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................................... i Contents ..................................................................................................................................................... ii 1.

2.

3.

Development of the Regional Weed Strategy .............................................................................. 3 1.1

Vision ............................................................................................................................................. 3

1.2

Aim and Components of the Strategy .................................................................................... 3

Background ........................................................................................................................................ 4 2.1

What is a Weed? ......................................................................................................................... 4

2.2

Weeds of the Cradle Coast Region ......................................................................................... 4

2.3

Principles of Weed Management ............................................................................................ 5

Weed Management in the Cradle Coast Region ........................................................................ 6 3.1

Preventative Weed Management ........................................................................................... 6

3.2

Managing New and Emerging Weed Infestations ................................................................ 7

3.3

Managing Existing Weeds.......................................................................................................... 8

3.4

Awareness, Education and Training....................................................................................... 10

3.5

Coordination of Weed Management ................................................................................... 11

3.6

Legislation and Regulation ...................................................................................................... 12

3.7

Monitoring and Evaluation ...................................................................................................... 13

4. Weed Management Priority Actions in the Cradle Coast Region ............................................... 14 4.1 Priority Actions for Preventative Weed Management ............................................................. 14 4.2 Priority Actions for Managing New and Emerging Weed Infestations ................................... 15 4.3 Priority Actions for Managing Existing Weeds ............................................................................ 16 4.4 Priority Actions for Awareness, Education and Training ........................................................... 17 4.5 Priority Actions for Coordination of Weed Management ........................................................ 18 4.6 Priority Actions for Legislation and Regulation........................................................................... 20 4.7 Priority Actions for Monitoring and Evaluation ........................................................................... 20 Appendix 1: Declared Weeds by Municipality ................................................................................... 21 Appendix 2: Regional Weed Management Roles and Responsibilities........................................... 24

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1.

Development of the Regional Weed Strategy

This Weed Strategy (referred to simply as the Strategy from this point) is the principal framework for weed management in the Cradle Coast region. To ensure that it reflects key regional weed management issues, extensive stakeholder and community consultation was undertaken when it was first developed in 2005. The original strategy was released with an agreement to review its contents after five years. The 2010 review provided an opportunity to analyse the outcomes of the strategy, update priorities, and develop new targets and actions. The actions have again been set to be achievable within a five year period from 2010 to 2015 and recognise that financial and other resource constraints prevent the strategy from prescribing specific deadlines for actions. The realisation of the medium term goals goes beyond the five-year timeframe, in particular for the control of widespread, enduring weeds such as gorse, willows and broom. This document is a specific and targeted strategy for a specific purpose that forms a component of the Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy and assisting to fulfil its aims. It acknowledges and encourages adherence to National, State and Local Government policy, standard and procedure. This Strategy also exists within a framework of National, State and Local/Individual weed management plans that continue today and can be viewed in the 2005 Regional Weed Strategy document.

1.1

Vision

The vision for weed management in the Cradle Coast region is: A region leading the way in protecting natural resources from the impacts of weeds through practical and integrated management involving members of the Cradle Coast community and all levels of government and industry.

1.2

Aim and Components of the Strategy

This Strategy aims to identify priorities and possible weed management actions that could be undertaken in the Cradle Coast region. The contents of the Strategy assume that funding and other required resources are available (the absence of which would prevent or limit strategy implementation) and that all of the actions identified within this strategy are considered to be of significant benefit to the region. The source of any funding and its associated priorities (local, regional, state or federal) will determine which of the actions are undertaken at what time. The weed management issues of the Cradle Coast region have been compiled under the following headings: •

Preventative Weed Management Aim: To prevent new weed infestations.

•

Management of New and Emerging Weed Infestations Aim: To control weed incursions at an early stage, before they become problematic.

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Managing Existing Weeds

Aim: To significantly reduce the impact of existing weeds. Awareness, Education and Training Aim: To establish an enthusiastic, well informed and wide network of people involved in weed management in the Cradle Coast region.

Coordination of Weed Management Aim: To manage regional weed issues in a cooperative, coordinated manner.

Legislation and Regulation Aim: To use the Weed Management Act 1999 and other relevant legislation appropriately, consistently and to best effect.

Monitoring and Evaluation Aim: To ensure the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy is implemented, relevant, achievable and reflects the current weed management issues of the region.

2.

Background

2.1

What is a Weed?

A weed is a plant that has, or has the potential to have, detrimental effects on environmental, economic or social values. Almost any plant can be a weed, and while some weeds of Tasmania originate from within Australia, most are species introduced from overseas. Approximately 65% of the weeds in Australia were brought in for their garden and ornamental values. Other weeds were introduced for commercial purposes and became naturalised, or they were accidentally introduced.

