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BURNIE LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. BURNIE MUNICIPALITY MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

BURNIE

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

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Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

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*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo T. Tame

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Acacia sophorae—Coastal Wattle

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Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Bursaria spinosa Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Prickly Box Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus nitida Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Cider Gum Smithton Peppermint Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

BURNIE MUNICIPALITY

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TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


CENTRAL COAST LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. CENTRAL COAST MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

CENTRAL COAST

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

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*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo D. Harding

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Callistemon pallidus - Lemon Bottlebrush


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia stricta Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Beyeria viscosa Bursaria spinosa Callistemon pallidus Callistemon viridiflorus Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Hop Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Pinkwood Prickly Box Lemon Bottlebrush Green Bottlebrush Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia verniciflua Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Varnished Wattle Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Cider Gum Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

CENTRAL COAST MUNICIPALITY

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o o


TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


CIRCULAR HEAD LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. CIRCULAR HEAD MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

CIRCULAR HEAD

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

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*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo Mark Wisniewski

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Eucalyptus nitida - Smithton Peppermint

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Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Bursaria spinosa Calytrix tetragona Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum glaucescens Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Prickly Box Fringe Myrtle Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Grey Tea Tree Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia verniciflua Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus delegatensis Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus nitida Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Varnished Wattle Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Alpine Ash Cider Gum Smithton Peppermint Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

CIRCULAR HEAD MUNICIPALITY

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TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


DEVONPORT LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has developed a local planting guide for each of the nine council areas represented Cradle Coast NRM within has collated the Cradle information Coast region. to create Thealistlocal represents planting plants guide which for each are more of thecommon nine municipalities to the region in the as Cradle a whole, Coast but also region. recognises that some plants are local (endemic) to selected municipalities duethroughout to their geographic distribution. The guide lists plants which are common the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. Each plant species is placed into categories of vegetation community, soil type, To assist with selection of that arewhich suitable to your identifies purpose and the propagation to plants easily identify plants are needs, suitablethe forguide your needs. the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. The plant species in the list are easy to propagate from seed or are available to All listed plants are easy to propagate purchase from native plant nurseries. from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. DEVONPORT MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

DEVONPORT

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Euryomyrtus ramosissima Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Creeping Heath Myrtle Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

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Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

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*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo Greg Jordan

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Acacia stricta - Hop Wattle

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Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia stricta Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Beyeria viscosa Bursaria spinosa Callistemon pallidus Callistemon viridiflorus Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Hop Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Pinkwood Prickly Box Lemon Bottlebrush Green Bottlebrush Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Cider Gum Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

DEVONPORT MUNICIPALITY

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TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


KENTISH LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. KENTISH MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

KENTISH

Propagation

Ground Covers Chrysocephalum apiculatum Euryomyrtus ramosissima Hibbertia procumbens

Common Everlasting Creeping Heath Myrtle Spreading Guineaflower

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Ficinea nodosa Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei

Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Cutting Grass Button Grass Knobby Club Sedge Pale Rush Broom Rush Sagg Tussock Grass

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo Greg Jordan

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Leptospermum glaucescens - Grey Tea Tree


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia verticillata Acacia stricta Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Beyeria viscosa Bursaria spinosa Callistemon pallidus Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum glaucescens Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum rupestre Leptospermum scoparium Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Prickly Moses Hop Wattle Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Pinkwood Prickly Box Lemon Bottlebrush Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Grey Tea Tree Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Mountain Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia verniciflua Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus delegatensis Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Varnished Wattle Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Alpine Ash Cider Gum Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

KENTISH MUNICIPALITY

o o o o o

o o


TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


KING ISLAND LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. KING ISLAND MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

KING ISLAND

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Bower Spinach

o

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Pale Rush Sea Rush Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

o

o o

o o o

o

o o o o

o

o o

o o

o

o

o

o

o o

o

o o

o o

o o

o o

o

Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Juncus pallidus Juncus kraussii Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

o

o o o

o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o

o o

o o o o

o o o

o

o

o

o o

o

o

o o

o o o o o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o

o o o

o o

o o o o o o

o o o o

o o o o o

o

o

o o o

o o

o

o

o o o

o o o o o

o o o o o o

o o o o o o

o

o

o o o o o

o o

o

o o o o o

Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard

o o

o o

o

o o

o

o o

o

o o

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo Greg Jordan

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Acacia verniciflua - Varnished Wattle

o o

o


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

KING ISLAND MUNICIPALITY

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bursaria spinosa Calytrix tetragona Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Dodonaea viscosa Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata

Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Prickly Box Fringe Myrtle Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Hop Bush Wolly Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper

o o o o o

o o o o

o o o o o

o o

o o o

o o

o o o

o o o

o o o

o o o o o o o o o o

o o

o o o

o o

o

o o o o o

o

o

o o

o o o

o o o

o

o

o

o

o

o o o

o o o o o

o

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o

o

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o

o o o o o

o

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

o

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o

o

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o

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o

o

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o

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o

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o o o o

o

o

o o o o o o o o o o o o o

o

o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o

o o

o

o o o o o o o

o o

o

o o o o

Trees Acacia melanoxylon Acacia mucronata Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus globulus Eucalytpus viminalis Nematolepis squamea Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Blackwood Willow Wattle Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak King Island Blue Gum White Gum Satinwood Cheesewood Dogwood

o o

o

o

o o

o

o

o o o o o

o o

o

o

o

o o o o

o o o o o

o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o o

o

o

o o

o o o

o o o o o

o

o o

o

o o o o

o o o o o o

o o o o o o o

o o o

o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o o

o o o

o o

o

o

o

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Local plants offer many maintenance, environmental and productivity advantages


TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


LATROBE LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. LATROBE MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common Name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

LATROBE

Suitable for use

Propagation

o

o

o

o o o o

o o o

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Euryomyrtus ramosissima Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Creeping Heath Myrtle Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

o o o o o

o o o

o o

o o o o

o

o o o o o

o o

o o o o o

o

o

o

o

o o

o o

o o o

o o

Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

o o

o o o

o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o o

o o

o

o o

o

o o o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o o

o o o o

o o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o

o o o

o o

o o

o

o

o o

o

o

o o

o

o o

o o

o

o

o o o

o o o o

o

o

o

o o o

o o o o

o o o o

o

o o o o o o

o

o o o o

o o o

o o

o

o o

o o o o o o o o o

o o

o o

Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

o o

o o o

o o

o o o

o

o o o

o

o o o

o

o o o

o o

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo Greg Jordan

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Calytrix tetragona - Fringe Myrtle


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Suitable for use

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Beyeria viscosa Bursaria spinosa Calytrix tetragona Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Pinkwood Prickly Box Fringe Myrtle Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

o o o o o o

o o o o o

o

o o

o o o

o o

o o o

o

o o o

o o o o

o

o o o

o o

o o o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o

o o o

o o o

o

o

o o o

o

o

o

o

o

o o

o

o o

o

o

o o

o o

o o

o

o o o o o o o

o

o

o

o o o o o o

o o o

o o

o

o o o o o o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o o o o

o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o o

o o

o

o o o

o

o o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o o o o o o o

o o

o o

o

o o

o

o o o o

o o

o o o o o o o o o

o

o

o o

o

o o

o o o o o o o o

o

o

o

o o o o o o o o

o

o o o o

o o

o o o o

o

o o o o

o

o

o

o o o

o o o

o o o o o o o o o

o o o o o o

o

o o o o o o o o o o

o o o o o o

o

o o

o

o o o o

o

o o

Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nothofagus cunninghamii Nematolepis squamea Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Cider Gum Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Myrtle Beech Satinwood Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

o o o o o

o

o o

o

o

o

o o

o o o o o

o o o o o o o o o

o o

o

o o o

o o

o

o

o o o o o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o o o

o o o o

o o o

o o o o o o o o o

o o o

o o

o

o o o o o

o o

o

o o

o

o

o o

o

o o o o o o o o o o o

o o o o o

o o o

o o o

o

o o

o o o

o o o

o o o o o o o o

o o o

o

o

o o

o o

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common Name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

LATROBE MUNICIPALITY

o o o o o

o o


TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


WARATAH-WYNYARD LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. WARATAH-WYNYARD MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

WARATAH-WYNYARD

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

o o o o

o o

o o o

o

o o o o o

o o

o o o o

o

o

o

o

o o o

o

o o

o o

o o

o

o o

o o

o

Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

o

Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

o

o

o o o

o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o o

o o o

o

o o

o o

o

o o

o

o o o o o

o

o

o o

o o

o o

o o o o

o o

o

o

o

o

o o o o o

o o o

o o

o o

o

o

o o

o

o

o o

o

o o

o o

o

o

o o o

o o o o

o

o

o

o o o

o o o o

o o o o

o

o o o o o o

o

o o o o

o o o

o o

o

o o

o o o o o o o o o

o o

o o

Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

o

o o o

o o

o o o

o

o o o

o

o o o

o

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo D. Harding

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant Species Lists.

