__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FACES OF MEMPHIS | HEROES OF THE PANDEMIC | FISH TALES | URBAN ART

Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

MAGAZINE

VOL XLV NO 11 | M A R C H 2 0 2 1

T H E

MIND’S EYE

ANDREA

PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREA MORALES

O F

USA $4.99

MORALES

0 3

—2 1

DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 10, 2021

C01_MM03_2021_Cover_Andrea_v04.indd 1

2/19/21 10:05 AM


M Y L A G O S M Y W AY

C AV I A R C O L L E C T I O N S

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:47 PM


Times may change our dedication to you does not. Behind the masks, the gloves and the gowns, you’ll find the same commitment to your health. And the same dedication to your safety. So you can step through our doors with confidence. The world may have changed. But at Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, our world still revolves around you.

To learn more about our services, visit methodisthealth.org.

Brian Hawkins, MD

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1 20-MLB-108_AD_9-25x11-125_MemphMag_Hawkins.indd 1

2/18/21 AMAM 2/17/216:01 9:13


A GETAWAY YOU DESERVE

The ultimate getaway awaits you, delivering the utmost in service, non-stop gaming and action.

goldstrike.com ©2020 MGM Resorts International.® All rights reserved. Gambling problem? Call 1.888.777.9696.

GS Memphis Magazine Ad.indd 1 MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

1/19/21 1:13 PM 2/22/21 8:47 AM


Gossett Porsche

1875 Covington Pike Memphis, TN 38128 (901) 388-8989 Gossett.porschedealer.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 12:47 PM


CARING FOR THOSE WHO CARED FOR US

With more than 50 years of working with Midsouth seniors, Homecare by Wesley is positioned to change the way we age. We provide older adults with quality care that enables them to live happier, healthier lives at home. Our services are distinguished by the caliber of our caregivers, the responsiveness of our staff and our expertise in non-medical support services delivered in the home, hospital or other senior living setting. We embrace a positive, wellbalanced approach to aging care that recognizes the evolving needs of older adults with respect and dignity as they age in place.

homeca reb ywesl ey.o rg | Phone: 901. 380. 4880

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:48 PM


ON RTEN

CY TON

SUE RUBY

MELONIE SAIN

CARRIE

ANDERSON SHARON ELIZABETH TURNER WEBSTER

JON DICKENS

PAULA SANSOM

Relocation CATHLEEN BLACK

MYRA SHEDDAN

MARTHA SHIPP

OWNER JIM

OWNER JEFF

BLACK JIM

EILEEN CHERNY

BLACK

KELLY ERB

ROBIN FAUSER

Real Estate and Investment Company

BLAKENEY DAVID OKEON

ALTA SIMPSON

OWNERMELANIE

BLAKENEY JIMMY REED

Need help getting wired into Memphis? Job for your Spouse? The right schools? Special needs? The Relocation experts GOLDA of Marx & Bensdorf can help. WeRIP wrote FRANKLAND HANEY the book on Relocation to Memphis. Call for your free newcomers packet.

ASHLEY BONDS

MELODY BOURELL

KATIE NICHOLS COOK

LITA HURSTON-REED

LAURENCE KENNER

MARIA KRAHN

GLOBAL RELOCATION DIRECTOR

Call Eileen Cherny, Director of Relocation Services at 800-866-0092 or 901-682-1868

● ● ● Established 1868

ng call (901) 682-1868 and visit: MandBrealtors.com ELIZABETH KUHLO

JAKE LAWHEAD

TRACY LOMBARDO

JERRY LUCIUS

MINDY OKEON MATTINGLY

THOMAS MURPHREE

BARBY PERLBERG

SHELDON ROSENGARTEN

ANGIE STREET

Professional, high volume REALTORS® Knowledgeable throughout all our market areas DIANE BENSON MALKIN

HUGH MALLORY

Supported by quality marketing and web consultants Serving clients world wide through our global network

Find YOUR NEW home at www.Marx-Bensdorf.com JORDAN NICHOLS

MIKE PARKER

MARCY MATHIS SEIDEL

STEPHANIE SHEAHAN

MYRA SHEDDAN

THOMAS SHEDDAN

ALTA SIMPSON

JIM SIMPSON

MELONIE SAIN SIMPSON

JENNY VERGOS

WARD WALTHAL

JOHN WEST

LAUREN WIUFF

JIMMY REED

DAVID TESTER

OWNER

OWNER

5860 Ridgeway Center Parkway, Suite 100 Memphis, Tennessee 38120 • 901-682-1868

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/17/21 9:56 AM


Great Rates Right in Your Backyard

Low Rates, Local Mortgage What puts the “local” in Local Mortgage? Our commitment to a transparent lending process with a personalized feel. We leverage our 50+ years of combined industry experience to hold rates low, while staying committed to individualized customer service. Choose a local team that cares about you and the community, because we’ll be here every step of the way to listen to concerns, address questions, and focus on what you need most.

Contact us for help purchasing or refinancing your home LOCAL MORTGAGE, INC. 8295 Tournament Drive Suite 150, Memphis, TN 38125 • 901-504-4663 LOCALMORTGAGE.COM

NMLS# 1855068 • nmlsconsumeraccess.org

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/17/21 9:57 AM


VOL XLV NO 11 | MARCH 2021 ON THE COVER A mother holds the hands of her two daughters while at a labor strike action organized by Fight For $15 outside the McDonald’s on Union Avenue in Midtown in July 2020. PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREA MORALES

78

40

UP FRONT 10 I N T H E B E G I N N I N G ~ b y a n n a t r a v e r s e f o g l e 12 C I T Y S C E N E ~ p h o t o g r a p h s b y a n n a t r a v e r s e f o g l e 14 P A G E S ~ b y j e s s e d a v i s 16 T I D B I T S ~ b y s a m u e l x . c i c c i 18 C L A S S I C D I N I N G ~ b y m i c h a e l d o n a h u e SPECIAL SECTION 20-39 | 55-77 | 92-115

2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

FEATURES 40 T H E M I N D ’ S

EYE

Andrea Morales

Documenting Memphis moments, from protests to parades. ~ by a n n a t r av e r s e f o g l e

50

ARTS

Cultural Vibrancy

The UrbanArt Commission aims to stir the artistic spirit of Memphis. ~ by j o n w. s pa r ks

50

78 Heroes of the Pandemic

Six Memphians who have made a difference. ~ b y c h r i s m c c oy

86

ROAD TRIP

Fish Tales

Embracing the Natural State may be the cure for the winter blues. ~ by j e s s e dav i s

116 A S K

VANCE

Goodwin Sign Company

Our history expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $18 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, 2nd Floor, Memphis, TN 38103 © 2021. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

~ by va n c e l au d e r da l e

118 C I T Y

BEAT

116

A Landmark in Limbo

The rise and fall of the 100 North Main Building. ~ by va n c e l au d e r da l e

120 C I T Y

DINING

128 L A S T

STAND

The city’s most extensive dining listings. The Golden Hour

All the pleasures (and these days, the safety) of the drive-in theater. ~ by a l e x g r e e n e

118 MARCH 202 1 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

007_MM03_2021_TOC_v05.indd 7

2/19/21 2:24 PM


Memphis THE CI T Y M AGAZI N E

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

CEO AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF anna traverse fogle EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh

Myra Green and Lynn Green Root Memorial Exhibition Series

SENIOR EDITORS shara clark, jon w. sparks ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci CONTRIBUTORS jesse davis, michael donahue,

alex greene, chris mccoy, vance lauderdale EDITORIAL ASSISTANT matthew j. harris CALENDAR EDITOR julie ray EDITORIAL INTERN abigail morici

4 EDITOR jon w. sparks ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNER bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHERS samuel x. cicci, casey crocker,

jesse davis, brandon dill, michael donahue, anna traverse fogle, chris mccoy, andrea morales, jon w. sparks, brad vest

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES kelli dewitt, chip googe,

deshaune mcghee, michelle musolf

The presentation of this exhibition in Jackson, Mississippi is sponsored by:

4

published by contemporary media, inc. memphis, tennessee Dusti Bongé (American, 1903-1993), The Balcony Balcony, 1943. oil on canvas, 20 x 16. Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson. 1999.015

ON VIEW THROUGH MAY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

23

380 SOUTH LAMAR ST. • JACKSON, MS 39201 • MSMUSEUMART.ORG

901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

4

CONTROLLER ashley haeger CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER jeffrey a. goldberg DIGITAL SERVICES DIRECTOR kristin pawlowski CIRCULATION & ACCOUNTING MANAGER lynn sparagowski MARKETING & CIRCULATION COORDINATOR kalena mckinney SPECIAL EVENTS DIRECTOR molly willmott

4 &7

PUBLISHER EMERITUS kenneth neill

march 2021

member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council 8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • MARCH 202 1

007_MM03_2021_TOC_v05.indd 8

2/19/21 2:10 PM


SELLING MEMPHIS

74 2 C R O S S OV E R L A N E • M E M P H I S , T N 3 8 1 1 7 • ( 9 0 1 ) 6 8 4 - 2 2 9 0

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/17/21 9:57 AM


I N

T H E

B E G I N N I N G | BY ANNA TR AVERSE FOGLE

How We Justify Hope

O Alta Simpson, CRS

Since 1868 901.682.1868 | 901.484.6040 asimpson@m-brealtors.com

May I help you make your move?

That the vaccine roll-out would have been somewhat chaotic was no surprise. Nor was it a surprise that privilege would play a role in the roll-out: Folks not plugged into social media, who don’t have reliable transportation or time off work, or who simply aren’t connected to the ‘right’ people likely had no way of knowing they could show up to get their shot, and no simple way of showing up even if they did learn of the option. Early in this pandemic, I remember well-meaning declarations (both hearing them and making them myself) about how we were “all in this together.” The reality of the past year tells a very different story. The pandemic has exposed and deepened existing fault lines in our society, and in our city. Unexpected challenges have a way of revealing preexisting inequities. Even the snow falls on Memphians in unequal ways: Were you already working from home when February’s polar express rolled into town? Is that home a comfortable and safe environment? If a pipe burst, could you afford to repair the damage without forgoing other household needs? Many are not so lucky. More Americans slipped into poverty in 2020 than in any other year since the federal government began tracking poverty rates, in 1960. According to a study conducted in late 2020 by the Universities of Chicago and Notre Dame, poverty rates rose at disproportionately high levels among Black Americans, children, and those with a high school education or less. Far too much of this was far too predictable — heartbreakingly so. But we couldn’t have predicted the details. Only a year ago, few could have imagined the confluence of circumstances we’re experiencing in Memphis as I write. Six inches of snow, more on the way; mercury registering single-digit temperatures for days on end;

vaccines of over 90 percent efficacy being distributed against a disease we barely understood? This time last year, we had a vague notion that a potentially scary illness called the novel coronavirus was infecting people young and old, primarily in other parts of the world. We were not so naïve as to think the United States would prove immune, but maybe it wouldn’t be so devastating here? Then Seattle reported the first U.S. covid-19 death on February 28, 2020. New York registered its first case on March 1, and shutdowns came down like so many dominoes in subsequent days and weeks. Scientific labs around the world began to develop vaccines over a year ago, when the virus’ genetic sequence was published in January 2020. By any measure, the vaccines are triumphs, boasting high efficacy rates (even, so far, against the virus variants now circulating), lightning-fast development, and a supply chain that needed to be scaled up in record time, in the midst of a pandemic. Estimates of exactly how many Americans have contracted covid-19 remain hazy, but we’ve either already passed, or soon will pass, the point at which more people will have received at least one dose of vaccine than have had the virus itself. This doesn’t erase the inequities of virus exposure or vaccine distribution, but nonetheless is a distinct measure of progress. Hope feels justifiable again, not simply a choice we make to avoid the alternative — despair — which was pretty much how I treated hope in 2020. As winter melts into spring, I hope we can do a better job of caring for each other. Most of us may not be in positions to perfect vaccine distribution, or to fix the economy, or to reopen schools safely. But we can hold our leaders to account. And we can be of service within our communities. That’s hope in action. 

PHOTOGRAPH BY PIYAPONG THONGCHAROEN / DREAMSTIME

A HOUSE-SOLD NAME IN MEMPHIS!

n a string of arctic-chilled, snow-laden February days, Memphians lined up in their cars to receive covid-19 vaccines. Tips about vaccine availability spread via social media, with anecdotal reports that those who showed up at vaccination sites like the Pipkin Building or the Board of Education could get their shot on the spot, even if they had not signed up in advance and even if their place in the vaccine queue had not yet been called. Once the vaccine is loaded into a syringe, it cannot be placed back into storage, so if that syringe isn’t injected into an arm, the dose must be discarded.

10 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

007_MM03_2021_TOC_v06.indd 10

2/22/21 12:50 PM


2020

EXCEPTIONAL WOMAN IN MEDICINE

★★★★★

VICTORIA L. LIM, M.D. Otolayngology/Head and Neck Surgery Adult and Pediatric ENT

6133 Poplar Pike Memphis, TN 38119 800-477-SHEA

sheaclinic.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:52 PM


C I T Y

S C E N E

12 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

012_MM03_2021_CityScene_PhotoSpread_v02.indd 12

2/17/21 4:43 PM


Memphis turned Narnian in mid-February following an ice storm, several days of snow, and temperatures that made our Southern city feel more like the South Pole. Taken individually, these occurrences are unusual but not outlandish — but the combination had even native Northerners hunkering down. Nothing happens in a vacuum, and wintry conditions disrupted the already chaotic distribution of the covid-19 vaccine, while many voiced concerns, to varying degrees of efficacy, for unhoused Memphians (and outdoor pets). But waking up inside a snowglobe always feels a little magical. Seen here: a walk through Overton Park (Feb. 14). — photographs by anna traverse fogle

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 13

012_MM03_2021_CityScene_PhotoSpread_v02.indd 13

2/17/21 4:43 PM


PAG E S

On the Road to Justice and Joy

In her new book, Deborah D. Douglas takes readers along the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. BY JESSE DAVIS

award-winning journalist and educator, first managing editor of MLK50: Justice Through Journalism, and a contributor to the recently published 400 Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019, edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain. I spoke with Douglas about her new book, and her path to writing it.

“ANY OPPORTUNITY TO WRITE”

“I have this thing I do when I move someplace new. I go outside to a particular place and I look around, take my time really looking around and noting whatever detail I can see in the landscape around me. And then a year later I go to the exact same spot and I look around to see what I see, and I always see so much more.” — D eb or a h D . D ougl a s

S

o much of life — of empathy and understanding — can be summed up simply as learning to see more. As a Memphian, I have sometimes taken for granted the depth of culture and history that surrounds me every day. On such occasions, I am grateful for reminders. One such reminder comes in the just-released U.S. Civil Rights Trail: A Traveler’s Guide to the People, Places, and Events That Made the Movement (Moon Travel) by Deborah D. Douglas,

t an early age, Douglas started on the path that would, one day, lead to writing the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. Born in Chicago in 1967, she moved to Detroit with her mother. “I started school there after the riot, so that imprinted itself on me,” Douglas says, referencing the Detroit race riots of 1967 and laying the early foundation for a passion for justice. “[My mother] was born in Memphis and raised in Covington. So at a certain point I moved to Covington to go to school.” At first Douglas wasn’t sure what she wanted to do. The other girls, she remembers, all wanted to be Diana Ross, but she set her sights on a slightly less glamorous goal. “I liked the news anchors on television, and I really liked reading. I also happened to notice that adults did a poor job of listening to each other,” she explains. “So I just made an equation in my mind and decided to be a journalist because it would allow me to be pretty and smart, read books, and actually listen to people. “Any opportunity to write, I took it,” Douglas continues. “When I was in seventh grade in Covington, we had a student newspaper, the Bulldog Reporter. So I wrote for the Bulldog, and I was on the yearbook staff at Covington High School. It was rigorous journalism.” She says the experience gave her an early taste of what most journalism students aren’t exposed to until undergraduate classes. Another blessing in disguise came in the form of one of her first assignments: covering the Future Farmers of America. “I’m really a city girl,” Douglas admits, but, she says, there were lessons to be learned from that assignment. “It was good for me to be forced to report on something in which I had no innate interest. That’s really the point — to get to know the world.” Douglas graduated from high school and enrolled at Northwestern University. Her rise continued as she honed her skills, interning with different publications throughout her academic career — landing herself a front-page story before she’d even graduated. “I interned for the Chicago Sun-Times,” she says. “That summer, actually, I went to a journalism conference in St. Louis on a 45-minute flight. My plane wasn’t landing and after going back and forth between the two airports in Chicago, they finally admitted they didn’t have any landing gear and we were stuck in the air. So they had to do a belly flop, a kind of controlled crash, and I got a front-page story out of it.” If the job is to get to know the world, Douglas was on the path to doing so. “I graduated and went to a minority internship program, so I moved to a different paper every four months. I went around the country — Kansas City, the Detroit suburbs, Connecticut. And then I ended up interning in Memphis.” The young journalist did a four-month internship at The Commercial Appeal, which had a hiring freeze at the time, so Douglas went to work next for The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi. “I ended up going down there

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY DEBORAH D. DOUGLAS

A

14 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

014_MM03_2021_Pages_v02.indd 14

2/12/21 2:46 PM


and writing for a few years.” Eventually, she made her way back to the Chicago Sun-Times. “I was the library director, then I moved to the editorial page, became the editorial page editor, and I got a column.” Though that was the nothing-but-the-highlights whirlwind tour of Douglas’ career, it helps set the stage.

rights leader and House Representative John Lewis). “Before we could turn to run, it was too late,” Douglas quotes Bland as saying. The book is filled with equally moving moments — trials and struggles alongside triumphs and celebrations.

“THE STORY IS RIGHTEOUS”

T

Y

ears later, with more accolades to her name, Douglas was again in the Bluff City. “I was in Memphis a few years ago, at The Commercial Appeal, and I met with Wendi [Thomas]. I had always known about her, but I didn’t know her personally. I got to meet her for the first time, and we fell into this easy discussion about all these issues related to economics and injustice. It was just a real wonky kind of conversation, and not the kind of thing that you can talk about with just anybody. But to talk to a fellow journalist about all of these esoteric things that I really care about was just so refreshing.” Is that, I ask Douglas, how you joined the MLK50 team? She explains that the move was more organic than planned. “We were in each other’s orbits,” Douglas continues, speaking of MLK50 founder Thomas. “So when she launched MLK50, early on she invited me to write a story, which I really enjoyed. I covered for her while she was on a reporting assignment out of the country. So I coordinated the team that covered the rally around the Confederate monuments. “It was the runup to the 50th commemoration of MLK’s assassination, and it just made sense. Memphis is one of my homes. The story is righteous.” Douglas has since returned to Chicago, where she took a break from working on a cover story for Chicago magazine to chat on the phone. Her work in pursuit of righteous stories continues, in part with the U.S. Civil Rights Trail guide.

“IT’S A MINI HISTORY BOOK”

T

he book intersects with everything I care about right now,” Douglas says. “Travel South, the agency that supervises this, has made it an official trail. That designation was completed in 2018, so this is new. This book is the only book that covers the official civil rights trail.” The guide is packed with information. “When I started out writing this book, I thought, ‘Okay, this is going to be a travel guide,’ but it ended up being so much more,” she says. “It’s a mini history book. It’s really either an introduction to the civil rights movement, or a refresher for the civil rights movement.” Douglas interviewed people who were present at watershed moments. But she also makes room for Black joy — and to celebrate African-American contributions to the national culture. “This book covers a mid-century movement, but sometimes it’s necessary to go back to the 1940s or ’30s to get the proper context,” Douglas explains. “It was really important to me to touch these people because they’re up in age. I just wanted to amplify them as respectfully as possible and include their stories in this book.” One such powerful moment comes in the Selma section in an interview with Joanne Bland, who was 11 years old on Bloody Sunday when a 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery ended in state-sponsored violence on the Edmund Pettus Bridge (as Douglas points out, still ironically named for a Confederate general and Ku Klux Klan member, despite a popular movement to rename the bridge for the late civil

THE “MEMPHIS” IN THE MOVEMENT

urning to the Memphis section is a reminder of the wealth of history here, from journalist Ida B. Wells to the brave children who made up the Memphis 13, the pioneering first-graders who, in 1961, desegregated four all-white Memphis schools. The National Civil Rights Museum is listed as a highlight, of course, as well as the I AM A MAN Plaza and the Withers Collection Museum & Gallery (a personal favorite of mine if only for two photos — one of activist Fannie Lou Hamer holding aloft her hard-won voter registration card, and another of Aretha Franklin and Sam Cooke holding hands). Also mentioned, though, are Payne’s barbecue restaurant, just a 10-minute walk from my apartment; Soulsville Music Academy, where I taught Wordsmith preparatory classes my last semester of undergrad; Memphis Rox, where I used to exercise pre-covid. People I’ve interviewed, businesses I’ve frequented without thought — walking in Memphis is walking among history, a record of our country’s great failures and triumphs. It’s easy to forget, or to consider moments in isolation, forgetting the ways each intersects and defines our lives’ trajectories. Southern food, though, is anything but forgettable. “The food, to me, is my favorite thing in that book,” says Douglas. “Because I love Southern food, I love soul food. There was never a chicken wing I didn’t want to eat,” she says, the smile on her face audible in her voice. “I love going to Chef Tam’s [Underground Café]. I really love Chef Tam’s joy for food. You can tell she just loves what she does.” Douglas made sure to include rural stories as well, with one example being Shelby’s neighboring Fayette County. “So much of the attention about the movement goes to the cities. When I was growing up in Covington, I did the whole small-town thing,” Douglas says, explaining that she was on the cheer squad, and that the basketball team and cheerleaders would get excited about away games in Fayette County. There, they saw Black cheerleaders “with a lot of rhythm and sass” as opposed to the more traditional stiff movements often seen in cheer routines. Of course, Douglas explains, that “rhythm and sass” was the legacy of segregation; Fayette County schools weren’t fully desegregated until a consent decree in 2014. “I didn’t know that segregation was so entrenched there,” Douglas says. “You never really understand how structure is dictating your life. In this case, it was an opportunity for us to engage with Black joy. But it was Black joy that came at the expense of segregation and lack of opportunity.”

“THIS IS ONGOING”

O

ne thing about interviewing journalists is they have a way with words. It takes some of the pressure off, as they know how to sum up their story. “This is ongoing. We’re all learning this together. We all have to unravel some stuff,” Douglas says. “Also, as an African American, I know our community has absorbed a lot of information that doesn’t really serve us well. Part of our deprogramming is sort of [brushing] off the stories that don’t serve us, and really standing in our power.”   M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 15

014_MM03_2021_Pages_v02.indd 15

2/12/21 2:46 PM


City Silo Table + Pantry Scott and Rebekah Tashie bring their clean eats to Germantown. BY SAMUEL X. CICCI

Sunshine Burrito

Scott and Rebekah Tashie opened a second location last month of their popular City Silo Table + Pantry restaurant.

T

he first thing to do in City Silo Table + Pantry in Germantown is relax. Bask in the warm glow of light flowing in through wide windows, breathe in the fresh air cleansed by an abundance of greenery lining the walls, and sip on a fruity burst from one of the restaurant’s signature smoothies. It’s everything that Memphians loved about the original City Silo, just updated, refined, and honed to a T using all the experience owners Scott and Rebekah Tashie have gained since opening the first franchise in East Memphis in 2017. With demand at their original City Silo so high, they knew they’d have to add a second location. The restaurant’s hook is its “clean eating.” It’s comfort food with a conscience, taking the best components of Southern cuisine and gently nudging them in a healthier direction. The familiar tastes, ideas, and concepts from the Mid-South are all here; diners just won’t feel like they need a nap afterwards. To take one example, the Sunshine Burrito (stuffed with crum-

bled silo burger patty, scrambled eggs, seasoned sweet potato, red quinoa, brown rice, sharp cheddar, cashew ranch, and sriracha aioli) leaves you feeling full, yet almost weightless. The accompanying Green Light Go smoothie provides a burst of energy via a delicate balance of sweet and sour, deftly mixing together fruit juices for a perfect blend. If healthy Southern fare is what you

City Silo’s pantry section offers a range of healthy snacks.

desire, City Silo has a take on it. It’s clear that the husband and wife duo are incredibly passionate about — and already comfortable in — their new space that opened last month. Scott, who grew up around the movie theater business (his father, Jimmy, is co -chairman of Malco Theatres), chats about some of his favorite movies from the early 2000s, creating a friendly and familial vibe at the table. Opening a second restaurant “is almost like having another child,” laughs Rebekah. The covid-19 pandemic certainly gave the journey more ups and downs than the Tashies would have liked. They originally signed their lease in February 2020, but the pandemic delayed their plans. Luckily, their landlord at Saddle Creek was flexible, allowing the couple to adjust to the new normal and make sure everything was in order. And while not specifically designed for

the pandemic, the 3,500-square-foot space allows plenty of social distancing, both inside and on the outdoor patio. While the pandemic might have put others off, the Tashies were undeterred. “There’s always the fear of the unknown when you’re opening a new restaurant,” says Scott. “All you can do is just prepare and give it everything you’ve got. Don’t leave anything on the table when it comes to preparation.” Longtime fans of the original City Silo on Sanderlin Avenue won’t have to worry about their favorite foods being exclusive to one location; the menu will be the same, whether diners are in East Memphis or Germantown. “We have the City Silo brand,” explains Scott, “and we really want that to be consistent in everything we do. We’ve kept the same menu items, and when we add new options, like some tacos that we did recently, we’ll have that at both stores.” Expect to see more small plates and limited-time dishes added to the menu going forward. One big change for City Silo Germantown is the inclusion of a full bar area. The Tashies have selected a small, carefully curated liquor section, picking out a specific variety of vodka, tequila, mezcal, rum, and gin. “We’re not going crazy with our selection,” says Scott, “but what we do have is something we’ve put a lot of time and thought into. When we eventually roll this out, the list will officially be the ‘City Silo Cocktail Menu’ for the whole brand.” “We’ll be incorporating our own juices,” adds Rebekah. “You can expect to see something like a beet margarita, or maybe carrot juice mixed in with mezcal. We’re really excited about this; it’s been fun trying to come up with the cocktails we’ll use on our menu, and we think they’re going to be a big hit.” City Silo Table + Pantry’s new location can be found at the Saddle Creek Shopping Center; 7605 W. Farmington Blvd, Suite 2; 901236-7223; THECITYSILO . COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SAMUEL X. CICCI

T I D B I T S

16 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

016_MM03_2021_Tidbits_v02.indd 16

2/12/21 2:46 PM


DO GOOD. BETTER. 901.726.5725 momentumnonprofit.org

We help Mid-South nonprofits succeed.