2.2

Weeds of the Cradle Coast Region

Australia has 28,000 introduced plants and approximately 760 of these have naturalised in Tasmania. Whilst most of them are considered benign, some have significant impacts on the environmental, economic and social values of the Cradle Coast region. The region has six of the 20 Weeds of National Significance (WONS) - gorse, willows, serrated tussock, blackberry, bridal creeper and boneseed, which are also declared weeds. Tasmania has 77 plant species declared under the Weed Management Act 1999, with 30 known to be present in the Cradle Coast region (Appendix 1). A number of other species, not declared under the Act, are also considered a threat to regional assets. The highest priority regional and sub-regional weeds will be referred to as Weeds of Regional Significance (WORS) and potentially include rice grass, Poa aquatica, sea spurge and New Zealand flax. Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

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2.3

Principles of Weed Management

The following principles create a solid foundation for successful regional weed management and underpin the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy: 1. Prevention and early intervention are the most cost effective techniques that can be employed against weeds. 2. The primary responsibility for weed management rests with landholders/land managers, but collective action is necessary where the problem transcends the capacity of the individual landholder/land manager to address it adequately. 3. Successful weed management requires a coordinated approach that involves all levels of government in establishing appropriate legislative, educational and coordination frameworks in partnership with industry, landholders and the community. 4. Weed management is an essential and integral part of the sustainable management of natural resources and the environment and requires an integrated, multidisciplinary approach. 5. Weed management is resource intensive and should be driven by priorities developed using appropriate information and/or relevant expertise. 6. A continuous and long-term commitment is necessary for successful weed management. NOTE: 1-4 adopted from the National Weed Strategy, 5 adopted from the Northern Regional Weed Management Strategy.

Case study: Circular Head Quarry Hygiene Program – an example of municipal initiative. Following public concern regarding the spread of declared weeds such as gorse in roading gravel, Circular Head Council applied to Cradle Coast NRM for funding under the Local Government incentive scheme to complete an inventory of quarry hygiene within the municipality. The Circular Head Council Weeds Officer, with field support from Forestry Tasmania, inspected 29 quarries for declared and environmental weeds as well as Phytophthora root-rot disease. Of the 29 quarries visited, 22 contained weeds declared under the Weed Management Act (1999) and many were also being used as a dumping ground for unwanted topsoil, road works waste etc. Each quarry owner received a written report on the hygiene status of their quarry, with recommendations on weed control and quarry management. The quarries which previously contained declared weeds have just had their 2-year follow-up field visit and in most cases, actions have been taken and weed control programs have been put in place. In two instances, the required weed works had not been done and a cooperative approach with both the DPIPWE Regional Weeds Officer and the Mineral Resources Tasmania Leasing Officer was required to get the job done. This is a strong example of a municipal initiative, working in cooperation with the other relevant agencies to achieve a good result. In addition, this is the first stepping stone towards a change in attitude by the quarry owners, better quarry management, recognition of the value of clean products and a culture of continuous improvement.

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3.

Weed Management in the Cradle Coast Region

3.1

Preventative Weed Management Aim To prevent new weed infestations.

New weed infestations occur when a new species, not previously reported, is recorded in the region or when existing weeds are spread from infested to un-infested areas within the region. The strategies detailed in this section promote preventative weed management practices. These minimise the likelihood of new weed infestations by managing the movement of viable weed material (e.g. seeds, tubers, cuttings) into and around the region. The modes of weed spread considered by this Strategy are related to human activity: • Transport and utilisation of materials contaminated with weeds (stock, fodder, grain, soil, quarried materials, mulch, primary produce, boats, boat trailers and fishing gear, vehicles, machinery, equipment, boots etc) • Inappropriate disposal and management of weed material, including garden waste and aquatic plants • Retail and trade of weeds and potentially weedy species • Inappropriate weed management practices (e.g. untimely slashing, mowing). Controlling weed dispersal by natural means such as wind, water, birds and animals is more difficult and highlights the importance of managing source populations in order to minimise natural spread. The spread of weeds along natural and artificial corridors – roadside verges, railways, utilities (transmission lines, gas pipelines), waterways, recreational trails and drainage lines is a significant avenue for distributing weeds throughout the region. A key area of concern is the spread of weeds along roadsides, where they may then provide a source of infestation for neighbouring bush and farmland. The adoption of hygiene measures is a key strategy in combating this issue. As the activities of all individuals may contribute to the introduction of new weed species, or the spread of existing weeds, everyone has a role in preventative weed management. Quarantine Tasmania regulates the importation of plant material into the State and activities undertaken by any party to contribute to the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Strategy will continue to comply with policy and regulation as appropriate and where required. • • • • • • • •

Strategies Develop Codes of Practice and guidelines for managing risks of new weed infestations from movement of stock, fodder and grain Develop weed management plans for priority weed corridors Prevent declared plants or WORS being available for sale by plant or aquarium retailers Distribute guidelines for best practice disposal of green waste to all Councils Establish best practice weed dumps in each municipality Ensure all quarries have an operational weed management plan Monitor quarantine hotspots Develop and implement a regional hygiene plan. Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.1

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Targets • By 2015 weed hygiene policies and implementation within the Cradle Coast region have been maintained or improved from 2010 baseline. o Reporting method: Each year the Weeds Advisory Group documents changes to policy and implementation (short report/summary)

3.2

Managing New and Emerging Weed Infestations Aim To control weed incursions at an early stage, before they become problematic.

