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Tribune Tri-Lakes 10.23.13

October 23, 2013

Tri-Lakes

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtrilakesnews.com

Tri-Lakes Region, Monument, Gleneagle, Black Forest and Northern El Paso County • Volume 48, Issue 43

Board approves where funds will go if override passes ‘We want the money to go back into the classrooms’ By Lisa Collacott In less than three weeks, citizens will vote whether or not to approve a mill levy override that Lewis-Palmer School District 38 is seeking. The board of education has approved where the money will be allocated for the first year if the tax measure is approved. “We want the money to go back into the classrooms,” Mark Pfoff, vice-president of the D-38 school board, said. “We owe a good education to our students.” The money will be used to restore critical student services that the district has had to cut, maintain the ones that are still in place and hire and keep quality teachers. Some of the specifics on where the funds will go include:

• $1.3 million will be used to restore 22 classroom teachers and instructional budgets • $1 million to attract and retain the best teachers • $900,000 to restore counselors, teachers who support students struggling in math and reading, teachers for gifted and talented students, technology teachers and elementary summer school teachers • $720,000 will go to Monument Academy proportionately based on the number of students enrolled at the charter school • $450,000 will go to provide updated technology for students • $130,000 will be used to enhance the safety and security environment for students and staff Pfoff said the district never knows from year to year where the teachers are needed and will place them strategically where Funds continues on Page 9

Signs from a local citizens group in support of the D-38 mill levy override dot the Tri-Lakes area. The D-38 board of education has approved specifics on how the money will be spent the first year if voters approve the MLO. The board of education plans to keep all the money in the classroom. Photo by Lisa Collacott

Survivors look

PRETTY IN PINK Fundraiser raises money to send breast cancer survivors on retreats

By Lisa Collacott It was one survivor’s dream to see women who had battled breast cancer to move on to the next phase of their lives. After completing her own treatment, Cathy Glavan Schulze had to figure out how to move on to the next phase of her life. She knew other women felt the same way so with the help of her two sisters she created the HOPE Retreat. The threeday retreat is designed for women who are six to 12 months out of breast cancer treatment. HOPE stands for Healing Opportunities through Personal Enrichment. It is while they are at the retreat that they can reflect on their experience, talk about their experience with other breast cancer survivors, identify positive changes and celebrate their courage. “It’s to move forward to a new normal,” Teri Glavan, Schulze’ sister-n-law, said. The retreats are now in their 11th year and have expanded to Michigan, where one of Schulze’ sister lives, and Missouri, where Schulze was originally from. Schulze, who had lived in Monument, died in 2004 after her breast cancer returned, but her family carries on what she started through the nonprofit organization Sister’s Hope. In order to send women to the retreats funding is needed and the second annual Pretty ‘n’ Pink Fashion Show and Luncheon took place on Oct. 15 at the Antler’s Hilton in Colorado Springs. “This luncheon is to keep the retreats Pink continues on Page 8

Woodmoor hopefully has water leaks fixed The district had been losing up to 70 gallons of water a day By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com

Another breast cancer survivor models clothing provided by Macy’s during the second annual Pretty ‘n’ Pink luncheon and fashion show. The fundraiser raises money to send breast cancer survivors to a HOPE Retreat, which was started by former Monument resident Kathy Glavan Schulze. Photo by Lisa Collacott

The water leaks have been fixed. At least that’s what the folks at Woodmoor Water and Sanitation District No. 1 hope. “For many years, the district has performed a monthly check that compares the aggregate amount of source water produced during each month against the aggregate quantity of water consumed by customers during the month,” said District Manager Jessie Shaffer. “This check is a part of the district’s monthly water report. “For the district’s specific system, the two quantities should match within 10 percent of each other on a consistent basis. After the repairs were made, district personnel noted only a 5 percent difference as the average for the months of August and September.” Shaffer added that the repairs were made by district operations staff with part and supplies on hand at a minimal cost. Based on the results of the repairs, it appears the District’s water production vs. water consumption has returned to normal. “District personnel will continue to closely monitor these parameters in upcoming months to confirm the success of the repairs,” Shaffer said. Water continues on Page 9

POSTAL ADDRESS

THE TRIBUNE (USPS 418-960)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 MAILING ADDRESS: PO Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866 PHONE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in El Paso County, Colorado, The Tribune is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES: Display advertising: Thurs.11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

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2 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

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The Tribune 3

October 23, 2013

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Firefighters lauded by Air Force Academy Military and civilian firefighters fought the Black Forest fire By Staff report About three dozen military and civilian firefighters who fought the Black Forest fire in June have received awards from the Air Force Academy. The firefighters received Air Force Achievement Medals and Air Force Civilian Achievement Awards in two ceremonies Oct. 9 and 10 at fire stations 2 and 3. Academy firefighters helped save 100 structures, including two schools and more than 60 homes, during the blaze. The fire destroyed nearly 500 homes. “We traditionally receive decorations in our Air Force because we did something for the betterment of the unit,” said 10th Mission Support Group Commander Col. Martin Schlacter at the Oct. 10 ceremony. “These decorations are not being awarded for that at all. You were helping secure and protect property that didn’t even belong to the Air Force. You’re getting the decoration for protecting people who don’t even know your names and may not even have known you were there. If that’s not the definition

of Service Before Self, I don’t know what is. “But we know your names,” Schlacter added. “It’s amazing what you guys do. We just want to say thank you.” The Black Forest fire burned nearly 24 square miles, eclipsing the devastating 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire. Airman 1st Class Blake Nelson, a Dallas native, fought both fires. The Waldo Canyon fire erupted just four months after he arrived at the Air Force Academy from technical training at Goodfellow Air Force Base in Texas. The following Air Force Academy firefighters were honored for their work during the Black Forest fire: Hans Barkley, David Caulfield, Roy Dalton, Staff Sgt. Tanner Derosier, Steven Gonzales, Wesley Harrison, Ken Helgerson, Patrick Kraft, Xavier Leal, Reid Lohse, Staff Sgt. Nicole Longwell, Mike Mater, Travis Perkins, Staff Sgt. John Salinas, Airman 1st Class Dusty Smock, Technical Sgt. Jason Linta, Airman First Class Sulaimon Burns, Brandon Eubanks, William Gates, Andrea Caraway, Mark Caraway, Martin Clinton, Tommy Disario, Michael Fitzpatrick, Airman 1st Class Tieghan Fitzpatrick, Staff Sgt. Jacob Frey, Senior Airman Kenneth Gestes, Patrick Holt, Jonathan Milam, Tyler Moran, Ryan Moriarty, Airman 1st Class Blake Nelson, Ron Prettyman, Mike Trenker and Kenneth Kotcher.

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4 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

Amendment 66 is no easy sell Tax hike for schools generates opposition By Sandra Fish

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS Teachers unions and several wealthy Coloradans are spending millions to convince voters to agree to almost $1 billion annually in higher income taxes devoted to public schools. But they face an uphill battle with an electorate that rarely agrees to increase taxes. And opponents of the measure say they’d like to spend at least $1 million in the fight, though the sources of that money likely won’t be revealed. Amendment 66 would raise the state income tax rate from 4.63 percent to 5 percent on the first $75,000 of taxable income and to 5.9 percent on taxable income beyond $75,000. It would be the first tiered income tax since a single tax rate was adopted in 1988. I-News Network at Rocky Mountain PBS and Maplight are teaming up on VotersEdge.org/Colorado, a website offering details about the proposal’s pros and cons, its funding and daily updates on news stories. The site also offers information on Proposition AA, which would place taxes on retail marijuana sales statewide. Amendment 66 would raise about $950 million a year in the first year and about $1 billion after that. And it would require that 43 percent of the state’s general fund go to pre-K-12 public schools. The initiative would fund a revamped school finance formula that would give more money to districts with higher proportions of at-risk and non-English speaking students, as well as increased funding for preschool and kindergarten students. It’s a more complex proposal than those in the past — including a 2011 effort that would have temporarily raised sales and income taxes for education, but lost with only 36 percent of the vote. “That was a temporary fix, and it didn’t have widespread initial support,” said Curtis Hubbard of the 2011 effort. Hubbard is a spokesman for Colorado Commits to Kids, the pro-Amendment 66 group that raised more than $7.7 million through Oct. 9.

Gov. John Hickenlooper talks about Amendment 66 to those assembled at a regional mayoral roundtable in Arvada on Oct. 18. Photo by Crystal Anderson

Some have doubts

Despite promises that money will go to classrooms as specified by the Legislature’s Senate Bill 213, which revises the school finance formula but will not take effect if Amendment 66 doesn’t pass, not everyone is convinced. Norma Anderson was in the state Legislature for 19 years, serving as both House and Senate majority leader. She was a key author of the 1994 school finance act,

which would be replaced by Amendment 66, and she is still active in education efforts. A Republican, Anderson is one of the leaders of Coloradans for Real Education Reform, a primary opponent of the tax hike. “My concern on this, it’s a budget nightmare, and you’re tying up the general fund in the Constitution,” she said. “It’s too much money, and I’m not sure it’s going to the right places.” Hubbard counters that the bill changing the funding formula requires annual audits of spending, a website to allow the public to compare how money is spent and a return-on-investment study every four years. Backed by Gov. John Hickenlooper, at least 25 school districts and several local chambers of commerce, Colorado Commits to Kids spent more than $1.4 million to collect signatures to put the issue on the ballot, and is now spending on television advertisements, fliers and other strategies to support the initiative. That compares with $7,605 for Kids Before Unions and $14,500 for Coloradans for Real Education Reform. The Independence Institute, a libertarian Denver think tank, donated $10,800 to the latter group. An Independence Institute program, Kids Are First, is running television ads against Amendment 66. As a nonprofit, the organization doesn’t have to file disclosures with the Colorado Secretary of State. The Kids Are First donation page says it has

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and cultural events are happening in your area and the areas around you? Visit our website at www.ourcoloradonews.com/ calendar/.

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raised $668,025 of a $1 million goal. “I’d love to spend $1 million,” said Jon Caldara, president of the Independence Institute, though he said some of the advertising is coming from the think tank’s general budget. “As a (nonprofit) organization, we don’t report to the secretary of state.”

Deep pockets

Backers of Amendment 66 are disclosing their donors, though, revealing some of Colorado’s deep pockets in campaign finance. The bulk of that money comes from large donors. Among them: The National Education Association gave $2 million through Oct. 9. The Colorado Education Association gave $2 million. Pat Stryker, the medical technology heiress from Fort Collins, gave $825,000. The Gary Community Investment Co., operated by Sam Gary, founder of the Piton Foundation, gave $700,000. Education Reform Now, a national nonprofit, and Ben Walton, a Walmart heir, each gave $500,000. Other six-figure donors include David Merage, $254,314; Rose Community Foundation, $200,000; Stand for Children, $103,409; and Kaiser Permanente Financial Services Operations and Davita Total Renal Care at $100,000 each. Since voters approved the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights in 1992, they also must ratify any state or local tax increase, even if it’s to

retain tax money that exceeds the TABOR financial formula. Of 16 funding proposals since 1993, voters have approved only five. One of those, Amendment 23 in 2000, didn’t increase taxes or fees — it simply required lawmakers to increase spending on K-12 schools. Two years ago, voters defeated an effort to raise income and sales taxes for five years to fund education. Supporters hope that emphasizing benefits for individual school districts will sway voters this time around. On Oct. 12, supporters of Amendment 66 organized to campaign for the measure in 15 communities, including Greeley, Pueblo, Colorado Springs, Grand Junction, Durango, Steamboat Springs and others. Carol Hedges, executive director of the Colorado Fiscal Institute, is optimistic about the 2013 proposal. “I think Amendment 66 is the best opportunity we’ve had to actually pass a measure that will provide additional funding for school reform,” she said. “The recession really underscored for people how important education is to economic opportunity.” I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS and works in collaboration with news media statewide. To read more go inewsnetwork.org. Contact writer Sandra Fish at sandrafish@comcast. net.