Banksia serrata - Saw Toothed Banksia

o o o

o o


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia stricta Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Bursaria spinosa Callistemon viridiflorus Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Hop Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Prickly Box Green Bottlebrush Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia mucronata Acacia verniciflua Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Banksia serrata Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus delegatensis Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus nitida Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Willow Wattle Varnished Wattle Drooping Sheoak Sassafras Saw Toothed Banksia Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Alpine Ash Cider Gum Smithton Peppermint Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

WARATAH-WYNYARD MUNICIPALITY

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TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.


WEST COAST LOCAL PLANTING GUIDE

January 2013

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region. The guide lists plants which are common throughout the region and identifies local (endemic) plants found in select areas. To assist with the selection of plants that are suitable to your needs, the guide identifies the vegetation community, soil type, purpose and propagation of each plant species. All listed plants are easy to propagate from seed or are available to purchase from native plant nurseries.

BENEFITS OF LOCAL SPECIES PLANTING Local or indigenous plants are the original native plants occurring naturally in a specific area, and there are many benefits in using them to revegetate the local landscape. Indigenous plants have adapted over thousands of years to the conditions of a geographic area, thus are ideally suited to the particular climate and soil conditions of a site. Local fauna species have also adapted to specific vegetation, and are often reliant on local plants for their survival. Planting a mix of indigenous overstorey, understorey and groundcover species creates a more biologically diverse environment. Indigenous plants provide many environmental benefits as well as fulfill farm purposes such as the provision of shelter, wind breaks, soil erosion control, provide timber for fence posts and firewood.

The benefits of local plant species: relatively lower inputs to establish and maintain; tolerant of local environmental conditions; maintenance of the ecology and biodiversity of an area; provide a balanced and suitable habitat for native fauna ; contribute to the productivity of farm enterprises; maintain the unique character of the landscape; and prevent and reverse degradation of land. WEST COAST MUNICIPALITY


Page 2

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

WEST COAST

Propagation

Ground Covers Carpobrotus rossii Chrysocephalum apiculatum Hibbertia procumbens Kennedia prostrata Tetragonia implexicoma

Pigface Common Everlasting Spreading Guineaflower Running Postman Bower Spinach

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Grasses, Lillies, Sedges Austrostipa stipoides Baloskion tetraphyllus Carex appressa Carex fascicularis Dianella tasmanica Diplarrena latifolia Ficinea nodosa Gahnia grandis Gymnoschoenus sphaerocephalus Juncus pallidus Juncus sarophorus Juncus kraussii Lomandra longifolia Poa labillardierei Poa poiformis

Coastal Spear Grass Tassel Rush Tall Sedge Tassel Sedge Tasman Flax Lily Butterfly Flag Iris Knobby Club Sedge Cutting Grass Button Grass Pale Rush Broom Rush Sea Rush Sagg Tussock Grass Coastal Tussock Grass

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Climbing Blue Berry Old Mans Beard Forest Lignum

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Climbers Billardiera longiflora Clematis aristata Muehlenbeckia gunnii

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*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

Planting a mixture of local species creates a more biological diverse environment

Photo P. Murray

The format and some of the species information in this planting guide is based on the Understorey Network Plant

Athrotaxis selaginoides - King Billy Pine


Page 3

Vegetation community

Soil type

Purpose

Propagation

Shrubs Acacia myrtifolia Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia verticillata Aotus ericoides Banksia marginata Bauera rubioides Bedfordia salicina Bursaria spinosa Callistemon viridiflorus Casuarina monilifera Coprosma quadrifida Correa alba Correa backhousiana Correa lawrenciana Dodonaea viscosa Gaultheria hispida Grevillea australis Leptospermum glaucescens Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum nitidum Leptospermum rupestre Leptospermum scoparium Leucophyta brownii Leucopogon parviflorus Lomatia tinctoria Melaleuca ericifolia Melaleuca squamea Melaleuca squarrosa Myoporum insulare Olearia argophylla Olearia lirata Oxylobium ellipticum Pultenaea daphnoides Rhagodia candolleana Tasmannia lanceolata Telopea truncata