Preventative weed management may not always be successful, the result being the establishment of new weed species and the spread of existing ones. The reporting and eradication of small, isolated weed incursions is required to prevent the development of new, potentially costly infestations. In addition, threats posed by emerging weeds or sleeper weeds (plant species which under certain environmental/climactic conditions have the potential to become weedy) need to be considered and minimised. The community has an important role to play in the detection of new and emerging weed infestations. The targets and strategies outlined in this section aim to increase the capacity of the Cradle Coast region to manage new and emerging weed incursions. Success depends upon: 1 The early detection and reporting of new, spreading and emerging weeds 2 A rapid response 3 Site monitoring and follow-up. Strategies • Implement effective and efficient systems to detect, report, map and respond to the introduction of new weed species, outbreaks of existing weeds and sleeper weeds • All land managers apply mechanisms for responding to new weed incursions reported on their land. Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.2 Targets • By 2015 information about, and management of, new and emerging weed threats have been maintained or improved from 2010 baseline o Reporting method: Weeds Advisory Group collates report annually on changes to above.

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3.3

Managing Existing Weeds Aim To significantly reduce the impact of existing weeds.

While it is feasible to eradicate some weed species from the Cradle Coast region, a number will require long-term management to substantially reduce their impacts. The control of widespread weeds can consume considerable resources (people, equipment, information and funding) and given that resources for weed control are limited, it is important to prioritise on-ground works to ensure maximum effect. A long-term commitment to the effort is also required. Determinants of weed priorities include: • Weed-related factors: Weeds with, or with potential to have, significant impacts on environmental, economic and social values. These include WONS, declared weeds and WORS. (Note: a weed can be all of these) • Site-related factors: Areas of significant environmental value (e.g. threatened species), economic value (e.g. agriculture and tourist sites), cultural value (e.g. Aboriginal heritage) threatened by weed incursions, along with key sources of weed spread (e.g. road sides and tip sites) • Community-related factors: Weeds/sites considered significant from a community viewpoint • Management feasibility: Consideration of human and financial resource levels. There are many options for managing weeds (e.g. biological, mechanical, cultural and chemical) and these need to be considered when determining how a particular weed at a particular site is to be addressed. Weed mapping and assessment are important tools for monitoring and managing weed spread and the effectiveness of the control methods used. Integrated weed management involves the use of a combination of control methods and is usually required to achieve sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sensitive outcomes. In developing any integrated weed management program, the potentially adverse impacts of control methods need to be considered including: threats to native species and habitats resulting from weed removal; off-target herbicide damage; increased susceptibility to erosion; effects on water quality; and damage to soil structure. Strategies • Implement long-term incentive programs for land managers on best practice and cooperative control of weeds • Identify and update Weeds of Regional Significance • Regularly update a regional weed mapping program • Map, prioritise and set control benchmarks for the distribution and density of declared weeds (including WONS) and WORS in the region. ...continued...

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• In accordance with Tas Together Benchmarks, determine priority sites and eradicate the following target species: Botanical Name Nassella trichotoma Ulex europaeus Chrysanthemoides monilifera Ammophila arenaria Salix species Cortaderia

Common Name Serrated tussock Gorse Boneseed Marram grass Willows Pampas grass

Cytisus scoparius

Broom

Erica lusitanica Delairea odorata

Spanish Heath Cape Ivy

Hypericum perforatum

St John’s Wort

In accordance with Tas Together Benchmarks, eradicate these limited distribution weeds: Botanical Name Berkheya rigida

Common Name African thistle

Rorippa sylvestris

Creeping yellowcress

Asparagus asparagoides Amaranthus albus

Bridal creeper Tumbleweed

Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.3 Targets • By 2015 weed management actions are undertaken as appropriate funds become available • Cradle Coast regional weed mapping data is available, incorporated in appropriate State systems, and updated to determine priorities and monitor progress in regional and all municipal weed strategies o Reporting method – summary of changes in mapping and weed extent are presented annually.