Palmer Lake to feature haunted hayrides The Awake the Lake organization will offer haunted hay rides around Palmer Lake on Halloween night from 4 to 9 p.m. Trick or Treat candy stations, glow in the dark face painting, ghost stories and the dreaded hay wagon ride are just some of the featured attractions.

SEND US YOUR NEWS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes schoolnotes@ ourcoloradonews.com Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com

Families with younger children are welcome to come from 4 to 6 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Awake Palmer Lake fund. Those that would like to help with the event are encouraged to join the the team at O’Malley’s on Wednesday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. to find out how they might help.

General press releases Submit through our website Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com Letters to the editor rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com News tips rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 719-687-3009 Mail to P.O. Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866


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The Tribune 5

October 23, 2013

Anti-bullying assembly to be held Omegaman coming to Bear Creek Elementary School By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Omegaman is coming to Bear Creek Elementary School. The anti-bullying campaign, which is considered the No. 1 school assembly in the nation, will be at the Monument school on Oct. 21 for two assemblies; 9 to 10 a.m. for grades kindergarten through third, and 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. for fourth through sixth grades.

“Omegaman talks about a lot of character building” said Bear Creek Parent Teacher Organization president Aimee Morley, who is responsible booking Omega Man. “He feels it’s so important for kids to stand up for themselves and for other kids. He tells kids it’s not tattling to go get a grown up or get a teacher if you see someone getting bullied. He stresses that everyone should respect each other.” There are 847 students at Bear Creek. Last week, the fourth through sixth grade students — about 300 of them — signed a no-tolerance policy to take a stand against bullying.

“Omegaman shares a lot of cool analogies with the kids,” Morley said. “He rips a phone book and breaks a baseball bat and bends steel. “I can’t wait. I think this is something that the kids will remember for many years.” Omegaman and Friends is not cheap. The Bear Creek PTO spent $2,200 to book him. “Over the summer we do a budget meeting,” Morely said. “Spending some money on a large impactful assembly is a good way to spend money. “In the spring where’ going to have a huge science assembly to kick off our sci-

ence fair. We’re going to get someone from the Air Force Academy to come talk to the kids.” Omegaman’s anti-bullying message is geared toward elementary and middle school students. Omegaman will pass antibullying wrist bands to each student to visually reinforce the anti-bullying message throughout the school year. This bonus is not only a high-quality wristband but serves as a tool to echo the anti-bullying message by the positive words inscribed on them. Omega-Man and Friends has performed in nearly 5,000 assemblies across the nation during the last 12 years.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Tribune. PROFESSIONAL FRONT RANGE Business Group meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1

p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of every month at Bella Panini in Palmer Lake.

TRI-LAKES BUSINESS Networking International meets from 8-9:30 a.m. every Wednesday at the Mozaic Inn in Palmer Lake. Call Elizabeth Bryson at 719-481-0600 or e-mail ebryson@ farmersagent.com. TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business After Hours meets at 5:30

p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at various locations. Free to members; $10 for non-members. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www.trilakeschamber.com.

TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business Networking Group meets at

7:30 a.m. the first and third Thursday at Willow Tree Cafe, 140 2nd St., Monument. New members welcome. If District 38 is delayed or cancelled, their will be no meeting. Yearly membership dues are $20. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www.trilakeschamber. com.

WISDOM AND Wealth Master Mind Group Lifting Spirits meets from 7-9 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday from July to September at 755 Highway 105, Unit C, Palmer Lake. RSVP to Meredith at 630-618-9400. Visit www.MeredithBroomfield.com. WOODMOOR BUSINESS Group Meeting is the second Monday of every month from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Woodmoor Barn, 1691 Woodmoor Dr. We are Woodmoor residents offering products and services to the community. New members welcome. For more information, call Bobbi Doyle at 719-331-3003 or go to www.woodmoorbusinessgroup.com.

Fire Radio Association), meets the third Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Monutemnt Fire Protection District Station 1, 18650 Hwy 105. All Amateur Radio Operators are welcome. Call Joyce Witte at 488-0859 for more information.

p.m. the second Tuesday of every month (except June, August and September) at the Colorado Division of Wildlife Training Classroom in the back of the building at 4255 Sinton Road, Colorado Springs, CO 80970.

ADULT RECREATIONAL and intermediate pick up volleyball

THE VAILE Museum, 66 Lower Glenway, is open from 10 a.m.

is at Lewis-Palmer Middle School every Monday from 7-9 p.m. Call Claudia at 719-313-6662 for details.

BINGO BY the Tri-Lakes American Legion Post 9-11 is conducted from 7 to 9 p.m. every Saturday at the Post home, Depot Restaurant in Palmer lake. Proceeds are dedicated to Scholarship and community support activities of the Post. At least 70 percent of the game sales are awarded in prizes, and free food drawings are conducted. Doors open at 6 p.m. and all are invited for the fun, food, and prizes. See www.americanlegiontrilakespost911.com/bingo.htm for more information. BIG RED Saturday Market. Fresh vegetables and fruit, bakery items, local honey, crafts, jewelry, pet stuff and more are for sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday at the Big Red Saturday market at Second and Jefferson streets in Monument. The money benefits Lewis-Palmer community schools. FRIENDS OF Monument Preserve is a nonprofit organization that works to keep trails rideable and hikeable in the Monument Preserve Area. Meetings are at 7 p.m. every third Wednesday at the Monument Fire Center. Trail work is done at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday in the summer months. Contact info@fomp.org or Chris at 719-488-9850.

RECREATION

GLENEAGLE GOLF Club has implemented a Community Advisory Committee. Their mission is to help establish a stronger relationship between the club and the community. They are looking for representatives from all home owners associations. The committee meets the fourth Wednesday of the month at 6:30PM at Gleneagle Golf Club. If you can join, give Rick Ebelo a call at the club at 488-0900.

AMATEUR RADIO Operators, W0TLM (Tri-Lakes Monument

THE PIKES Peak chapter of Pheasants Forever meets at 6:30

481-0141

www.northword.org

to 2 p.m. Saturdays year-round and from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays from June through August. Groups by appointment are accepted. Call 719-559-0837.

VINI E Crostini, 6 flight wine tasting paired with moZaic tasty bites is at 5 p.m the first Saturday of the month at 443 S. Highway 105, Palmer Lake. Cost is $40 per person.

Worship Service at 9:30 a.m. Lewis Palmer High School Higby Road & Jackson Creek Parkway

THE BLACK Forest AARP Chapter meets for a luncheon the second Wednesday of each month at the Black Forest Lutheran Church. Call 719-596-6787 or 719-495-2443.

LEGACY SERTOMA dinner meetings are at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Monument Country Club. New members and visitors welcome. Call Ed Kinney, 481-2750.

THE CENTURIAN Daylight Lodge No 195 A.F and A.M meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month. Eastern Star meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays. Both groups meet at 18275 Furrow Road. Call 719-488-9329.

MOMS IN Touch prayer groups meet, by school, throughout the school district for one hour each week to support the children, their teachers, the schools and administration through prayer. Call Judy Ehrlich at 719-481-1668.

COALITION OF Tri-Lakes Communities. Call John Heiser at 719-488-9031 or go to www.CoalitionTLC.org.

THE MONUMENT Homemakers Club meets the first Thursday of every month at the Tri-Lakes Fire Department Administrative Building, 166 Second Street, Monument. Arrive at 11:30 a.m. to prepare for a noon potluck, program, and business meeting, which ends around 1:30 p.m. Newcomers are welcome. Call Irene Walters, Co-President, at 719-481-1188 for Jean Sanger, Co-President, at 719-592-9311 for reservations.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for volunteers. The troop meets at 7 p.m. the first Friday of the month at the Colorado Springs Police Department, Gold Hill Division, 955 W. Moreno Ave, Colorado Springs. Visit  https:// coloradoranger.org/index.php/troops/troop-i or email info@ coloradoranger.org

Crossroads Chapel, SBC Bible Study 9am 10:15am Celebrating HIM in Worship

The Church

Wednesday AWANA 6:15pm

Woodmoor

Pastor: Dr. D. L. Mitchell

at

A church for all of God's people

www.thechurchatwoodmoor.org

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20450 Beacon Lite Road • 488-9613

Sunday Bible Classes … 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship … 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship … 5:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Classes … 7:00 p.m.

www.trilakeschurch.org

OurTriLakesNews.com

Monument Hill Church, SBC

18725 Monument Hill Rd. 481-2156 www.monumenthillchurch.org Sunday: Bible Classes 9:15am Worship Service 10:30am Pastor Tom Clemmons USAFA ‘86, SWBTS ‘94 Preaching for the Glory of God God-centered, Christ-exalting worship Wed: AWANA 6:30pm The “New” MHC - Where Grace and Truth Abound

Traditional Worship Service Sunday 10a.m.-Nursery available 18125 Furrow Road Monument 80132

488-3200

HISTORY BUFFS meets at Monument Library from 1-3 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month.

SOCIAL

SHARE COLORADO, a nonprofit organization, is a monthly food distributor that offers grocery packages at half the retail price to everyone. Call 800-375-4452 or visit www.sharecolorado.com.

6pm evening Adult Bible Study

Sunday Worship: 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 am Sunday School: 9:45 am

GLENEAGLE SERTOMA Club luncheon meeting is every Wednesday at 11:45 a.m., at Liberty Heights, 12105 Ambassador Drive, Colorado Springs, 80921. Call Garrett Barton at 719-433-5396 or Bob Duckworth at 719-481-4608, or visit www.sertoma.org.

KIWANIS CLUB of Monument Hill, a service club dedicated to providing assistance to those less fortunate in the Tri-Lakes community, meets 8 a.m. Saturdays at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 Colo. 105. Join us for breakfast, great fellowship and informative programs, and come be a part of the opportunity to give back to your community. Visit http:// monumenthillkiwanis.org; call 719-4871098; e-mail info@ monumenthillkiwanis.org

SERVICES

840 North Gate Blvd. True Direction from God’s Word

GIRL SCOUTING offers opportunities for girls ages 5-17 to make friends, learn new skills and challenge themselves in a safe and nurturing environment. Call 719-597-8603.