MM_Mar21_fp.indd 1

2/18/21 6:07 AM


C L AS S I C

D I N I N G

Hot and Sour Soup

Mosa Asian Bistro’s signature dish offers “an overwhelming sensation.” BY MICHAEL DONAHUE

T

back row, l to r: Laura Pao, Alex Pao, and Michelle Pao Levine (Alex’s sister). front row, l to r: Charleen and Eddie Pao.

His mother taught him to make the soup 43 years ago when he opened his first restaurant in Memphis, Formosa (a former name for Taiwan). His initial attempts weren’t successful. Eddie remembers his mother telling him, “My recipe is different.” They worked together so he could create a soup that would feed more people — diners at a restaurant, instead of a small family gathering. “We tried together every day,” he says. “A month later, Mama said, ‘That’s very good. You’ve got my recipe.’” “She was happy with how he was able to adjust all the ingredients, so that when he made it in volume it still tasted the same,” says his daughter, Michelle Pao Levine. “I really know how to use sugar, vinegar, and black pepper,” Eddie says, “because my mama taught me. That’s very important. And hot pepper.” “I think it’s the true balance of hot and sour,” says Eddie’s son, Alex Pao. “I’m personally biased, but it’s an overwhelming sensation. You get the spice and then you get the sour aftertaste.” The entire Pao household works at the restaurant. Eddie’s

wife, Charleen, makes cupcakes, though she has paused that work because of the pandemic. The restaurant business was not in Eddie’s original career plan. Years ago, he was a motion picture director in Taiwan. “I shot 12 years of movies,” he says. “Ten years as assistant director, two by myself.” But he grew tired of having to make the same type of films. “I didn’t want to spend all my life doing love stories or kung fu movies.” Wanting a change, he recalls, “Something pushed me to the United States.” After moving to Memphis in 1977, Eddie opened his first restaurant so he could provide for his family. His cooking is similar to his movie-making, according to his daughter. “It’s an everlasting memory and impression he wants to make on people,” Michelle says. “Like when you watch a film.” That particularly applies to Eddie’s hot and sour soup. “When you take a sip of it now versus 20 years ago,” she says, “it gives you that sense of familiarity, memories, and associations.” Mosa Asian Bistro is located at 850 S. White Station Road.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JON W. SPARKS

he signature item at Mosa Asian Bistro is suan la tang — hot and sour soup. It also was a popular meal in the Pao household in Taipei, Taiwan, when the restaurant’s owner, Eddie Pao, was growing up. His mother, the late Ying-Chu Pao, made it for the family at home.

18 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

018_MM03_2021_DiningClassics_v04.indd 18

2/12/21 2:47 PM


JIMMY REED, PRESIDENT

Celebrating 40 Years Selling ALL AROUND TOWN! JimmyReedRealtor.com | 901.682.1868

RURAL LOGIC: THE ROAD TO ONE’S HEART IS RARELY PAVED. How do you get closer to the things that matter? Get further away. Rural 1st is the leader in rural lending because we’ve been living our values out here for over 100 years. More at Rural1st.com.

Home Loans • Construction Loans • Land Loans • Lot Loans Rural 1st is a tradename and Rural 1st, the Rolling Hills Window icon, Rural Logic, and Closer to What Matters are exclusive trademarks of Farm Credit Mid-America, NMLS 407249. Rural 1st products are available to consumers within the territories of participating Farm Credit System Associations.

MM_Mar21_fp.indd 1

2/18/21 6:03 AM


2021

You’ll find on the pages listed here the talented individuals behind many of Memphis’ favorite brands. This year’s Faces of the Mid-South include doctors and lawyers, rug sellers and pizzaioli, independent schools and centers for independent living. These impressive people and organizations contribute to making Memphis great.

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

1776 Men’s Grooming Parlor - 94

Fogelman Properties - 25

MINIMAX Kitchen & Bath - 74

Pradeep Adatrow, DDS, MSD - 58

Gant Systems - 72

NuBody Concepts - 28

Babcock Gifts - 113

Glanker Brown PLLC - 77

Paradox Catering & Consulting - 35

The Bailey Law Firm - 61

Glo Medical Aesthetics - 93

Minesh Pathak, MD - 96

Baptist Medical Group/GI Specialists Foundation - 70

Harding Academy - 36

People’s Custom Rx - 39

The Bar-B-Q Shop & Our Dancing Pigs BarB-Que Sauce and Dry Seasoning - 26

Holloway Furs - 67

Pimento’s Kitchen + Market - 33

Hutchison School - 63

Premier Flowers - 65

Independent Bank - 37

The Rices - 59

Kirby Wines & Liquors - 115

RKA Construction - 57

Kroc Memphis - 38

Robinson Tree Service - 104

Lakeside Behavioral Health System - 31

Southern Screens - 101

The Langsdon Clinic - 27

Southland Casino Racing - 68

Law Office of Stephen R. Leffler, P.C. - 56

St. Mary’s Episcopal School - 21

Jerry Lucius, Marx-Bensdorf, Realtors & Shannan McWaters, McWaters & Associates Realtors - 106

Tactical Magic - 32

Blair Parker Design - 75 Bob Richards Jewelers - 64 Broadway Pizza - 103 BrownDog Lodge - 60 Ludy Callaway, The Mortgage Lady - 95 Clay & Land Insurance, Inc. - 73 CO’s Janitorial Service - 23 Consolidated Medical Practices of Memphis, PLLC - 109 Corky’s Ribs & BBQ - 66 The Crone Law Firm - 62

Mahogany Memphis - 110 Mays & Schnapp Neurospine and Pain - 100

De La Belle Wellness & Spa - 114

Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry - 30

EBOX - 55

Memphis Orthodontic Specialists - 99

Evangelical Christian School - 71

Mercedes Benz of Memphis - 92

Fertility Associates of Memphis - 105

Mid South Night Lights, LLC - 76

Fleet Feet - 108

Mid-South OB-GYN - 97

Taghavi Oriental Rugs - 98 Triumph Bank - 34 United Way of the Mid-South - 102 Van Atkins Jewelers - 24 Vascular and Vein Institute of the South 111 VIA - 112 The Village at Germantown - 107 Walnut Grove Animal Clinic - 22

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 12:34 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE ST. MARY’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL >>>

A St. Mary's education is an investment in a Students. The 60 members of the Class girl's future. For almost 175 years, we have of 2020 earned over $12 million in provided girls in Memphis with the finest scholarships, matriculating to 46 colleges education possible. In our robust academic and universities including Yale, Vanderbilt, environment, relationships are based on the Naval Academy, and a Morehead-Cain trust and girls grow into young women of Scholar at the University of North Carolina. integrity, compassion, and confidence. The mission of St. Mary's Episcopal For the last 10 years, 20 percent of School is to provide a superior educational St. Mary's graduates have been recognized experience for girls which will encourage by the National Merit Scholarship Program and enable each student to reach her as Finalists, Semifinalists, and Commended individual potential. 60 Perkins Extended, Memphis, TN 38117 I 901.537.1405 I stmarysschool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:27 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANIMAL CARE

WALNUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC >>> With every patient and client, we are guided by our core values: Integrity, Excellence, and Compassion. Our professional staff is highly trained and well educated. All employees participate in regular training and

development programs. Walnut Grove Animal Clinic is a full-service, state-ofthe-art, small animal hospital located in the center of Memphis at the corner of Walnut Grove Avenue and Tillman. New clients are always welcome.

2959 Walnut Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.323.1177 | MyMemphisVet.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:53 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANTIBACTERIAL SANITIZING SERVICES

CO'S JANITORIAL SERVICE >>> Carzell Oliver I’m not a doctor, but my solution sure works like one. It is a special government order solution that kills all viruses, including covid-19, the flu, and pneumonia. We treat your place of business, or home, up and down using a fogger and a sprayer. And you have got to try my carpet cleaning. It is the best! We are able to hot extract your home or business — removing all dirt and viruses — leaving only a fresh and very clean scent to your place. Keep in mind that cleaning services professionals are essential workers, too. Please do not leave us out. Anyone interested in my services, please text: Carzell Oliver, 901.355.1651.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 12:04 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANTIQUE & ESTATE JEWELRY

VAN ATKINS JEWELERS >>> Left to right: Jack Cooper, Sam Cooper, Chuck Cooper, Van Cooper, and Ray Cooper What began as a family-owned group where most days you will find Chuck of department stores is now known for and Sam. Chuck's eldest son, Van, is at the helm in the Oxford location all things jewelry! Van Atkins Jewelers, the South's leader in Estate Jewelry on the square, along with Ray, who is and diamond solitaires, was opened by responsible for all hand-engraving and Chuck Cooper in 1990. Today, three of customer assistance. The youngest son, his sons are leading the way. Chuck, Jack, a recent graduate from MTSU in Aviation, can be found here when he is Van, Sam, and Ray have all graduated from Gemological Institute of America in not flying. Thank you, Mid-South, for California. The original store is in historic featuring us, and we look forward to seeing you. You Know She's Worth It. Downtown New Albany, Mississippi, 129 W. Bankhead Street, New Albany, MS 38652 | 662.534.5012 124 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS 38655 | 662.236.5012 VanAtkins.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 5:57 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

APARTMENT INVESTMENT AND MANAGEMENT FOGELMAN PROPERTIES >>>

The Fogelman Difference. Built on 55+ years of experience, innovation and results; we are proud to be one of the nation’s leading multifamily investment and management firms. Our fully integrated approach brings asset, construction and property management together under one roof, allowing us to maximize the investments of our clients and partners in all parts of the industry cycle. Local Properties: • ADDISON AT COLLIERVILLE 400 Orchard Cir. W., Collierville, TN 38017 | AddisonCollierville.com • ARBORS HARBOR TOWN 671 Harbor Town Edge Dr., Memphis, TN 38103 | ArborsHarborTown.com • AVENIDA WATERMARQ AT GERMANTOWN 7900 Wolf River Blvd, Germantown, TN 38138 | AvenidaGermantown.com • BRISTOL ON UNION 205 Pasadena Pl., Memphis, TN 38104 | TheBristolOnUnion.com • CHEROKEE CABANA 3204 Sharpe Ave., Memphis, TN 38111 | CherokeeCabana.com • THE EDGE OF GERMANTOWN 1730 Hunters Trace Dr., Memphis, TN 38120 | TheEdgeOfGermantown.com • LEGACY FARM 1130 Legacy Farm Ct., Collierville, TN 38017 | Legacy-Farm.com • MADISON SHELBY FARMS 330 N. Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | MadisonShelbyFarms.com • THE RETREAT AT GERMANTOWN 7865 Grove Ct. W., Germantown, TN 38138 | TheRetreatatGermantown.com • THE SUMMIT 4981 Hidden Lake Dr., Memphis, TN 38128 | TheSummitMemphis.com • THE TENNESSEE BREWERY 495 Tennessee St., Memphis, TN 38103 | AtTheBrewery.com • THORNWOOD 7794 Kings College Ave., Germantown, TN 38138 | TheResidencesatThornwood.com Fogelman.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 3:43 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BAR-B-Q

THE BAR-B-Q SHOP & OUR DANCING PIGS BAR-B-QUE SAUCE AND DRY SEASONING>>> Eric Vernon, co-owner & GM; Robert Deen, head server, front of house; Melvin Herron, kitchen manager Thirty-three years ago, we opened our doors in November 1987, in the heart of Midtown, on Madison Avenue. We quickly developed a loyal following & Family Culture. Both are still with us to this day. Two key people that were instrumental in helping Eric Vernon and family develop this culture: Melvin Herron (kitchen manager) who has been with the Shop for 31 years, and Robert Dean (head server), who has been with us for 21 years. They have both become crowd favorites.

As the years have gone by, our Dancing Pigs BarB-Que Sauce & Dry Seasoning have been picked up by the Kroger grocery chain. We have recently won #1 Ribs in America for our Glazed Ribs on Top Five Restaurants on The Food Network. We have also been featured on the Bobby Flay Show, Food Paradise, and Andrew Zimmern’s Bizarre Foods (on three separate occasions). Finally, we are frequently mentioned in Southern Living & Bon Appétit as well.

1782 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 I 901.272.1277 I DancingPigs.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 8:14 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL FACES

THE LANGSDON CLINIC >>> Phillip R. Langsdon, MD, FACS and Carol H. Langsdon, RNP

Celebrating 30 years in practice, Dr. Phillip Langsdon, facial plastic surgeon, has been treating one face at a time. Dr. Langsdon is Board Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He is the only surgeon in the Mid-South whose practice is limited to facial plastic surgery. Seeing each person’s face as unique, he treats the common and complicated cases and believes in “Compassionate Care with Natural Looking Results”. Carol Langsdon, RNP, provides expert nonsurgical aesthetics such as Botox®, dermal fillers, skin resurfacing and customized medical-grade skin care. Dr. Langsdon served as the President of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) in 2019. To view before and after photos, visit drlangsdon.com. 7499 Poplar Pike, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.755.6465 | DrLangsdon.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:55 AM


THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL BODIES

NUBODY CONCEPTS >>> Dr. Mark Peters Dr. Peters is a board-certified plastic surgeon and medical director of the NuBody Concepts Cosmetic Surgery Center of Excellence in Germantown, TN. He performs a full range of body and facial cosmetic surgery, including breast augmentations, tummy tucks, liposuction, and traditional facelifts. In addition, Dr. Peters has extensive experience with the most advanced skintightening technology providing customized alternatives to surgeries requiring longer downtime and longer scars. Dr. Peters was one of the first plastic surgeons to utilize BodyTite and FaceTite technology in the Mid-South. This minimallyinvasive procedure uses radio-frequency energy to tighten tissues and liquify the fat for removal. It provides an alternative to more invasive procedures such as tummy tucks or facelifts. Dr. Peters has also used the technology to improve the appearance of cellulite caused by age-related tissue laxity. Dr. Peters graduated from Vanderbilt University (biomedical engineering) and received his medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport, Louisiana. He has been performing plastic surgery procedures for almost 25 years. 9037 Poplar Avenue Suite 101 Germantown, TN 38138 901.235.5753 NuBodyConcepts.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 2

2/18/21 6:27 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 3

2/18/21 6:27 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SMILES

MEMPHIS CENTER FOR FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY >>> Miles C. Moore, DDS Creating beautiful smiles is just another day in the office for Miles C. Moore, dentist at Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry. With a friendly staff, a soothing atmosphere, and the latest technology, Dr. Moore’s practice offers all dental services, but specializes in cosmetic

dentistry. Whether you seek a complete smile makeover, “invisible” braces, or teeth whitening, cosmetic dentistry can transform your smile in several ways. Dental veneers from Dr. Moore improve the form and function of your teeth, leaving results that you have to see to believe.

725 W. Brookhaven Circle | Memphis, TN 38117 901.761.2210 | BeautifulSmiles.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:08 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

LAKESIDE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SYSTEM >>> Left to right, front row: Lindsey Blevins and Ella-Victoria Robinson Middle row: Joy Golden, Theresa Jarvis, Carie Elston, Lenora Coleman, Lindsey Hightower, and Teresa Scott Back row: Dr. Daniel Boyd, Jacob Arnett, Rita Dailey, Dr. Mahmood Ali, and Kevin Parker For more than 50 years, Lakeside has — from children to seniors who struggle had one mission: to provide specialized with behavioral health issues, addictive behavioral healthcare and addiction diseases, or co-occurring diagnoses. In treatment in a welcoming environment addition to providing targeted treatment for people in search of healing. Our 37for our patients, Lakeside is committed to acre campus near Memphis, Tennessee, helping our community better understand was designed to make recovery an and recognize the complexities associated accessible, effective reality for everyone with behavioral health and addiction. 2911 Brunswick Road, Memphis, TN 38133 | 901.377.4700 | LakesideBHS.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:26 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRANDING

TACTICAL MAGIC >>> Trace Hallowell has been an influential force in Memphis advertising for more than 30 years. Both strategist and creative leader, he is best known for developing high impact brand identities and marketing campaigns. Having earned national and international creative awards, his work is also featured in books, magazines, and college textbooks as examples of branding excellence. Trace founded Tactical Magic in 2001. The firm’s diverse clientele includes CGHP, Etairos HVAC, Eventive, IMC Companies, Malasri Engineering, Maximum Hospitality, The Mighty Olive, Soundways, and Trousseau. 1460 Madison Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.722.3001 TacticalMagic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:48 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BURGERS

PIMENTO'S KITCHEN + MARKET >>> Trey and Jules Jordan The friendly faces behind Pimento’s Kitchen + Market are father daughter duo, Trey and Jules Jordan! In 1993, Trey started Holiday Deli & Ham Co. with a passion for entrepreneurship, good food, and great service. In 2016, Trey’s dreams grew even bigger as he opened Pimento’s Kitchen + Market, which has since turned into a “Burgers, Bar & Grill” with the best burgers in the 901 and a Happy Hour that can’t be beat. Whether it’s grabbing a quick lunch or a fun night out, we can’t wait to see you! 6450 Poplar Ave. Suite 123, Memphis, TN, 38119 | 901.602.5488 3751 South Houston Levee, Collierville, TN, 38017 | 901.453.6283 Pimentos.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:09 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BUSINESS BANKING TRIUMPH BANK >>>

Triumph is proud to serve as your local bank but have an invested interest in helping in the greater Memphis area, deeply invested you find your own triumph. By remaining in our community and in helping businesses completely privately owned, our bankers and individuals grow. Your money is a very have the power to be more flexible in your personal issue. You’ve worked hard to earn favor — whether it’s a loan decision or making what you have. You deserve a bank where ourselves more available. It gives you more the people talking to you about your financial control and confidence that when we say you dreams and goals not only know your name matter, you really matter. Let’s talk growth. 5699 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.333.8800 | TriumphBank.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 12:06 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry Chef/Owner Jimmy Gentry of Paradox Catering was formally trained at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts. Before starting his own business with partner Alia Hogan, he led kitchens across the MidSouth to win multiple awards. Almost 11 years ago, Paradox Catering was created with the vision in mind to redefine what people expected not only from the food itself, but from the presentation and service

as well. Paradox's Jessica Lambert and Chef Gentry work closely with clients to define their personal style, which we then translate into every aspect of an event so we can provide that one-of-a-kind experience they always envisioned. We have been truly fortunate to be embraced by the Mid-South and have in turn seen tremendous success with our creative and innovative approach to catering.

901.619.1196 | Event@ParadoxCuisine.com | ParadoxCuisine.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:28 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION HARDING ACADEMY >>>

Students love that they get to be so many things at Harding. From music to engineering to pottery to athletics, Harding students have the opportunity to explore their interests and expand their minds. Our East Memphis campus for

senior kindergarten — grade 12 provides a one-stop school in the heart of the city. Our preschool Little Harding is expanding to offer infant care and will serve 6 weeks — junior kindergarten in East Memphis beginning this fall.

HARDING ACADEMY (SR. K–GRADE 12): 1100 CHERRY ROAD “LITTLE HARDING” (6 WEEKS–JR. K): 1106 COLONIAL ROAD 901.767.4494 | HARDINGLIONS.ORG SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 8:59 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMMUNITY BANKING INDEPENDENT BANK >>>

Strong. Safe. Customer-Focused. Local. Since our founding in 1998, Independent Bank has been committed to supporting our customers and communities by helping you achieve your dreams and financial success. We are a full-service bank with personal and business loans, a variety of deposit and cash management options, mortgage loans and wealth management. We offer innovative solutions, effective products and heroic service. We invite you to experience the i-bank difference — it’s a better way of banking. Proud to be the face of community banking. Member FDIC | Equal Housing Lender 5050 Poplar • 844.0401 | 1711 Union • 844.2050 | 450 Perkins • 842.2620 6209 Poplar • 842.2600 | 5995 Stage • 842.1210 | 2116 W. Poplar • 842.1170 | 40 S. Main • 312.8900 3295 Poplar • 844.2075 | 7635 Poplar • 842.1190 i-bankonline.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 12:11 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMMUNITY FITNESS KROC MEMPHIS >>>

caring, and exciting environment,” says There is something for everyone at the family-oriented, 100,000-square-foot fitness, marketing coordinator Samilia Colar. “Our recreation, and education center which staff is committed to helping every individual includes a church, arts, and community thrive in mind, body, and spirit.” outreach programs. It’s a place where Offerings include in-person and online personal training and group fitness classes, a individuals of all ages, races, educational backgrounds, and economic means can come complete aquatics center, senior activities, free together to learn, grow, and explore their child watch, school break camps, and youth potential. and adult sports leagues. Stop in for a tour to “Our mission is to support our members see for yourself why The Salvation Army Kroc with programming that fosters a sense of Center was recently named #1 Health and belonging and overall wellness in a safe, Fitness Center by Memphis Flyer readers. 800 East Parkway South, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.729.8007 | KrocMemphis.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 12:33 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMPOUNDING PHARMACY PEOPLE'S CUSTOM RX >>>

Since 1969, People's Custom Rx — the oldest and largest compounding pharmacy in the Memphis area — has been helping people and their pets feel better. We are excited to announce two brand new, state-of-the-art sterile rooms that allow us to better prepare your customized medications. Our

pharmacists and technicians work hard to increase our knowledge and stay up-to-date with training in the fields of hormone therapy, sterile compounding, pediatric compounding, veterinary compounding, dermatological compounding, and so much more. How can we help you feel better?

785 E Brookhaven Circle, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.682.2273 | PeoplesCustomRx.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:13 AM


ANDREA MORALES Documenting Memphis moments, from protests to parades.

THE MIND’S EYE

BY ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE

A

ABOUT THIS SERIES: Memphis has played muse over the years to artists across the spectrum, from the music of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Al Green, and the collective at Stax Records, to the prose of Peter Taylor, Shelby Foote, and John Grisham. Visual artists, too, have been inspired by Memphis, whose look has been described as gritty, dirty, active, eerie, beautiful, and captivating. “The Mind’s Eye” profiles the photographers whose work documents the city. Past stories in the series — featuring Bob Williams, Murray Riss, Saj Crone, Karen Pulfer Focht, Willy Bearden, Jamie Harmon, Brandon Dill, Ziggy Mack, and Ernest Withers — are showcased in our digital archives (memphismagazine.com).

ndrea Morales was stuck behind a slow-moving pickup truck hauling sweet potatoes through Coahoma County, Mississippi. Sweet potatoes naturally tending to roll, a man rode along with them, doing his best to prevent any from tumbling out of the truck bed. Morales was new to the South (this was 2014) and still processing the region’s cultural syntax, its tempo. She had driven down to photograph an assignment for The Commercial Appeal and was impatient to be on her way home — but for the sweet potatoes, but for their minder. Something stopped her short, and not only because her car could do little more than crawl along the blacktop, dodging the occasional careening sweet potato. Something about this unknown man, devoting all his energy, all his attention, to the simple, earnest chore of keeping the sweet potatoes on the truck — it nearly made her cry. “I looked at the guy, and looked at the moment, and I was like, how did I get here, stuck behind the sweet potato truck?” she found herself asking. “Every stupid thing has yielded something really special and miraculous. I don’t buy into linear progression,” she says, “but I do buy into cumulative progression.” The sweet potatoes, the man steadying them, the slowness, the Southernness — all accreting as part of Morales’ story.

right: Elvis fans gather outside of Graceland to celebrate the 38th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death in 2015. opposite: Cherita Jackson Kirkland embraces her son, Luke Jackson, then 7, as a bell outside of the Lorraine Motel rings at 6:01 p.m. on April 4, 2018, the 50th annual commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

40 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 40

PORTRAIT OF ANDREA MORALES BY BRAD VEST: ALL OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREA MORALES

2/22/21 7:09 AM


M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 41

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 41

2/22/21 7:09 AM


S

Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, American Heritage Girls, and community members gathered to salute and tend to 44,000 graves at Memphis National Cemetery in May 2015 as part of a Memorial Day celebration.

he was born in Lima, Peru, but it was in Memphis; Thomas planned for MLK50 to be a yearlong Lima, Ohio, a small town 3,670 miles north, that project, but the newsroom has proved durable and Andrea Morales — a storyteller whose camera is her continues to publish groundbreaking work. She says of medium — learned to build community. Morales, who Morales, “I can think of no modern-day photographer who has captured movement making in Memphis betgrew up in Miami, dreamed of one day becoming an “adventuring correspondent,” as ter than Andrea. If you looked up she puts it, in Latin America. In- “I think a lot about who ‘bearing witness’ in the dictionary, you’d see her face. Just about every stead, a few years out of college, chronicles this draft she found herself working at a sedemonstration, action, or protest ries of small-town newspapers in of history. In the past, in Memphis in the last five years, rural, white America — including the story has been told she’s been there with her camera.” Thomas continues, “I think a lot a stint in, yes, Lima, Ohio. (The through the lens of about who chronicles this draft of Midwestern version of Lima is pronounced like the bean.) Somewhat white men. Thanks to history. In the past, the story has to her surprise, Morales loved “the Andrea, the story will been told through the lens of white small-town-ness of it,” finding that men. Thanks to Andrea, the sto“there’s a whole level of adulting be told through the lens ry will be told through the lens of that happens when you’re account- of a Latina, a first-gen a Latina, a first-gen American, a able to a community.” woman, someone who, at her core, American, a woman, is in solidarity with the people Dr. Morales has thought deeply King was in solidarity with.” about what it means, especially as a someone who, at her journalist, to make herself account- core, is in solidarity with Morales has shot for this magable to a community. Memphians azine (including cover stories in may recognize her name through the people Dr. King was October and December 2020) and her ongoing work with MLK50: Jus- in solidarity with.” for an impressive range of national tice Through Journalism, a nonprofit publications, such as The New York — Wendi Thomas digital news outlet based in MemTimes, The Washington Post, and The phis, where she has been visuals director and primary Wall Street Journal. She’s completing an MFA in docuphotographer since veteran journalist Wendi Thomas mentary expression at the University of Mississippi, launched the project on April 4, 2017. working full-time at the university, continuing to freeApril 4, 2018, marked a half-century since Dr. Marlance, all while maintaining a part-time relationship tin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Downtown with MLK50.