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3.4

Awareness, Education and Training

Aim To establish an enthusiastic, well informed and widespread network of people involved in weed management in the Cradle Coast region. Weeds affect everyone and awareness of the following by those involved in weed management is critical to successful outcomes: • Impacts of weeds on environmental, economic and social values • Preventative weed management practices • Weed identification • Best practice control measures • Importance of weed mapping • Roles and responsibilities • Legislation • How to access supportive resources. School programs to raise awareness are critical to achieving positive, long-term weed management. There are also opportunities to increase participation of the region’s youth by building on initiatives that currently exist, such as the Weedbuster Program. More structured awareness raising activities, such as formal education and training packages need to be both available and relevant to regional needs. Strategies • Showcase through media, signage, documentation and online channels, current weed management projects and promote Cradle Coast weed issues and knowledge • Increase the number of people accessing formal and informal training in weed management • Increase the annual percentage of stakeholders that recognise and address weed management as part of their core business. Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.4 Targets • By 2015, actions to improve key stakeholders and the broader community’s skills, knowledge and engagement in weed control activities are undertaken. o Reporting method – stories of change from a selection of projects are collected annually; monitor training participant numbers; and keep copies of media stories promoting weed management issues.

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3.5

Coordination of Weed Management

Aim To manage regional weed issues in a cooperative, coordinated manner, through working partnerships to ensure cost effective weed management. Weed infestations invariably cross property boundaries, necessitating a cooperative, coordinated approach for effective management. A number of coordinated weed management projects involving partnerships between industry, government and the community have been undertaken in the region (refer to the Case Studies in this Strategy). In addition to increasing effectiveness, working in partnership reduces the overall cost of controlling weeds by facilitating resource sharing. There is a strong willingness by a range of organisations in the Cradle Coast region to work cooperatively to address common weed issues. People are the key to successful weed management and the Cradle Coast region is fortunate to have a network of enthusiastic, motivated people controlling weeds at all levels of community, industry and government. These people are a valuable source of expertise; identifying issues, developing projects and getting the job done. Individuals working to remove weeds on their properties and/or on other land tenures play a vital role in reducing the impact of weeds. Adequate resources are required to support and facilitate people undertaking weed management as well as to encourage the involvement of other land managers. Strategies • Continue the involvement of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Advisory Group in coordination of weed management • Increase the number of community groups undertaking weed management activities and the number of industry sectors participating in advisory groups and municipal committees each year • Review, update and annually distribute information regarding equipment availability, information sources, contact list for weed management personnel and funding options for weed control • Ensure all municipalities have a weed management strategy in place and progress towards implementation. Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.5 Targets •

By 2015 processes to coordinate regional weed management are maintained or improved from 2010 baseline o Reporting method: WAG collates report annually on changes to above

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3.6

Legislation and Regulation Aim To use the Weed Management Act 1999 and other relevant legislation appropriately, consistently and to best effect.

The Weed Management Act 1999 (the Act) promotes a strategic, sustainable approach to weed management with shared responsibility and involvement of all stakeholders and individuals, to minimise the impact of weeds in both agricultural and natural environments. An understanding of everyone’s responsibilities under the current legislation is important to supporting the legislation. Under the Act, a gazetted weed officer (termed a Weed Inspector) has the authority to take regulatory action against land managers who breach the statutory requirements. It is, however, considered preferable for sustaining long-term positive outcomes that gazetted weed officers work with land managers to develop and implement strategies to deal with incursions of declared weeds. This approach requires a network of gazetted weed officers working with the community, local government and industry. When other avenues fail, the use of enforcement is necessary to support the efforts of compliant land managers and for the successful control of weeds across the landscape. Despite this legislative framework, the Act has rarely been enforced since proclamation in 2000. The Cradle Coast community has demonstrated strong support for enforcement of the Act, as appropriate. Strategies • Support a network of Weed Inspectors for all municipalities • Develop and promote a consistent model for enforcement of the Weed Management Act 1999 • Support the process for declaring new weeds, including WORS Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.6 Targets • All parties undertake weed management actions consistent with appropriate legislation o Reporting method: Weeds Advisory Group collates report annually on changes to above.

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3.7

Monitoring and Evaluation

Aim To ensure the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy is relevant, achievable, and reflects the current weed management issues in the region. Monitoring and evaluation are important components of strategic planning. Monitoring the outcome of an action provides information to evaluate the success of that action and to plan future goals and targets. Strategies • Implement a monitoring and evaluation process to measure performance against the outlined actions. Note: Priority actions for these aims and strategies are listed in section 4.7 Targets • The Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy is reviewed and updated every five years.