Myrtle Wattle Coastal Wattle Sweet Scented Wattle Prickly Moses Golden Pea Silver Banksia Dog Rose Tasmanian Blanketleaf Prickly Box Green Bottlebrush Necklace Sheoak Native Currant White Correa Velvet Correa Mountain Correa Hop Bush Snowberry Alpine Grevillea Grey Tea Tree Wolly Tea Tree Shiny Tea Tree Mountain Tea Tree Common Tea Tree Coastal Cushion Bush Currant Bush Guitar Plant Swamp Paperbark Swamp Honey Myrtle Scented Paperbark Coastal Boobialla Native pear Snowy Daisy Bush Golden Rosemary Native Daphne Coastal Saltbush Mountain Pepper Tasmanian Waratah

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Trees Acacia dealbata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia mucronata Acacia verniciflua Allocasuarina verticillata Atherosperma moschatum Athrotaxis selaginoides Casuarina littoralis Eucalyptus amygdalina Eucalyptus delegatensis Eucalyptus gunnii Eucalyptus nitida Eucalyptus obliqua Eucalytpus ovata Eucalyptus regnans Eucalytpus viminalis Eucryphia lucida Hakea lissosperma Nematolepis squamea Nothofagus cunninghamii Pittosporum bicolor Pomaderris apetala

Silver Wattle Blackwood Willow Wattle Varnished Wattle Drooping Sheoak Sassafras King Billy Pine Black Sheoak Black Peppermint Alpine Ash Cider Gum Smithton Peppermint Stringybark Swamp Gum Mountain Ash White Gum Leatherwood Mountain Hakea Satinwood Myrtle Beech Cheesewood Dogwood

*Note that plant species in bold are endemic to this municipality

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From division of plant

From cuttings

From seed

Water Wise

Bush tucker

Shelter belts

Erosion control

Low flammablity

Fertile soil

Poor soil

Clay soil

Loamy soil

Sandy soil

Poorly drained soil

Well drained soil

Montane Vegetation

Riparian

Sedgeland and Wetland

Heath

Grassy Vegetation

Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland

Wet Eucalypt Forest

Common name

Rainforest

Scientific name

Coastal

WEST COAST MUNICIPALITY

o o o o o

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TESTING FOR SOIL TYPE A simple soil texture test can be carried out using the ribbon technique to identify the soil type before planting. This texture test is a simple soil classification comprised of sandy, loam and clay categories. Repeat 2-3 times for consistent results. 1.

Dig a hole about 15cm deep and take a small handful of soil.

2.

Add enough water to make a ball. If you can’t make a ball, the soil is very sandy.

3.

Feel the ball with your fingers to find out if it is gritty (sand), silky (silt) or plastic/sticky (clay).

4.

Reroll the ball and with your thumb gently press it out over your forefinger to make a hanging ribbon. Sandy soils form a ribbon length up to 25mm.

5.

If you can make a short ribbon your soil texture is loamy, a mixture of sand and clay. Loamy soils form a ribbon length between 25mm to 50mm.

6.

The longer the ribbon, the more clay is in your soil. Clay soils form a ribbon longer than 50mm.Â

References Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group 2005, Grow local: a guide to local native plants suitable for gardens in the Cradle Coast region, Australian Plants Society Tasmania North West Group. Giddings J., 2004, Waterwise on the farm: Soil texture, NSW Department of Primary Industries. Johnson H., 2001, Landcare Notes: The benefits of using indigenous plants, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. King island Natural Resource Management Group 2002, King Island Flora: A Field Guide, King Island Natural Resource Management Group. Mcleod J., Gray S., 2005, Living with plants: a guide to revegetation plants for North West Tasmania, Oldina. Nouhuys M.V., 2003, Landcare Notes: Values of native vegetation, biodiversity and ecosystem services, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Understorey Network, Plant Species Lists, http://www.understorey-network.org.au.

PO Box 338 1-3 Spring Street Burnie Tasmania 7320 Phone: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 E-mail: nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com.

Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

Cradle Coast planting guide  

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region....

Cradle Coast planting guide  

Cradle Coast NRM has collated information to create a local planting guide for each of the nine municipalities in the Cradle Coast region....