42 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 42

2/22/21 7:09 AM


I’ve been aware of her as a photographer for a few years — both seeing her credit line and catching sight of her in motion, camera in hand, in the Memphis community. More recently, we corresponded about those two Memphis magazine cover shoots. But it was in preparation for this article that we first sat down and talked at length. Our central conversation took place over Zoom one bright February morning, still early enough that our discussion tended to drift, cloudlike, from memory to theory, from social justice to pets, hither and thither. Not linear, but cumulative. You don’t need to talk to Morales for long to know a couple of things for certain. One, she’s passionate about her work — not simply the making of photographs, but the moments of communion with her subjects, and the stories her work helps share. Two, she’s incandescently smart. Her talent for creating textured, evocative photographs is formidable, sure. But her work as a whole is guided by her continued interrogations of political systems, history, transcendence, joy, and justice.

I

n the 1980s, Peru roiled with political, social, and economic turbulence. A series of coups had, in part, defined the 1960s and ’70s; by the ’80s, guerrilla fighting was prevalent. The specifics get complex in a hurry. Morales remembers from her early childhood — she was born in 1984 — that people were setting off bombs in Lima. She cites the night her younger sister, Gabriela, was born as her most vivid early memory: A nightly curfew was in place to forestall violence, and her mother went into labor in the middle of the night. Getting her mother to the hospital was “a whole thing.”

Her parents, César and Rosa, wanted what parents tend to want for their children: safety, opportunity, stability. Determined to move to the United States, they entered a visa lottery system in hopes of receiving tourist visas. That lottery system, Morales notes, involves “so much luck.” She was 5 years old at the time, with a child’s memories — but “in my head,” she says, “those first years in Miami were all kind of special and sparkly.” But not without their hardships, she acknowledges. In many ways, life was harder in Miami than it had been in Lima. In Lima, her parents had owned a house (they won it through a contest — there’s the luck again). In Miami, the family piled into a family friend’s pool house, and next into a one-room apartment. When Hurricane Andrew hit, the youngest of the three girls was a weekold infant in a crib shoved next to the TV. It was time for an upgrade. Tourist visas are temporary by design, and the Morales family did what plenty of people hoping to immigrate do: They overstayed their visa. For their first few years in Miami, they were undocumented, and so César and Rosa labored at what Morales describes as “the humble work that you can get without papers.” Together, the two cleaned shrimp on the docks for a time. César later worked as a janitor; Rosa found nannying and domestic work. By the time Morales was in middle school, her parents had obtained green cards and were able to find more stable jobs. For many years, Rosa has worked for American Airlines — enabling the family to get plane tickets back to Peru, and thereby to maintain a relationship with their family “in a way that I think a lot of immigrants don’t have,” her daughter notes.

Visitors to the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel are reflected in the glass that encases Room 306, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was staying during his fatal visit to Memphis in 1968. They are gazing past the balcony where he was standing when he was shot, and toward the site from which the bullet was reportedly fired.

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 43

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 43

2/22/21 7:09 AM


Many years later, Morales traveled on assignment to the U.S.–Mexican border, near Brownsville, Texas. This was in 2018, after the panic early in Donald Trump’s presidency about caravans of migrants, and just before a tent city emerged across the Rio Grande from Brownsville. Hopeful immigrants from Central and South America were left, Morales recalls, to wait indefinitely on the bridges that span the Rio Grande. She arrived “all keyed up to tell a story. I was like, oh, Yo so immigrante tambien, I’m an immigrant also.” Seeing the conditions these immigrants were facing, though, she quickly realized, once on the ground, that “what immigrants coming to this country right now are facing is so different from what we had to deal with. The fact that we moved when we did — it’s just pure luck.”

T

he bits of English 5-year-old Andrea knew in 1989, when her family immigrated, she had absorbed from the global tentacles of American pop culture. But she learned the language quickly once in Miami, where she attended a bilingual elementary school. Coral Way Elementary School (now Coral Way Bilingual K-8 Center) was an early pioneer in two-way language immersion when it was founded in 1963 following an influx of Cuban immigrants. Little Havana, the neighborhood of Miami where the family lived, was a little rough around the edges then, not yet the “gentrified hellscape” she says it’s become in more recent years. Morales is the eldest of three sisters (she spent a lot of time babysitting), and her parents “weren’t super interested in having us roam around

Rosa, Andrea’s mother, is “an incredible archivist,” recording and organizing moments on film. Thanks to her mother, she says, “I did grow up recognizing the value of seeing and documenting.”

the streets.” The girls — “real indoorsy kids” — grew robust imaginations, consumed their share of television, and did a lot of reading: all teleportation devices away from a cramped apartment on rainy Miami days. The family camera served as another transportation device; the kids weren’t permitted to mess with this one. Rosa, Andrea’s mother, is “an incredible archivist,” recording and organizing moments on film. Thanks to her mother, she says, “I did grow up recognizing the value of seeing and documenting.” In high school, she would carry around a point-and-shoot camera, taking pictures of her friends. Through high school, Morales’ goal was to become a writer. As college approached, though, she felt insecure about her ability to write in English. (For the record, her command of her second language is fluent, inventive.) Photography turned out to be insecurity’s roundabout gift: a language to tell stories without any words at all. She was touring the University of Florida campus

44 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 44

opposite top: On August 15, 2016, as hundreds gathered outside Graceland for the 39th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death, community members in support of Black Lives Matter and the Coalition of Concerned Citizens planned a direction action calling for police reform and economic justice. They were stopped by Memphis Police and fenced off in the rain a block away on Elvis Presley Boulevard. opposite bottom: Men who took part in the 1968 Sanitation Workers’ Strike hold hands during a prayer at Mason Temple on April 3, 2018, during a ceremony ahead of the 50th commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

above left: Andrea and her sister Gabriela in Lima, Peru, 1988. above right: Andrea at Disney World in Orlando, Florida, 1990. bottom left: Alexandra, Gabriela, and Andrea at Andrea’s graduation for her Master of Arts at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, in 2010. All three sisters had walked across a graduation stage that year earning their high school, undergraduate, and master’s degrees, respectively, so Rosa forced them to take this photo to send to the family back home in Peru.

THIS PAGE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROSA MORALES

2/22/21 7:09 AM


M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 45

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 45

2/22/21 7:09 AM


Wisteria crawls through bramble in South Memphis on April 3, 2018.

ahead of matriculating when she checked out the She had begun to ask herself questions then that journalism school, and noticed information about the she continues to ponder now: For whom is the work intended? What effects is the work designed to provoke? photojournalism program — not something she had In her work with MLK50, Morales acknowledges that considered prior. “That’s when it really all clicked in,” she remembers. Beyond handling an SLR camera in “sometimes it feels like there’s the people I’m telling high school, when she took photos for the yearbook, stories about, and then there’s the people I’m telling she didn’t have much technical experience. And — stories to — and why are those different? I’m trying to maybe because the University of translate someone’s struggle and, Florida is part of the SEC, fosterwhat, inspire pity? Pity doesn’t do “You want to reach ing “sports-guy culture”; maybe shit.” for sensory elements because the two central professors (Susan Sontag addressed these whenever possible. The questions in her 2003 Regarding the were “both white men named John” — Morales found the program Pain of Others, an argumentative syntax is really seen “long, hard, fraught.” That “sportscompanion to 1973’s On Photography: through the sequencing; “If one feels that there is nothing guy culture” fostered a technical, gear-driven approach that she says ‘we’ can do — but who is that ‘we’? you want interludes.” — and nothing ‘they’ can do either simply isn’t her. (“I still don’t think — and who are ‘they’? — then one starts to get bored, I’m the best technician when it comes to cameras, but cynical, apathetic.”) you develop your own syntax in photography,” she says, “even if you’re working with your iPhone.”) One Despite conflicted feelings about the geopolitics of it of the two professors named John led photojournalism all, she saw the trip and her broader studies as a pathstudents on a several-weeks-long trip to Latin America, way to becoming a correspondent in Latin America where they were to execute a project. Morales complet— the “adventuring” mode she envisioned for herself. “That didn’t end up happening,” she says, adding, with ed a certificate in Latin American studies alongside a wry smile, “I live in Oxford, Mississippi, now, so …” her photojournalism coursework; she was gaining a language through which to understand globalization and its human-scale effects, and she saw that the photo or those of us who grew up at a certain expedition was “basically a course in the white gaze.” time — like Morales, I was born in 1984 — the in-

F

46 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 46

2/22/21 7:09 AM


ternal logic of a really solid mixtape is its own art form. The song sequence should feel at once foreordained and revelatory; reflective moments should follow harder-driving tracks; there might even be a tiny novel lurking in the connections from one song to the next. Mixtape logic comes up when I ask about the more contemplative, quiet shots — often absent any human figures — that she splices between energetic, populated, high-octane photos. She explains, “You want to reach for sensory elements whenever possible. The syntax is really seen through the sequencing; you want interludes.” A slumped tangle of wisteria, the sweetness of the blossoms wafting up through my monitor. A teddy-bear memorial attached to a utility pole. An unidentified man, back turned to us, on a church dais. Another man in another church, wiping his face with a white cloth. Many of her photos show activity, purpose, community — those bursts of life all the more vivid thanks to softer, quieter interludes.

S

he may not have wound up a foreign correspondent, but Morales has charted a course through the U.S. that has brought her into all manner of communities. After graduating from college, she earned a master’s degree in photography from Ohio University. She questioned the wisdom of working in newsrooms, local daily papers having been in such steep decline.

But then came an internship at The New York Times, which started her on her way as a working photojournalist. She worked at El Sentinel in South Florida; at the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester, New York; at the Lima News in the aforementioned Lima, Ohio. Before her move to Memphis, she spent the longest consecutive time, post-college, in Concord, New Hampshire, at the Concord Monitor, a paper with a “strong tradition of community journalism, and community photojournalism.” She was in a long-distance relationship at the time with a partner, fellow photojournalist Brad Vest, in Memphis, and Morales moved south in 2014 to join him. She remembers arriving in town a week before Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Missouri, in early August. Morales’ understanding of Memphis, before she moved here, was based on “common mythological understanding. Getting here, being here, was totally different. I knew about Dr. King, I knew about the Lorraine,” she says, “but I just didn’t know.” Following Brown’s death in Ferguson, cities across the country rose up in protest; the Movement for Black Lives was building momentum after the 2013 killing of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida. As a new Memphian, Morales remembers “kind of holding my breath. I remember thinking, ‘This is a city that’s part of the country’s civil rights history, and has this particularly dark chapter. Surely there’ll be a response.’ It didn’t

Elmore Nickleberry hauls branches and waste into the truck he drives as a sanitation worker for the City of Memphis. For 63 mostly uninterrupted years, the rhythms of Nickleberry’s life have included the rumbles and roars of Memphis sanitation trucks. In 2017, at 85 and as the longesttenured employee in the city’s history, Nickleberry still ran a Downtown route until 3 a.m.

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 47

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 47

2/22/21 7:09 AM


48 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 48

2/22/21 7:09 AM


really happen here. It was pretty quiet.” She now understands Memphis’ relative slowness to rise up in protest as a conditioned trauma response to Dr. King’s assassination in 1968. “The silence isn’t that,” she says. “It’s that organizing in Memphis has been met with a pretty oppressive response, a fatal response.” Hungry for community, Morales remembers attending “every parade I could, because I love parades — never get tired of them. And I started going to protests.” She got to know community members who were motivated and activated to create change, and building a new body of work both through personal interactions and larger gatherings. Around the same time, Wendi Thomas had returned to Memphis from a Neiman Fellowship at Harvard, with the idea to create MLK50. Morales had followed Thomas on Twitter and admired her work, and raised her hand when she heard that Thomas was searching for local journalists to join the project. Morales has found her work with MLK50 fulfilling — it’s enabled her to forge deep connections within the community, and she says that collaborating with Thomas has brought “a different depth to my understanding of the systems, and I think that has informed my photography.” Meanwhile, Thomas comments that Morales “teaches me so much — I’m lucky to have her as a partner on this journey to make, as the late Rep. John Lewis would say, good trouble.” For Morales, photographing in Memphis requires being a part of the local community — not just observing the community, but integrating herself within it. In this approach, she’s acutely aware of “the privileges that my identity affords me.” Memphis is a 64 percent Black city, and while Morales identifies as a person of color, she is still “a person who’s not Black photographing in Black communities frequently.” In the past year, especially, she’s scrutinized that position. How can journalism better serve communities? How can we distinguish between work that demands justice and work that provokes pity? Where are the lines? Sontag again: “So far as we feel sympathy, we feel we are not accomplices to what caused the suffering. Our sympathy proclaims our innocence as well as our impotence.”

in their living spaces. This, she says, was “a rough experiment.” She was photographing a story about people facing housing instability during the pandemic. “These are people struggling with resources,” she says, “and I was like, ‘Do you want to jump on Zoom?’” Typically in her work, Morales tries to make her presence feel comfortable and noninvasive; composing what would essentially be a screenshot through a web conferencing service does not necessarily meet that goal. The socioeconomics struck her, too: She couldn’t help but think about the power differential between herself and her subjects (she prefers the term ‘collaborators’). All of which is to say, she is genuinely (if cautiously) looking forward to what’s next. Morales tells me she wants to be back in Memphis full-time within the next year, once she finishes the MFA she’s working on at the University of Mississippi. She wants to be working fulltime at MLK50, instead of splitting her time in so many directions. And she has a vision for “developing a space in Memphis for visual journalism and visual expression rooted in the goal of liberation.” In her conceptualization, this space would generate visual conversations — not just among working photographers, but community members, too. (Collaborators, not subjects.)

opposite top: Bertrand Andrus, 21, at home in Greenville, Mississippi. Andrus lives with severe autism and his aging grandmother is his primary caretaker. Morales photographed the family for The Washington Post as part of a story about people on long Medicaid waiting lists. opposite bottom: Landon Montgomery, 18, hangs out in his room with his dog, Bentley, in Florence, Alabama. Montgomery came out five years ago and was kicked out of his Christian middle school for it. He began attending public school where he came into his own through the support of his family, friends, and theater community.

In her work with MLK50, Morales acknowledges that “sometimes it feels like there’s the people I’m telling stories about, and then there’s the people I’m telling stories to — and why are those different?”

F

or a photographer who is drawn to protests and parades, to near-sacred moments of communion with those on the other side of her lens, the pandemic poses challenges both logistical and personal. Approaching strangers is fraught; folks are anxious, and with good reason, about physical nearness. Morales recalls being on a recent assignment for The Washington Post. She traveled to a community outside Atlanta called Doraville. She sat outside a soccer gym packed with people, most maskless, debating with herself: “I know if I go in there, I will get a picture that will be useful to this story. And I can’t go in there.” But she didn’t feel right staking out at the entrance, either, to photograph people outdoors when they exited: “Then I’m just sitting outside of this place with a camera, and that’s big surveillance energy.” No good options. She made some photographs over Zoom in April 2020 for The New York Times. To make the photos, she met with people over the video-conferencing platform, and worked with them to arrange screenshots of them

A

s we talk, morning light streams through the windows of Morales’ Oxford apartment. A cat named Big Rick perches behind her head, then wanders off to find another sunbeam. Lily Bear, my dog, snoozes curled on a sofa behind me. I find myself feeling like we’ve stepped into a hall of mirrors as we talk via Zoom interview about the weird, immediate intimacy of Zoom photo shoots. As we’re wrapping up the conversation, one of our internet connections shakes, falters. Her face freezes on my screen, and I hear her voice say I’ve frozen on hers. A moment later, the connection breaks up entirely and I’m alone in my study again. So close, so far away. 

above: Proctor Wilson’s grandson peeks through the screen door of Wilson’s home at Foote Homes in 2015. The public housing project would be demolished two years later in order to break ground on the mixedincome community known as South City.

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 49

040_MM03_2021_MindsEye_AndreaMorales_v05.indd 49

2/22/21 7:09 AM


CULTURAL   A R T S

50 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

050_MM03_2021_UrbanArt_v05.indd 50

2/19/21 2:02 PM


VIBRANCY

The UrbanArt Commission aims to stir the artistic spirit of Memphis. BY JON W. SPARKS

E

ven a global pandemic has done little to slow the creation of public art in Memphis. Sculptures, murals, and all manner of visual arts are found on neighborhood buildings and in big projects, such as the Renasant Convention Center. When the revamped Concourse B at Memphis International Airport opens in mid-2021, it will be chock-full of new art and design. Thank the UrbanArt Commission for the explosion of art around town. For the past six years, Lauren Kennedy has been at the helm of the independent nonprofit that wants to enhance what it calls the cultural vibrancy of the city. And with ambitious goals, a desire to serve artists and communities, and even enduring a bit of political flak, she is bringing art to town.

W

Lauren Kennedy, executive director of the UrbanArt Commission, is leading the effort to bring art to every corner of the city. left: The I Am A Man Plaza unveiled in 2018 is adjacent to Clayborn Temple and honors the legacy of the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers.

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY URBANART COMMISSION

050_MM03_2021_UrbanArt_v05.indd 51

hether she knew it or not, Kennedy was on track to become the executive director of the UrbanArt Commission well before she accepted the post. She was and always has been devoted to the arts, particularly the visual arts, so it was hardly a surprise that she’d end up at the UAC. Still, it happened more quickly than she imagined. She admits to being overwhelmed at first by the idea of taking on the job, but Kennedy is not someone who frets overlong about challenges. She far prefers to get things moving. “I was at Ballet Memphis when the position became available, and I was enjoying my role,” she says. She was partnership manager there, which gave her invaluable experience working on collaborations with individuals and organizations. But she hungered to get back into the visual arts. “That’s my background, that’s my education and my passion,” she says. “Even when I was at the ballet, I ran this small gallery in my apartment that helped me keep my foot in there.” The gallery was in a bedroom of her apartment at the time, and it served not only to keep her involved in the fine art scene, but to provide an intersection for artists from all over. “It was a way for me to convince some of my friends that lived around the country to throw art in their car and drive and come visit,” she says. “And then it spread through word of mouth and became almost like a speakeasy — there would be people coming through that

I hadn’t met that heard about it from a friend, and there was something really cool in that as well.” In her way, Kennedy was preparing for a full-time role in the visual arts. In 2008, she earned a bachelor’s degree in art history from Rhodes College, where she’d gotten involved in public arts projects. After graduation, she moved to Dallas to handle programming and project management at the Nasher Sculpture Center, the Art This Week video podcast, and the Dallas Art Fair. That work primed her to come back to town to work at Ballet Memphis, where she expanded her network and furthered her skills working with foundations and other nonprofits. Then, at age 28, the opportunity opened up. A UAC board member, Russ Wigginton, urged her to apply. He’s held several staff and faculty positions at Rhodes College and had known Kennedy from the time she was a sophomore there. “I’d never been at a director-level position, much less an executive director,” she says. But with her track record in development and programming, along with other contacts made along the way, she was offered the job in January 2015. She shared similar thoughts that the board had about what the UAC was and what it could be. “It didn’t feel super active to me,” Kennedy says. “It felt more like something that I knew existed but not that I felt the presence of in a significant way. That was intriguing to me. How could my role in this organization feel like a bigger part of the art scene?” M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 51

2/19/21 2:02 PM


left: A detail of Jeff Zimmerman’s fivestory-high mural A Note for Hope at 195 Madison Avenue. Done in 2009 with the help of Rhodes College students, it’s visible from AutoZone Park. right: A storytelling mural by Lawrence Matthews III was dedicated in 2020 at Orange Mound Community Center.

I

n the late 1990s, the UrbanArt Commission got its start as part of ArtsMemphis, then called the Memphis Arts Council. Carissa Hussong, now executive director at the Metal Museum, was there at the beginning as director of the UAC. “My support goes back to having been so involved in founding it and being there for the first 10 years,” Hussong says. “It’s close to my heart, the thing I want to see continue and to grow.” Kennedy’s approach in bringing new ideas and methods has been encouraging to Hussong. “You look back and there are ideas that you had and things you wanted to do but the timing wasn’t right or the environment wasn’t there or the support wasn’t there for it,” says Hussong. “So, it’s great to see new people come in with fresh ideas and approaches. They’re able to make those things happen, but also the new ideas they’re able to bring that you hadn’t thought of. Lauren’s approach and her commitment has been really perfect for being a leader during this time.” Kennedy says she and the board agreed that increasing the awareness and visibility of the UAC was paramount. “They were really specific about wanting to see the work grow beyond the City of Memphis’ Percent-for-Art program,” she says. Through that program, the city annually allocates a percentage of its capital improvement funds to public art projects. “That was really my charge when I started and I’m very proud to say I feel like we’ve done a lot in both of those spaces.” With her deep interest in the area art scene, Kennedy already knew many artists, but she pushed further to seek out artists that the UAC had worked with and to understand their experiences. She also needed to quickly learn the dense process of making public art and to become even more familiar with the neighborhoods where the commission was working. One important change for the UAC was to move its offices, which had been in what Kennedy calls “no-man’s-land” above Buster’s Liquors, at Poplar and Highland. Now it is ensconced across from Crosstown Concourse on Cleveland Street. “People see our sign and can pull up and 52 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

050_MM03_2021_UrbanArt_v05.indd 52

park right in front of our door and walk into our space,” she says. “We’ve got this pizza-front storefront window that we call our Tiny Gallery where we do small shows.” There was also what she calls a “brand lift.” “It’s not like a full facelift,” she explains, “but we amped up our graphics and all that, and launched a website that was a little bit more user-friendly, including some great tools like a map of public art around town.” The improvements are aimed at giving a clearer picture of what the commission does and generating further interest in what it’s doing.

I

t’s been important for Kennedy to make inroads into areas that can take the UAC beyond the city’s public art program. One such outreach has been into the architecture community, and she credits architect Mary Haizlip, chair of the board of directors, as being among those who have made introductions and started conversations. “It’s been really helpful in plugging into new developments and garnering more private business and contracts that have really helped expand our portfolio,” Kennedy says. Since she started at the UAC, that effort has generated more than $3 million in private project revenue beyond the city. “That’s been hugely important,” she says, “not only for our visibility as an organization but, to be quite frank, our financial capacity. Every dollar in that total has also meant more opportunities for artists. There’s been a whole lot of work for us to grow as an organization, but I would say that it’s always, always been underlined about how we’re supporting artists and how we’re supporting and engaging the neighborhoods in which we’re making work. And that message has been important to garner the foundation support and drum up new business, because that’s always been a critical piece of why we’re trying to grow.” In further fulfilling that vision, Kennedy points to similar organizations around the country that are taking innovative approaches. One such is Mural Arts Philadelphia: “You walk around Philadelphia and basically at every turn

you are greeted by these gigantic, beautifully executed murals,” she says. “It’s one of the best organizations in the field, and we’ve gotten to work with them to provide training and resources for artists who are coming into mural-making for the first time through the two different iterations of our district mural program that we’ve done with the city. Because they’re so good at what they do, they also received some national funding to create the Mural Arts Institute where they’re finding ways to more strategically share their process and work.” Memphis was one of three cities selected to participate in the institute and the UAC was ultimately chosen to lead a project through the institute’s art and environment initiative. “So we got to actually develop two mural projects with them in town — in Uptown and Frayser — that dealt with the intersection of public art and the environment,” says Kennedy. “And we’re able through some continued support from them to launch a series of conversations this past fall that actually took that a little bit further.” A recent series of talks from artists and environmental justice activists has resulted in submissions for a new round of projects. Another influential organization is Forecast Public Art in Minnesota, with which Kennedy has developed a good relationship. She has traveled and observed ideas from other organizations around the country, building a network and mining for fresh ideas. “It’s supportive because public art is still a relatively new field in the larger arts field and still somewhat small,” she says. “So it actually feels really accessible to be in conversation with people, and that has been super meaningful as the UrbanArt Commission has grown and shifted.”

O

ne of the true tests of leadership and capability is how well one manages the political environment. Much of the money comes from public funds, so there is scrutiny from public officials on where it’s going. And then there’s the art, and that also can bring scrutiny from public officials. “That’s been a really tough component of the job. I’m not going to lie,” Kennedy says. “We’re finding the opportunity and bringing people together ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY URBANART COMMISSION

2/19/21 2:02 PM


who are creating it. But art is so subjective. And so when you’re making work in public spaces, it just follows that you’re certainly not going to be able to please everybody.” That was the case in 2017 when some members of the Memphis City Council sought to pull funding from the UAC. Council member Joe Brown claimed the commission wasn’t spending enough on local or minority artists. Reflecting on that moment, Kennedy is the essence of diplomacy. “Some things in that represented a misunderstanding of how we function in terms of the committee process and how decisions are made,” she says, “but then there were also certainly truths in it as well, and people’s direct experiences. When you hear that kind of thing, the most important thing to do is to really listen and to understand that perspective.” The pandemic of the last year has profoundly affected the normal course of doing things, and arts organizations have been hit especially hard. For the UAC, it was a matter of keeping the well-being of artists at the fore, and doubling down on projects. “We immediately saw that the most important thing we could do was to keep our projects moving so we could keep paying artists for what they’re doing,” Kennedy says. “Thankfully, the major projects that we were working on weren’t shelved because of that economic uncertainty. Things kept moving forward in most cases, maybe some delays, but we were able to keep progress on track for most everything that we were working on from a capital project standpoint.” But just maintaining the status quo was not an option for the UAC. “We thought about what else we could do,” she says. “One of the big strategic aims for us in the last few years has been to support different kinds of work in different kinds of spaces, and to think beyond the traditional mural and sculpture public art that is made. Ultimately we took $10,000 of our operating money and turned that into $500 project grants through the Bridging the Distance program.” The program was designed for artists to respond to the pandemic with works about being connected and to allow those works to be quickly made and shared with the community. Most projects for the UAC are longer term and often complex, but this was a stripped-down process. The artworks could be easily delivered, the application was short, and the timeline was brief. “We received a lot of great ideas and proposals and awarded 20 project grants with our widest range of disciplines represented ever, including short films and ceramics. It was very rewarding and exciting to get to fund that range of work and to support people that we usually don’t get to support through the traditional public art process.” The success of the program in May 2020 prompted a second round in August with more grants awarded. As is happening with many organizations that have had to rethink processes due to the pandemic, the UAC will hang onto some of the ideas that have emerged. “We’re building this into our programming on a regular basis,” Kennedy says. “We’re just

Installation, Fabrication, and Restoration of Granite, Marble, Manufactured Quartz, and Other Natural Stones

(901) 907-0434

Monday - Friday: 7:30am - 4:30pm *Saturdays By Appointment Only

www.bluffcitystoneworks.com | info@bluffcitystoneworks.com

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 53

050_MM03_2021_UrbanArt_v06.indd 53

2/22/21 6:58 AM


Photographer Brandon Dill set up his “Social Distance Photo Booth” outside his house last year where he could take pictures of anyone who wanted to walk through it. “My hope is to support a spirit of community to combat the feelings of isolation and loss so many are experiencing,” he said in his artist’s statement.