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4. Weed Management Priority Actions in the Cradle Coast Region 4.1 Priority Actions for Preventative Weed Management Strategic Focus

Actions (in no particular order)

Vehicle, machinery and equipment hygiene

• Encourage the implementation of the Regional Weed Hygiene Plan, identify best practice in washdown and other cleaning facilities (ref DPIPWE Draft Washdown Guidelines or Forest Practice Authority Flora Technical Note 8), map the distribution of publicly available washdown stations, identify gaps in distribution • Support the establishment of new facilities as recommended by the Regional Weed Hygiene Plan • Identify facilities available to general public at waste management sites, encourage Council support for public access as part of general hygiene practice

Transportation and utility corridors Transport of stock, fodder and grain into and around the region

• Encourage and support the implementation of weed corridor management plans

Movement and use of earth and quarried products

• Work with Mineral Resources Tasmania (MRT) and Forestry Tasmania to develop a complete list of active and inactive quarries in the region • Support the implementation of a regional program of quarry inspections and work with other stakeholders such as DPIPWE, Local Government and the forestry industry to ensure that all quarry surveys undertaken contain a weeds section • Help raise the expectation amongst quarry owners that declared weed incursions observed during quarry surveys will be reported to DPIPWE to be documented in the Natural Values Atlas weeds database • Promote the concept of a “clean quarries” register with the ultimate aim of this information being available to potential customers • Help ensure that weed control expectations and weed control information are widely available to quarry owners • Support the implementation of best practice guidelines for the movement of soils contaminated with weed material (ref Weed Management Act 1999) • Promote the use of weed-free material from quarries as part of standard practice with a process to be adopted by end users (customers) • Annually update and distribute a list of potential, new and emerging weeds to key stakeholders, including the nursery industry and other plant retailers • Support the development of a ‘weed free’ accreditation system for the nursery and plant retail industry, including aquarium plant retailers and pet shops • Promote the “Grow Me Instead” publication to other regions for possible adoption as a state wide initiative

Retail of weeds and potential weed species, including aquatic weeds

• Support the development and implementation of voluntary Codes of Practice and guidelines for the transport of stock and fodder • Support the use of fodder and grain vendor declaration systems • Support the certification system to manage the risk of imported feed grain containing declared weeds

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Inappropriate disposal of weedy material

Quarantine hotspots

• Combat illegal dumping of garden waste through the provision of free tipping vouchers, green waste collection days and mechanisms for reporting of illegal dumping sites (ref Circular Head initiative of free disposal of green waste) • Develop and distribute guidelines for best practice disposal of weed material and promote onsite composting, mulching and sterilizing at Council facilities with a view to on-selling (i.e cost recovery) • Undertake an inventory of municipal weed dumps, assess for compliance with best practice and inform or recommend new facilities as appropriate • Identify regional gateways (land, marine and freshwater) and assess the adequacy of preventative measures/ surveillance systems

4.2 Priority Actions for Managing New and Emerging Weed Infestations Strategic Focus

Actions (in no particular order)

Early detection and reporting of new weed species and outbreaks of existing and emerging weed problems

• Support the Weed Alert Network, a program for the reporting of potential weedy plants and isolated outbreaks of target weeds throughout the region, provide a link on the Cradle Coast NRM website • Promote and distribute material from the DPIPWE Weed Section regarding the identification of new, potential and emerging weeds in the region, including a ‘red flag list’ of weeds for the region (i.e. weeds that are present in the State but absent from the region), provide a link on the Cradle Coast NRM website to DPIPWE service sheets • Support the investigation of emerging weed threats to the region, including the effects of climate change, new invertebrate introductions and plant breeding •All land managers to have mechanisms for responding to reported weed incursion on their land and to undertake monitoring and follow-up works as required

Rapid response, monitoring and follow-up

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4.3 Priority Actions for Managing Existing Weeds Strategic Focus Incentives

Weed mapping data

Weed control methods

Weeds of Regional Significance Limited distribution weeds Widespread weeds

Actions (in no particular order) • Continue with the implementation of incentive programs to encourage land managers to control weeds • Source opportunities to promote small grants programs for community groups to manage weeds in their local area • Monitor and document outcomes of incentive programs and review programs as necessary • Review, implement and maintain a Cradle Coast regional weed mapping program, as part of a State-wide program, which identifies and maps priority weeds and sites, and incorporates nationally agreed WONS core attributes as a minimum reporting standard (this process to complement the Natural Values Atlas) • Continue to integrate existing and new mapping information from all sources into this single program and encourage land managers to use this as a tool to assist with strategic planning for weed control. Include other stakeholders and promote and support the use of the same mapping system • Map outbreaks of new weed species and isolated outbreaks of existing and emerging weed problems using the Cradle Coast mapping program, to provide information for the identification of weed incursion hotspots and for modelling patterns of spread • Encourage land managers with established mapping programs to include a weed component • Provide incentives and support to undertake local level weed mapping and enable utilisation of mapping data • Incorporate and liaise with various WONS Officers and DPIPWE to better inform distribution of density of WONS weeds in the Cradle Coast region • Consolidate and, where necessary, develop and distribute best practice guidelines for integrated weed management, additionally provide a link to the DPIPWE website from the Cradle Coast NRM website • Participate in State biological control programs through recommendation of release sites and rearing and distributing agents, currently implemented by TIAR • Determine Weeds of Regional Significance, update as required