495-3200 Child care provided

MOUNT HERMAN 4-H Club meets at 7 p.m. on the third

Monument Community Presbyterian Church We Welcome You! 9:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

Worship with Praise Team Adult Bible Class Children’s/Middle School Sunday School Fellowship Coffee Youth Sunday School Adult Bible Class Worship with Chancel Choir

238 Third Street Monument, CO 80132 719.481.3902 www.mcpcusa.org

Maranatha Bible Fellowship A Home Church Spirtual Growth Meaningful Relationships Solid Biblical Teaching A New Testament early church format that is changing lives 495-7527

Connecting People to God and Others SUNDAYS 10 AM

Family of Christ Lutheran Church 675 W. Baptist Road Colorado Springs, CO 719.481.2255

7:30 AM – Classic Worship 9:00 & 10:45 AM – Modern Worship 9:00 & 10:45 AM – Children and Student Programs 5:00 – 7:00 PM – Programs for all ages

Pastor David Dyer Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

Service TimeS Woodmoor Campus 8:15, 9:30 and 11:00 a.m 1750 Deer creek rd., monument, cO Northgate Campus 9:30 a.m. 975 Stout Dr., colo Spgs, cO Church Office 1750 Deer creek rd. monument, cO 80132 (719) 481‐3600 www.TheAscentChurch.com

Bear Creek Elem School 1330 Creekside Dr. 487-7700 www.forestridgechurch.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


6-Opinion-Color

6 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Understanding our historical shortcomings It is a bit too easy for us to wag our fingers at the people of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy for choosing the likes of Hitler and Mussolini. It is a little more difficult to reconcile and understand our own political shortcomings right here in Colorado. In one of the more embarrassing chapters of Colorado conservative history, Clarence Morley, the Ku Klux Klan-picked Republican candidate, became Governor of Colorado in 1925. “In the spring of 1924, Klan members packed the precinct caucuses of both the Democratic and Republican parties, then supported Klan candidates in the primary and general elections.” according to a 2003 article by Ed Quillen. “In Colorado, the Klan captured few Democratic nominations, but had its most success infecting the Republicans.” Jason Brockman and Erin McDanal, staff archivists for the Colorado State Archive, said Morley’s “political ascent paralleled the anti-minority, anti-foreign, anti-Jewish, and anti-Catholic sentiment that existed throughout the country during the 1920s.” Under the charismatic and persuasive

tutelage of Grand Dragon John Galen Locke, the Klan was able to create one of strongest political machines in state history. Locke, the short, extremely overweight Denver physician, ran the Klan and much of the state from his office at 1345 Glenarm Place. “Beyond any doubt the KKK is the largest and most cohesive , most efficiently organized political force in the state,” according to the Denver Post at the time. Locke, as Klan Grand Dragon controlled Morley as Governor, Ben Stapleton as mayor of Denver, obtained a majority in the House and Senate, elected the Secretary of State, and secured a Supreme Court Judgeship and seven benched in

Denver District Court, according to state archivists. Although, on cue Locke espoused the usual Klan nonsense messages of hate and bigotry in public, but didn’t seem to live the life himself. “He had been married to a Catholic and employed two Catholic secretaries, paying their pew rents,” wrote Dark Cloud column author Richard L. MacLeod of the Boulder Lout Forum. He was also known to look the other way in additional examples. Catholics in the northwest Denver were able to build St. Catherine of Siena parish by holding lavish and lucrative bingo parties that eventually led to the nick-naming of “the carnival parish” in the Harkness Heights area of North Denver. “Even the Ku Klux Klan could not stop St. Catherine’s,” noted Thomas J. Noel of the Archdiocese of Denver. “According to Judge John J. Dunn, whose mother was John Galen Locke’s nurse, and his father happened to be a long-time patient of Dr. Locke, it was Locke who arranged bingo permits for St. Catherine’s with Denver’s anti-Catholic chief of police, William Clandish.”

Locke was also known to have contributed philanthropically to Jewish and Black charities as well, and is widely considered to have promoted the Klan as a means to political power rather than committed universally to its philosophies of hate and bigotry. Most of the Klan-sponsored legislation during the time of Morley’s Governorship was effectively killed in committee by anti-Klan Republicans and a small but tenacious group of Democrats which included future Governor Billy Adams. After Morley left office, he established a stock brokerage in Indiana. In 1935, however he returned to Denver to reestablish his law practice. “His plans were interrupted, however, when he was arrested in 1935 for mail fraud,” according his biography at the state archive. “While he was found not guilty in Colorado, the Federal courts indicted him for 21 counts of mail fraud and for using his prestige and past public office connections to defraud his customers. Morley was found guilty on these charges and was sentenced to Leavenworth Prison for five years,” according to Brockman and McDanal of Colorado State Archives.

Shanahan returns to Denver as Redskins’ coach Mike Shanahan returns to Denver on Oct. 27. It will mark his first regular season appearance at the facility since he took over the reins of the Washington Redskins four seasons ago. Shanahan once held the keys to the city; the state of Colorado for that matter. Backto-back Super Bowl championships will earn any coach that honor. But that was 15 years ago. The Broncos have done a lot of losing since their golden age; 1977 through 1998 when they made the playoffs 13 different seasons. Shanahan rode into town in 1995 and took over a Broncos team that was in disarray. Four seasons later the Broncos had won two Super Bowls and were the toast of the NFL. It seemed like Shanahan could do no wrong in those early years. He, of course, was blessed to have John Elway as his quarterback those first four seasons. It seemed as though Shanahan and Elway were perfect for each other. Elway finally had a coach that was willing to let the

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gunslinger display his talents. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Elway was handing the ball off to a 2,000-yard rusher in Terrell Davis. Shanahan’s remarkable first four years with the Broncos came as somewhat of a surprise to a lot of folks in Denver and around the NFL. After all, he was not very successful when he was head coach of the Raiders in 1988 and 1989. In his one-plus season with the Silver and Black Shanahan was just 8-12. The late Raiders’ owner Al Davis ran him out of town, causing Shanahan to go into exile, sort of like Kid Lester

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Tribune features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of The Tribune. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

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from the Robin Williams movie “Best of Times.” When Shanahan resurfaced as a head coach six years later, many wondered if Pat Bowlen was light-headed and not thinking clearly. After an 8-8 season in 1995, the Broncos dominated the AFC to the tune of a 13-3 record in 1996. But, as everyone knows, the Broncos laid an egg in the divisional playoffs, losing to Jacksonville at home, 30-27. Many wondered if Shanahan was the right guy for the job. Two years and two Super Bowl victories later nobody was wondering. Fast forward to 2008. The Broncos went 8-8 and missed the playoffs for the sixth time in 10 seasons. Bowlen apparently grew tired of the Broncos’ mediocrity and decided to fire Shanahan. I’ll never forget where I was when I got the news that Shanahan had been fired as Denver’s coach. I was playing Donkey Kong at the Manitou Springs Arcade when I got a call from a friend that Shanahan had been

given the boot. Shanahan was a television commentator for one season. In 2010, Redskins owner Daniel Snyder lured Shanahan away from the studio be coach of his team. In his first two seasons, Shanahan was 11-21 with the Redskins. But he hit pay dirt last year with Robert Griffin, III, as his quarterback. Washington went 10-6 and advanced to the first round of the playoffs. The Redskins are struggling this season. Injuries have left RGIII a shell of his former self. Meanwhile, the Broncos are riding high. So what will the coming home reception be like for Shanahan when he leads his Redskins onto the field against the Broncos? My hope is that the Denver fans give him a huge ovation. I also hope the Broncos honor their former coach in some way. Shanahan deserved a better ending than the one he got in Denver. Perhaps he will find a way to have his Redskins knock the Broncos from their perch? I am looking forward to a fun matchup.

Lessons on catching a fish I ran across this story in a 1905 Cripple Creek newspaper, but it is not unique. I read a similar story from Leadville a few years before, but this one’s ending is different. Back at this time, steam engines used our nice mountain water in their tenders. A train had to stop about every 20 miles in their mountain climbs to fill their tanks. At designated stations, you would find a young man with the job of assuring that the big water tank was kept full. Woe be it if a train arrived and had to wait for water. This story starts out with the unusual discovery. It seems that an engineer had found, after a mountain water stop, that there were at least two fish in his engine’s water tank. He decided to keep these as pet fish in his tender, and when waiting at stations would feed them bits of his lunch! Engineers in those days used a locomotive assigned to only them. The fireman knew of the cargo. It was the engineer’s goal to raise a crop, not just to have a fine dinner. The crew in the roundhouse eventually learned about the situation, and played along, not draining the tank. Occasionally others heard of the cargo. Baggage handlers, brakemen and even a conductor or two would climb up into the cab of the engine to see if they could get a glimpse of the fish. At one of the stops, the station agent’s daughter wanted to see, too. The teenage girl was invited up, and shown the bounty. She asked if anyone was allowed to catch

a fish. The engineer was proud of his pets, and was mainly upset when anyone asked about eating one of them. The young lady, however, was also attracted to the young engineer. It seems she was visiting her parents for the summer. Through the summer, at each stop at the station she would come up to see the fish. By the end of the summer, she had caught her fish, the engineer! At the end of the summer, the crew arranged to dump their fish into a local stream, except for the larger ones that could not go out the drain. The tender was due to be in the shop for some repairs and would have to be dry. The bigger fish, indeed, made a fine meal for the couple. Eventually, they married, the newspaper story is incomplete, but it would be fun to see how long it lasted. I have heard of fish in locomotive tanks before, but this is the only one that I know of that led to a marriage!


7-Color

The Tribune 7

October 23, 2013

The beauty of paying it forward I typically go to the free-standing Starbucks in Highlands Ranch everyday. On two occasions while I was in the drive-thru, someone in a car ahead of me has bought my drink for me. It’s a lovely practice that shows how decent human beings can be. But I had not yet paid it forward, and I felt guilty about it – until recently! I went to the Starbucks in Target before work. Ahead of me in line was a boy who appeared to be about 12 or so. I’m not sure why, but he had tubes attached to him that began in a backpack he wore. He pulled at my heartstrings. He ordered a pumpkin spice frappuccino. When it came time to pay, he reached in his pockets and was frustrated and embarrassed when he realized he had forgotten his money. Without thinking, I stepped in to pay for his drink. He thanked me profusely. I told him no problem and to have a great day. I almost teared up. The Starbucks girl gave me a voucher for a free drink next time. Not that I needed it. I felt so good for helping the little boy in front of me, whose name was Liam, that I was floating on air. It was

such a wonderful way to pay it forward. It reminds me of how many ways we can pay it forward everyday. Random acts of kindness are a dying art it seems. Sometimes we need to stop and think about another human being and what they might be going through. As the saying goes, everyone is fighting a battle, so be extra kind. When I posted about my recent trip to Starbucks and Liam on Facebook, there was an outpouring of love coming from my friends about my deed. I also heard some of their personal stories about treating strangers with kindness and respect. One of my friends said, “I bet if we looked around we would discover that

many of us have helped strangers in need financially when it is put in front of us. My dad once told me that the homeless man begging for money on a street corner needed the dollar in his pocket much more than we did. I’ve always remembered that idea and held it to heart.” And yet another friend commented, “I have helped people in front of me at (the grocery store) and Walmart that would have had to put back groceries if I didn’t help them out. The first time I did it, I was afraid they would think I was being too forward, but the guy was very humble and it made me feel good to help him. Everyone should try it ... it makes your day and really someone else’s too.” This isn’t the first time I have helped out a stranger. Once in the grocery store, I was in line with a group of mentally-challenged individuals who were out with their caretaker. They were buying their groceries. Each one had their money out and ready to pay for the few little — but necessary — food stuffs. One man spotted a display rack of fuzzy scarves near the checkout line. He giggled and put one of the scarves to his

face. He picked it up and proceeded to add it to his groceries. “No, you can’t buy that,” his caretaker said gently, “you have to put it back now.” He looked very sullen and put the scarf back. I jumped in and grabbed the scarf and put it with my groceries. After I paid, I waited for the man to finish paying for his items. I walked up to him and said, “this is for you!” He looked shocked and took the scarf from my hands. He grinned a wide grin. “Tell her thank you,” his caretaker said. “Thank you!” he was still grinning and put the scarf around his neck. “You are welcome,” I told him, and proceeded to walk to my car. I felt so wonderful. There are more ways to help someone than just monetary ways. A smile, a friendly greeting, giving up your place in line for them. All we have to do is look around and opportunities will present themselves. Stephanie Ogren is married and has two children. She is employed at Colorado Community Media as the lead editorial page designer and a copy editor.