Our treatment works whenViagra, Cialis & Levitra don’t! Erectile dysfunction will no longer be a problem after you visit Mid-South Wellness Clinic for Men!

No pain or surgery • Licensed physicians Effective FDA approved medications

6005 Park Ave, Suite 704, Memphis, TN 38119 (901) 761-8100 www.midsouthwellnessclinicformen.com

5860 Ridgeway Center Parkway, Ste. 100 Memphis, TN 38120

“STREET SMART FOR YOU!”

leaning into it and going to take it forward with us now. I don’t think that would have happened in the same way without covid because not only was it a response to supporting individual artists, but it was also us looking at virtual space as a different kind of public space, which is not really something we had considered. It’s not just about parks or community centers or murals on the sides of prominent buildings. It’s about creative experiences and shared spaces.” The commission is also changing timelines where possible to get more money to artists, including the purchase of about $50,000 of studio art for the city’s public art collection to be shown in small galleries at library branches around town.

I

ANGIE STREET Affiliate Broker

Celebrating 8 years with the oldest firm in town!

901-682-1868 ext. 312 office 901-481-5560 cell astreet@m-brealtors.com www.AngieStreetRealtor.com

54 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

050_MM03_2021_UrbanArt_v05.indd 54

n her six years heading up the organization, Kennedy has managed growth and had to respond to change. She is continuing to keep her eye on the future to bring more public art to the area. The UAC recently moved to a bigger grant category with the Tennessee Arts Commission, which translates into some longer-term plans that now can be realized. “We’ll certainly see us playing more in this space of how we support multidisciplinary projects in different kinds of forms,” Kennedy says. “Not everybody wants to make sculptures or murals, but that doesn’t mean we can’t find a way to support that as a form of public art. I would love to also see us helping connect Memphis-based artists to opportunities in other cities as well. A huge part of our focus lately has been building up the folks in Memphis who are being support-

ed by our work. And I would love to see some of these people that we’re working with for the first time, or working with more, for them to be able to take on some exciting projects in other places.” One of the key developments that Kennedy is anticipating is a pilot program that would change the way the UAC identifies public art funding. “We can open up applications for neighborhoods, associations, organizations, and leaders to apply for public art funds for their communities, rather than basing it on where capital funds are being spent,” she says. “I’m really excited to see that grow and for us to continue to find ways for neighborhoods to drive and shape the work that’s made in their spaces.” The strides that Kennedy has made in reshaping the UrbanArt Commission are appreciated by Hussong who, from the organization’s beginning, had hopes it would grow and thrive. “It’s not an easy job,” Hussong says. “I think people assume that it is, but there’s so much that’s involved with working with the city council and the city administration, and also working with the community and needing to make sure that you meet all of these different goals and expectations. That can be a very challenging and sometimes thankless job, because there are just so many different points of view and so many different needs that public art is trying to address and so many different voices that need to be not just heard, but also incorporated into the final project, whatever it is. “It’s a very challenging job to do,” she continues, “and it takes a special person to do it. I’m just thrilled that Lauren is there and that she is really managing those different voices and needs so well.”

BRANDON DILL PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREA MORALES; OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRANDON DILL

2/19/21 2:02 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CONSTRUCTION & INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS HAULING, RECYCLING & DISPOSAL

EBOX >>> Seated left to right: Jonalyn Medling, Amanda Sanders, Jennie Berrie, Jennie Tummins, and Amy Carroll Standing left to right: Herb Honeycutt, Bell Saia, Norman Brown III, President, Glyn Moore, Tabitha Nance, and Loretta Sommer EBOX is a family-owned business with a mission to provide our customers with the highest quality products and services at competitive prices. EBOX serves the construction, commercial and industrial industries in West Tennessee, North Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas by providing an environmentally

safe solution for construction, demolition and industrial waste created on job sites and at businesses. In addition to our hauling services, EBOX also delivers mulch, soil mix, topsoil, sand and gravel. Our goal is to pursue recycling, LEED projects, and related sustainable enterprises with superior on-time service.

10636 Shelton Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.850.9996 | eplexebox.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:55 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

LAW OFFICE OF STEPHEN R. LEFFLER, P.C. >>> Stephen R. Leffler If you're facing a serious legal situation, you need an experienced trial attorney. Stephen Leffler leverages 37 years of successful practice devoted to aggressively protecting his clients. Leffler handles a full range of federal and state criminal charges, including white collar crimes. His civil practice has secured multi-million

dollar judgments in cases that involve automobile and premises injuries, wrongful death, and traumatic injuries. Leffler offers experienced, insightful counsel and remains personally involved with the details of the case from start to finish. The firm offers 24hour assistance through investigator and litigation consultant Timothy Norris.

707 Adams Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105 | 901.527.8830 | LefflerLaw.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:58 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CUSTOM HOME BUILDING & REMODELING RKA CONSTRUCTION >>>

Formed in 2011, RKA Construction is a custom builder located in Memphis, Tennessee. Created out of a love for building and a desire to provide a better client experience, our focus is simple — provide superior quality, craftsmanship, and customer service in everything we do. 901.674.5522 | rka.build SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:29 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DENTAL IMPLANTS & TMJ TREATMENTS PRADEEP ADATROW, DDS, MSD>>>

Building better and brighter smiles, one mouth at a time. Dr. Adatrow was a full-time professor and director at the University of Tennessee for 14 years prior to establishing his practice in Southaven, MS. He is the only BoardCertified Dual Specialist (Periodontist and Prosthodontist) in the Southeast. At his office, you’ll find a dedicated team that provides the ultimate positive dental experience. His patients are more informed and confident in their treatment options due to his vast experience in placing more than 10,000 Dental Implants and helping hundreds of patients suffering with TMJ Disorders and gum diseases. In addition, the friendly, familial style of his team and office environment welcomes patients back to every appointment with a smile. ADVANCED DENTAL IMPLANT AND TMJ CENTER 7135 Getwell Road Southaven, MS 38672 advanceddentaltmj.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 2:30 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DIVORCE LAW THE RICES >>>

Need a divorce? Consider yourself fortunate if you can hire the Rices. Their credentials show that they represent more than simply their three generations of family law experience. The ABA publishes the Rices’ Complete Guide to Divorce Practice. Fellow lawyers designated Larry as a Super Lawyer and Nick as a Super Lawyer Rising Star. NAFLA awarded Larry with its National Top Ten Ranking, while the AIOFLA selected Nick as a Tennessee Top Ten Attorney in granting the Client Satisfaction Award. Avvo.com rates both with its highest ranking possible. Their divorce guide can be found at AboutDivorce.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:49 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DOGGY HOTEL, DAYCARE & SPA BROWNDOG LODGE >>>

Since 2007, BrownDog Lodge has been the premier destination for the pampered pup, offering luxury boarding, grooming, and daycare in an environment designed for fun and safety. Each facility is staffed with trained employees who love your pets as if they were their own. The two pet centers are conveniently located in East Memphis and Germantown, and we also have a veterinary office in Arlington. BrownDog Veterinary is a full-service hospital with the BrownDog name, and with service you know and trust. Visit the vet team at our Arlington location, or let our shuttle service provide a true door-to-door experience for luxury care and comprehensive wellness! Our friendly team of pet-care professionals is waiting to offer your furry family member the very best! EAST MEMPHIS: 4953 Black Rd. (near Poplar and Mendenhall) l 901.767.1187 GERMANTON: 426 S Germantown Pkwy. (next to Lowe’s) l 901.266.9100 ARLINGTON: 9765 US-64 l 901.382.0330 SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:50 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ELDER LAW

THE BAILEY LAW FIRM >>> Olen M. "Mac" Bailey, Jr. We are all getting older. Father Time marches past birthdays, reunions, anniversaries and holidays, setting or re-setting the clock each time. As we age, our concerns and needs change. As an Elder Law Attorney, Mac assists clients with legal issues affecting older Americans in such areas as estate planning, wills, trusts, powers of attorney, long-term care planning, Medicaid eligibility, Veterans Benefits and probate.

A member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys since 1996, Mac has been recognized as a Super Lawyer, a Five Star Professional, and one of the Mid-South’s "Top 40 Under 40." Proving that education is not reserved only for the young, Mac earned his Master of Laws in Elder Law in 2015. Learn more about Mac and Elder Law at TheBaileyLawFirm.com.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 3:45 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

EMPLOYMENT LAW

THE CRONE LAW FIRM >>> Attorney Alan Crone, Founder

The Crone Law Firm provides tireless, compassionate, and effective counsel for clients facing employment law disputes — any legal situation that impacts our clients' ability to make money, including: • Workplace Harassment and Discrimination • Executive and Employment Contracts • Buy/Sell, Buyout, Nondisclosure and NonCompete Agreements • Compensation Disputes

• Commercial and Business Disputes • Business Partner and Shareholder Disputes • Accident and Injury Cases “We focus on creating solutions that work, so that our clients can work. We aim to restore control and predictability in the lives of employees, executives and entrepreneurs while providing proactive counsel to help avoid costly lawsuits and disputes.” — Alan G. Crone, Firm Founder

88 Union Avenue, 14th Floor, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.737.7740 | CroneLawFirmPLC.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:08 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

EXCELLENCE IN GIRLS EDUCATION HUTCHISON SCHOOL >>>

Hutchison empowers every girl to find her unique place in the world. Here she can discover, create, and lead in a nurturing environment, surrounded by a group of strong young women. A Hutchison girl experiments with

new ideas, asks insightful questions, and doesn't back down from a challenge. If she can imagine it, she can do it. Her voice matters. Her ideas are valued. That's the strength of a Hutchison education.

1740 Ridgeway Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.762.6672 | HutchisonSchool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/20/21 11:26 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FINE JEWELRY

BOB RICHARDS JEWELERS >>> Bob, Polly, and Anthony Richards, Owners Since 1927, our now third generation store refurbishing your watches and jewelry, and has provided a selection of fine jewelry and our four graduate gemologists can help you watches that will help you turn your special with most any of your appraisal needs. Our moments into special memories. We pride sales associates are constantly updating their ourselves on keeping up with the latest training on the products we sell. trends, staying educated in this ever changing Our fine jewelry designers include JB Star, market, and giving great customer service. Simon G, Spark Creations, Vahan, Gabriel, and Our on-premises staff of four watchmakers Amavida. Our watch brands include Rolex, and two jewelers take pride in repairing and Omega, Tag Heuer, Seiko, and Swiss Army. 1696 S. Germantown Road, Germantown TN 38138 | 901.751.8052 SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 3:41 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FLORISTRY & FLORAL DESIGN PREMIER FLOWERS >>> Colby Midgett, Owner

Premier Flowers is a full-service Master Florist that creates trendy, elegant, and luxury floral designs with a personal touch. We focus on delivering sensational florals with exceptional service. At Premier Flowers we specialize in creating one-of-a-kind designs with trendy florals catered to your personal style. From special occasions and events to sympathy and funeral services we make sure you get the most out of your flower-buying experience. We are located in the heart of Downtown Memphis and deliver all over Memphis and the surrounding areas, including West Memphis! Experience floral design at its best! 10 N. Second Street #105 Memphis, TN 38103 901.618.2661 premierflowerstn.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:14 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FOOD MANUFACTURING & DISTRIBUTION CORKY'S RIBS & BBQ >>> Jimmy Stovall, COO

It all started with Corky’s original location many regional family owned stores. Our on Poplar in 1984. The smokestacks were success on QVC has led us to growing recreated almost 30 years ago at our our own frozen food direct-to-consumer USDA-inspected meat facility at Bellbrook business fulfilling for more than 50 unique Center off Brooks Road. While each national brands with more than 1000 SKUs restaurant location still smokes its own constituting over 1.5 million packages meats, our USDA facility prepares fully shipped to homes across the country. We cooked bbq products and distributes to see manufacturing and direct-to-consumer more than 3000 locations such as Kroger, distribution as a huge growth opportunity Walmart, Sam's, Costco, Publix, and for the future. CorkysBBQ.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:52 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FURS

HOLLOWAY FURS >>> Left to right: Linda Reilly, office manager; Jimmie Morris, finisher; Jim Holloway, owner and furrier; Casey Holloway, now on apprenticeship; and Mary (KK) Holloway, monogrammer in East Memphis. Holloway Furs has a Holloway Furs, located at 404 Perkins large inventory with the best prices in Extd., was established in 1992 by master furrier Jim Holloway, after the Memphis area. We accept tradeeight years of apprenticeship with four ins and offer a 12-month layaway different master furriers. Outside of program. All work is done in-house by Jim Holloway and his staff. Jim sales, we specialize in custom-made also specializes in the manufacturing garments, fur coat enlargements, reductions, and remodeling; all types of beaver and mink blankets/throws. of repairs, monograms, and appraisals; Open six days a week. Come meet Jim, and cold storage and cleaning/glazing. and the friendly staff at Holloway Furs. We have a newly remodeled cold We appreciate your business. Come see storage and cleaning facility located us at Holloway Furs! 404 Perkins Extended, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.685.3877 SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:11 AM


THE FACE OF

GAMING

SOUTHLAND CASINO RACING >>> David Wolf, President and General Manager David Wolf is the face of gaming at Southland Casino Racing, the area’s fastest growing gaming destination. As president and general manager, Wolf leads the property that has been a major racing venue for more than 50 years and now features live table games, sportsbook betting, the largest slot floor in the market, and several restaurants. Wolf is also overseeing the $250 million expansion of the property, which will grow Southland’s gaming offerings to 2,400 slot machines and up to 60 live table games. The new 113,000-square-foot casino complex will also feature new and expanded dining options, but the signature component of the expansion is a 20-story, 300-room hotel tower. "The views and amenities are going to be beautiful,” Wolf says. Onsite parking will be expanded via a new covered parking garage with 1,250 spaces. Wolf is excited about the future of Southland: “We’ve developed a loyal customer base and can’t wait to see more people discover Southland in the coming years and make it an overnight and weekend tourism destination.” Must be 21+. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800.522.4700.

1550 North Ingram Blvd. West Memphis, AR, 72301 870.735.3670 southlandcasino.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 2

2/18/21 6:30 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 3

2/18/21 6:30 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GASTROENTEROLOGY

BAPTIST MEDICAL GROUP/GI SPECIALISTS FOUNDATION >>> Top row, left to right: James Whatley, MD, Randelon Smith, MD, Gaurav Kistangari, MD, MPH Bottom row, left to right: Edward Friedman, MD, Paul Bierman MD, and Kenneth Fields, MD COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE: THE ART OF TREATMENT AND CARE Suffering from unpleasant stomach and bowel conditions can be challenging enough, without having to worry about finding a top-quality doctor! The highly skilled medical professionals at GI Specialists are experts in helping prevent, diagnose and treat everything from heartburn, food allergies and hemorrhoids, to colon and pancreatic cancers.

HIGH QUALITY AND CONVENIENT CARE The physicians and staff focus on each patient’s comfort in the onsite Baptist Memorial Healthcare Corporation GI Lab. For added convenience, choose from five satellite locations: Brighton, Collierville, Covington, Millington, Marion, and coming soon Desoto. Whether you need screening or treatment, our group is passionate about providing excellent care for every patient.

Main Office and GI Lab: 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 901.578.2538 | GISpecialistsMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:23 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CHRISTIAN DISCIPLESHIP EDUCATION EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL >>>

At Evangelical Christian School, we are committed to partnering with parents to build students for life. Our academic approach fosters critical thinking, group collaboration, and experiential learning, engaging students to become owners in their learning so they are well prepared for

college. We also understand that education is about more than just college preparation; it is about being well equipped for life. That is why all ECS students are known, loved, and discipled to become Christ-following influential leaders in their homes, churches, careers, and communities.

LOWER SCHOOL CAMPUS (K2-5th grades): 1920 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Germantown, TN 38139 SHELBY FARMS CAMPUS (6th-12th grades): 7600 Macon Road, Cordova, TN 38018 901.754.7217 | ecseagles.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:22 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GANT SYSTEMS >>> Nick Gant, President & Founder

The responsive choice in Managed IT Services for small businesses and nonprofits. MEMPHIS: 901.881.5087 | NASHVILLE: 615.647.9145 | GANTSYSTEMS.COM SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:47 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INSURANCE & SURETY CLAY & LAND INSURANCE, INC. >>> Louis Clay and Todd Dyson

Clay and Land is one of the largest locally owned insurance agencies in the MidSouth. The agency represents more than 200 insurance carriers specializing in commercial, personal, surety bonds, and employee benefits. With more than 90

Employees, the agency brings a diverse and dedicated group of individuals that work together to bring expertise and unsurpassed customer service to the marketplace. Located in East Memphis (Ridgeway Center), licensed in 48 states.

866 Ridgeway Loop Road, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.3600 | ClayAndLand.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:21 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

KITCHEN & BATH MINIMAX KITCHEN & BATH >>>

Beginning to End. Floor to Ceiling. Our DESIGN+BUILD process ensures a smooth transition from your kitchen or bath of today to your plans for the future. MINIMAX Kitchen and Bath has been a leading kitchen & bath dealer, fabricator and manufacturer in the Memphis area for 33 years. New or remodel, residential or commercial, MINIMAX Kitchen & Bath offers everything you need from design through installation. The key elements we offer our clients include: showrooms filled with popular products, experienced, in-house interior designers, lifelike 3-D preview illustrations (for new cabinets only), turn-key remodeling/installation services, in-house MINIMAX construction professionals, and licensed plumbing, electrical & HVAC veterans. Plus, MINIMAX has a Contractor’s License. 2945 Brother Boulevard, Bartlett, TN 38133 | 901.386.6868 | MinimaxDesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 7:45 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

BLAIR PARKER DESIGN >>> Blair Parker Design, LLC (BPD) is a Memphisefforts, including the Conwood Snuff District, based Landscape Architecture firm that combines Tennessee Brewery, Memphis Union Mission, more than 50 years of knowledge and experience and Overton Park Golf Course, as well as with new and creative ideas. The firm specializes new construction including TraVure, Overton in creating places for people and building Gateway, Le Bonheur Green, and Hidden relationships with clients and their peers. Creek, to just name a few. BPD is a respected firm with a wide range “The Mid-South is our home, and we take of skills and expertise in design, planning, pride in finding creative solutions to complex stakeholder involvement, construction design constraints that are aesthetically documentation, and the public approval pleasing, efficient, and functional. We strive to process. BPD has been involved in multiple create innovative, buildable spaces and places projects in the city’s recent revitalization where people live, work, and play.” 5100 Wheelis Drive, Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.767.6555 | blairparkerdesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:46 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LIGHTING

MID SOUTH NIGHT LIGHTS, LLC >>> Jesse Wisley started installing and servicing architectural and landscape lighting in 2008. In 2011, he created his own business, Mid South Night Lights. Over the past thirteen years, changes in low voltage lighting have evolved due to LED technology. There are many different designs, and installation techniques are endless. What Jesse and his crew of installers are able to illuminate today, versus ten years ago, is literally and figuratively the difference between night and day. The design and implementation of any lighting project is extremely rewarding, with a soft illumination that not only pleases the eye, but simultaneously produces a wow factor. Jesse has become a leader in the area's architectural and landscape lighting market. He makes time to attend national conferences, where he is introduced to advancements in lighting, as well as other products. Mid South Night Lights is the Greater Memphis Area’s premier architectural and landscape lighting firm. 9377 Marbella Cove Cordova, TN, 38018 901.371.6031 Mid-SouthNightLights.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 12:14 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LITIGATION

GLANKLER BROWN PLLC >>> Josh Kahane Josh Kahane of Glankler Brown, PLLC is a leading trial lawyer who has successfully litigated public and private companies’ highest stakes and most consequential matters. As a lawyer, Josh’s commitment and skill have garnered him too many accolades to list — among them, Best of the Bar, Best Lawyers in America, Super Lawyers, Top 100 Trial Lawyers, Top 100 High Stakes Litigators, and Tennessee Attorney for Justice Awardee, in just 2020 alone! He has been featured in Forbes, Fortune, Money, and Bloomberg BusinessWeek, and was recently the cover and featured attorney in the 2020 listing of The Top 100 Attorneys in America. As an advocate for both plaintiffs and defendants in the courtroom, boardroom, and

before government agencies, Josh couples a unique brand of creative thinking with a command of the facts and law that allows him to drive exceptional results. He is a key asset for his clients — someone to whom they regularly turn for guidance and strategic thinking beyond the scope of a legal dispute. While Josh focuses a great deal of his energy representing Memphis companies and others who have invested in the Memphis market (and serving in the executive leadership of numerous philanthropic organizations around town), his record of victory in litigating cases in 14 states — involving more than a billion dollars — has garnered Josh the reputation as a go-to litigator for real estate and business-related litigation in Memphis and across the country.

6000 Poplar Avenue, Suite 400, Memphis TN 38119 | 901.576.1701 JKahane@Glankler.com | Glankler.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:24 PM


ES O R E H HE T F O MIC E D PA N

78 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v03.indd 78

PHOTOGRAPH BY SEAN PAVONE / DREAMSTIME

2/15/21 4:12 PM


VE O HA E H W C NS P H I A D I F F E R E Nc C O Y M E RIS M SIX M MADE A Y CH B

-19 st covid r fi e h t en he 020, wh 2 h c mphis, t r e a M M e in c ed Sin of diagnos e r e w aspect s y r e v e case ded as upen h s ho have u w ir v s a n n ia o h r co mp y t six Me e e M ll of dut . a s c e v e li h t r ou nd nd beyo a e v g time. o in b g a n e e n ll go his cha during t

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 79

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v03.indd 79

2/15/21 4:12 PM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

S BERT O R E I ER L A U R TION TE ACH L E D U CA H I G H S C H O O L A I C E N SP STATIO em to deliver th WH ITE d n a p u pick

to decided s. rt e b ses.” rts sat o u o R ns, Robe their h er than io s rd a a c h c o it ts nts’ n tude e had On a few ced on her stude their Few hav taught s tism s a h n ith e ta h w is s re au eryears, socially d and helped them red e day ev For 23 y ties such as seve rges th s u a s s n w n , e w he r cha at day isabili , 2020 front la the fall, s ote M arch 12nged. “I remember thsays Laurie with dvision impairment. Hestruction. olwork. In d devices for rem o h c s in a ,” d y n a n a o a h lly rd e s a n d te tu o n s thing ch e ry vir ly ery ha that eve e it was y r everything I did teaches at’s simp ally require v ic era, th almost lik Now, she olroom. “I set re be . s m g s m e e in d la n c m rn a e a p re o le I th e h “ . c in th s s e h id rt In ty s e d b Rob , Ro emp nts,” g we it erous. wore on from her rds for my stude t year everythin s a little b , too dang out hutdown b a s that day, to that, there wa a d l las ls n d ia e a it ta ie n m s in rr io high or gly wo ad told As the h profess in s u ra m enting a o a o y p re fr if c e room. Pri e t oint, pres ed ys, “bu rP a kay, ecame in y of whom com tween th e s b e w ‘O b , s o e P rt lk e lik g ta my oin an believ of a were dents, m ations. “How are ey they’d be d , I wouldn’t have about nts. We tu r s ta a r e is e s h h s u a u n o it th my f real-life ree ed s Did y “Are on the sc ’re getting a lot o dvantag t?’ I’ve ndered. oing on? a o is w d e kids [in h y s e what’s g u hear about tha with my lt like, tally?” . So th n e fe u e b o It o r y . m y e ” is s id th t? id th D a k high-five h, I’d ra this? rs say h to e week for kills. Yea e them a g enoug r teache learning a s e iv in d tr g e th tt x e o e p to g lo n t rd a e n hea al get I wa dy ool dev person]. p as virtu e going to at’ll give everybo . The sch ues. e the ga w g ‘Oh, we’r e th d good job n n , , ri ll k e y b I e a “ he contin th s . s to W d e . d ,” n k p n ts d a a a a e a h k t, re b s c u b ll a o p een took not a spring schools ble to efit has b on plans k up “But it’s lean the were una e they instructi gest ben the families. I ’ll just pic ts ig e n b w e e time to c d d n th tu b a h ay es “I think e back ships wit that som ckets, because m eir parphysiwe’ll com ft off.’” g relation cha th in en’t ever e to a p v r ild a te o ir , u h r e le I n b o th o e F o ti . t h w y a e a w g rt los re ,” w o c e ts t p rs h n o a s u e s w d me se ho ve tran appen th hirlwind have stu ave beco uring tho at I h didn’t ha ething d I t m g It didn’t h ear has been a w ing u o in b s rk t, is e this ally me ents th eth s st y c were wo d u a m a p tu ts o c s s n e e e e o b d th e , d , nts ers for th : y to all ha to ed th their pare rted, and we’ve as they tr attempted before says. “So h with that need s e s h e s I tr , s a f o em ch y. en t in touc to get th that’s un , on the fl never be ther.” could ge ren’t able that had tire school online e arn toge w le t f a o d th in t, n k e e k c n a a p e Mov