• Continue to implement strategic plans for the eradication of current priority limited distribution weeds • Continue partnerships at all levels that include Municipal Weeds Officers, West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group and the Cradle Coast Weeds Advisory Group. Provide project management information and support to deliver specific on-ground actions to control declared weeds and WORS at the local level

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4.4 Priority Actions for Awareness, Education and Training Strategic Focus

Actions (in no particular order)

Awareness

• Promote the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy generally, including the outcomes of implemented actions • Liaise with groups involved and potentially involved in natural resource management to determine their role in raising awareness of weed issues e.g. distributing information to employees, group members etc. • Review, reprint and distribute the Cradle Coast weeds booklet and produce a Cradle Coast weeds related article for inclusion in the Cradle Coast NRM newsletter • Promote weeds as a priority NRM issue through regular newspaper articles, free public education workshops, relevant media and Council rates notice mail outs • Promote regional weeds more prominently on the Cradle Coast NRM website with links to relevant material including stakeholder lists, weed mapping information, disposal of weedy material, best practice control, a weeds reporting system etc. • Promote the successful completion of projects, use signage to publicise on-ground weed management programs underway in the region and encourage involvement in these programs • Conduct a survey to determine the percentage of stakeholders that recognise and address weeds as part of their core business

Training

• Continue to implement the Weedbusters Course; training days and workshops in weed identification; impacts and best practice management including latest advantages in technology and alternatives to herbicide use; the use of appropriate non-invasive/local native plants and mapping techniques; include an aquatic weeds component • Hold at least one weed workshop and/or seminar in each municipality per year • Promote existing avenues for learning about long term weed management (e.g. Polytechnic Tasmania’s Diploma in Weed Management, ChemCert) and investigate the demand for further course development and training through less formal avenues such as Adult Education, community groups and non-government organisations • Review and, where necessary, develop training resources that reflect the priority weed issues in the Cradle Coast region e.g. aquatic weeds information and Weeds of Regional Significance • Encourage integration of weeds information into Essential Learnings curricula for schools, and encourage school involvement in regional and local level weed activities, e.g. the Weedbuster Course and field days

Education

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4.5 Priority Actions for Coordination of Weed Management Strategic Focus

Actions (in no particular order)

Cooperative regional weed management

• Continue to utilise the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Advisory Group, with representatives from government, industry and the community to provide advice on all matters pertaining to regional weed management issues • Continue to support the Cradle Coast NRM Weeds Officer to oversee the implementation of the strategy, facilitate the development of ongoing partnerships, develop regional projects, support funding applications and liaise with the Northern and Southern Regional Weed Management Committees and the Tasmanian Weed Management Committee to ensure an integrated approach

Municipal weed management

• Support the implementation of municipal weed management strategies • Develop a management reminder system, based on known infestations, to inform land managers undertaking project works funded by Cradle Coast NRM, when and how to treat particular infestations. This enables land managers to undertake management at the appropriate time and on a regular basis • Encourage local governments to appoint a municipal weed officer, at least 0.5 FTE • Municipal weed officers to continue to actively encourage and support community weed management groups

Community weed management Communication

Equipment On-going/ follow-up funding

• Continue to facilitate quarterly meetings of weed officers from government, industry and the community to encourage information sharing, cooperative decision making and coordinate actions • Facilitate communication within industry sectors to promote networking, the development of strategic, cooperative weed management actions and setting of industry targets • Promote information sharing, cross-sector networking, and promote advances in weed control technology including the introduction of biological control agents as required • Promote industry good neighbour charters and guidelines for managing weeds from neighbouring properties • Update annually and distribute the Cradle Coast region weed contact list of people responsible for weed management in local government, industry and community. Include available equipment in this list. • Provide a link on the Cradle Coast NRM website to make available weed management information sources, including other websites and brochures for distribution through relevant outlets, e.g. retailers of herbicides • Conduct an inventory of equipment available for use at the regional and municipal levels and source funding to fill identified gaps • Research and promote available funding options for weed control and provide assistance with the development of NRM projects that will attract funding for weeds

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Case Study: West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group – a structure for municipal weed management The West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group was established to oversee a longterm program to address wide spread weed infestations and undertake fire prevention measures in the West Coast municipality. The group is comprised of representatives from Forestry Tasmania, West Coast Council, Parks and Wildlife Service, the Department of Infrastructure Energy and Resources, Hydro Tasmania, Transend, DPIPWE, Aurora, West Coast mining companies and community groups. All stakeholders recognise their legal responsibility to address weeds and the benefits of approaching this task in a cooperative manner. Working in partnership ensures resources are used with maximum efficiency and that weeds on both sides of property boundaries are treated concurrently, thereby minimising potential sources of reinfestation. The group meets every two months to discuss ideas, develop projects and coordinate onground works. It is guided by the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Strategy, which identifies priority weeds in the municipality and strategic management actions. A municipal weeds officer is responsible to the group and whose duties include strategic on-ground weed control, coordination of weed control projects, community support and school education. The weeds officer is hosted by the West Coast Council, which also provides ongoing administration support to the group. The West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group has made significant progress with controlling weeds in recent years and its structure provides a model for the effective management of weeds at the municipal level.