letter to the editor Dear Editor: Issue 5A proposes to raise taxes from seven to 11 mills to hire nine firefighters for the Donald Wescott Fire Protection District. The DWFPD is bounded on the west by Interstate 25, on the north by Baptist Road and Interquest to the south. The DWFPD loosely follows Highway 83 to the east. In the 1990s, as Colorado Springs annexed north, the areas that were annexed were taken over and the DWFPD coverage

shrunk. The city has annexed between Interquest and Northgate. Currently, those properties pay both city and DWFPD taxes until the city is capable of providing service. The DWFPD has the potential to shrink about 50 percent in area and closer to 70 percent in taxable value. The city has budgeted for a fire station in 2014-15 to serve the areas that it annexed. What does that mean for the properties that will remain in the DWFPD? There is not a lot of potential for development in

the area that is left which would be from Northgate to Baptist Road and from I-25 to Highway 83 so the taxable value is not likely to change much. I question raising the mill levy to hire more firefighters when the service area will probably shrink dramatically and the amount of funds long term will not support a larger fire department. It is time for a bigger community conversation regarding not only fire service but also water service. Donala Water Dis-

trict has been having meetings to discuss the need for a long-term plan. This is also the case for the DWFPD. We need to come together as a community and explore the alternatives that we have for both fire and water service. Until the larger question is answered, it is difficult to make an informed decision regarding the right mil levy for our fire district. Dennis Feltz, taxpayer, retired DWFPD volunteer fireman

monument police report THEFT: On 10/11/13 Officers responded to the 700 block of Baptist Rd. in response to a theft of merchandise. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: On 10/13/13 at 12:34 a.m., officers responded to the 600 block of Saber Creek Dr. in regards to a domestic violence. One adult female was arrested. ASSAULT: On 10/14/13, at approximately 4:34 p.m., officers responded to a report of a cold assault which occurred in the 100 block of Fourth Street. DUI: On 10/15/13 around 2:11 a.m. officers responded to a theft in progress at a business in the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. The driver of the vehicle was arrested for suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol. THEFT: On 10/15/13 at approximately 2:11 a.m. hours, officers responded to a report of a theft in progress at a business in the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. One juvenile male was arrested for theft, criminal mischief, harassment and minor in possession. TRAFFIC ACCIDENT: On 10/17/13 at approximately 7:54 a.m. an officer responded to the 1200 block of Baptist Road

Oct. 26

to take the report of a non-injury traffic accident. A summons was issued. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: On 10/17/13 officers initiated a citizen contact in the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. One adult male was arrested for domestic violence. DUI: On 10/17/13 around 9:34 pm an officer responded to a business in the 1100 block of Baptist Rd. on a report of a drunk person, the party was subsequently arrested for suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol. THEFT: On 10/17/13 at 7:10 p.m., officers responded to the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway in regards to a theft. PROPERTY FOR DESTRUCTION: On 10/20/13 at 1:31 a.m., officers initiated a citizen contact in the 15000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. HIT AND RUN: On 10/20/13, at approximately 3:59 a.m., officers responded to the 16200 block of Jackson Creek Parkway in reference a hit and run involving vehicle damage. Officers located the suspect and issued a summons to one adult female.

THINGS TO DO

Scary mOvie nights. The Town of Monument plans showings of family-friendly retro scary movies at 7 p.m. Thursdays in October at the marketplace in Jackson Creek, near the clocktower. Movies are free and begin at 7 p.m. Free snacks available to everyone. Lineup includes: “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes” on Oct. 10; “Gremlins” on Oct. 17; and “Beetlejuice” on Oct. 26. Visit http://www.townofmonument.org/ or follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ TownofMonument. thrOugh Oct. 26 Painting exhibit. Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts will exhibit 30 oil paintings by Monument artist John DeFrancesco from Oct. 1-26. The display, titled, “Glorious Days,” will be in the upper gallery of the center. Part of the exhibit will introduce a grouping of seven panoramic paintings inspired by scripture in an ongoing series being painted by DeFrancesco. A free open-

ing reception is planned from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 4. The center is at 304 Highway 105, in Palmer Lake.

Oct. 31 tO nOv. 3 art ShOw. The Black Forest Arts & Crafts Guild plans its 49th annual fall show and sale Oct. 31 to Nov. 3 at the Black Forest Community Center, just north of Shoup Road on Black Forest Road. The center is wheelchair accessible. More than 90 artisan and culinary members will sell their work. Included will be quilts and afghans, baby items, paintings, pottery, jewelry, woodworking, stained glass, dolls, stitchery, note cards, baked goods, jams & jellies and much more. New items arrive throughout the show. Admission is free. The show is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. A portion of sale proceeds will benefit the Black Forest Arts and Crafts Guild Scholarship Fund and the Black Forest community. No strollers allowed. Visa, Mastercard and Discover accepted.

Private Party

Contact: Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes

Visit: www.memoriams.com


Tri-Lakeslife 8-Life-Color

8 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

Photo illustration by Stephanie Ogren

Does the Coyote Girl of Monument still roam the area? By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com

W

e all know that ghosts, goblins and monsters are a dime a dozen at the Haunted Mines. But it seems like there might be a few more paranormal inhabitants running around other parts of the Tri-Lakes area. According to various ghost hunter websites, the there are dozens of these spooky creatures hanging out in houses and business and roaming the streets of northern El Paso and Douglas counties. The web site www.ghostsofamerica. com is chock full of fun stories. One anonymous person reports that in the Jackson Creek area of Monument she could hear children playing on swing sets, but when she looked outside there were none nearby. This same person reports that she can hear a little girl laugh everywhere she goes, but when she looks around nobody is there. In Larkspur, a young girl reports that she heard someone in high heels walking around the kitchen late at night. Upon further inspection, the girl claims that a ghostly creature walked by her, and then later that night the girl’s friend got pushed off of her bed by the same ghost.

Pink Continued from Page 1

going,” Jack Glavan, Schulze’ brother and president of Sister’s Hope, said. Macy’s provided clothing for the fashion show with breast cancer survivors modeling the clothes and there was also an opportunity for a chance to win baskets made up of items donated by local businesses in the Pikes Peak region. Breast cancer survivors shared their stories and talked about what the retreat had done for them during the luncheon. “The retreat allows survivors to come to

The ghost apparently decided to really shake things up and whispered the girls’ names while they were in bed. Yet another girl in Perry Park claims that her family’s home was built on top of an old hanging ground. A few weeks she and her family moved in the home they all started seeing an old man and a really bratty teenage girl. Both had rope marks around their necks. The family also reports that they have been choked by the ghost. The Haunted Mines is a fun place to see living and breathing ghosts, but according to legend there might also be a “real” ghost not too far away. According to the Mines’ website, the famed “Coyote Girl of Monument” has a long and storied history. It seems that in the 1850’s a trapper named John Herman and his wife, Rebecca, settled where Howling Creek emerged on the south side of what is now called Mt. Herman. John was after beaver, which was plentiful there. He and Rebecca built a small log cabin. In 1855 Rebecca Herman became pregnant. When she was ready to have their child, John raced on horseback to their nearest neighbors several miles away. He called out “My wife is having a baby, can you help us?” The neighbors

the other side and look back,” one survivor said. Teri Glavan said Schulze did a lot of research before she developed the retreats. Women will go to a bed and breakfast and take part in small group discussions and workshops and they participate in yoga, go on hikes and get massages. “The retreat is also to pamper them. It is a very intimate environment,” Teri Glavan said, adding that there are usually only eight women at a time attending a retreat. The next retreat in Colorado is scheduled for April 24-27 in Dillon. To learn more about Sister’s HOPE and the HOPE retreats or to make a donation visit http://sistershope.org.

agreed to help, but as they got ready to leave, a violent thunderstorm came over the mountain and a bolt of lightning struck and killed John Herman. The neighbor man and his wife managed to find John and Rebecca’s cabin, but did not arrive until the next day. By then Rebecca Herman was dead too. It looked as if she had given birth before she died, but the neighbors could not find the baby. Since there were coyote tracks all around, they decided the coyotes had eaten the baby. They buried Rebecca and left. But that is hardly the end of the story. Several years later, people began telling a strange story about a coyote girl who lived near Mt. Herman. Residents of Palmer Lake, which at that time was not yet a town but just a small settlement, claimed that one morning a pack of coyotes raced down from the mountains and killed some goats. A boy thought he saw a naked young girl with long blond hair running with the coyotes. A year or two later, a woman came upon some coyotes eating a calf they had just killed. Eating the calf with them, the woman claimed, was a naked young girl with long blond hair. When the coyotes and the girl saw her, they ran off into the woods. The woman said that at first the

girl ran on all fours, and then she stood up and ran like a human, as swift as the coyotes. A search party was formed and folks began along the banks of Howling Creek, across Fire’s Edge and up Mt. Herman. And one day, it is said, they found the coyote girl walking along a ridge with a coyote at her side. When the coyote ran off, the girl hid under a large rock. When the men tried to capture her, she fought back, biting and scratching like an enraged animal. When they finally subdued her, she began screaming and howling like a frightened young coyote pup. The men bound her with rope, put her across a horse, and took her to a small ranch house away from town. They decided to turn her over to the sheriff the next day. They placed her in an empty stall in the barn and untied her. Afraid of the men, she hid in the corner. They locked the barn and left her. Soon she was screaming and howling again. The men thought they would go mad listening to her, but at last she stopped. When night fell, coyotes began howling and yipping in the distance. Folk Girl continues on Page 9

Debbie Ross, a retired Lewis-Palmer School District 38 teacher and breast cancer survivor, models clothing from Macy’s during the Pretty ‘n’ Pink luncheon and fashion show on Oct. 16. The fundraiser raises money for breast cancer survivors 6-12 months out of treatment to attend a HOPE Retreat. Photo by Lisa Collacott


9-Color

The Tribune 9

October 23, 2013

Funds Continued from Page 1

they are needed to drop the classroom size down. If the MLO should pass the first focus will be on putting teachers in place for kindergarten through third grade. He also said there is a real need for updating technology in the classrooms. “We are trying to teach modern technology kids with years old technology,” Pfoff added. Pfoff said that a committee made up of parents, teachers and community members will be formed to ensure the money is being properly spent. Pfoff also wants the citizens to understand the difference between the MLO the

Water

district is requesting and Amendment 66. Amendment 66 is a statewide initiative to change how the state would fund public schools. It is asking for a $950 million dollar tax increase. Income taxes for individuals would increase from 4.63 percent to 5.0 percent on the first $75,000 of state taxable income and 5.9 percent on any taxable income above $75,000. Pfoff said in Amendment 66 the revenue goes to the state and the state then allocates the money to the school districts. “The (D-38) MLO is given 100 percent to the children. It’s an opportunity for the local community to help our children,” Pfoff said. The D-38 school board takes no stance on Amendment 66 but wants citizens to understand the difference between the two tax measures.