80 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v04.indd 80

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY LAURIE ROBERTS

2/16/21 8:14 AM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

EY INFR R W E NIQU I NATO D O M I R A M COO R D O FF I C E G AYOR ’ S -1 9 PRO COVI D Y CO U NT Y M m ne progra rants. “O was able S H E LB g restau I

strugglin er proud of, that ’t n s up s, is our a w I that I’m s ery in-the-weed That says. “ e h s I ” . t, v s ils n deta says. “ ally fa to work o intricate ck,” she ission re a e m b th e y f h-based d m o o o t b in a lo pted a every ithful C as for fait e d a c w e re F c t u lv a a s o v y g th e in in gram Winfr ither t of t mak yor Lee minique was a pro s to help them e more jus ] invites. I did a lo on s ie g t, or get When Doin Shelby County Mashe would was th it n rt n n ti o e u e ff e e m m n com a ip m equip a got e [m communicatio tective e l tr a s e ip fellowsh e, she had no ide rsonal pro as ting munic eive liv a e a c f r in o u [p c re r o E rd ffi h o te P o it o n ’ P c nw ward Harris That w to the ce uate of the end, eve this day.” $1,500 to reimbursement. lot of thrust in the front grad o that to ituation d ll 18 ti t] a 0 soon be s n 2 e I e e d lik m h An feel the s equip C. Hum risis. T mayors. scope of rris called e we truly d in particular in s ly historic c f Memphis Cecil u d a a c y e e p d b p , an big, r Ha yo st ha As the nt, Mayo w was ju people the South e that faith is an Universit e appare “I remember he eople in ool of La v ll p h m a c lie te c e S e b to s , b y e “I lik phre e ovid ounty ther. ugh,” sh ortunity. d said, ‘c am toge Shelby C rt of their lives.” p n ro te p a o th is m e d h o n th a ro for l pa ugh e world s in a s we essentia phis thro life, I love ll over th thered u is real.’ He told u a a le g o le h frey has p is o w e y ty I’m Mem hile p coun ovid ome, Win day. e here m W c h . h g T m re in “ e o . e h s fr B y “ g is sa orkin says. e every to drive ad,” she started w Downtown offic e city.” lectic. d have to le n us, so we have charged r serving th er duties were ec as, e ty aroun h in o in a t g been uncert that jus h ependin y d c d d n u o e A m At first, h d to describe it w . ’r b e n so every ed do, w ersatio “There’s y I like “Initially home liv the conv atever we have to not “The wa he says. ’t have a s up their n ,” ll h id e id ’r d ro W v e . t o s a t th f c . And w all of u ready to o , id s v rd s agains d a o anything e o c . e b t s n the effort people to figh other was on mic-re she say in g e e ,” jo in d th e o n t lp g a m u e p h o h h it t rs wit nd here forget ab ealing w got her fi sleeves a . Now, you see w — even 020. going to nty while we’re d Winfrey e bruary 2 9 didn’t g s e ue in a F g e th ti u is te e fa o d la n C s the ail in helby s just o ovid-1 g covid S t’ c in a c g n th y in any effort e n lated em e lv ri a s m o e ied, as , becau dle of m ment, it . are exp tr jects inv id id rn re e v ro e m e o w p v h e c o .” s e ll g a g c th Sin is sti thin uch n in ounty eetings us. As m s going o huge, big this thing ur office , m t’ ome in c a a h rd te ’s a a th a it e in rw h v g a l h t fo , l in o coord althou federa as we pu tentiona te March infrey to others — CARES Act (the 0, fell to W nts. By la ple in d to be in ntal health and 2 e a 0 h m 2 e e rt h ’v a th e rc p r W e de eo Ma Afte re we moting m between ed busiest p assed in r, make su at our bout pro lus bill) p She help f a ne of the ave to remembe . u to o d s m e s g ti d a s n in w a th e sh rs th y ing ou h f relie role exp really do hit Shelb the leade ounty. “Y dozens o e for Winfrey’s ue to be ding for Shelby C time, when covid munity n c n ti n n fu .” ta o e c is te b s a n to as ca at om coordin as utility xpect us ts for during th went from zero c nssidents e ms, such and gran a re s e ra e tr g w ili , y ro it ty m p n n fa u Cou omm n 3,600 sion to c more tha transmis PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY DOMINIQUE WINFREY

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v03.indd 81

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 81

2/15/21 4:12 PM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

OR V E R N OR O G S A R A OOR DI NAT L C ECMO IAL HOS PITA D A E L R S E AN D P TI ST M E M O R U eir data.” N ack of th BA tr p e HE AD e k atients ve to

p a chine, I h ival rate of covid ercent. g n ri p rv b u 4 n s 4 a e Th we c ent is a device octor would O treatm ut in our reality ’s M It . C n E o n ti k, b give Oxygena t’s room, and a d e of nds blea le would have hich sou insid atien got word op W p s r e “ a in o p e ra rn to s d e in o v r bes o ll the s, all th ara Go a tu g S n , s e in e h e e rg th o b rc f d la a o d e e in as plac I n early Mrst covid patient ha n’t think e says. he mach eart, ndemic h died,” sh patient. T ent’s lungs or h fi its the pa ody that’s did e I m “ th d l. a a g r it in o ti p that the s n do nyb the pa Govern to her ho alls, “whe an is not al toll: “A with work for admitted ecause,” she rec xpect to what org demic, it’s emotion n n fortable o a m g n o e c in k d b e n re n ta a o e it u p f p o m y o e e of t l, d h e th rt a c g mu you lood ospit It’s pa about a nurse, in a big h ual problems.” ] drains b ine, nt to be. . Talking ll a O rk e w o n M w u a w C o u E th y o y re an g ach nus gs. [The death th w? You see it mo to the m le with u a startlin f their lun o as sort o see peop rwards, she had y, takes it r their lungs, n h d k o is u b h o y T ir , e l. rs e e ra to th lif ft fo e c a o n m rk x n e d o e o o g r fr w ir to in So e of ou ow how want to, es all the k into the a friend tion. “On which do ts the blood bac sick with you ed that. I don’t kn nts me every conversa ra, I just talked to e said u fi u o li p a re s amp , Sa and then ot like it h nt to rleans. H gs that a ork.” said, ‘Oh this. It’s n e get up and wa g it their lun in New O last night for in w o n la y S w p . n o y a d d o o e m d b e e to akes eople m givin of min plants, th don’t hav at? I ay — it m very single day I’ ted 25 p s h d a id n b w a v , y tu o tr r rr c in o y fo the rk. E , ‘I’m s used just covid go to wo nd I said ntilators Normally es are now the it ti g I have. covid.’ A if we have 25 ve n in in e h v c th to od, and if e n a s ry e eve w ppen rt. Wh s out, go CMO m o sh E rk s ,” o re e , w t e m s it don’t kno ! What if that ha ti lin s dec “And if rson’s f it sort t’ ent of la e o d n p n e y tm t u ti a lit a a e a ro p th a tr u re est a as m ch lying , the initial it was fail to arr doesn’t, n only do one take the a sudden ‘What happens if I a rs f “ c o to I r. ll t o e la A u g ’ rn B ? ia us me s. “ ink, that call Gove m and sort of tr continue To me, there’s so control nd you th e that? What’s doctors . ys. m the in o of hits, a a lik o l, d s e fr u n e rf n a h rg e c o s u I ti s w as big hone,” forma ore po p in m e r, y job. I do th e r we get a l like?’” h e o d ig v and d m people, uch h tient o the lea e of the e a m in n h p fe o e it , e w m to rs th o g e g s c vid ese goin just , it look onsultin hcare pro e pandemic has to help th akes of stuff. I If, after c ian, Dr. John Craig ernor For healt I can do f th g tm o v a s in o ic e th s G th n , g y , y a n h ry d eve challe MO p the da helpe as had f C e h o E b r d o n n e a e rn c th biggest e I know e t t e ov atien “I’m a and at th od at night. And istical. G k: coordinating th like the p atment. e tr o g e been log s ople that to p e th ta s e inates ysician me sle am of p ut vital, h rd b te p , o a g o e . c n h s th u it e e s g un rk w It devic assistin d that, th that I wo me way.” e says. “ f ECMO bedside, tuff done. Beyon O manym,” sh brane supply o sa ro e c a s th M n is ls a C is fee et all th n the E al Mem g o re e “ECMO o ’r y rp e o e th r Extra C whole tim stands fo

82 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v04.indd 82

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY SARA GOVERNOR

2/16/21 8:14 AM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

RRIS E F T KA M A KE R M AS K

y Saliate Gabb 00 id d n a c s ve 5,0 resentati upplied at least t Rep Is nteers lo e lu a v o t v lie a e d th b n nas. “I aign, a it’s just p ; is m e a th c s g r d ” e h trict, h e spee ple doin masks to in her dis we have lot of peo n’t have the sam They m e th d “ do distribute iscussed, should and ] he says. of people d ampaign in the film at Ferris at I do,” s ted a le th n p e o ig g e s p e ta ays. “We h their [c tion t K d n s it s r a a w o v e e d d m m v a a te e tu h n ik s a L aliz c pri y, co cessarily . I had the equipthe fabri e came to this re litics. ndemic. n industr don’t ne a ome televisio w by the pa po d h t a t d y ir u h u e it e I B o C lin b th d ? e a ff o n sid log Blu re not a studio in ke it go faster, a t s c k s e re, and has been ion gig here was a rf ,” e c m ma st a p at no, health a r 2019 n to ju e u th t ic s b t s n a s a e to w b la c m t It r O . u “Ou abo ople hcare.” ed in y, I ork of pe They are ion is basic healt t, in a da that end hiatus a d n tw n o th e a n n , w e e w e n a L iss terials ve b e. I k en, in her life m rris’ supply of ma . “We ha rm for m bout 150, and th and are a few to s re e th e she says h F a e g sew r frantic t out When n, althou During th p with he ter, Jess alf, I could could cu u h p a e d since the g back up now. e n , k a s a day couldn’t pace, her daugh rrin myself w eanother things sti on ce engag uestion to t 150.” to her q u o y rd b o m a , w producti e h d audien t is n ll u a a o fin c r t o u a p t th u downtim o?” au erris free ut o ts Id Zaferris, At first, F ey could pick up dweek, p rted rolling her talen A r d e fo r id what can o c it e at th n, as ickly d . She ment ed nd donations sta ewn and friends th r backyard. “The Ferris qu d making masks ss it, a ise, I w ed e h rt ic e ta in s m s u s e on Redd erris says she ha t k C d s . mas fd, pan the CD ro te F were be p , re ra 0 masks n ld o fo 0 le y n e e to ,0 c b ll e in. A som eeks ngs. “M than 12 ings ac to ri t ,” e th re v u it o o o t c m u h began w o e c d c ab to rea distribute ending fa t,” she says, “so ills to talk decided recomm etual tis . es me ch omewhere else, rp n s iv e y ie g r P a c u f s It s o “ o e y a h rs g ’s ,s e iste its,” s husband logic of containin r . “People 25 to giv Suede S her e she says ver know, sent $ asks. d to othe The Blue gan handing out at e we saw th not being expose m n then ce be that I will is area access to nd Indulgen on Beale Street, st year, breath a th in .” t a le k L th rs p . s a fi o a , ts e re s m p b tes up.” mask ith other were a people’s atter pro se of okes me nected w It still ch k Lives M Tennessee Hou ere c h la T “ B . She con ia d l me ed with on socia she work makers

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY KAT FERRIS

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v03.indd 83

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 83

2/15/21 4:12 PM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

UX E D E A ER D A D RK VEL I O N WO T C E L E

ere f whom w , many o rs d e e rk c o fa w , hics election emograp re to the trying to erable d ln re su u e o v h p x in in e ntial ming ays uch pote tion, Dedeaux s ho are co m w o le s p o e c p fe ig in ” b c s ? a s le u ir rst e e had ir vote coronav hy Velda sed the fi aught cast the itate. “W w is s read r e p m h s fo e ’t e ld h n n s u we co hurrica they did ton. She se she c onically, e re a g u Ir e a e in h c ill m w e la b M e B 20 p in ayb som room ’re a ended u enough day of 20 tor told me, you eans as re than m ’t give it a n o o m ti t lo c Dedeaux rked in New Orl ole til idn k,” The do wo out a wh . Navy un says. “I d for a wee gI the flu. “ lived and loyee for the U.S I to be off ces,” she as just somethin ! e g ’t la v p n in a a r v h c a e I H to th p “ o o . g w m 5 ‘N in e , It 0 o e n t. g 0 a h lik 2 civili oug gust ast, ork on , “and I’m second th do.” day in Au d on the Gulf Co o she says ommitment to w to a fateful t e g u is o was als B in “ o c ra . g s d was rn an other, wh ve he say ade this m s lo m r ,” a e s r h e s been bo rm h y at I day!’” 20, om sto She sa tilled in n 0 th fr s o 2 e n in ti f n c r, u o ra a e o ll le r ic y e e rk fa t I nev t hurr n wo t that t the e busies s the firs This was our n electio y. “It is importan roughou a a th h f w ou T o y a e o in g n h tr o . in Ka om crac use w staffed process ally ran fr of demo ause our on, beca ve ti a c h Dedeaux s in Tennessee, le to e ’t g n ry ever actu fter Katrina bec ter.” in eve l is goin We did lace e “ p te a . v o a y g n le v a n w n l e d lli v a h a o c a it th p ters y life a the lo ny ted w safe h 1,000 vo e Navy te for at ay-to-da onal s inunda t that ma o d a th to e v r r w g 0 u fo g o 0 to y in 8 rk g n o w build e nati ect o were goin November, we tinued to g in 2010. But more eff you vote for at th er think we She con . “In n at s ri h y ti n a T e. Wheth . o s re a e ic l r e rs ti o e e h m v n s ti p ft r u ,” A e u e n n o r. le th o to e p ’s t h g o It a r a pe ree ’t fo ses, t ays. “ in Millin ure wasn , she signed up the top th because of the el,” she s ted for wins or lo is v in le le f dy re o e e w f as rd o the lif g re. Nobo guard on I vo st unhea ou busy. As long n out the for, but somethin crossing the pers ju io a ’s s in a It s “ p a w s o r. t e y n ie y sti e fl tm ted work It keeps vote, tim who I vo least I pu I enjoy election w location. in line to ’re working t I did, or e says. “ to be an a le h ing, I kno h s p y o w ,” a e t. s s to p n t w a h d u o rd a rt o n ig a h o y k n p y t rw w e a o im fo th kn I look to sleep oting is on’t even I can go k than se I feel v g.” by. You d urs.” it, becau r way to give bac e right thin w e , 13 ho her fello I did th tte r th 12 d e , fo n b a t 10 rk a e o h h s w W nd ugh t there a Even tho to get ou

84 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v03.indd 84

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY VELDA DEDEAUX

2/15/21 4:12 PM


ES HERO HE OF T EMIC D N A P

UR Y A G A LTH T I D D R . A IONAL HE A AL T CCU PA RCH HOS PIT O F O SEA TO R DI R EC I LDR E N ’ S R E vestigaL A C I ur case in o D te H E le p C M E e com cing.” hours, w ST. J U D missed ntact tra it

ly co ingle tion and how rapid high. A s rips asis, from were no signs takes are n outbreak that s b y e a h d T re a -to e y a to th d d e t ntinu to ld lea g, tha us it en case cou hospital. “We co e says, spreadin and how infectio ve not be s a a h w 9 -1 k h h the the quic of covid inment, ons, suc ployees,” through of conta says. “And then, y in our em h a multilayered T he effec.tsVulnerable populatiro it s n re e u a s c r a m c u p m a co wit see ly g u was,” G sting is l overall, scientific felt even tic people in e borne ut we fee gram in which te it as ness the out asymptoma b v erly, and “ a re ld h a e s w e e a ti th d as ined facili on pro have ab , change lly conta ected ted living preventi re is no started to ns, in many ways e hopefu v and assis the disease. The refl a h is e is io w to m , s t th part t of in Me f wha nsmis . And n o a le o tr e ti ib p s la a s mission u c o n the brun p s n p e t ble po ce tra s rm.” es, wh ole land uch as e. Mos ra la s h d e p a m e w ln Ju rk u is e t. o v d S w th s f , more t that ren o the no infectiou creening the child in the fac tion rather than mised expect. In mptom-based s u p o phis than immunocompro se of e y , Gaur c e h x s g e y u u s is the have ’t eno are cau r, beca n u e ie o b re s y the e r a e e t w u t s th of them a y B he tigator in e wa o by. As if th regard, w ease, or HIV. ’s in som ing tangible to g ipal inves it c on s n h n ri h p ic in some is h a Jo d son & thing w eep ometh as also n kle cell k e s h w ic e m to t s Jo v o r, b a e s e h jo g c th rc ur’s can facin ial of 2 pe en ne ho ditya Ga clinical tr as found to be 7 . “This n you are n from those w ’s not alo e e h h w s y It’s Dr. A a s e on nt It w aur ying smit ev ng infecti ,” he vaccine. s a differe fe. But G w, the sa can tran preventi them sa atic, that’ ys in a m “You kno ild’ is so e . w v to s ti e p rt c a m e m o p eff m a ch are asy ue in s e iq .” is n e u on the ra ra g vaccine n is ly y to the on accine ientific w man village of challe v c o l ’s a s h e it s f , v ’s e o w le e k k o d ta n in ‘It ht ith a I th St. Ju s able to says. “Rig g researched w s less ate when orking on campu Thanks to ur and Kim were ce in appropri e w b tra ine ha , Ga which is ave been ngoing efforts to test and this vacc sources s d re u n d A ro . e o o e people h ts, as in, lv g s l, o ri to patutiona uiremen ny “It’s inv ingle do ment a ti q g . s s le 0 in re p in 2 tt e e 0 e g im g 2 th e for ,” h r ma from t stora ,” in March ng hours stringen pt refrigerated fo covid-19 ther employees program ds and lo ct tracing n e prevent o e k to be d k e n e d b a ls e e , a n e w s it ca milie dividu rking conta s not n o in n e f w o w o d o s ry r d d e u tients, fa n v o a dre ork e do months, “It’s hun 0.” ns. We w says. “W he says. .” t minus-7 s have brought estigatio County] health l s a v a e n in ic tl e d e ti z e s o s a u m fr c e , o y d ri in im n lb a c v a e K c h a h t h v s we’re na wit ve se the [S But while world, Gaur say d Dr. Han ntrol, routinese we ha sely with u a lo c c e d ll have Gaur an b o re t c in ti ent, bu t. “We sti e to a e d staff fection e p s e m y in o a in rt f s h e a a o d re is p r tr o d e o e . to d tions the w direc e hav here the erging Jude’s investiga ot out of r another year w ystem, w ck of em t. s n a e S s a tr t a c p p c e u e d ff e ,” n ity ly k ame re fo ight a tracing a irus activ as on to prepa ults the s s that m contact level of v ant not to e t test res ult is called outbreak force. covid-19 w people e m g o s e e w , t port res will b ork Typically fore mos on a in will be im the test global w onths be , says. “It soon as itive, with g s m e s in o r h A e p a . e y d s s a t’ ra .” d a th were their guard omeone of it. “We drop our out for s had heard PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL

078_MM03_2021_PandemicHeroes_v04.indd 85

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 85

2/16/21 8:14 AM


R OA D

T R I P

FISH

Tales Embracing the Natural State may be the cure for the winter blues. BY JESSE DAVIS

“The trout are always waiting,

and usually willing. Soon, three or

four fly-fishermen are looping casts

over the shoals, testing their skills and

bringing trout to the net with regularity. The early sun and fog make the river seem a magical place. Almost like a dream come true.”

— B ruce Va nWy nga r den

E

leven months into a fairly rigorous, pandemic-induced self-isolation, my girlfriend and I had begun to go a little stir-crazy. Though we’re relatively young and healthy, I decided early on in the covid-19 pandemic that it was my duty to my community not to spread this disease. Since I’m able to work from home, for the most part, I’ve kept to myself. “With great privilege comes great responsibility,” to paraphrase Spider-Man’s Uncle Ben. Trout are plentiful in the Little Red River. 86 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v05.indd 86

PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY CROCKER / TOURISM ARKANSAS

2/18/21 10:07 AM


M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 87

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v03.indd 87

2/15/21 9:15 PM


I live in a two-room apartment in the upstairs unit of an old converted Midtown home, and, when I’m not pecking away at my keyboard, I’ve perfected a Phantom of the Opera-esque moody pacing. It’s exercise, of a sort. Sometimes, though, it just feels good to get west of the Mississippi River, hike up a hill, and breathe a little fresh air. Memphis has it all — the best blues, soul, hip-hop, barbecue, and chicken wings in the world. For a city mouse such as myself, that’s usually enough to keep me satisfied. The other great thing about the Bluff City, though, is its conveniently central location in the Central Time Zone. We’re in the middle of the Mid-South, a day trip away from an outdoor adventure. Last month, instead of climbing up the walls, Sydnie and I decided to climb into the car and make for the state line — and take a Sunday hike in the hills of Arkansas.

cold river currents, and flat rice fields giving way to rolling hills. I’ve driven to Little Rock to see concerts and watched Mick Jagger strut across a stage there. I’ve played my own gigs in Jonesboro, an hour’s drive away, where the “band from Memphis” status is sure to win audience favor — and not a few drinks on the house. Most of all, though, I think of the fishing trips I used to take with my dad, uncles, and granddad to Calico Rock in Izard County, a little place on the White River in north-central Arkansas.

HAVE TACKLE BOX, WILL TRAVEL

O

ne White River fishing trip stands out like a beacon in my memory — the last one I took. These trips were usually smaller affairs — a few Ten-

VIEW FROM A BRIDGE

above: The Hernando de Soto Bridge over the Mississippi River, with Arkansas on the horizon.

wonder how many times I’ve crossed the Hernando de Soto Bridge, slipping over the state line and into Arkansas, to visit attractions in almost every direction. Lake Ouachita, near Hot Springs, is stunningly beautiful, a jewel of a lake where I’ve spent weekends hiking and camping. During one of those excursions, I’ll never forget being jolted awake by the bone-rattling yowl of what I later determined to be a bobcat in heat. I was sharing a tent with an old college friend, whose eyes were so wide with surprise they seemed to glow in the dark. We were perfectly safe, but I’ll always remember that night as the time I learned that bobcats sound much bigger and indescribably ferocious when heard in the woods in the dead of night. We also went hiking, of course, and wet our toes in the crystal-clear and clean waters of Lake Ouachita. That trip is one of many, each with its own memories — the smell of campfire smoke, trailing my fingers in

right: Jesse and cousin Ryan are almost swallowed by adult-sized life preservers. far right: Just “watch” me: Jesse’s dad, Jeff, pulls in a trout caught with a shiny lure made from a broken watch band. opposite top right: Fishing for trout on the White River. opposite bottom: A view of the White River from Calico Rock.

PHOTO CREDITS: TOP BY CHENGUSF / DREAMSTIME; CENTER AND BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY JESSE DAVIS

I

88 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v04.indd 88

2/16/21 8:11 AM


Fishing is equal parts luck and patience. Something hit my lure. I gave the rod a jerk to set the hook and began to reel in a smallish rainbow trout.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CASEY CROCKER / TOURISM ARKANSAS

nesseans making time for a change of scenery, paying fishing license dues at Lindsey’s Trout Dock, and spending a weekend on the water. That year, though, Uncle Keith was in poor health, so the family rallied to spend one last weekend on the water. At the time, my dad worked for Northwest Airlines, so we flew standby on a small commuter jet to St. Louis to meet extended family and make the drive down to Calico Rock. Disembarking in Missouri, my dad spotted a faux silver and gold watch band glinting from the avant garde airline carpet. Because all Davises are part magpie, he stooped to scoop up the piece of jewelry. Passing it to me, he said, “Might could make a fishing lure out of that. You never know.” After a longer trip than usual, our caravan cruised into town around dusk. By the time we had checked into the little motel, most businesses had closed for the day, including the little diner where we always ate. So, grumbling stomachs as our guides, we set out to look for something to eat. Dinner came that night, not in the form of a freshly caught rainbow trout or familiar fare from our favorite local diner, but in the form of a rodeo. If memory serves, it was my uncle, David, who pointed out the lights and metal horse trailers. “Are we eating horse now?” my dad said. “Every rodeo worth its spurs has a concession stand,” Uncle David replied. So we bought hamburgers and single-serving bags of potato chips and ate them sitting on truck tailgates. I’m sure for the older guys in the group, it felt familiar — like a high school football game. My idea of a fun extracurricular activity always leaned more toward whiling away hours in the library, so to me it was entirely novel. That was the single greatest hamburger I’ve ever tasted. To save my life, I could never recall what was on

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 89

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v03.indd 89

2/15/21 9:15 PM


Memphis! THANK YOU

Voted No. 1 BEST BURGER & BEST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

Come See GP C! Sunday Morning Worship 9:30am Livestream and Limited Onsite Online Offerings Throughout the Week The GPC family includes: Children * Youth * Adults Special Needs Individuals of All Ages Join us on social media facebook.com/GermantownPres instagram.com/germantownpres twitter.com/germantownpres Germantown Presbyterian Church

www.GermantownPres.org

it — lettuce, tomato, ketchup, maybe? — but it was satisfying in a way no other burger has been before or since. Perhaps the most satisfying seasoning is a healthy dose of making the best of it.

SPIRIT ON THE WATER

T

he next day, out on the water, I was lucky enough to have a few firsts. At some point, the adults let me pilot the boat. I still remember the way it bumped along the water, the difference between a motorboat and a canoe or a kayak. At that point in my life, it was the fastest thing I had ever driven. If I thought my day couldn’t get any better, though, I was woefully mistaken. As we drifted downriver, having little luck trailing lines hooked with live bait, I made up my mind to try the homemade watch lure

There and back again: Sydnie crosses Calico Creek on a narrow wooden bridge.

I’d crafted. I reeled in my line and switched out my hook for the lure. I cast the line and began reeling it in, repeating the process. I remember sunlight glinting off the White River, the little whorls and eddies around rocks and fallen logs. I remember, quite vividly, my dad saying, “You’re never gonna catch anything with that.” He wasn’t being cruel. We were not a family that took many vacations, and I don’t think he wanted me to waste my time or remember this trip as a disappointing one. But fishing is equal parts luck and patience. Something hit my lure. I gave the rod a jerk to set the hook and began to reel in a smallish rainbow trout. When my dad pulled it into the boat, water dripping from sleek and shiny scales, he wore the biggest smile I’ve ever seen on his face. It was the first time I ever proved him wrong. It’s an experience I hope to give to my own children someday.

90 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v04b.indd 90

2/18/21 6:21 AM


From the river to the sea, from my father to me. The sun was setting — the golden hour — a good time of day to cast a line.

An egret keeps watch over the White River.