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4.6 Priority Actions for Legislation and Regulation Strategic Focus

Actions (in no particular order)

• Encourage Municipal Weed Officers to be appointed as Inspectors under the Weed Management Act 1999 • Develop and promote the role of Weed Inspectors and a consistent approach to the use of enforcement through regular networking • Weed Inspectors to undergo training in weed identification and control methods through a Weedbusters Course with support from DPIPWE Compliance • Provide information and guidance on how industry, local government, and community groups and individuals can comply with the provisions under responsibility the Weed Management Act 1999 (note that the Weedbusters Course will support this). • Raise awareness of the provisions under the Weed Management Act 1999, the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 and the Seeds Act 1985, highlighting compliance responsibilities under these Acts • Provide input and support to DPIPWE during the review of municipal zones in Statutory Weed Management Plans Declaration of • Promote and encourage the use of the mechanism for declaring weeds new weeds and nominate Weeds of Regional Significance where appropriate. Network of Weed Inspectors

4.7 Priority Actions for Monitoring and Evaluation Strategic Focus Strategy review

Actions (in no particular order) Review the Strategy in 2015 after conducting annual updates of contributions to actions (assists project reporting time lines as part of funding criteria)

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

20


Appendix 1: Declared Weeds by Municipality (Declared list current as at December 2010) N = none known P = previously known I = isolated occurrences L = localised infestations W = widespread infestations E = eradicate C = contain BURNIE

CENTRAL COAST

CIRCULAR HEAD

DEVONPORT

KENTISH

KING ISLAND

LATROBE

WARATAH WYNYARD

WEST COAST

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

Botanical name

Common name

Achnatherum caudatum

espartillo

Alternanthera philoxeroides

alligator weed

Allium vineale

crow garlic

Anthemis cotula

stinking mayweed

Asparagus asparagoides

bridal creeper

Asphodelus fistulosus

onion weed

Bassia scoparia

kochia

Berkheya rigida

African thistle

Bifora testiculata

bifora

Cabomba caroliniana

cabomba

Cardaria draba

white weed

Carduus nutans

nodding thistle

I/E

I/E

Carduus pycnocephalus

slender thistle

W/C

W/C

W/C

L/C

W/C

I/E

W/C

W/C

?

Cardus tenuiflorus

slender thistle

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

Carex buchananii

leather leaf sedge

Carex comans

New Zealand sedge

Carex flagellifera

New Zealand sedge

Carex testaceae

New Zealand sedge

Carthamus lanatus

saffron thistle

L/E

L/E

Cenchrus incertus

spiny burr-grass

Cenchrus longispinus

spiny burr-grass

I/E

I/E

L/E

L/E

P

P

I/E I/E

L/E

I/E P I/E

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

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BURNIE

CENTRAL COAST

CIRCULAR HEAD

boneseed

L/C

W/C

L/E

I/E

pampas grasses

L/E

L/E

I/E

L/E

Botanical name

Common name

Ceratophyllum demersum

hornwort

Chondrilla juncea

skeleton weed

Chrysanthemoides monilifera Cortaderia spp. Cuscuta spp.

dodder

DEVONPORT

KENTISH

KING ISLAND

LATROBE

WARATAH WYNYARD

I/E

W/C

L/E

WEST COAST

I/E

I/E

I/E

L/E

L/E

I/E

L/E

W/C

W/C

W/C

I/E

I/E

I/E

I/E

P

(excluding Cuscuta tasmanica) Cynara cardunculus

artichoke thistle

Cytisus scoparius

English broom

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

Datura spp.

daturas

I/E

I/E

I/E

I/E

Echium plantagineum

Paterson's curse

I/E

I/E

I/E

I/E

I/E

Echium vulgare

viper's bugloss

I/E

I/E

I/E

I/E

L/E

Egeria densa

Egeria

L/C

L/C

Eichhornia crassipes

water hyacinth

Elodea Canadensis

Canadian pond weed

Emex australis

spiny emex

Equisetum spp.

horsetails

Eragrostis curvula

African lovegrass

Erica lusitanica

Spanish heath

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/E

L/C

L/C

L/C

Foeniculum vulgare

fennel

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

I/E

W/C

W/C

W/C

Galium spurium

false cleavers

Galium tricornutum

three-horn bedstraw

Genista monspessulana

Montpellier broom

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

I/E

W/C

W/C

W/C

Gymnocoronis spilanthoides

Senegal tea plant

Heliotropium europaeum

common heliotrope

Hieracium spp.

hawkweeds

Homeria spp.