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY

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Let Monument Hill Country Club organize all of your holidayClub festivities for This Let Monument Hill Country organize allyou! of your season we have put together a delightful menu for of elegant andput show-stopping festivities you! Thisappetizers season we have together a party platters please everyone on your guest list. the water the District produces. that will surely delightful menu of elegant appetizers and show-stopping It’s That Time...

Continued from Page 1

According to Shaffer, for many years the district has performed a monthly check that compares the aggregate amount of source water produced during each month against the aggregate quantity of water consumed by customers during the month. In September, Woodmoor water assistant manager Randy Gillette said that the district had been experiencing an unexplained water loss of 60 to 70 gallons per minute since late fall 2012. Gillette added that a few defective valves had been replaced, but at that time the water loss was continuing. Gillette estimated that the district was losing two-and-a-half to three million gallons of water a month; about 3 percent of

Girl Continued from Page 8

Shaffer said as soon as the huge irreguparty platters willHoliday surely please larities showed up, the district began a Bookthat your Partyeveryone today! on your thorough investigation of its water system guest Book yourlist. Holiday Party today! and treatment facilities. “From the investigation, the District disLet Monument Hill Country Club organize all of your holiday festivities for you covered two rare types of leaks; one subsurseason we have together a Country delightful menu of elegant appetizers show-sto Let put Monument Hill Club organize all of your holiday and festivities for y face from a fire hydrant where no surface season we have put together a delightful menu of elegant appetizers and show party platters that will surely please everyone on your guest list. indicators were present and one at a treat• Custom designed suitplease youreveryone budget on and style party platters menus that will to surely your guest list. ment facility due to a faulty valve causing leakage into a subsurface drain,” Shaffer • Buffet or plated menus Our Personalized Services Include: said. “With over 80 miles of water mains Personalized Services Include: • Carry Our out, orto use our in house and thousands of valves and hydrants in • Custom designed menus suit your budget and style • Custom designed menus to suit your budget and style the district’s system, the task of identifying banquet facilities to host your special event. • Buffet or plated menus • Buffet or plated menus and repairing these types of allusive failCarry out, or use in house ures is both rare and quite challenging.” Carry out,our or use our in house Shaffer also noted that while water leaks banquet facilities to host your special event. banquet facilities to host your special event. Our professionals have great ideas to help you plan your of this sort are a huge concern, consumers are affected in their pocketbooks. next office gathering or holiday party! Our professionals have greattoideas helpplan you plan “Curtailing the leaks assures that the Our professionals have great ideas helptoyou youryour Call us today to schedule a vist and let’s get started. District continues to operate at its historioffice gathering or holiday next officenext gathering or holiday party!party! cally high efficiency levels,” he said. Call us today to schedule a visit and let’s get started.

It’s That Time...

Our Personalized Services Include: • Custom designed menus to suit your budget and style Our Personalized Services Include: • Buffet or plated menus Carry out, or use our in house banquet facilities to host your special event.

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CallMinor us today to schedule a visit and let’s get started. Julie Julie Minor Years passed with no word of the girl.Food & Beverage Manager Julie Minor Food(719) & Beverage Manager Then one day, some men on horseback food@monumenthillcc.com Phone: 884-7233 Julie Minor Food & Beverage Manager came into the forest in front of Mt. Herfood@monumenthillcc.com food@monumenthillcc.com Phone: (719) 884-7233 man, not far from Howling Creek. They Food & Beverage Manager claim they saw a young woman with long food@monumenthillcc.com Phone: (719) 884-7233 Phone: (719) 884-7233 blond hair feeding two coyote pups. When

she saw the men, she snatched up18945 the pups Pebble Beach Way, Monument, Colorado, 80132Beach Way, Monument, Colorado, 80132 18945 Pebble 18945 Pebble Beach Way, Monument, Colorado, 80132 and ran into the forest. They tried to follow 18945 Pebble Beach Way, Monument, Colorado, 80132 her, but she quickly disappeared up the mountain. They searched and searched, but found no trace of her. There has been no reported sighting of the famous Coyote Girl of Monument for Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 23 many years. But the old timers in the area claim that that when you hear the howlcommunity papers with boundless opportunity and rewards. ing of the coyotes you can hear the howl We publish: Adams County Sentinel, Arvada Press, Castle Rock News Press, of a girl. Centennial Citizen, Douglas County News Press, Elbert County News, Englewood Herald, Foothills Transcript, Golden Transcript, Highlands Ranch Herald, Lakewood Sentinel, Littleton Independent, Lone Tree Voice, North JeffCo Westsider, HAVE AN EVENT? Northglenn-Thornton Sentinel, Parker Chronicle, Pikes Peak Courier View, To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com or by South Platte Independent, Teller County Extra, Tribune Extra, Tri-Lakes Tribune, fax to 303-566-4098. Westminster Window, and Wheat Ridge Transcript.

say that each time they stopped, the girl howled in reply. The cries of the coyotes came from every direction, and got closer and closer. Suddenly, like it was planned, the coyotes attacked the rancher’s horses and other livestock. The men rushed into the darkness, firing their guns. When the men got back to the barn, they noticed that a hole was dug in the dirt under and out of the barn. The girl was gone.

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10 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

CrUISIN’ tHroUGH tHE toUrNEY

Discovery Canyon senior Luke Lorenz won the Class 4A state No.1 singles title Oct. 12 in Pueblo. Photo by Danny Summers

Discovery Canyon’s Lorenz wins state tennis title Thunder senior wins Class 4A No. 1 singles championship By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Discovery Canyon senior Luke Lorenz made his final state tennis appearance memorable last week when he won the Class 4A No. 1 singles title Oct. 12 at Pueblo City Park. Lorenz defeated long-time rival David Mitchell of Kent Denver in straight sets, 7-5, 6-4, to claim the title — his first in four attempts at the state tournament. Lorenz seemingly cruised through the three-day tournament, winning twice on Oct. 10 to advance to the semifinals. On Oct. 11 he defeated Mullen’s Connor Arend, 7-5, 6-0, to move on to the finals. Lorenz’s state championship brought praise from Palmer Ridge coach Skip Wells. “It’s a phenomenal accomplishment,” Wells said. “Luke is very humble. Easy going. A classy guy.” Lorenz had never defeated Mitchell in eight previous matches, including twice this season. Mitchell was the 2011 state champion and runner-up last season. The two battled back and forth in the first set and were tied five games apiece. Lorenz broke the tie when he broke

Lewis-Palmer No. 2 singles Nolan Rademacher serves during one of his state tennis matches at Pueblo City Park. Photo by Julie Smith Mitchell at love for a 6-5 advantage. Lorenz trailed by two points in the deciding set, but served out for the victory, including an ace to clinch the set. In the second set, Lorenz took control at two games to one and never looked

back. Lorenz was the only Discovery Canyon player to advance to state. Lewis-Palmer was represented by seven players; No. 1 singles Jared Stuart, No. 2 singles Nolan Rademacher, No. 3

singles Thomas Gregory; No. 1 doubles JK Balk and Brennan Stuart, and the No. 2 doubles team of David Meleski and Kyle Flinn. Everybody lost in the first round. Stuart, a senior, lost to Pueblo Central’s Steven Alcala, 6-2, 6-3. Rademacher, a freshman, lost to Niwot’s Allen Fu, 6-1, 6-2. Gregory, a senior, lost to Niwot’s Drew Pasma, 6-0, 6-1. “There usually aren’t any weak spots when you get to state,” said Lewis-Palmer coach Paul Kardell. “I fully expected to win some matches and some first rounds. It didn’t work out that way this year.” Palmer Ridge had four state qualifiers; the No. 3 doubles team of freshmen Zach Wilcox and Drake Wilson, and the No. 4 doubles team of sophomores Ricky Wilcox and Marc-Andre Lacrampe. Zach Wilcox and Wilson won a firstround match, defeating a duo from Fountain Valley, 7-5, 7-6. The Palmer Ridge freshmen lost in the quarterfinals to Niwot, 6-3, 6-3. Ricky Wilcox and Marc-Andre Lacrampe lost their first-round match. “It’s nice to get a point and win down there,” Wells said. “It gives our guys a taste of the big dance.” The Bears could land a number of players at state in the coming years. Of the 36 players on their team this season, only seven were juniors and seniors. “We have a very good young team,” Wells said. “I’m excited about the future.”


11-Sports-Color

The Tribune 11

October 23, 2013

Bears come up short in state softball tournament Palmer Ridge loses, 5-4, to No. 2 seed Ponderosa By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcolroadonews.com Facing the No. 2 overall seed in the Class 4A state softball tournament did not intimidate No. 15 Palmer Ridge. Trailing by one run in the top seventh inning at Aurora Sports Complex on Oct. 19, the Bears loaded the bases twice against Ponderosa, but could not push across the go-ahead run in a 5-4 first-round loss. “We had opportunities, but we didn’t hit how we’re supposed to,” said Palmer Ridge coach Randy Gillette. The tournament was delayed one day due to cold weather and unsafe playing conditions. For a brief moment, it looked as if Jennifer Tarwater might have gotten that big hit Gillette and the Bears were looking for in the final frame. “She hit a ball down the right field line that hit chalk, but the umpire called it foul,” Gillette said. “That would have scored the two runners.” Tarwater was eventually hit by a pitch to reload the bases with two outs, but McKenzie Brummond grounded out to first base to the end the Bears’ season. “That was tough a loss,” Gillette said. “I thought we had (Ponderosa).” The Bears (15-8) rallied from an early 3-0 deficit and scored a pair of runs in the

fourth and sixth to take a 4-3 lead into the bottom of the sixth against the Ponderosa (19-4). Ponderosa retook the lead on consecutive two-out RBI singles. The Bears have advanced to the state tournament in each of the last two seasons. They lost to Niwot, 7-0, in a first round game in 2012. “We have to hold our heads up high,” Gillette said. “We accomplished a lot this season.” Gillette and the Bears made a great run this season despite having only 14 players in the entire program. Palmer Ridge only has a varsity team. “I’m concerned about the future,” Gillette said. The Bears are set to return the bulk of their team next season. They lose just four players to graduation; catcher Taylor Klee (team-leading 6 homes runs, .388 batting average), outfielder Libby Acker (.460, 10 doubles, 26 RBIs), outfielder Madison Broussard (.250 in a limited role) and first baseman Brummond (.313, 4 doubles). Among those Bears expected to play another key role next season are junior pitcher Madysen Kearns (team-leading .589 average and 29 RBIs), Tarwater (.350), junior Jennifer Slaughter (.452), junior Ciara Richardson (.436), freshman Alicen Minarick and sophomore Julia Schroeder (.254). “I think we’ll be in good shape again next season,” Gillette said. “The girls work hard and they are dedicated.”