DOWN BY THE RIVER

PHOTO CREDITS: TOP LEFT BY CASEY CROCKER / TOURISM ARKANSAS; TOP RIGHT BY JESSE DAVIS

T

he last thing I remember from that trip was struggling into waders and standing next to my father in the river, the current flowing all around us, joining us in a moment, a cycle as old as time. From the river to the sea, from my father to me. The sun was setting — the golden hour — a good time of day to cast a line. The fish are always biting, but it can build to a frenzy at dusk, when more insects come out and the fish are greedily snapping up their supper. I think, though, my dad chose our mode and time with two things in mind: to give my uncle and grandfather some time alone, and to make sure to give me a memory. Grandaddy and Uncle Keith took a boat out together. It didn’t fully hit me then, but looking back, I wonder if they talked or if they were just happy to be together one last time, in nature, doing something they loved. Dad and I didn’t speak much that afternoon, not as I remember it. There was just the sound of water, of boat motors in the distance, the whir of lines playing out, and the soft crank of the reel. As it swirled around my rubber waders, the water was cold — piercingly so. The White River, fed from the depths of Beaver Lake, is famously frigid. Maybe it’s the dusk light that brings the analogy to mind, but the memory feels preserved in amber. I can’t recall if we even caught anything. Surely we must have, in that river so stocked with trout, at that fortuitous time of day. As an angler, I’m amateur at best, though, and

no trout can match the joy of simply being together, away from the hustle and bustle, as the river flows onward.

RIVER OF TIME

W

hen I pitched this story in the first months of 2020, I had no idea how long it would take to write, before I would see it in print. This wasn’t the feature I had imagined — mostly reminiscing, more or less as I told it to Sydnie as we wound our way through Arkansas roads and, later and on foot, up and down Arkansas trails. My brother-inlaw, my dad, and I had a trip planned, but we know what god does when man makes plans. There’s something to be said for resiliency, though, for traditions that outlast the hard times. I can’t help but think of this trip as a scouting mission, and I’m hopeful for many more camping, hiking, and fishing trips to come. Calico Rock wasn’t quite how I remembered it — the town has grown. Change is good, though, and Sydnie and I enjoyed playing tourist, following the meandering Calico Creek, and making plans for the future. Hiking with Sydnie, telling fish tales from childhood, I couldn’t help but think of the days ahead. There’s a certain symmetry to these trips, too. The last time I traveled, it was for a feature for this magazine. Now, with some end in sight as we wait for a vaccine, those briefly deferred plans, hopes, and dreams float to the surface of my mind, like bubbles of air dancing up toward the water’s edge. By and large, I’ve escaped the troubles

of the last year relatively unscathed, but all the postponed trips and celebrations — even Sydnie’s and my engagement as we decided to work and save money — have given me a renewed determination to cherish each experience. By the time you read this, my sister, brother-in-law, and nephew will have moved to Memphis. I look forward to exploring a newly reopened Bluff City once it’s safe to do so. There’s a river tugging at my mind, though, too. The hook is set, and I catch myself looking forward to helping my nephew cast a line or clamber over a hill to watch the tree-covered horizon stretch out in front of him. Maybe my kids will one day too. There may be some changes in store, some slight modifications to be made, if the tradition is to continue. I’m glad Sydnie came with me on this trip, for example. The old Davis fishing trips were something of a boys’ affair, but I see no reason why that should be. Sydnie can out-run, out-hike, and out-climb me any day. She’s faster on inline skates, the trails, or a treadmill, too. It’s been some time, but I have every confidence she could out-fish me, even with a lure made of scavenged flotsam and jetsam. Maybe we’ll renew the tradition of going to Calico Rock and the White River, but the Black River and the Little Red River are great fishing spots too, or so I’m told. There’s really only one way to be sure, and the answer lies in the cold, cold water flowing through hills, just across the bridge. M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 91

086_MM03_2021_Travel_Arkansas_v03.indd 91

2/15/21 9:15 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LUXURY AUTOMOBILES

MERCEDES BENZ OF MEMPHIS >>> Doug Session With over 25 years of experience in the automobile industry both selling cars and being a finance manager, Doug Session has a passion for quality and reliability and decided he could only continue in the automobile industry if he could work for a company truly showcasing The Best or Nothing! Mercedes Benz of Memphis was the answer. As Doug stepped into his role of Sales Manager of this family owned store with 40 years of history here in Memphis, TN, he leveraged his experience as a family man

with a wife and three children to build a sales team and dealership with that same family atmosphere. Even during the trying year of 2020, Doug was able to have one of the highest percentages of increased sales year over year in the Southern Region. Leading the best sales team, selling the best automobiles, working for the best owner in the business, and delighting every customer is the daily goal of Doug Session. Stop by anytime to say hello and take a look at why Mercedes Benz is truly The Best or Nothing.

5389 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.345.6211 MBofmemphis.com | dsession@mbofmemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 7:43 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEDICAL AESTHETICS

GLO MEDICAL AESTHETICS >>>

Lisa Street, Nurse Practitioner and owner of Glo Medical Aesthetics in Midtown Memphis has been in nursing for 26 years. Her strong clinical background — including ER, ICU, and nursing education — has paved the way to a successful 15-year practice in Medical Aesthetics. As a national clinical educator for Allergan Medical Institute, Lisa is passionate about continuing education and keeping up with the latest innovations. Her priority when seeing aesthetic patients is always to ensure patient safety and satisfaction. Her philosophy on beauty is “the glow that makes people beautiful starts from within . . . if you love others, are kind to yourself, and strive to be the best person you can be, then that beauty will show on the outside." Glo offers ONLY the gold standards in medical-grade skin care, injectables, lasers and body treatments. Known for their warm, welcoming vibe, the professionals at Glo strive to make each patient feel “uniquely beautiful." 703 New York St. Memphis, TN 38104 901.552.3461 GloMedMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:23 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEN'S GROOMING

1776 MEN'S GROOMING PARLOR >>> Left to right: Caitlin Williams — managing partner; Chris Farrar & Gina Kay — co-owners

Where old meets new. Modern cuts and straight razor shaves with an old school vibe. 1016 S. Yates Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 563 West Poplar, Collierville, TN 38017 1776MensGroomingParlor.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 12:03 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LENDING

LUDY CALLAWAY — THE MORTGAGE LADY >>> “In today’s housing market, if you’re not prepared to act when you find the home you’ve been looking for … you’ll lose it to someone who was! It happens all the time.” As Vice-President of Independent Bank Mortgage, Ludy can get you prepared. Get pre-qualified! A mortgage pre-qualification can be as easy as a 10-minute phone call. And that can make the difference in winning and losing the contract. Make the call now. Then go find your home. Make that difference happen! 901.494.4400 Ludy@i-bankonline.com YourMortgageLady.net

NMLS #267872 SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:12 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEPHROLOGY MINESH PATHAK, MD >>>

Kidney disease is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a board-certified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient's quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment. 6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400 Memphis, TN 38120 901.382.5256

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:24 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OB-GYN

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN A Division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC >>> Front row: Robin Taylor, MD, Judi L. Carney, MD, and Candace D. Hinote, MD Back row: Dominique Butawan-Ali, MD, Paul D. Neblett, MD, Mary Katherine Johnson, MD, and Thomas D. Greenwell, MD Mid-South OB-GYN provides comprehensive density tests, aesthetics services, PelleFirm Gynecological and Obstetrical health care body treatments, cosmetic laser procedures for women of all ages. and skin care products. The physicians of Mid-South OB-GYN Some of our services include yearly have received award recognition from wellness exams, fertility counseling, weight management, contraceptive options, Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for MonaLisa Touch for vaginal atrophy and their leadership roles. They have also been other in-office procedures. Our physicians recognized by The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching and have also perform minimally invasive procedures received certification by the American Board including laparoscopic, hysteroscopic and robotic surgeries. We deliver at of Obstetrics & Gynecology. At Mid-South we don’t believe in a one size Baptist Women’s Hospital and Methodist Germantown Hospital. All expectant fits all approach to women’s health care; we mothers receive a complimentary 3D/4D treat each patient with personalized plans, ultrasound. courtesy and compassion. We look forward Other services include mammograms, bone to caring for you. 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.1200 | MidSouthObgyn.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 6:05 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORIENTAL RUGS TAGHAVI ORIENTAL RUGS >>>

At Taghavi's Oriental Rugs, we take great pride in our 60+ years in business and the type of services we offer, including sales, hand cleaning, reweaving, color-run restoration, moth-damage repair, stain and odor removal, disinfecting all viruses, and much more! With every customer, we are guided by our core values: integrity, experience, excellence, and professionalism. We have not only the largest stock in new and antique rugs, but also the best cleaning and restoration method in the country. We have built our reputation for more than 60 years, not on false promises, but integrity and excellence. 3554 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38111 901.327.5033 TaghaviRugs.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:28 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHODONTICS

MEMPHIS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS >>> Left to right: Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner Celebrating more than 75 years of combined orthodontic experience, Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner have offices in Memphis, Munford, and Collierville. They have cared for numerous generations of families, specializing in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics for children and adults. Both understand how a beautiful smile can change a

patient’s life, improving health and selfesteem with traditional appliances or Invisalign. Dr. Scott and Dr. Stanley have been included in the annual Memphis Top Dentists awards every year since its inception, achieved status as Diplomats of the American Board of Orthodontics, and are members of the American Association of Orthodontists.

6425 Quail Hollow Road, Suite 201, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.5415 843 South Tipton Road, Suite A, Munford, TN 38058 | 901.837.7708 2002 Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.854.6493 WernerOrthodontics.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:25 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PAIN MANAGEMENT

MAYS & SCHNAPP NEUROSPINE AND PAIN >>> Left to right: Moacir Schnapp, MD, Cody Scarbrough, MD, and Ryan McGaughey, MD Established for over 25 years, it has long been known that Mays & Schnapp Neurospine and Pain has been the trusted practice for chronic pain in the Mid-South. In fact, Dr. Moacir Schnapp was a pioneer in the field, and the medical practice continues to be a leader in pain management. In 2020, Mays & Schnapp further cemented its place at the top of this class by being chosen as one of two independent practices in the country to offer the first FDA-approved temporary peripheral nerve stimulator to help ease chronic pain. Patients choose Mays & Schnapp because they are treated by physicians with decades of experience, including board certifications in pain management. Our specialized team treats each individual patient and his or her pain as unique.

There simply is no other place like Mays & Schnapp within 500 miles, where at its CARFaccredited facility, patient treatments are unique to the individual and may include interventional treatments such as nerve blocks, radiofrequency ablation, and joint injections, as well as restorative therapies like physical therapy and behavioral therapies. You can be sure, when the problem is pain, Mays & Schnapp is the place that can help. Mays & Schnapp treats a wide variety of painrelated conditions including back and neck pain, arm and leg pain, arthritis, sciatica, shingles, peripheral neuropathy from diabetes, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and post-stroke pain.

MEMPHIS: 55 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 SOUTHAVEN: 7900 Airways Blvd., Ste. A6, Southaven, MS 38671 901.747.0040 | maysandschnapp.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 7:33 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PHANTOM SCREENS

SOUTHERN SCREENS >>> Left to right: Don, Micah (aka '12') , Mike, Kandi, Doug, David, and Adrian. Not pictured: Megan We often fail to recognize major forks in the roads of our lives until we’ve traveled a good ways down the new path, and so it was for us in the Fall of 1997. Founders of the 2 time Chrysalis Award winning Atlanta-based residential remodeling company ‘SuperStructures’, my wife, Kandi, and I went in search of alternatives to traditional fixed screening systems for our own recently completely renovated home. Little did we know then where this search would ultimately take us. Intrigued by a new product named Phantom, we arranged to have 2 sets of something called ‘retractable screens’ to be installed on our new double french doors. Once installed, we were delighted with both the style and operation of the screens, and we became dealers for the Georgia distributor on the spot. Initially marketing them to our remodeling clients, the Phantom Screens portion of the business took on a life and an identity of its own. In just 2-1/2 short years, given our explosive success as dealers, Phantom offered us an exclusive distributorship in the mid-south territory, and Southern Screens was born. After founding Southern Screens in 2000, we relocated to Memphis in 2001 and began our new lives and business here. It was also in

2000 that Phantom introduced the Executive motorized screen providing the ability to screen in openings as big as 25'w x 16'h. The passing of the guard from old fixed screen systems to 21st century remote controlled walls of screen had begun. Phantom was then, and is still now, the future of the screening industry. What was novel in 2000 is almost de rigeur on finer homes now, and Phantom Retractable Screening Systems continue to set the standards of the very industry that they themselves created. Over the years, we’ve added other product lines that have added to our ability to provide the finest quality Outdoor Lifestyle products including Insolroll solar/privacy shading, Sunesta Awnings and motored roof systems, Draper industrial solar shading, and Equinox operable pergolas. But, at our core, our DNA is still Phantom and construction. So, while acquiring Phantom Screens for your home or business may not change your life as dramatically as it did ours, it will enhance your life and business by providing stylish and sometimes near-invisible on-demand protection from recurring annoyances like insects, glare, sun, and rain. Our passion for what we do is truly organic. We were and still are customers first!

4095 Winchester Road, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.758.2121 | SouthernScreens.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 8:17 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PHILANTHROPY

UNITED WAY OF THE MID-SOUTH >>> Rev. Kenneth S. Robinson, M.D., President & CEO United Way of the Mid-South is a convener of funders, fighters, and followers who join us in our pursuit to break the cycle of generational poverty in two ways — by funding 70 exceptional partner agencies through our aligned grant-making, and by transforming the lives of individuals and families through a collaborative system of services, Driving The Dream — both creating economic advancement and opportunity for all. Never before has there been a more critical need for our United Way, as COVID-19 continues to impact not only our most vulnerable neighbors, but also those who are needing help, perhaps for the first time. We stood up our COVID-19 Economic Relief Fund, providing supplemental funds for nonprofits which experienced a surge

in demand for their services. Our Free Tax Prep program instituted a low-risk, “social distanced” Drive-Thru Drop-Off process to allow us to still prepare tax returns — for free — for low-income families. Finally, we instituted our Relief Call Center, powered by Driving The Dream, which connected 2,500 individuals to impactful pandemic-related assistance. Unwavering in our mission to improve the quality of life for Mid-Southerners by mobilizing and aligning community resources to address priority issues, we’re adapting to changing times and continuing to create lasting change. Please donate and learn more at uwmidsouth.org — to help us help thousands "move from where they are to where they dream to be!"

United Way Plaza | 1005 Tillman Street, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.433.4300 | UWMidSouth.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 12:07 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PIZZA

BROADWAY PIZZA >>> Legendary Broadway Pizza, one of Memphis’ favorite family-ownedand operated restaurants, was opened by Lana Jeanette Cox in 1977 at 2581 Broad. Thirdgeneration family members now offer Broadway East at 629 S. Mendenhall. Elder family members raised in extreme poverty find it

important that faithful friends get their money’s worth and don't leave hungry. Not just a pizzeria, Broadway offers salads, whole wings, fish, spaghetti, chicken parmesan, burgers, and homestyle plate-lunch specials. Cakes made in-house daily. We deliver large orders and call-in orders welcomed.

2581 Broad Avenue, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.454.7930 629 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.207.1546 BroadwayPizzaMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:59 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICE ROBINSON TREE SERVICE >>>

Robinson Tree Service has been family owned since 1948. Jason Sengel and his wife, Cynthia, acquired the business from Pop Robinson’s grandson in 2001. Jason was well prepared to take the helm, with a degree in Urban Forestry from Texas A&M and as a certified arborist. Cynthia is a lifelong resident of Memphis, with a marketing degree from the University of Memphis and many years of customer service experience.

Under their helm, Robinson Tree has grown to be one of the most highly recommended tree services in Memphis. Their response on why, “We think it is mainly to do with our great crews; we receive compliments on our guys all the time. We couldn’t do it without their professionalism and expertise.” Give them a call for a free estimate and they promise, “We know Memphis trees.”

2807 Farrisview Road, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.363.3539 | RobinsonTree.net SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:26 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

FERTILITY ASSOCIATES OF MEMPHIS >>> Left to right: Amelia P. Bailey, MD, William H. Kutteh, MD, PhD, Raymond W. Ke, MD, and Paul R. Brezina, MD Fertility Associates of Memphis is the only state-of-the-art practice providing comprehensive reproductive health care to couples of the Mid-South and beyond, treating patients struggling with infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and reproductive disorders. Our highly specialized team utilizes cutting-edge techniques, including in vitro fertilization with laser blastocyst biopsy, preimplantation genetic testing, and fertility preservation, and has been designated a Center of Excellence. Our compassionate physicians, board-certified in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, have been bringing dreams to life for over 28 years. 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.2229 | FertilityMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:09 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

JERRY LUCIUS, MARX-BENSDORF, REALTORS & SHANNAN MCWATERS, MCWATERS & ASSOCIATES REALTORS >>> Two familiar faces in the world of media marketing. She began making a name for herself 11 years ago and is now Residential Real Estate: Jerry, a Broker with the prestigious Marx-Bensdorf ranked in the top 1% of Memphis Realtors. Realtors, is known for his extensive market Jointly selling The Villages at Porter knowledge that a successful 19-year career Farms Collierville is an unprecedented yields. Specializing in new construction, collaboration between two of Memphis' finest firms. Two agents, different but Jerry has sold over 700 homes, the equally powerful talents, merging to majority to people downsizing. Shannan, from the well-respected McWaters & form the new and innovative "Face of Associates Realtors, is a pioneer in social Residential Real Estate". JERRY LUCIUS: JLucius@M-BRealtors.com | 901.682.1868 (o) | 901.355.3076 (c) SHANNAN MCWATERS: ShannanMcWatersRealtor@gmail.com | 901.372.6611 (o) | 901.413.7318 (c) SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 7:37 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RETIREMENT LIVING THE VILLAGE AT GERMANTOWN >>>

Built in 2005 — and tucked into the heart center and pool. It is the perfect place to of Germantown — The Paskowitzes retire and live life to the fullest. found their retirement village. A village The Village is Germantown’s only they fell in love with while visiting from Continuing Care Retirement Community Sacramento, CA. They found not only a offering independent living, assisted living, community of new friends and fellowship, memory care, and skilled nursing with but an active lifestyle through the fitness rehabilitation services. 7820 Walking Horse Circle, Germantown, TN, 38138 l 901.737.4242 l Village-Germantown.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 5:56 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RUNNING FLEET FEET >>>

Passion for running, fitness, and a healthy was required. Helping Memphis Youth lifestyle has continually inspired Fleet Feet Athletics safely put on cross country races to be a local fixture for active Memphians. for the youth of the city to fitting health In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, care heroes with shoes that could stand the community that was central to Fleet the long days and hours required became Feet’s identity was not as easily accessible. our passion. What began 28 years ago Without weekly events like hosted group as a journey to become the best place for runs and yoga classes, as well as supporting running gear has evolved into a shop that local races and events, a new way to serve strives to be so much more. 4530 Poplar in Laurelwood | 901.761.0078 | FleetFeetMemphis.com Facebook.com/FleetFeetMemphis | Instagram.com/FleetFeetMemphs SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/19/21 10:15 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

THE MULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP

CONSOLIDATED MEDICAL PRACTICES OF MEMPHIS, PLLC >>> CMPM, a “group practice without walls,” was established in 2008 to provide compassionate, convenient, and efficient care for those in the Mid-South. Since its formation CMPM has grown to 39 physicians in multiple specialties located across the area, from Midtown to Oakland. The physicians enjoy practice autonomy while benefiting from the economies of scale and scope provided by a larger group. With its network of nationally recognized physicians, nurse practitioners and health care providers, CMPM strives to provide compassionate, outstanding and personalized care to those living in Shelby County and the surrounding areas. 1555 Lynnfield Road, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.261.0700 | MedicalOfMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:51 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

UPSCALE SOUTHERN CUISINE MAHOGANY MEMPHIS >>>

Restaurateurs and childhood friends Carlee McCullough, Esq. and VeVe Yates called on their years of travel and fine dining experience as the inspiration for a brand new twist on Southern dining. Mahogany Memphis' concept is embodied by the rich variety on its menu, with everything from oxtails

& grits to the popular Cajun fried chicken. Located inside Chickasaw Oaks village, the gracious hospitality and staff, extensive cocktail menu, and weekly featured live performances will keep diners coming back. Check out Mahogany's signature seasoning line, now sold online and in the restaurant.

Mahogany Memphis Restaurant | The Shops of Chickasaw Oaks Village 3092 Poplar Ave. Suite 11, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.623.7977 | MahoganyMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:59 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

VASCULAR SURGERY

VASCULAR AND VEIN INSTITUTE OF THE SOUTH >>> Left to Right: Dr. Jacqueline Majors, Dr. Tatiana Chadid Santamaria, Dr. Prateek K. Gupta, Dr. Anton Dias Perera, Dr. Alissa Hart, and Dr. Timothy Weatherall The largest group of board-certified vascular surgeons in the Mid-South. The group has the lowest amputation rate in the region and serves as the premier center for restoring blood flow to the legs and limb preservation. They provide the best clinical outcomes for patients with peripheral arterial disease, varicose veins, carotid disease, aortic aneurysms, and dialysis access. Providing convenient locations in: Germantown, TN | Memphis, TN | Millington, TN | Southaven, MS | Senatobia, MS | Oxford, MS | West Memphis, AR 901.390.2930 | VascularAndVeinInstitute.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 9:29 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

VIDEO PRODUCTION

VIA >>> Sarah VerStrat, Director of Accounts Offer superior services and delight clients; that’s VIA’s mission. Sarah VerStrat, VIA’s director of accounts, makes certain that happens. VIA’s full-service production division, VP, serves clients all over North America. In 2021, VIA’s tech offerings will be a part of a new division of VIA, Spothub, which focuses on simplifying

effective audience engagement for franchisees, licensees, and dealers. The two divisions have one common vision: offer the best vendor experiences across all industries. So, ask Sarah what VIA does, and her response is pretty simple: “We solve our clients’ problems and create new opportunities.”

1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 119, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.755.1011 | viaproductions.co SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 9:15 AM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEDDING REGISTRY BABCOCK GIFTS >>>

A Memphis tradition for over 46 years, Babcock Gifts leads the way in wedding registry and gift giving. Babcock Gifts offers customers personalized service and an outstanding collection

of gifts and tabletop choices for your everyday table or a special occasion. Online or in person, Lee, our wedding manager, is here to assist you with your registry or an update of your table.

Laurelwood Shopping Center 4538 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 901.763.0700 | BabcockGifts.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 7:35 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESS

DE LA BELLE WELLNESS & SPA >>>

Renee Pinlac, MSN, FNP Nurse Practitioner, is the owner of De La Belle Wellness & Spa, in the Shops of Chickasaw Oaks Village. Renee received her Masters of Science in Nursing and is certified in Family Practice. She specializes in Comprehensive Weight Loss Management and Education, Endocrinology, and Facial rejuvenation. Renee holds certification as a Master Cosmetic Botox and Filler Injector, as well as certifications in Laser Facial Aesthetics and Noninvasive Laser Lipo treatments. Renee believes in providing only modern and state-of-the-art cosmetic services; such as PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) injections for facial rejuvenation and hair restoration. Her 17+ years of experience at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has allowed her to bring a higher level of professionalism and compassion to medical aesthetic and weight loss treatments. Renee cares about her clients' wellbeing, both inside and out at De La Belle Wellness & Spa. With her extensive clinical background, she's holding the Aesthetic industry of Memphis to a higher standard than ever before! 3086 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38111 901.433.9024 | DeLaBelle.net

SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/18/21 3:53 PM


2021

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WINE & LIQUOR KIRBY WINES & LIQUORS >>> Left to right: Philip Forman, Stephen Newport, Brian Herrera, Zach Scott, and Nermin Hodzic Thirty-six years ago, the owners and staff at Kirby Wines & Liquors started out with the mission of providing the best selection, pricing, and service to the Mid-South. Fast-forward to now, and our goal is the same today. Our experience and dedication to our customers animates this endeavor, providing a broad international selection of wine and liquor, as well as ever-changing and seasonal beer offerings. It is also our great pleasure to assist in planning parties from 2 to 2,000, including party supplies, gifts, and delivery. We are truly your one-stop-shop. 2865 Kirby Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.756.1993 | KirbyWines.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 6:00 PM


AS K

VA N C E

Goodwin Sign Company Our history expert solves local mysteries: who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes. BY VANCE L AUDERDALE

below: Gegan’s Drug Store was one of Harold Goodwin’s first clients when he set out on his own as an independent sign painter. Note the Chevrolet panel truck with his name on all sides. There’s no trace of the sign today — or the building itself, for that matter.

The artistry here (below left) is impressive father-in-law, a professional sign painter, taught him — just look at the effort your father put into the “G” the rudiments of the craft. Harold first worked for a local sign company called Arnett, but after a while of Midwest’s Golden Royal Ice Cream. In 1954 John Gegan opened his drug store at 1228 Lamar, on the decided to strike out on his own. His main clients southeast corner of Lamar and Bellevue. He purchased were Midwest Dairy and Ful-O-Pep feeds, and he’d paint their ads on buildings, barns, billboards, silos, the property from Albert Frayle, whose name is still whatever “canvas” was available. The work carried visible across the front of the building. him all over the Mid-South. This building, erected in the 1930s, had always been “The drugstore photograph from 1954 is significant home to different pharmacies. Over the years, it was Walker Mabry Drugs, Kendall-Rambo Drug Co., Curtis because it depicts the very beginning of his career,” says Drug Co., and Frayle Drug Store. Gegan Bill. “This was one of the first signs he bought it after operating two groceries in did for Midwest, and it includes the first “You’re a pretty good Midtown, but the wonderful sign shown truck with his name on it.” Bigger things were in store. One day, here probably didn’t remain on the buildsign painter. How would Harold was high on a ladder painting a ing very long. Within five years, the store you like to come work for became Gray’s Pharmacy. Midwest billboard at Russwood Park Coca-Cola?” Now, right about here, anybody who’s baseball stadium and noticed a fellow read this column knows that I usually go in a suit, watching him carefully. He beinto an obsessive overview of people I’ve mentioned, came curious when the same man showed up the next such as Gegan or Frayle. I sometimes even provide a day. “If you’re an artist like my dad,” says Bill, “you don’t year-by-year history of the property itself. want people standing over you. So he yelled down, ‘Hey, Look, I’m not doing that, because I’m more intrigued what do you want?’” by the life of the sign painter. After all, he was obviously The man responded, “You’re a pretty good sign painttalented — so confident about his work that he put er. How would you like to come work for Coca-Cola?” his name at the bottom, and drove a brand-new Chevy It turns out he was in charge of outdoor advertising panel truck with his name painted on the doors. So who for the local bottling company. Bill says, “My dad told me later that he almost jumped off the ladder was Harold Goodwin? I contacted B.G. — that would be Bill Goodwin — to hug the man.” and asked him to tell me about his dad. Here’s the story. That offer was good news, because in recent years Born in Memphis in 1927, Harold Goodwin attendHarold had, as Bill put it, “started feeling a spiritual ed Humes High School, where he met his future wife, tug and wanted to become a minister.” The new job Dorothy Pearson. They married in 1948, and his new would keep him in Memphis, while allowing him to attend school to study for the ministry. And besides, he now had a son (Bill was born in 1956) and wanted to spend time with him. But first things first: Harold agreed to paint signs for Coca-Cola, but only as an independent contractor. “Dad didn’t like meetings and didn’t put up with nonsense,” says Bill, “so that’s why he wanted to work on his own.” Harold painted almost every Coca-Cola sign around town. About this time, Bill began to help his father after school and on weekends. “I was 12 years old,” he says, “and I was riding around in the truck, carrying ladders, cleaning brushes, and learning how to mix paints.” After a while, he began to help his father with the actual painting. I won’t reveal how billboard artists can transfer a small sketch into a painted sign that may stretch 20 feet wide, but Harold showed Bill how to master the craft. Harold was talented enough with various Coca-Cola signs that he could freehand the preliminary design, including the all-important “sweep” — that white ribbon across the brand’s logo. While Bill filled in the red and white blocks of color, his father would lay out the “privilege” — the additionDEAR B.G.:

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COPYRIGHT BILL GOODWIN

DEAR VANCE: My father was a sign painter in Memphis. This old photo shows a fine example of his work, but I can’t locate the building. Can you help? — B.G., MEMPHIS.