Cape tulips

L/E

L/E

L/E

L/E

Hydrilla verticillata

hydrilla

Hypericum perforatum

St John's wort

I/E

L/E

Lagarosiphon major

lagarosiphon

I/E I/E

I/E

L/E

L/E

I/E

L/E

L/E L/E

I/E

Lantana camara

lantana

Lycium ferocissimum

African boxthorn

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

I/E

W/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

Marrubium vulgare

horehound

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

L/C

I/E

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

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Botanical name

Common name

BURNIE

Myriophyllum aquaticum

parrot's feather

P

Nassella neesiana

Chilean needle grass

Nassella trichotoma

serrated tussock

Onopordum spp.

onopordum thistles

Orobanche spp.

broomrape

CENTRAL COAST

CIRCULAR HEAD

DEVONPORT

KENTISH

KING ISLAND

I/E

LATROBE

WARATAH WYNYARD

P

I/E

WEST COAST

L/E

except O minor and O cernua var. australiana Pennisetum macrourum

African feathergrass

Pennisetum villosum

feathertop

Rorippa sylvestris

creeping yellow cress

Rubus fruticosus

blackberry

Sagittaria graminea

sagittaria

Sagittaria montevidensis

arrowhead

Salix spp. except

crack willow

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

L/E

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

I/E

W/C

W/C

L/C

other willow species

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

Salpichroa origanifolia

pampas-lily-of-thevalley

P

Salvinia molesta

salvinia

Senecio jacobaea

Ragwort

W/C

W/C

L/E

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/C

W/E

L/C

Solanum elaeagnifolium

silverleaf nightshade white-edged nightshade

I/E

I/E

L/C

L/C

S. babylonica, S.X calodendron and S.X reichardtii

Solanum marginatum Solanum sodomaeum Striga spp. (all non-indigenous species)

apple-of-Sodom

Tamarix aphylla

athel pine

Trapa spp.

water caltrop

Tribulis terrestris

caltrop

Ulex europaeus

gorse

Xanthium spp.

burrs

I/E

witchweed

L/C

W/C

L/C

I/E

W/C

L/E

W/C

P

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

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Appendix 2: Regional Weed Management Roles and Responsibilities Organisation Level Individual Individual property and water managers

Community

Local community and community groups

Roles and Responsibilities • • • • •

Manage weeds on their own land in cooperation with other land managers and authorities Support sustainable production practices to minimise the development of weed problems Integrate best practice weed management with other land management activities Detect and report new weed occurrences Undertake property-scale weed management activities

• • •

Participate in local and regional weed management activities Raise awareness on weed management issues Encourage involvement in the management of weeds on public and private land

• • • • • •

Provide municipal weed officers Develop and participate in the implementation of a municipal weed strategies Manage weeds on their own land Assist the co-ordination of community weed management activities Support local weed management groups Assist information exchange

• • • • • •

Co-ordinate the implementation and management of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy Establish and participate in the Regional Weed Management Advisory Group Co-ordinate funding applications for regional weed projects, including NRM Promote co-ordination, partnerships and information exchange Develop and implement action plans for Weeds of Regional Significance Implement the regional actions within WeedPlan

• •

Produce and implement WeedPlan Encourage and support the development and implementation of effective weed management strategies at local, regional, state and national levels Assist in information exchange on weed management, particularly between national and regional bodies Provide leadership, co-ordination and resources for research, monitoring and evaluation, education and public awareness programs about weeds Develop and implement effective legislation, policies and programs (e.g. declared weeds, quarantine) Manage weed problems on their own land in co-operation with other land managers Provide positive support through financial incentives and assistance schemes Participate in partnerships and the development and implementation of NRM programs

Local industry

Municipal Local Government Industry Community groups and sub-regional NRM groups

Regional Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Advisory Group Cradle Coast NRM Regionally managed industries

State Tasmanian Government incl. DPIPWE Weed Section Tasmanian Weed Management Committee Government Business Enterprises State industry, community & representative groups, NRM Non-government organisations

National Australian Government

• • • • • • • • • • •

National co-ordination and leadership Provide research funding in partnership with industry and other stakeholders In co-operation with the State Government, facilitate the development of an economic, social, and cultural framework that encourages weed management as an integral part of sustainable land management Provide positive financial, structural and educational support through programs including Caring for our Country (e.g. WONS, NRM funding) and the National Landcare Program In co-operation with the State Government, provide the appropriate legislative framework necessary to reduce the introduction of new weeds into Australia

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy

24


Cradle Coast NRM PO Box 338, Burnie 7320 www.cradlecoastnrm.com

Profile for Cradle Coast Tasmania

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy  

This Weed Strategy is the principal framework for weed management in the Cradle Coast region. To ensure that it reflects key regional weed m...

Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy  

This Weed Strategy is the principal framework for weed management in the Cradle Coast region. To ensure that it reflects key regional weed m...