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Palmer Ridge senior catcher Taylor Klee belted four home runs in three regional games to help the Bears to the state playoffs. Photo by Rebecca Schroeder

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12

12 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

Thunder’s softball season comes to an end No. 4 seed Discovery Canyon loses , 9-2, to D’Evelyn By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Discovery Canyon’s first round softball game at the Class 4A state finals was put on hold 24 hours because of poor weather. When the Thunder finally took the field on Oct. 19, the experience was anything but pleasant. Discovery Canyon, the No. 4 seed in the 16-team Class 4A tournament, lost to No. 12 D’Evelyn, 9-2, in the first round. “D’Evelyn started to put the ball in play and we made some untimely errors,” said Thunder coach Tanya Ramsay. “One thing led to another and things got away. “Offensively, we didn’t make adjustments. It was just an off game. It’s tough when that happens in your first game at state.” The Thunder used the postponement day as a team-bonding time. It hung out around the hotel’s pool during the day, watched the movie “42” and also took in game 6 of the National League Championship series between Los Angeles and St. Louis. Making its fourth consecutive state tournament appearance, Discovery Canyon (16-6) trailed D’Evelyn, 2-1, heading into the top of the Jaguars’ seventh inning. That’s when things came unraveled for the Thunder. D’Evelyn scored seven runs on eight hits in the inning off Thunder junior righthander McKenzie Surface to build a comfortable lead. Discovery Canyon mustered a run in the bottom of the frame. “We just didn’t play our game,” Ramsay said. “(D’Evelyn) took advantage of our mistakes.” Discovery Canyon grabbed an early lead when Kailee Clark doubled on the game’s third pitch. She scored on Molly Turner’s single. But the Thunder bats went silent as it managed just three hits the rest of the way. D’Evelyn had 14 hits in the game. Despite the loss, Ramsay remained upbeat and praised her team for another successful season. “I couldn’t be more proud of the girls,” Ramsay said. “I’m excited with the direction we’re going. “We have a tradition in Aurora and our goal is get back here again next year.” The Thunder will return the bulk of its team in 2014 as it graduates just four seniors; Sheldyn Schindler, Rachel Wright, Riley Trousdale and Katie Jarrett.

Discovery Canyon junior right-hander McKenzie Surface threw a no-hitter against Thompson Valley on Oct. 12 to lead the Thunder to the Class 4A state tournament. Among the impact players expected to return are Surface (.353 batting average, team-leading seven home runs and 35 RBIs). Clark (team-leading .379 average), Turner (.317), Hannah Wirtjes (.355), Destiny Lackey (.333), Emily Selby (.279) and Emily Robinett (.263). “We need to continue to work hard and bring a state title home to Colorado Springs,” Ramsay said.

‘I couldn’t be more proud of the girls. I’m excited with the direction we’re going.’ Coach Tanya Ramsay

Discovery Canyon players celebrated after winning their regional at Four Diamond Sports Complex in Colorado Springs. They played in the state tournament in Aurora Oct. 18-19. Photos by Danny Summers

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The Tribune 13

October 23, 2013

Palmer Ridge and Colorado Academy set to square off Field hockey teams will meet for the fourth time in less than a year By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com For the fourth time in less than a calendar year, Palmer Ridge will play Colorado Academy in a must-see field hockey game. The Bears earned that right after disposing of Regis Jesuit in relatively easy fashion, 4-0, on Oct. 17 in the quarterfinals of the state playoffs at Don Breese Stadium. Palmer Ridge (12-4, the No. 4 overall seed in the tournament) will play its nemeses to the north Oct. 23 in Denver. Colorado Academy (15-0) is the No. 1 seed in the tournament. Colorado Academy defeated the Bears in last year’s state championship game, 1-0, on penalty strokes. “We’ve been thinking about `em since last year,” said Palmer Ridge coach Paul Lewis. “We’ve got a full week off now to prepare for `em. We have to put together a game plan that will be effective, and make it work.” The Bears got another strong effort from senior Jessica Berg, whose three goals - two off short corners - paced the team’s powerful offensive attack. Berg, who attends Air Academy, has 13 goals on the season. But it was actually senior left forward Mikayla Martin who got the Bears’ scoring started when she found the back of the net four minutes into the first half. “It felt really good,” Martin said. “I didn’t know it was going to happen because it was kind of like an accident. The ball was kind of coming straight at me and I just kind of stuck my stick out there and the ball went in.” Berg scored two more first-half goals to put the Bears up by a comfortable margin. That allowed Lewis to lower his level of in-

tensity for a while. “It allows you to relax and kind of enjoy the game and focus on the fundamentals,” Lewis said. “We were able to get some subs in and get everybody prepared for the next game.” Palmer Ridge and Colorado Academy are no strangers. In addition to playing in last year’s state title game, the clubs have played each other twice this season, with Colorado Academy coming out on top both times; 7-0 on Sept. 7, and 2-1 on Oct. 8. “They’re a tough opponent,” Berg said of Colorado Academy. “It’s a great opportunity to get to play them again. We’re ready. “We’ve learned their playing style. We’ve learned how to defend them, and we’ve learned how to counter their defense.” Bears senior right forward Daelynn Demello, the team’s leader in goals with 21, was held in check by Regis Jesuit. Demello was able to still assist on three goals, however. She is looking forward to the playing Colorado Academy. “The first time we played CA this year we weren’t prepared,” Demello said. “The second game we stepped it up. I think we’ll win this time. “We have to play strong as a team and make good passes and we can beat them. We all need to want it.” Palmer Ridge goalkeeper Cheradyn Pettit put in another strong effort, stopping all six of the Regis Jesuit shots that came her way. Palmer Ridge seems to be peaking at the right time. The Bears have won three consecutive matches - all by shutout - since back-to-back losses to Kent Denver, 1-0, and Colorado Academy. The Bears have won 9 of their last 11, with seven shutouts during that span. “When we see that our offense is ramping up their game, we ramp up our intensity on defense,” said Bears junior defender Lilly Commerford.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Warren Arthur Bostrom, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30018 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of El Pasco County, Colorado on or before February 9, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred.

Notice To Creditors Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Argyll E. Walker, a/k/a Argyll Eldon Walker, a/k/a Argyll Walker Case Number: 2013 PR 30419 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of El Paso County, Colorado on or before February 17, 2014, or the claims may be forever barred. Ronald P. Walker Personal Representative 7574 South Ivanhoe Way Centennial, CO 80112 Legal Notice No.: 932180 First Publication: October 16, 2013 Last Publication: October 30, 2013 Publisher: The Tri-Lake Tribune

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Warren Arthur Bostrom, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30018

Lynn M. Vanatta-Perry Attorney at Law 315 East San Miguel Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903

Notice To Creditors

Legal Notice No: 932175 First Publication: October 9, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF BUDGET Notice is hereby given that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Palmer Lake Sanitation District for the ensuing year of 2014; a copy of such proposed budget has been filed in the office of the Palmer Lake Sanitation District where same is open for public inspection; Such proposed budget will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Palmer Lake Sanitation District to be held at 120 Middle Glenway, Palmer Lake, Colorado on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. Any interested elector of such Palmer Lake Sanitation District may inspect the proposed budget and file or register any objections thereto at any time prior to the final adoption of the budget. Palmer Lake Sanitation District Becky Orcutt, District Manager

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of El Pasco County, Colorado on or before February 9, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred.

Legal Notice No.: 932187 First Publication: October 23, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tri-Lakes Tribune

Lynn M. Vanatta-Perry Attorney at Law 315 East San Miguel Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903

Notice of Names of Unclaimed Refunds

Legal Notice No: 932175 First Publication: October 9, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Public Notice CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR BOARD OF DIRECTOR VILLAGE CENTER METROPOLITAN DISTRICT EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO The El Paso County Clerk & Recorder, as designated election official, calls for the nomination of candidates for Board of Director to be placed on the recall

Public Notice

The following is a list of unclaimed refunds of consumer security deposits. Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881. The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain Viewfor Electric Association election ballot the Village Center directs all unclaimed property to the ColorMetropolitan District recall election ado Energy Assistance Foundation. to be held on Tuesday, December 17, 2013, inFIELD the Village Center Metropolitan 447700 ASSET SERVICES District. ALBE, FRANCIS ALDRIDGE, JENI M ALEXANDER, WILLIAM A person who desires to be a successor ALLEN, CHAD candidate may pick-up a Self-Nomination ANDERSON, ALISSA and Acceptance form ANDREWS, SHEILA G from the El Paso CountySHAWNEE Clerk & Recorder’s Office loAPAO, cated at 1675 West ARCELIN, TOM E Garden of the Gods ARNDT, CHRISTIANE E Road, Suite 2202, Colorado Springs, BAINBRIDGE, JULIE BALL, DEBRA C BARNHART, MARY BEARWALD, VANESSA H BENNETT, DIANA BEYON, GARY

Public Notice Notice of Names of Unclaimed Refunds

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The following is a list of unclaimed refunds of consumer security deposits. Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881. The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain View Electric Association directs all unclaimed property to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation. 447700 FIELD ASSET SERVICES ALBE, FRANCIS ALDRIDGE, JENI M ALEXANDER, WILLIAM ALLEN, CHAD ANDERSON, ALISSA ANDREWS, SHEILA G APAO, SHAWNEE ARCELIN, TOM E ARNDT, CHRISTIANE E BAINBRIDGE, JULIE BALL, DEBRA C BARNHART, MARY BEARWALD, VANESSA H BENNETT, DIANA BEYON, GARY BLACK, JAY BOLTON, WHITNEY BOWLIN, JAMES BRILEY, STEVEN BROCK, KENNETH BROWN, THOMAS J R BRUSH, GILBERT BRYANT, JESSICA BUSH, IRMGARD CHACON, IRMA CHAVEZ, GUSTAVO CLARK, JEFFREY K CLUBS, EDDIE CRANDALL, RANDY CRENSHAW, JOSEPH CRESS, RONN DANIELS, JUANITA K DAVIS, KRYSTINA DAVIS, WILLIAM NATHAN FERGUSON, JOHN G FOX, DANIEL T FRALEY, AMANDA M FREY, BRIDGET GANN, JERRY GARDNER, LISA A GARLINGTON, RONALD J GERBER, BRYEN GILMER, RONNIE L GOODMAN, MARCUS E also available CO 80907. The forms are GOTOVICH-WASHBURN, ANGELA on the Clerk & Recorder’s web site at GOURMET FAR EAST http://car.elpasoco.com/election. GRGICH, NIKEE L HALL, MALCOLM Each person who wishes to be a succesHAYDEN, NICOLE HAYES, ENJOLI sor candidate in the recall election must HEFFNER, GLORIA submit a Self-Nomination and Acceptance HENDERSHOT, form no later thanSAMANTHA 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, HERRANDO, RUSSELL October 26,KASHA 2013. HICKMAN, HICKS, JEROMIE Completed successor Self-Nomination HIOUAS, LISA L HOLASEK, JIRI forms may be submitted and Acceptance HOLMES, DAVID HOUSE, JULIETTE A IBARRA, JOHN JAFARI, ALI JARHOUSE, JANE JAYNES, JONATHAN

Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881. The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain View Electric Association directs all unclaimed property to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation. 447700 FIELD ASSET SERVICES ALBE, FRANCIS ALDRIDGE, JENI M ALEXANDER, WILLIAM ALLEN, CHAD ANDERSON, ALISSA ANDREWS, SHEILA G APAO, SHAWNEE ARCELIN, TOM E ARNDT, CHRISTIANE E BAINBRIDGE, JULIE BALL, DEBRA C BARNHART, MARY BEARWALD, VANESSA H BENNETT, DIANA BEYON, GARY BLACK, JAY BOLTON, WHITNEY BOWLIN, JAMES BRILEY, STEVEN BROCK, KENNETH BROWN, THOMAS J R BRUSH, GILBERT BRYANT, JESSICA BUSH, IRMGARD CHACON, IRMA CHAVEZ, GUSTAVO CLARK, JEFFREY K CLUBS, EDDIE CRANDALL, RANDY CRENSHAW, JOSEPH CRESS, RONN DANIELS, JUANITA K DAVIS, KRYSTINA DAVIS, WILLIAM NATHAN FERGUSON, JOHN G FOX, DANIEL T FRALEY, AMANDA M FREY, BRIDGET GANN, JERRY GARDNER, LISA A GARLINGTON, RONALD J GERBER, BRYEN GILMER, RONNIE L GOODMAN, MARCUS E GOTOVICH-WASHBURN, ANGELA GOURMET FAR EAST GRGICH, NIKEE L HALL, MALCOLM HAYDEN, NICOLE HAYES, ENJOLI HEFFNER, GLORIA HENDERSHOT, SAMANTHA HERRANDO, RUSSELL HICKMAN, KASHA HICKS, JEROMIE HIOUAS, LISA L HOLASEK, JIRI HOLMES, DAVID HOUSE, JULIETTE A IBARRA, JOHN JAFARI, ALI JARHOUSE, JANE JAYNES, JONATHAN JOHN LAING HOMES JOHNSON, GIB JOHNSON, PAMELA JOHNSON, RACHEAL JOHNSON, RACHELLE JONES, JENNIFER JONES, STEVEN KARAMCHETI, MICHAEL H KENNEDY, ROBERT KEY, DANNY KING, KEITH KINGSLEY, ASHLEY A KRUSE, CHERYL A LANGFORD, TERRESA L LARROW, BRUCE LASSITER, MIKE LAVANTURE, RAYMOND C LEHL, LINDA G LEHMPUHL, MICHAEL R LONGACRE, MICHAEL MAHALIE, GRADY M MAIER, RAYMOND C MANTER, DOREEN MARCIANO, STEPHEN S MARTINDALE, JOHN MARTINEZ, LUIS MATTHEWS, TRACY S MCAULIFFE, JACOB MCMULLIN, DAREN M MILLER, KENNETH ROMEL MONTEL, IAN MONTOYA, FRANK MONTOYA, JOHN A MORENO, MIGUELINA MORROW, JOHN D MOSBACKER, WENDY MOSHER, KEVIN MOSLEY, ANDY MURR, KIRBI NEWMAN, STEVEN NYSTROM, RYAN OAS, CRAIG OLSON, DAVID OMAHONY, BARRY O'NEIL DEVELOPMENT PADILLA, ELIZABETH PANACCIONE, GIOVANNA PAPE, DOUG A PARKS, WILLIAM K C PASSMORE, RENEE A PERSKY, AMANDA PFIFER, MICHAEL PILAR, SHARI PINECREST CONSTRUCTION CO POSTON, DIANE L PRATHER, DEBORAH PRESIDENT, DEBRA D QUINONES, REUBEN RADOSAVLEVICI, MIRA RAINS, MARGIE RITCHIE, WILLIAM RIVERA, CODY ROBERTS, GREENE ROBINSON, LAMONT ROCKWELL, STEPHEN B ROMANO, DANIEL RONCAGLIONE, TROY R RUBIO, GREG P RUCKDESCHEL, COREY H RYAN, JANET SAINE, SANDY SALDIVIA, DAN J SALZER, MARY SANTISTEVAN, REBECCA SCHINDLER, FRED S SCHOU, WILLIAM E SCHULTZ, ERIC CO 80920. The hours Colorado Springs, SCHUPPER, at this locationSANDY are Monday – Friday 8:00 SCIORILLI, LEONARD P a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and SECOR, SUSAN M 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Saturday. SHAVER, STAN •SIMPSON Mailed to:EST, Election Department, P.O. Box PARKS H SKIME, DANIELSprings, CO 80901 2007, Colorado WtoL LizOlson@elpasoco.com •SMITH, Emailed A •SOMERVILLE, Faxed to (719)LEE 520-7327 SQUIRE, AMANDA STENGER, WILLIAM The election will beHconducted by all mail STRAUB, DANIEL ballot. Beginning, Monday, December STUBBS, JENNIFER STULTS, ROBBIE 9, 2013, four Voter Service and Polling SUHRE, BRENDA THOMPSON, JOHANNA THORPE, ELIZABETH TRICH, JAMES TRIGO, ANTONIO TRUJILLO, TANYA

Palmer Ridge senior Jessica Berg, in white, smacks the ball during the Bears’ Oct. 17 state quarterfinals field hockey match against Regis Jesuit. The Bears won 4-0 as Berg scored three goals. Photos by Danny Summers

Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881. The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain View Electric Association directs all unclaimed property to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation. 447700 FIELD ASSET SERVICES ALBE, FRANCIS ALDRIDGE, JENI M ALEXANDER, WILLIAM ALLEN, CHAD ANDERSON, ALISSA ANDREWS, SHEILA G APAO, SHAWNEE ARCELIN, TOM E ARNDT, CHRISTIANE E BAINBRIDGE, JULIE BALL, DEBRA C BARNHART, MARY BEARWALD, VANESSA H BENNETT, DIANA BEYON, GARY BLACK, JAY BOLTON, WHITNEY BOWLIN, JAMES BRILEY, STEVEN BROCK, KENNETH BROWN, THOMAS J R BRUSH, GILBERT BRYANT, JESSICA BUSH, IRMGARD CHACON, IRMA CHAVEZ, GUSTAVO CLARK, JEFFREY K CLUBS, EDDIE CRANDALL, RANDY CRENSHAW, JOSEPH CRESS, RONN DANIELS, JUANITA K DAVIS, KRYSTINA DAVIS, WILLIAM NATHAN FERGUSON, JOHN G FOX, DANIEL T FRALEY, AMANDA M FREY, BRIDGET GANN, JERRY GARDNER, LISA A GARLINGTON, RONALD J GERBER, BRYEN GILMER, RONNIE L GOODMAN, MARCUS E GOTOVICH-WASHBURN, ANGELA GOURMET FAR EAST GRGICH, NIKEE L HALL, MALCOLM HAYDEN, NICOLE HAYES, ENJOLI HEFFNER, GLORIA HENDERSHOT, SAMANTHA HERRANDO, RUSSELL HICKMAN, KASHA HICKS, JEROMIE HIOUAS, LISA L HOLASEK, JIRI HOLMES, DAVID HOUSE, JULIETTE A IBARRA, JOHN JAFARI, ALI JARHOUSE, JANE JAYNES, JONATHAN JOHN LAING HOMES JOHNSON, GIB JOHNSON, PAMELA JOHNSON, RACHEAL JOHNSON, RACHELLE JONES, JENNIFER JONES, STEVEN KARAMCHETI, MICHAEL H KENNEDY, ROBERT KEY, DANNY KING, KEITH KINGSLEY, ASHLEY A KRUSE, CHERYL A LANGFORD, TERRESA L LARROW, BRUCE LASSITER, MIKE LAVANTURE, RAYMOND C LEHL, LINDA G LEHMPUHL, MICHAEL R LONGACRE, MICHAEL MAHALIE, GRADY M MAIER, RAYMOND C MANTER, DOREEN MARCIANO, STEPHEN S MARTINDALE, JOHN MARTINEZ, LUIS MATTHEWS, TRACY S MCAULIFFE, JACOB MCMULLIN, DAREN M by the following methods: KENNETH ROMEL •MILLER, In Person at: MONTEL, IAN MONTOYA, FRANK •MONTOYA, El Paso County Clerk JOHN A & Recorder’s Office located at 1675 West Garden of MORENO, MIGUELINA MORROW, JOHN D the Gods Road, Suite 2202, Colorado MOSBACKER, WENDY Springs, CO 80907. The hours at this MOSHER, location areKEVIN Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. MOSLEY, ANDY to 5:00 p.m. MURR, KIRBI NEWMAN, STEVEN •NYSTROM, El Paso County Clerk & Recorder’s RYAN OAS, CRAIG Office located at 8830 N. Union Blvd. OLSON, DAVID OMAHONY, BARRY O'NEIL DEVELOPMENT PADILLA, ELIZABETH PANACCIONE, GIOVANNA PAPE, DOUG A

Palmer Ridge field hockey players ready themselves in goal during the Oct. 17 state quarterfinals playoff game with Regis Jesuit. From left to right are Jennifer Lager, Courtney Child, Cheradyn Pettit, Jessica berg and Daelynn Demello.

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Legal Notice No.: 932183 First Publication: October 16, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tri-Lakes Tribune

Centers will be open for voter registration and voting purposes. For additional information, please contact Liz Olson by email LizOlson@elpasoco. com or by calling (719) 520-6222. Legal Notice No.: 932188 First Publication: October 23, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tri-Lakes Tribune


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14 The Tribune

October 23, 2013

Tri-Lakes cross country teams headed to state meet Palmer Ridge and TCA qualify both teams By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The Tri-Lakes area will be well represented at Saturday’s state cross country meet at the Norris-Penrose Events Center. Both boys and girls teams from Palmer Ridge and The Classical Academy will compete at state, as well as the Discovery Canyon girls team and the Lewis-Palmer boys team. The top four teams, as well as the top 15 individuals from last week’s Class 4A Region 2 race qualified for the state meet. On the boys’ side, Palmer Ridge junior Eric Hamer crossed the finish line first with a time of 16 minutes, 01 seconds. Hamer beat out TCA senior Conner Wilburn (2nd, 16:15). The two runners traded positions from a year ago.

Hamer is Palmer Ridge’s first boys’ regional champ since 2010, when Spencer Wenck set a course record at Monument Valley Park en route to a 4A state championship. Palmer Ridge finished third as a team with 50 points, while TCA was second with 43. Lewis-Palmer was fourth with 131 points. Air Academy was first with 31 points. Palmer Ridge’s top five runners - in addition to Hamer - were junior Tommy Herebic (7th, 16:34), senior Josh Bethany (9th, 16:50), freshman Andrew Rudnicki (15th, 17:13) and senior Zach Blehm (18th, 17:20). Joining Wilburn in the top five for TCA were senior Chandler Ryd (8th, 16:43), sophomore Michael Oldach (10th, 16:51), junior Everett Johnson (11th, 16:58) and freshman Tanner Norman (12th, 16:58). Lewis-Palmer’s top five were junior Austin Bach (17th, 17:19), junior Jeffrey Naumiec (22nd, 17:25), junior Hunter Shu-

man (25th, 17:33), senior Christopher Ecklun (33rd, 17:50) and freshman Cameron Barry (42nd, 18:26). Discovery Canyon finished fifth as a team with 154 points and did not qualify for the state meet. The Thunder’s top five runners were senior Matthew Beck (19th, 17:21), junior Andrew Wireman (20th, 17:23), freshman Niko Gonzalez (35th, 17:57), sophomore Dylan Custer (45th, 18:32) and senior Nick Wylie (48th, 18:44). Palmer Ridge senior Alison Deitsch had the best finish of any Tri-Lakes girl, finishing second to Air Academy sophomore sensation Katie Rainsberger. Deitsch had an impressive time of 18:32, but it was 53 seconds behind Rainsberger. Palmer Ridge finished third as a team with 71 points behind Air Academy (42) and TCA (42). Discovery Canyon was fourth (72). Palmer Ridge had four other runners place in the top 26; sophomore Audree Furst (12th, 19:47), sophomore Kaitlin

Ramsey (14th, 20:00), junior Claire Wilson (18th, 20:49) and sophomore Hannah Capek (26th, 21:21). Five TCA runners made it into the top 15; senior Lauren Hamilton (3rd, 14:45), junior Maddie Mullen (6th, 19:14), senior Katie Knapp (8th, 19:27), senior Brianne Hoglin (11th, 19:47) and junior Megan Percy (15th, 20:21). Discovery Canyon was led by sophomore Beth DeLaurell’s seventh-place finish (19:23). Rounding out the top five for the Thunder was junior Arianna Ross (10th, 19:39), freshman Yana Brown (16th, 20:35), junior Courtney McCann (17th, 20:35) and junior Riley McCone (22nd, 21:08). Lewis-Palmer’s girls finished sixth with 186 points. The top five Rangers runners were junior Kaitlin Cavera (31st, 22:00), junior Isabel Taylor (32nd, 22:19), freshman Brooke Taylor (34th, 22:41), sophomore Sidney Jones (44th, 23:39) and sophomore Maddie Smith (45th, 23:50).