116 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

116_MM03_2021_Vance_v03.indd 116

2/10/21 9:04 AM


al wording for the store name, address, whatever was needed. The father-and-son team constantly stayed busy with new signs, while repainting older ones that had faded over the years. “Dad was a master,” says Bill. “I never reached the level that he did, and it would take me twice as long to paint signs as he did. He just had a gift.” Meanwhile, Howard enrolled part-time at Memphis State University and at the same time became a lay minister for Decatur Street Christian Church, mentored by the senior pastor, Rev. Thomas O. Slaughter. It took him ten years, but he earned a bachelor’s degree in speech and later a master’s degree in counseling from MSU. Throughout the late 1950s and ’60s, he also served other congregations in Rossville, Eads, and Covington. In 1967, he returned to Decatur Street, where he was named the associate minister after Slaughter stepped down. In 1969, the Rev. Harold Goodwin oversaw the church’s move to a modern

Harold was a perfectionist, Bill recalls. “I might finish a sign and Dad would step back and say, ‘Son, I see some holidays over here.’” That was sign lingo for little places where the base coat peeked through the final colors. So that meant another trip up the ladder, until the billboard met his approval. About this time, their painting operations began to wind down. Across the country, Coca-Cola cut its budget for outdoor advertising. Bill picked up other

building at Highway 70 and Altruria in Bartlett. It seems he never stopped working or studying, and he eventually earned a master of divinity degree from Memphis Theological Seminary. In 1990, he retired from the ministry — but not for long. Just five years later, he became an assistant minister with Lindenwood Christian Church at East Parkway and Union, until his “final” retirement in 2012. And he was still making signs. By this time Bill, who studied journalism at Memphis State, had taken over the business side of their company. “I would go after the customers, and my dad and I would do the painting,” he says. “Even though our roles were reversed, there we were, father and son, still working side by side.”

accounts, including Carburetor Clinic and Xpert Tune, but new technology was the main factor. “Vinyl came in,” says Bil l. “ Vinyl banners and lettering, and that marked the end of the sign painting business.” One of Harold’s last signs is still prominently displayed Downtown. In 2000, he painted the vintage-style Coca-Cola sign on a wall of AutoZone Park (shown here). He passed away on Christmas Day 2018. Bill’s mother, known to everyone as Dot, had died five years earlier. For a while, Bill went to work for American Sign Shops and later became the managing editor of Memphis Home / Garden magazine. Today, he works in the insurance business. “A lot of our signs are still around,” says Bill, “and I’ll get calls to repaint some that have faded. But if technology had not outpaced us, we would still be going. I would have loved to introduce my three sons to the business, but it just wasn’t in the cards.” Bill obviously relishes the “windshield time” he and his father spent in their Chevy truck, driving all over the region, painting and repainting billboards for Coca-Cola and other clients. “We’d work hard,” he says, “but it was a wonderful time for both of us.” 

above: Bill Goodwin painted this old-fashioned Coca-Cola sign on property he owned in Arlington. He and Harold pose on a ladder by the newly completed work in 1997. left: In 2000 Harold Goodwin came out of retirement to paint a vintage-style CocaCola sign on the Union Avenue wall of AutoZone Park. It’s still there today.

Got a question for Vance?

EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ ask-vance

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 117

116_MM03_2021_Vance_v03.indd 117

2/10/21 9:04 AM


B E AT

A Landmark in Limbo The rise and fall of the 100 North Main Building. BY VANCE LAUDERDALE

The rooftop Japanese Garden was just one of many unusual features of the 100 North Main Building.

W

hen city officials gathered in a vacant lot at Main and Adams on June 30, 1963, for the groundbreaking of our city’s tallest building, they probably never dreamed the gleaming tower that would open two years later might one day be reduced to a parking facility. Constructed by local developer Harry Bloomfield and designed by Robert Hall and Associates in the ultra-modern International Style, the 38-story 100 North Main Building stood out from the more traditional designs of other Downtown buildings. What seems at first to be a plain, white concrete block actually features a rather elaborate facade formed of vertical “fins” of precast concrete, with the surface covered with a “white marble chip patina” and windows accented by strips of brushed aluminum. In addition to a lower-level parking garage, the first two floors housed a restaurant and retail space, reached by a pair of escalators that greeted visitors as they stepped into the lobby. This was an open space with 16-foot ceilings, black-and-white Carrera marble floors, and anodized gold aluminum trim throughout. Ten high-speed elevators carried attorneys, accountants, and other

professionals to companies that quickly filled Downtown’s newest and largest office tower. What truly set 100 North Main apart, however, was what the developers added to the top f loors. The 36th f loor was a health club, complete with a 40-foot stainless-steel swimming pool with louvers open to the sky, cocktail lounge, and billiard room. Perched atop the roof itself was a rotating restaurant, a fad at the time and one of only three in Memphis. To ensure a steady motion, the dining room “f loated” on 75 passenger-car tires that rolled along a steel track. This restaurant, originally part of the “Top of the 100 Club,” later became Diane’s when the health club closed in 1971. The circular dining area, designed after Seattle’s Space Needle, spun so slowly (one revolution every 90 minutes) that the ever-changing view was the only proof diners were mov-

ing. Only the outer ring of the interior revolved — not the entire structure — so anyone who left a purse on the windowsill had to run back and fetch it. The most bizarre feature of 100 North Main, however, was the Japanese Garden. In addition to stone lanterns, bamboo screens, and rock arrangements, newspaper accounts mentioned the rooftop included “fir trees” and something they called “flaming fountains.” The garden closed in 1971, and the building manager told reporters, “We had to put a stop to it because people kept throwing things off the roof.” A flaming fountain, dropped 38 floors, would indeed be a hazard to Main Street pedestrians. And on top of all that was a massive blue box, illuminated with a lighted sign for UP Bank, because Union Planters National Bank had a large branch on the lower floors. The sign prompted Memphians to believe the bank’s headquarters were located here; in fact, those were blocks away, at 67 Madison Avenue. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2015, the U.S. Department of the Interior’s “Narrative Description” notes that 100 North Main “has had very few changes and retains the integrity of setting, location, design, workmanship, materials, and feeling which combine to convey the significance of this office building.” Despite the effort put into the modern design, it seems some of those components didn’t hold up over the years. That same National Register listing mentions “loss of marble chip patina due to the failure of the polystyrene” (the adhesive that held it in place), and “the single-light aluminum windows have clouded.” Even worse, chunks of the outside concrete began to crumble and fall off. The “UP Bank” letters came down in 2005, when Regions Bank acquired Union Planters and closed that branch. “The sign was never replaced,” according to autopsyofarchitecture. com, “and the tower’s top cap is a blue, empty box, giving the building a somewhat abandoned appearance.”

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSIT Y OF MEMPHIS LIBRARIES

C I T Y

118 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

118_MM03_2021_CityBeat_100NMain_v02.indd 118

2/17/21 4:44 PM


us

ic

A RT

ART M

It was more than just an appearance. Over the years, major tenants moved out, and according to that same website, by 2012, barely 30 percent of 100 North Main was occupied. That number steadily dwindled to zero, and various developers announced ambitious plans to transform the tower into apartments or a hotel. In the meantime, 100 North Main continued to decline, with inspectors finding broken elevators, electrical problems, and fire hazards. In fact, in 2017, a blaze broke out on the top floors, probably set by intruders. It was extinguished by firefighters, who had to lug hoses up 34 flights of stairs. The building sold at auction in 2018, and new owners Townhouse Management Company, based in New York City, unveiled plans to convert 100 North Main into a 550-room Loew’s Hotel, with 200 other units turned into apartments. Last year, however, Loew’s announced their intention to build a brand-new hotel Downtown, and 100 North Main would play no role in the ongoing expansion of the Memphis Convention Center. In mid-February, the Downtown Memphis Commission planned to purchase the building for $12 million, and would invite developers to submit proposals for its redevelopment or demolition. Unfortunately, most accounts reveal that the best use of the property may be for parking, since the one-acre site, occupying half of a city block, could hold as many as 1,200 cars. As we go to press, the fate of Memphis’ tallest building, once considered an architectural marvel, is uncertain. In its “Statement of Significance,” the National Register listing concluded: “The 100 North Main Building, developer Harry Bloomfield’s grand architectural vision, remains a unique focal point of the Memphis riverfront skyline, as much today as when originally constructed.” That listing, however, does not prevent owners from demolishing historic structures (they just cannot use federal funds to do so). Unless other developers step forward with different plans — and do it soon — 100 North Main may become little more than a convenient place to park your car. 

festival

A RT

AR

d Foo

T

April 16-18 On Ridgeway Loop Road Fr 1p-6p • Sa 10a-6p • Su 11a-4p

www.artintheloop.org presented by ArtWorks Foundation

sponsored by

THE CITY MAGAZINE TY

For a gallery of photos of 100 North Main, then and now, visit autopsyofarchitecure. com/100northmain. M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 119

118_MM03_2021_CityBeat_100NMain_v04.indd 119

2/22/21 8:49 AM


TH E M E M P H I S D I N I N G G U I D E

A Curated Guide to Eating Out

M

emphis magazine offers this curated restaurant listing as a service to our readers. Broken down alphabetically by neighborhoods, this directory does not list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include the magazine’s “Top 50” choices of must-try restaurants in Memphis, a group that is updated every August. Establishments open less than a year are not eligible for “Top 50” but are noted as “New.” This guide also includes a representative sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias are listed. Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine; those that operate in multiple locations are listed under the neighborhood of their original location. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact Samuel X. Cicci at scicci@contemporary-media.com

FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, $-$$ THE GRAY CANARY—The sixth restaurant from chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman, offering small plates and entrees cooked on an open flame. Oysters, octopus, and hearty steaks are among the menu options at this eatery in Old Dominick Distillery. Closed Mon. 301 S. Front. 4666324. D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ GRECIAN GOURMET TAVERNA—Serves traditional favorites like spanakopita, pastitso, moussaka, and hand-rolled dolmathes, as well as lamb sliders and pita nachos. Closed Mon. 412 S. Main. 249-6626. L, D, X, $ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, editor’s note: As Memphis continues to navigate covid-19, some restaurants are open for socially along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. distanced dine-in, while others are focusing on takeout and delivery. Please call ahead to confirm Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. hours, adjusted menus, and available services. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 7672323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ including fried green tomatoes with smoked catfish, a HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimiDOWNTOWN buttermilk fried chicken sandwich, burgers, and more. Closed changas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. Mon.-Thurs. 141 E. Carolina. 321-5553. L, D, WB, $-$$ 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 117 PRIME—Restaurateurs Craig Blondis and Roger Sapp team CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, 751-5353. L, D, X, $ up with Chef Ryan Trimm to recreate the traditional American grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are HU. DINER—An extension of Hu. Hotel, diner serves such steakhouse. Serving oysters on the half shell and a variety of surf among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in dishes as country-fried cauliflower, cornflake-fried chicken, and and turf options. 117 Union. 433-9851. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ octopus and grits. 3 S. Main. 333-1224. L, D, X, $-$$ ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas CHEF TAM’S UNDERGROUND CAFE—Serves HU. ROOF—Rooftop cocktail bar with superb city views serves — including Mr. T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, Southern staples with a Cajun twist. Menu items include toasts with a variety of toppings including beef tartare with cured bottled or on tap. 100 S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. totchoes, jerk wings, fried chicken, and “muddy” mac and egg, cognac, and capers or riced cauliflower with yellow curry, 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ cheese. Closed Sun. and Mon. 668 Union Ave. 207-6182. L, D, $ currants, and almonds. Also salads, fish tacos, and boiled peanut THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French hummus. 79 Madison. 333-1229. D, $ Specialties include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peacuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a HUEY’S—This family-friendly restaurant offers 13 nut butter and banana sandwich, and breakfast served seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. The different burgers, a variety of sandwiches, and delicious all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ crown jewel of The Peabody for 35 years. Afternoon tea served soups and salads. 1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime Downtown favorite Wed.-Sat., 1-3:30 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sand(Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ wiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030; BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian banana pudding. Closed Mon. 745 N. Parkway and 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. L, D, X, MRA, $ influence, Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s Manassas. 527-9158. L, D, $ HUSTLE & DOUGH BAKERY & CAFE—Flaky, baked NJ Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily CURFEW—An elevated sports bar/American tavern breakfast goodness every day with fresh pastries, sandwiches, and specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, MRA, concept by Top Chef contestant Fabio Viviani at the more at Arrive Hotel. 477 S. Main St., 701-7577. B, L, X, $ $-$$ Canopy Memphis Downtown hotel. 164 Union Ave. B, ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only PaleoL, D, X, $-$$ here; specialties are duck and waffles and shrimp and grits, along centric restaurant, offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D, enchiladas, chicken salad, omelets, and more. Closed for dinner includes such dishes as Kingston stew fi sh, Rasta Pasta, and X, MRA, $$-$$$ Sun. 327 S. Main. 409-6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. BELLE TAVERN—Serving elevated bar food, including a KING & UNION BAR DINING SYMBOLS and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. butcher board with a variety of meats and cheeses, as well as GROCERY—Classic Southern 748-5422. L, D, X, $ daily specials. 117 Barboro Alley. 249-6580. L (Sun.), D, MRA, $ favorites including catfish plate, B — breakfast FAM—Casual Asian restaurant serves BEN YAY’S GUMBO SHOP—Spiritual successor to pimento cheese, po-boys, chicken & sushi rice bowls, noodle bowls, sushi L — lunch DejaVu, offering fresh and authentic Creole staples. 51 S. Main St., waffles. Open for breakfast, lunch, and rolls, and spring rolls. Closed Sun. 149 D — dinner 779-4125. L, D, X, $-$$ dinner with cocktails served with flair and Madison; 521 S. Highland. 701-6666. L, SB — Sunday brunch BISHOP—Ticer and Hudman’s newest venture at the Central favorite Memphis beers. Locally made D, X, $ Station Hotel features upscale dishes in a French brasserie style. WB — weekend brunch confections available in the grocery. 185 FELICIA SUZANNE’S— 545 S. Main St., 524-5247. L, D, X, $$-$$$ X— wheelchair accessible Union Ave. 523-8500. B, L, D, $-$$ Southern cuisine with BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime MRA — member, Memphis low-country, Creole, and Delta global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are rib, catfish, and burgers, including the Restaurant Association infl uences, using regional fresh seafood, a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night local beef, and locally grown foods. $ — under $15 per person without in the Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed drinks or desserts MRA, $$-$$$ Germantown Pkwy. 1-800-2453 L, D, X, Sun. and Mon. A Downtown staple at $$ — under $25 BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE— MRA, $-$$$ Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. $$$ — $26-$50 Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood and steak, THE LITTLE TEA 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ with seasonally changing menu; also a sushi bar. 135 S. Main. $$$$ — over $50 SHOP—Downtown institution FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & 528-1010. L, D, X, $-$$ serves up Southern comfort PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips, burgers, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun. 69 Monroe. 525-6000, the slice) with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, shepherd’s pie, all-day Irish breakfast, and more. 152 Madison. L, X, $ X, $ 572-1813. L, D, SB, $-$$ LOCAL—Entrees with a focus on locally sourced products include FISHBOWL AT THE PYRAMID—Burgers, CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, lobster mac-and-cheese and rib-eye patty melt; menu differs by fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique paninis, salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ location. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, “underwater” setting. Bass Pro, 1 Bass Pro Drive, 291CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers X, $-$$ 8000. B, L, D, X, $-$$ prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and restaurant serves vegetarian FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR— pasta, and several Northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The fare and smoked-meat dishes, including beef brisket and pork Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ tenderloin, cooked on a custom-made grill. Closed Mon.-Tues. 7 as bison ribeye and Muscovy duck, all matched with CAROLINA WATERSHED—This indoor/outdoor eatery, W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, MRA, $-$$ appropriate wines. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ set around silos, features reimagined down-home classics,

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M / F O O D 120 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v04.indd 120

(This guide, compiled by our editors, includes editorial picks and advertisers.)

2/11/21 1:40 PM


THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves seafood and Southern fare, including cornmeal-fried oysters, sweet tea brined chicken, and elk chops. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/291-8200. L, D, X, $-$$$ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include citrus glaze salmon and Cajun stuffed chicken. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 526-0002. B, D (Mon.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ MACIEL’S—Entrees include tortas, fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Downtown closed Sun. 45 S. Main. 526-0037, X, MRA, $
 THE MAJESTIC GRILLE, DBA COCOZZA— It’s red sauce, all the time in the Majestic Grille space on Main. Variety of Italian dishes for curbside and takeout orders. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ McEWEN’S—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib-eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-8902467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, MRA, $ MOMMA’S ROADHOUSE—This diner and dive at Highway 55 serves up hot and crispy fried chicken wings, among other solid bar food options. 855 Kentucky. 207-5111. L, D, MRA, $ THE NINE THAI & SUSHI—Serving authentic Thai dishes, including curries, as well as a variety of sushi rolls. Closed for lunch Sat. and Sun. 121 Union. 208-8347. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter cream sauce and crabmeat and spinach crepes; also changing daily specials and great views. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070; 8106 Cordova Center Dr. (Cordova). 425-4797. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ PONTOTOC LOUNGE—Upscale restaurant and jazz bar serves such starters as alligator filet fritters; entrees include Mississippi pot roast with jalapeño cornbread and tagliatelle with braised beef. 314 S. Main. 207-7576. D, X, $-$$ PUCK FOOD HALL—Food hall featuring a variety of vendors serving everything from bagels and beer to comfort food and healthy cuisine. 409 S. Main. 341-3838. $-$$ REGINA’S—New Orleans-inspired eatery offering po’boys, Cajun nachos topped with crawfish tails, catfish platters, oysters, and more. Closed Mon. 60 N. Main. 730-0384. B, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, $-$$ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and lamb belly tacos are menu items at this upscale diner. Michael Patrick is among the city’s best chefs. 492 S. Main. 304-6985. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SAGE—Restaurant and lounge features daily lunch specials and tapas with such dishes as braised short ribs, teriyaki pulled pork, and the Sage burger made with Angus beef, avocado mash, fried egg, and flash-fried sage. 94 S. Main. 672-7902. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SILLY GOOSE LOUNGE—Gourmet, wood-fired pizzas and hand-crafted cocktails at this Downtown restaurant and lounge. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 111. 435-6915. L, D, X, $ SLEEP OUT LOUIE’S—Oyster bar with such specialties as chargrilled Roquefort oysters and gulf oysters on the half shell with Prosecco mignonette; also serves flatbread pizzas and a variety of sandwiches. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 111. 707-7180. L, D, X, $

HELP Empower Deaf Children to HELP Listen, Learn, and Talk. Empower Deaf Children to Listen, Learn, and Talk.

HELP Empower Deaf Children to Listen, Learn, and Talk.

GIVE A CHILD THE GIFT OF SOUND

GIVE A CHILD THE GIFT OF SOUND

www.mosdkids.org GIVE A CHILD www.mosdkids.org THE GIFT OF SOUND

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v05.indd 121

www.mosdkids.org M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 121

2/18/21 6:13 AM


SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more. 520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SOB—Elevated gastropub that serves favorites like general Tso’s cauliflower or duck fried rice. 361 S. Main. 526-0388. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as woodfired pizzas, Gorgonzola-stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; large domestic whiskey selection. 383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$ SUGAR GRITS— Who said breakfast has to be in the morning? The Westmorelands offer grits and other breakfast goodness all day long, in addition to other Southern-style lunch and dinner options. 150 Peabody Pl., Suite 111. 249-5206. B, L, D, $-$$ SUNRISE MEMPHIS—From the owners of Sweet Grass and Central BBQ. Serves breakfast all day, including house-made biscuits, frittatas, kielbasa or boudin plates, and breakfast platters. 670 Jefferson. 552-3144. B, L, X, MRA, $ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such dishes as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, chicken satay, and mushroom pizzetta. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, MRA, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ TUG’S—Famous for New Orleans gumbo, fabulous burgers, fried thin catfish, and specialty pancakes. Now serving Grisanti Crafted Pizza. 51 Harbor Town Square. 260-3344. B, L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ THE VAULT—Oysters, shrimp beignets, flatbreads, stuffed cornish hen, and Smash Burger featured on “Late Nite Eats” are among the dishes offered at this Creole/Italian fusion eatery. 124 G.E. Patterson. 591-8000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ WESTY’S—Extensive menu includes a variety of wild rice dishes, sandwiches, plate lunches, and hot fudge pie. 346 N. Main. 543-3278.L, D, X, $

MIDTOWN (INCLUDES THE MEDICAL CENTER) ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small and large plates; among the offerings are pan-seared hanger steak, quail, and lamb chops; also handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. 940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ ART BAR—Inventive cocktails feature locally foraged ingredients; snacks include house-cured salt & vinegar potato chips and herb-roasted olives. Closed Mon. 1350 Concourse Avenue #280. 507-8030. D, X, $ BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This eatery dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274-0100; 6450 Poplar, 410-8909. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ BACK DO / MI YARD—A revamped patio space behind The Beauty Shop features rotisserie meats and fishes via Brazilian-style outdoor grill. Dinner Wednesday-Saturday, weather permitting. 966 S. Cooper, 272-7111. D, X, $$ BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, MRA, $ BAR KEOUGH—It’s old-school eats and cocktails at the new Cooper-Young neighborhood corner bar by Kevin Keough. 247 Cooper St. D, X, $ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BARKSDALE RESTAURANT—Old-school diner serving breakfast and Southern plate lunches. 237 S. Cooper. 722-2193. B, L, D, X, $ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas. 2094 Madison. 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$

BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks, salads, pasta, and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Perennial “Best Brunch” winner. Closed for dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BELLY ACRES—At this festive Overton Square eatery, milkshakes, floats, and burgers rule. Burgers are updated with contemporary toppings like grilled leeks, braised tomatoes, and sourdough or brioche buns. 2102 Trimble Pl. 529-7017. L, D, X, $ BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day Mon. 1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as chicken-fried quail and braised pork shank. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. L (Sat. and Sun.), D (Mon.-Sat.), SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas, including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and soul-food specials. 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE 1912—French/American bistro owned by culinary pioneer Glenn Hays serving such seafood entrees as seared sea scallops with charred cauliflower purée and chorizo cumin sauce; also crepes, salads, and onion soup gratinée. 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ CAFE BROOKS BY CITY & STATE—Serving grab-and-go pastries, as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, such as the Modern Reuben and Grown-Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ CAFE ECLECTIC—Omelets and chicken and waffles are among menu items, along with quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. Menu varies by location. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ CAFE OLÉ—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 7674672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760 ; 6201 Poplar. 417-7962. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ THE COVE—Nautical-themed restaurant and bar serving oysters, pizzas, and more. The Stoner Pie, with tamales and fritos, is a popular dish. 2559 Broad. 730-0719. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ THE DOGHOUZZ—It’s both bark and bite at the Doghouzz, which pairs a variety of gourmet hot dogs alongside local craft beer and one of the city’s most extensive whiskey selections. Open for lunch, dinner, and late-night. Closed Sunday. 1349 Autumn Ave. 207-7770. L, D, X, $ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$

FARM BURGER—Serves grass-fed, freshly ground, locally sourced burgers; also available with chicken, pork, or veggie quinoa patties, with such toppings as aged white cheddar, kale coleslaw, and roasted beets. 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 175. 800-1851. L, D, X, $ FINO’S ITALIAN DELI & CATERING—The newly revived Fino’s offers the old favorites such as the Acquisto as well as a new breakfast menu. 1853 Madison. 272-FINO. B, L, D, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia. 1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ GLOBAL CAFÉ—This international food hall hosts three immigrant/refugee food entrepreneurs serving Venezuelan, Sudanese, and Syrian cuisines. Samosas, shawarma, and kabobs are among the menu items. Closed Mon. 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 157. L, D, X, MRA, $ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ HATTIE B’S—Fried chicken spot features “hot chicken” with a variety of heat levels; from no heat to “shut the cluck up” sauce. Sides include greens, pimento mac-and-cheese, and black-eyed pea salad. 596 S. Cooper. 424-5900. L, D, X, $ HAZEL’S LUCKY DICE DELICATESSEN— Jewish deli venture by Karen Carrier, serving up all manner of New York-style and kosher sandwiches. Takeout only. 964 Cooper St. 272-0830. L, $ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes at this fully vegan restaurant range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, including eggplant parmesan and “beef” tips and rice; breakfast all day Sat. and Sun. 2158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, WB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, and chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INSPIRE COMMUNITY CAFE—Serving breakfast all day, in addition to quesadillas, rice bowls, and more for lunch and dinner. 510 Tillman, Suite 110. 509-8640. B, L, D, X, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po’boys, shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black bean and turkey patties available. 2021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ THE LIQUOR STORE—Renovated liquor store turned diner serves all-day breakfast, sandwiches, and entrees such as Salisbury steak and smothered pork chops. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 2655 Broad. 405-5477. B, L, D, X, $-$$ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes. 1495 Union. 725-0280; L, D, X, $-$$ MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Fast-casual establishment serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. Closed Mon.-Tues. 496 N. Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine; entrees include veggie paella and fish of the day. Closed Mon. 2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. D, SB, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, $-$$ MIDPOINTE FROM EDGE ALLEY—Edge Alley’s sister cafe at the Ballet Memphis headquarters focuses on freshness for its breakfast, lunch, and happy hour tapas. Closed SundayMonday. 2144 Madison Ave. 425-2605. B, L, X, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PAYNE’S BAR-B-QUE—Opened in 1972, this family-owned barbecue joint serves ribs, smoked sausage, and chopped pork sandwiches with a

122 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v04.indd 122

2/11/21 1:40 PM


standout mustard slaw and homemade sauce. About as down-toearth as it gets. 1762 Lamar. 272-1523. L, D, $-$$ PARISH GROCERY—Shrimp? Roast beef? Oysters? Whatever type of po’boy you want, the New Orleansthemed eatery has got it. Closed Monday. 1545 Overton Park Ave. 207-4347. L, D, X, $-$$ PIZZERIA TRASIMENO—Small pizzas baked in wood-fired clay ovens along with a selection of small salads. Menu is soon to include desserts, local beer on tap, and Umbrian wine. 1350 Concourse Ave., Suite 181. 308-1113. L, D. $ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ RAILGARTEN—Located in a former rail station space, this eatery offers breakfast items, a variety of salads and sandwiches, and such entrees as short rib mac-and-cheese and fish tacos. Also serves shakes, malts, floats, and cream sodas. 2166 Central. 231-5043. B, L, D, $-$$ RED FISH ASIAN BISTRO—In the former Nineteenth Century Club building, serves sushi, teriyaki, and hibachi. Specialties include yuzu filet mignon and Chilean sea bass. 1433 Union. 4543926; 9915 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 729-7581; 6518 Goodman (Olive Branch). 662-874-5254. L, D, X, $-$$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole-inspired classics, such as Gulf shrimp and rice grits congee served with lap chong sausage and boiled peanuts, are served at this newly remodeled restaurant owned by Chef Kelly English, a Food and Wine “Top Ten.” 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, $$-$$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes. 2116 Madison. 410-8290. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican. Closed Sun. 782 Washington. 421-8180. L, D, X, $-$$ SALTWATER CRAB—Offers an array of seafood dishes including boils with blue crab, crab legs, lobster tails, and more, and specialty sushi like the Dynamite or Royal King rolls, in addition to signature sangrias and cocktails. 2059 Madison Ave. 922-5202. L, D, X, $$ SAUCY CHICKEN—Specializes in antibiotic-free chicken dishes with locally sourced ingredients, with such items as hot wings and the Crosstown Chicken Sandwich, and a variety of house-made dipping sauces; also, seafood, salads, and daily specials. 1350 Concourse, Suite 137. 203-3838. L, D (Mon.-Fri.), $ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his newest eatery; serves a variety of po’boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, andouille shrimp, and pimento cheese fries. 2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 25 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar. 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 KirbyWhitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, $-$$$ STICKEM—Brick and mortar location for the popular food truck, which offers grilled meat on a stick. 1788 Madison. Closed Sunday. 474-7214. L, D, X, $ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ SOUL FISH CAFE—Serving Southern-style soul food, tacos, and po’boys, including catfish, crawfish, oyster, shrimp, chicken, and smoked pork tenderloin. 862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ SWEET GRASS—Chef Ryan Trimm takes Southern cuisine to a new level. Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. Restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, $-$$$ TAMBOLI’S PASTA & PIZZA—Pasta-maker Miles Tamboli whips up Italian soul food with seasonal menus featuring dishes like crispy fried chicken or creamy bucatini with pecorino cheese. Serves dinner Tuesday-Saturday. Pizza only menu after 9pm. 1761 Madison. 410-8866. D, X, $-$$ TAKASHI BISTRO—Fusion restaurant with an open kitchen that lets customers watch chefs prepare a variety of Japanese and Thai cuisine. 1680 Union Ave. Suite 109. 800-2936. L, D, $-$$.

TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Chef Ben Smith is a Cooper-Young pioneer. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday. 928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ZINNIE’S—Dive bar classic reopens with a makeover and signature Zinnaloni sandwich. 1688 Madison. 726-5004. L, D, X, $

SOUTH MEMPHIS (INCLUDES

PARKWAY VILLAGE, FOX MEADOWS, SOUTH MEMPHIS, WINCHESTER, AND WHITEHAVEN)

COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652; 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122. L, D, X, $-$$ CURRY BOWL—Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross Rd. 207-6051. L, D, $ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross Rd., Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Around the corner from the legendary Stax Studio. Closed Monday. 998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D, $ HERNANDO’S HIDEAWAY–No one cares how late it gets; not at Hernando’s Hideaway. Live music, killer happy hour, and plenty of bar fare at this South Memphis hang. 3210 Old Hernando Rd. 917-982-1829. L, D, $ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped pork-shoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings, and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagna, and more. 4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives for good reason: fried chicken (mild, hot, or home-style); jumbo burgers four patties high; strawberry shortcake, and assorted fruit pies. 3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. L, D, X, MRA, $

SUMMER/BERCLAIR/ RALEIGH/BARTLETT ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ ELWOOD’S SHACK—Casual comfort food includes tacos, pizza, and sandwiches. Specialties include meats smoked in-house (chicken, turkey, brisket, pork), barbecue pizza, and steelhead trout tacos. 4523 Summer. 761-9898. B, L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads. 6250 Stage Rd. 382-3433; 2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. A bona-fide Memphis institution. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials.

A Memphis landmark since the Knickerbocker closed. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. 377-2484. D, X, $-$$ TORTILLERIA LA UNICA—Individual helping of Mexican street food, including hefty tamales, burritos, tortas, and sopes. 5015 Summer Ave. 685-0097. B, L, D, X, $

UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT (INCLUDES CHICKASAW GARDENS AND HIGHLAND STRIP)

A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and fried seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—This little cottage is a breakfast mecca, offering specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon. 3519 Walker. 324-0144. B, X, $ CHAR RESTAURANT—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, charbroiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, Suite 120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yogurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar (Poplar Plaza). 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ JOES’ ON HIGHLAND—Specializes in fried chicken and comfort sides such as warm okra/green tomato salad and turnip greens. Entrees include salmon patties and chicken-fried steak. Closed Mon. 262 S. Highland. 337-7003. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$

EAST MEMPHIS

(INCLUDES POPLAR/ I-240) ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in an avante-garde setting using locally sourced products; also small plates and enclosed garden patio. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ AGAVOS COCINA & TEQUILA—Camaron de Tequila, tamales, kabobs, and burgers made with a blend of beef and chorizo are among the offerings at this tequila-centric restaurant and bar. 2924 Walnut Grove. 433-9345. L, D, X, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$

M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 123

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v05.indd 123

2/15/21 9:26 AM


ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN— Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu from two of the city’s top chefs that changes seasonally with such entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Circle. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs Benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast fare; also burgers, sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven location; call for hours. 715 W. Brookhaven Circle. 590-2585; 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748. L, D, X, $-$$ BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge Lake Blvd. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ BLUE PLATE CAFÉ—For breakfast, the café’s serves old-fashioned buttermilk pancakes (it’s a secret recipe!), country ham and eggs, and waffles with fresh strawberries and cream. For lunch, the café specializes in country cooking. 5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. B, L, X, $ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, $-$$$ BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Possibly the best biscuits in town. Closed Mon. and Tues. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, $-$$ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 5030 Poplar. 725-8557 ; 7609 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 4255908; 1707 Madison. 421-6949. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods re-imagined with wholesome ingredients. 5101 Sanderlin. 729-7687. Germantown: 7605 W. Farmington Blvd., Suite 2. 236-7223. B, L, D, X, $. CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662-890-7611. L, D, X, $ DORY—Chef David Krog whips up Southern specialties with classic French techniques and locally sourced ingredients. Current specialties include pork tenderloin, beef bourguignon, or cocoa-dusted chocolate truffles, with new weekly additions. 716 W. Brookhaven Circle. 310-4290. L, D, X, $$-$$$ ERLING JENSEN—For over 20 years, has presented “globally inspired” cuisine to die for. Specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees, and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wetaged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$

FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE—Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ FOX RIDGE PIZZA & GRILL—Pizzas, calzones, sub sandwiches, burgers, and meat-and-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery, which opened in 1979. 711 W. Brookhaven Circle 758-6500. L, D, X, $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday. 750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, filet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, $-$$$ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as king crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves a variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday. A neighborhood fixture. 477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $-$$ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip. Famous for first-class service. 5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun. 3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LIBRO AT LAURELWOOD—Bookstore eatery features a variety of sandwiches, salads, and homemade pasta dishes, with Italian-inspired options such as carbonara and potato gnocchi. Closed for dinner Sun. 387 Perkins Ext. (Novel). 800-2656. B, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 572-1803; 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ MAGNOLIA & MAY—The family behind Grove Grill cooks up Southern-inspired casual dining at this country brasserie, with popular menu items like peach gazpacho and low country shrimp n’ grits. 718 Mt. Moriah Rd. 676-8100. D, $$-$$$. MAHOGANY MEMPHIS—Upscale Southern restaurant offers such dishes as coffee-rubbed lamb chops and baked Cajun Cornish hen. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.-Tues. 3092 Poplar, Suite 11. 623-7977. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Veal Saltimbocca with angel-hair pasta and white wine sauce is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. 780 Brookhaven Circle. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211; 9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees. Closed Mon. 850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $

NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken. 4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties are miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees; also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, Brunswick Stew, and Millie’s homemade desserts. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, $ ONO POKÉ—This eatery specializes in poké — a Hawaiian dish of fresh fish salad served over rice. Menu includes a variety of poké bowls, like the Kimchi Tuna bowl, or customers can build their own by choosing a base, protein, veggies, and toppings. 3145 Poplar. 618-2955. L, D, X, $ OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PARK + CHERRY—The Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Seasonal menu features sandwiches, like rustic chicken salad on croissant, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed for breakfast Sun. and all day Mon. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery and Gardens). 761-5250. L, X, $ PATRICK’S—Serves barbecue nachos, burgers, and entrees such as fish and chips; also plate lunches and daily specials. 4972 Park. 682-2852. L, D, X, MRA, $ PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, $-$$ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIMENTO’S KITCHEN + MARKET—Fresh sandwiches, soups, salads, and plenty of pimento cheese at this family-owned restaurant. 6540 Poplar Ave. 602-5488 (Collierville: 3751 S. Houston Levee. 453-6283). L, D, X, $ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven, wide choice of toppings, and large local and craft beer selection. 1199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 207-1198; 3592 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 221-8109. L, D, X, MRA, $ RED HOOK CAJUN SEAFOOD & BAR—Cajunstyle array of seafood including shrimp, mussels, clams, crawfish, and oysters. 3295 Poplar. 207-1960. L, D, X, $-$$ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables. 5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ RIVER OAKS—Chef Jose Gutierrez’s French-style bistro serves seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, $$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and handmade ravioli, along with house-made pizza and fresh oysters. Closed Sun. 6150 Poplar, Suite 122. 850-0191. D, X, $-$$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster. 6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, $$$-$$$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$

124 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v05.indd 124

2/15/21 9:26 AM


WIN A ONE NIGHT STAY AT THE WATERS HOTEL IN HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS AND A $75 MEAL VOUCHER FOR THEIR RESTAURANTS.

VOTE MARCH 9-16 PRESENTED BY

TO VOTE VISIT MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM/GETAWAY

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/22/21 10:45 AM


SOBEAST—Eastern branch of the popular South of Beale, featuring the restaurant’s traditional staples, as well as rotating special menu items. 5040 Sanderlin. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, $-$$. SOUTHALL CAFE—Locally sourced ingredients bolster a chef-driven menu offering breakfast and lunch classics. 669 S. Mendenhall. 646-5698. B, L, WB, X, $ STAKS—Offering pancakes, including birthday cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch. 4615 Poplar. 509-2367; 7704 Poplar (Germantown). 800-1951. B, L, WB, X, $ SUSHI JIMMI—This food truck turned restaurant serves a variety of sushi rolls, fusion dishes — such as kimchi fries — and sushi burritos. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Mon. 2895 Poplar. 729-6985. L, D, X, $ SWANKY’S TACO SHOP—Taco-centric eatery offers tortas, flatbreads, quesadillas, chimichangas, burgers, and more. 4770 Poplar. 730-0763; 6641 Poplar (Germantown). 737-2088; 272 S. Main. 779-3499. L, D, X, $ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans. 5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527; 4183 Summer. 3244325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, $ VENICE KITCHEN—Specializes in “eclectic Italian” and Southern Creole, from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 50 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist. 6065 Park Ave., Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty. 5101 Sanderlin Rd., Suite 105. 4216399. L, D, X, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.-Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $

CORDOVA BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. filets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood. 107 S. Germantown Rd. 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, $$-$$$ COASTAL FISH COMPANY—Upscale offerings of international fish varieties utilizing styles ranging from Carribbean, East Coast, West Coast, Chinese, to Filipino, and more. 415 Great View Dr. E., Suite 101. 266-9000. D, X, $$-$$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here. 990 N. Germantown Parkway, Suite 104. 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ COMPANY—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.” 465 N. Germantown Pkwy., Suite 116. 509-2360. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ EL MERO TACO—This food truck turned restaurant serves up Mexican and Southern-style fusion dishes, including fried chicken tacos, chorizo con papas tacos, and brisket quesadillas. 8100 Macon Station, Suite 102. 308-1661. Closed Sun.-Mon. L, D, WB, X, $ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$

TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available. 830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$

GERMANTOWN BLUE HONEY BISTRO—Entrees at this upscale eatery include brown butter scallops served with Mississippi blue rice and herb-crusted beef tenderloin with vegetables and truffle butter. Closed Sun. 9155 Poplar, Suite 17. 552-3041. D, X, $-$$$ FOREST HILL GRILL—A variety of standard pub fare and a selection of mac-and-cheese dishes are featured on the menu. Specialties include Chicken Newport and a barbecue salmon BLT. 9102 Poplar Pike. 624-6001. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ KOHESIAN SOKO STYLE EATERY—KoreanAmerican eatery serves up fusion-style dishes like bibimbap burgers or gochujang marinated loaded spicy pork nachos. 1730 S. Germantown Rd. 308-0223. L, D, X, $$ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA— Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such powerfully popular fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas, tostados. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200; 6300 Poplar. 623-3882. L, D, X, $-$$ MOONDANCE GRILL—From the owners of Itta Bena and Lafayette’s. Serves steak cooked sous vide and seafood dishes including Abita-barbecued shrimp and pan-seared sand dab, in addition to an extensive wine and cocktail list. 1730 S. Germantown Road, Suite 117. 755-1471. L, D, X, $$-$$$ NOODLES ASIAN BISTRO—Serves a variety of traditional Asian cuisine, with emphasis on noodle dishes, such as Singapore Street Noodles and Hong Kong Chow Fun. 7850 Poplar, Suite 12. 755-1117. L, D, X, $ OPEN FLAME—This authentic Persian and Mediterranean eatery specializes in shish kebabs as well as kosher and halal fare. 3445 Poplar. 207-4995. L, D, X, $ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar. 754-4440; 547 S. Highland. 323-3050. L, D, X, $-$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 7850 Poplar, Suite 6. 779-2008. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties. 3120 Village Shops Dr. 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR—Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. 758-8181; 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 754-5555. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, $ WOLF RIVER BRISKET CO.—From the owners of Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza, highlights include house-smoked meats: prime beef brisket, chicken, and salmon. Closed Sun. 9947 Wolf River Boulevard, Suite 101. 316-5590. L, D, X, $-$$ ZEN JAPANESE FINE CUISINE—A full sushi bar and plenty of authentic Japanese dishes, like Hibachi or Wagyu beef. 1730 S. Germantown Rd. 7792796. L, D, X, X, $-$$$

COLLIERVILLE CAFE EUROPE—From Italian chef Michele D’oto, the French, Spanish, and Italian fusion cuisine includes a variety of dishes like Rosette al Forno, fish ceviche, and sole meuniere.

Closed Sun. 4610 Merchants Park Circle, Suite 571. 286-4199. L, D, X, $$-$$$$ CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ COLLIERVILLE COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches. 3573 S. Houston Levee Rd. 9795540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ DAVID GRISANTI’S—Serving Northern Italian cuisine and traditional family recipes, like the Elfo Special, shrimp sauteed in garlic and butter, tossed with white button mushrooms and white pepper, and served over vermicelli with Parmigiano-Reggiano. Closed Sun. 684 W. Poplar (Sheffield Antiques Mall). 861-1777. L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 9947 Wolf River, 853-7922; 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026. L, D, X, $ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemongrass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday. 8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland, TN). 384-0540. L, D, X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing. 8501637; 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300. L, D, X, $-$$$ JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 3660 Houston Levee. 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MULAN ASIAN BISTRO—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; sushi and Thai food, too. 2059 Houston Levee. 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965; 4698 Spottswood. 609-8680. L, D, X, $-$$
 OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call. 3670 Houston Levee. 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross (Olive Branch). 662-890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$ RAVEN & LILY—Eatery offers innovative Southerninspired cuisine with such dishes as crispy shrimp and cauliflower salad, spiced lamb sausage and parmesan risotto, and bananas foster pain perdu. Closed Monday. 120 E. Mulberry. 286-4575. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice. 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing. 854-3399. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 115 (Downtown). 207-7638 L, D, X, $-$$ ZOPITA’S ON THE SQUARE—Cafe offers sandwiches, including smoked salmon and pork tenderloin, as well as salads and desserts. Closed Sun. 114 N. Main. 457-7526. L, D, X, $

OUT-OF-TOWN BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy. 70 (Mason, TN). 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajunand Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando, MS). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COMO STEAKHOUSE—Steaks cooked on a hickory charcoal grill are a specialty here. Upstairs is an oyster bar. Closed Sun. 203 Main St. (Como, MS). 662-526-9529. D, X, $-$$$ ELFO GRISANTI’S NORTHERN ITALIAN CUISINE—Grisanti family classics like lasagna, homemade ravioli, garlic bread, and Northern Italian pizza. Closed Sun. 5627 Getwell Rd. (Southaven, MS). 662-470-4497. L, D, X, $-$$

126 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v05.indd 126

2/15/21 9:26 AM


LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black-eyed peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cider-steamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun.-Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $ MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7849 Rockford (Millington, TN). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARSHALL STEAKHOUSE—Rustic steakhouse serves premium Angus beef steaks, seafood dishes, rack of lamb, and more. Breakfast menu features griddle cakes, and lunch offerings include hamburger steak and oyster po’ boys. 2379 Highway 178 (Holly Springs, MS). 628-3556. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac-and-cheese, grits, and red beans. 709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ CASINO TABLES BOURBON STREET STEAKHOUSE & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND CASINO RACING—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-800-467-6182 CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225 FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711 JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ—711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213 TWAIN’S STEAKHOUSE AT SAM’S TOWN TUNICA—1477 Casino Strip Resorts Boulevard, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-456-0711 NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven, MS). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis, AR). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes. 6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. (Millington, TN). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ SAINT LEO’S—Offering sophisticated pizzas, pastas, sandwiches, and salads. A James Beard nominee for Best New Restaurant in 2017. 1101 Jackson (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, L, WB, $-$$ SNACKBAR—Billed as an intriguing mix of “French Bistro with North Mississippi Cafe.” Serving a confit duck Croque Monsieur, watermelon-cucumber chaat, pan-fried quail, plus a daily plate special and a raw bar. Chef Vishesh Bhatt was named as Best Chef South by the James Beard Foundation in 2019. 721 N. Lamar (Oxford, MS). 662-236-6363. D, $-$$$ WILSON CAFE—Serving elevated home-cooking, with such dishes as deviled eggs with cilantro and jalapeño, scampi and grits, and doughnut bread pudding. 2 N. Jefferson (Wilson, AR). 870-655-0222. L, D (Wed. through Sat. only), X, $-$$$

Love a little, die a little and break the law. Trey Milligan did all three in the summer before his 14th birthday. From Sartoris Literary Group, the debut novel by Frank Murtaugh. Available NOW at Amazon.com. Paperback ($19.95) and eBook ($8.95). Also available at Burke’s Book Store (936 S. Cooper) and Novel (387 Perkins Extd). M A R C H 2 0 2 1 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 127

120_MM03_2021_CDL_v05.indd 127

2/18/21 6:16 AM


L AS T

S TA N D

The Golden Hour

All the pleasures (and these days, the safety) of the drive-in theater.

W

hen you’re at a drive-in cinema, you’re naturally eager to see darkness fall. That’s when the fun begins: the projector beams, the images dance onscreen, and you’re transported. But my favorite moment is just before then. As you’re gathering up your last concessions, strolling back to the car, or wrapping up stray conversations, you may notice the last glint of the sun, sinking behind trees and roofs beyond the looming screens. And the entire landscape of the drive-in becomes golden, the cinema itself a star in its own feature. Those are the moments, before you’re engrossed in the movie, that can lead you to reflect on what an institution the drive-in is. And what a crucible for our memories it can be. Of course, drive-ins are famous for teenaged dates and steamed-up windows. Our managing editor, Frank Murtaugh, even had a first date with his wife-to-be at one, and, as he notes, “Drive-ins make the world better. Even when the movies are dreadful.” The memories are what stay with us. I had a couple of drive-in dates in my high school years near Memphis, Nebraska. Going to Omaha was a big deal in itself. The dates, as I recall, were both nerve-wracking — burdened as we were with the pre-loaded expectations of a steamy cinematic encounter — and entirely innocent. Yet most of my drive-in rev-

elries were with gaggles of other rambunctious lads, laughing at our own jokes in that juvenile echo chamber of the adolescent automobile. Omaha has no drive-ins now, and I don’t mourn their loss, honestly, because my most treasured drive-in experiences came later, when I was a young father, here in Memphis. I recall those times whenever I return to the Malco Summer Quartet Drive-In, which is very much still with us. When you’re co-parenting a very young child, you have to give up on any expectations of entertainment. You’re always on call, and good luck trying to see a movie. That’s how my children’s mother and I felt at the time, but we noticed that our infant son tended to fall asleep in his car seat. How delicious it was when he would do so, and we could gin-

gerly roll in to the drive-in to see Warp co-curator Mike McCara blockbuster. thy to perform a dual baptism by “Ain’t this living?” we’d enthe concession stand — in a baby thuse with silent smiles, as our pool filled with popcorn. Now darling boy snoozed in the back. that’s pop culture. But when his sister was born, Fast-forward to the era of getting them both to catch 40 covid-19, and drive-ins have winks simultaneously was too taken on a new meaning. Sudmuch to ask. denly the open air is where It wasn’t long, though, beit’s at, guaranteeing an expofore they got a bit older and we nentially safer environment in could take them both, and what which to watch movies. Our a grand excursion it was: packvehicles double as safe zones, ing the cooler, piling the blansealed capsules where we kets in the car, backing in and might responsibly go maskless. opening the tailgate so those My kids, now driving on their snuggle monsters could gaze up own, can gather up the one or at the towering screen with their two friends in their “pod” and drinks and snacks. Then friends have an almost-normal evening. would be added, or whole other They might even acquiesce to families parked beside us, with a night out with their old man. lawn chairs gathered together Meanwhile, I have pod pals and the good cheer flowing. of my own, and can savor that That communal spirit came to brief, limited feeling of freedom define the drive-in as our kids and possibility. grew up. Indeed, I recently enjoyed Suddenly the open their coming-of-age such an evening out, coincided with a and, after months of air is where it’s renaissance of the sheltering in place, at, guaranteeing Summer Quartet, as it struck me like a revelation. Thanks it came to host the an exponentially Time Warp Driveto the Time Warp, safer environment In series: triple or the night promised in which to watch quadruple features all the fun and abof older films, either movies. Our vehicles surdity of The Sevclassics or cult favorenth Voyage of Sinbad double as safe zones, and other Roy Harites. The all-night Kubrick marathon ryhausen classics. sealed capsules alone offered the Donning a mask where we might and stepping out once-in-a-lifetime responsibly go experience of seeto stock up on poping the sunrise over corn, with the sun maskless. Memphis just as the just sinking into end credits for 2001: A Space Odysthe golden hour, I looked back sey rolled across the screen. at my friend in the car and felt Amazingly, even as drive-ins a rush of gratitude: that such a across the country were shutterplace still existed in Memphis, ing, Malco made ours flourish, that such delights could be ineven investing in digital projecdulged in safely, even during a tors, ensuring its continued relepandemic. I looked at the convance. And that rebirth was percession stand, bathed in the sonally meaningful for many. One glow of twilight. Soon, darkness newlywed couple was so comwould settle in and the fun would mitted to the Summer Quartet’s begin. I smiled and thought to glory that they persuaded Time myself, “Ain’t this living?”

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS McCOY

BY ALEX GREENE

128 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 2 1

128_MM03_2021_LastStand_v03.indd 128

2/12/21 2:48 PM


MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/14/21 5:46 PM


LUXURY REIGNS SUPREME.

The Ultimate Driving Machine®

Roadshow BMW is proud to offer an opportunity to experience the height of luxury with their full range of BMW vehicles. From world-class engineering and innovative technology to near-perfect 50/50 weight distribution, premium appointments and advanced safety features, BMW sets the pace among luxury brands. Indulge your passion for excellence with a test drive of the Ultimate Driving Machine® at Roadshow BMW today.

www.roadshowbmw.com Roadshow BMW 405 N. Germantown Parkway Memphis Cordova, TN 38018 901-365-2584 © 2021 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/16/21 12:16 PM

Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Magazine - March 2021  

The Mind's Eye of Andrea Morales Faces of Memphis Heroes of the Pandemic Fish Tales Urban Art

Memphis Magazine - March 2021  

The Mind's Eye of Andrea Morales Faces of Memphis Heroes of the Pandemic Fish Tales Urban Art