Rangers spike, dig their way to huge victory over rival Are Lewis-Palmer and Cheyenne Mountain on a collision course for a state finals rematch? By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Only time will tell if the Oct. 15 volleyball match between Lewis-Palmer and Cheyenne Mountain was a preview of the high school state finals. But if it was, fans can expect to see one heck of a rematch next month at the Denver Coliseum. For the second consecutive year, LewisPalmer (17-1, 7-0 in the Class 4A Pikes Peak Athletic Conference) defeated its rivals from the south in a hotly contested match. The Rangers won the latest affair in five grueling sets, 25-15, 22-25, 25-23, 22-25, 16-14. This Rangers’ victory was especially sweet. It clinched their second consecutive PPAC title. It also marked the first time Cheyenne Mountain (15-2, 6-1) had lost a home league match in the 10 years since David Barkley has been coach of the Indians. “Regardless of classification, these are the two best teams in the state right now,” Barkley said. “Tonight was tremendous. “I know that if we play them in the finals it will be a great match. We hope we get there, but we have a long way to go before we do that. There are some really good teams out there.”

Lewis-Palmer is hoping to avoid last year’s scenario when the two clubs met in the state finals. That heated match resulted in a Cheyenne Mountain victory in four games; the Indians’ fifth-consecutive state championship. “We’re not even looking at the state finals,” said Lewis-Palmer coach Susan Odenbaugh. “There are still a lot of really great teams. “It was nice to fight and get this win, but there are still a lot of things we need to work on and try to perfect to get to that state final game. Our focus again is to get better every single match. If we can do that, hopefully we’ll get there.” Odenbaugh stressed that her club needs to work on consistent serve receive, stronger block, and the defense needs to be more consistent. While Odenbaugh might be playing down a possible state finals rematch with Cheyenne Mountain, at least one local coach believes the two clubs are on a collision course for an epic battle. “It wouldn’t surprise me if those two teams were playing in the state finals,” said former Lewis-Palmer coach and current Coronado coach Don Lash. “I think both of those teams are very good.” Lash knows a thing or two about both clubs. He’s faced them on a regular basis over the years during the regular season and playoffs. On Sept. 14 of this year, Lewis-Palmer defeated Coronado in four sets. Coronado plays at Cheyenne Mountain on Oct. 23.

“They don’t’ rebuild at Cheyenne Mountain,” Lash said. “They reload.” Only time will tell if Lewis-Palmer and Cheyenne Mountain meet in the state tournament. But Round 2 might take place this weekend as the Rangers travel back to the prestigious Broadmoor area for the Cheyenne Mountain Tournament. The finals of that tournament are set for Saturday evening. On Sunday, the Colorado High School Activities Association will announce regional pairings. “We’re hungry to play (Lewis-Palmer) again,” said Cheyenne Mountain senior outside hitter Maddie Beal, who had a team-high 16 kills against the Rangers. “Lewis-Palmer is a very good team. We all hope we get to play them again so we can battle it out again.” The best player on the court when the two clubs get together is Lewis-Palmer junior outside hitter Alexa Smith. She came up with a game-high 28 kills, including the game-winner in the fifth set. But Smith is not looking at a rematch with Cheyenne Mountain just yet. “We’re still just going game by game and trying to get better,” said Smith, who also added a game-high 14 digs against Cheyenne Mountain. “We have to communicate more on the court and have a better serve receive.” Smith was among the many Rangers who carried the PPAC championship trophy around the Cheyenne Mountain gymnasium following her team’s emotional

victory. Senior setter Abi Bartalo also got to handle the hardware. “We need to work on our fundamentals more,” said Bartalo, who had a game-high 27 assists against Cheyenne Mountain. “We’re doing great already. We just need to fine tune everything so we’re ready to go.” Lewis-Palmer’s only loss this season was to Doherty in five sets on Sept. 19. Doherty defeated Cheyenne Mountain in straight sets on Sept. 27. The Spartans are the defending 5A state champion. “We need to be more consistent in our positioning,” Barkley said. “L-P caught us flat-footed a few times.” Lewis-Palmer added several key transfers over the off season to its already strong team; senior outside hitter Haley McCurley, sophomore setter Mariah Evans and sophomore libero Emily McCurley. All three girls had to sit out the first 11 games of the season due to the CHSAA transfer rule. “We work hard in practice and we work hard in games and we’re just really focused,” said Haley McCurley, who had 18 kills and 11 digs against Cheyenne Mountain. “Playing volleyball with these girls is incredible. They’re awesome.” Odenbaugh added that getting the whole team to mesh is a work in progress. “We’ve only played four or five games with this lineup,” Odenbaugh said. “We’re still not we’re we need to be. If you don’t communicate everything will break down. If we do communicate the level of play will go from here to here.”

Your Colorado news Colorado Community Media connects readers to 23 local communities: Castle Rock, Castle Pines, Douglas County, Parker, Elbert County, Lone Tree, Highlands Ranch, Littleton, South Platte, Englewood, Centennial, Lakewood, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Golden, Foothills, Northglenn, Thornton, Westminster, North Jeffco, Teller County, Pikes Peak and Tri-Lakes. To find out more about our communities visit www.ourColoradonews.com the online home of Colorado Community Media.

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The Tribune 15

October 23, 2013

Former Packers quarterback enjoying a fun month of football Don Horn, a North Gate resident, was the first round draft pick of the Packers in 1967

FALCONS PICKED 10th IN CONFERENCE The Air Force Academy men’s basketball team is picked to finish 10th in the Mountain West Conference in the preseason media poll. New Mexico is picked to repeat as conference champions, followed by UNLV, Boise State and San Diego State. Mountain West newcomer San Diego State is picked to finish to finish in last (11th) place. PALMER RIDGE LOSES TWO TOUGH VOLLEYBALL MATCHES The Bears’ volleyball team saw their four-game winning streak come to an end last week with losses to Air Academy and Cheyenne Mountain. The Bears are 10-6 overall, 4-3 in the 4A Pikes Peak Athletic Conference. RANGERS TOP DISOCVERY CANYON Lewis-Palmer completed a perfect PPAC season with a straight-set victory over Discovery Canyon on Oct. 17, 2514, 25-10 and 25-8. The Rangers (17-1, 7-0) got a game-high 14 kills from junior Alexa Smith. Haley McCurley added eight kills, while Nicole Montgomery had seven.

By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com North Gate resident Don Horn, a former first-round draft pick of the Green Bay Packers, was among those supporting San Diego State in its Mountain West Conference football game against Air Force Oct. 10 at Falcon Stadium. San Diego State won 27-20. Horn was an all-American quarterback at San Diego State in the 1960s before becoming the first round draft choice of the Green Bay Packers in 1967. He was part of Green Bay’s second Super Bowl-winning team and was the back-up behind Bart Starr. Horn, a realtor, played eight years in the NFL with the Packers, Denver Broncos, San Diego Chargers and Cleveland Browns. He also played one season in the defunct World Football League for the Portland Thunder. On Oct. 20, Horn and former Browns teammate Don Cockroft (a graduate of Fountain-Fort Carson High School) will make an appearance at Southside Johnny’s in Colorado Springs as guests of the Pikes Peak Brown Backers. Horn was in Green Bay on Sept. 15 for a Packers reunion at famed Lambeau Field. The reunion honored players from the 1965 to 1967 Packers’ NFL Championship teams. Among those in attendance were Pro Football Hall of famers Starr, Jerry Kramer, Paul Hornung, Willie Davis and Dave Robinson. Other famed Packers at the affair included Bill Anderson, Donny Anderson, Ken Bowman, Zeke Bratkowski, Tom Brown, Dick Capp, Bill Curry, Carroll Dale Boyd Dowler, Jim Flanigan, Marv Fleming, Jim Grabowski, Doug Hart, Dave Hathcock, Bob Long, William “Red” Mack, Chuck Mercein, Bob Skoronski, Fred “Fuzzy” Thurston, Phil Vandersea, Jim Weatherwax, Ben Wilson and Steve Wright. As always, Starr got the biggest ovation. BEARS DEFEAT MESA RIDGE TO STAY IN PLAYOFF HUNT Eben Martin rushed for 189 yards and two touchdowns to lead the Palmer Ridge football team to a 31-21 victory over Mesa Ridge in a 4A Foothills Conference game played on Oct. 18. Martin has 582 yards on the season and had broken the 100-yard barrier three times. Bears quarterback Blaine Wycoff completed 8 of 18 passes for 126 yards against Mesa Ridge. Palmer Ridge is 3-2 in league, 3-5 overall. The Bears are tied for third place with Pueblo Centennial and Canon City, whom the Bears finish the regular season against. Pueblo South and Pueblo East are in first and second place, respectively. PALMER RIDGE LOSES TO PUEBLO WEST Palmer Ridge had its modest two-game winning streak come to an end with a 35-22 loss to Pueblo West in a 4A Foothills League football tilt played in Pueblo on Oct. 11. Bears senior quarterback Blaine Wycoff completed 8 of 24 passes for 80 yards and a touchdown, while junior tailback Eben Martin rushed for 56 yards and two touchdowns. THUNDER ROLLS MITCHELL, 50-0 The Discovery Canyon football team improved to 7-1, 2-0 in the 3A South Central League, with a 50-0 victory over Mitchell on Oct. 18. The Thunder piled up 309 yards on the ground as 10 different players carried the ball. Ben Gilsen, Scott Betzer, Adrian Mack, Canin Ritz, Alex Weber and Spencer Chambers had touchdown runs. Quarterback Andrew Hall threw a touchdown pass. The Thunder plays at Woodland Park (5-3, 1-1) on Friday. TITANS DOWN SIERRA, 41-14 The Classical Academy rolled to an easy 3A Southern League football victory over Sierra as quarterback Jantzen Ryals threw two touchdown passes and running back Andrew Register rushed for 120 yards. Ryals completed 7 of 12 passes for 111 yards. He had a 50-yard touchdown pass to Nick DeRay and a 25-yard scoring toss to Jake Frankmore. Frankmore also scored on a 17-yard run. Register had touchdown runs of 52 and 10 yards. Na-

Welcome to the Community Former NFL quarterback Don Horn, right, a resident of North Gate, shakes hands with Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers at last month’s Packers’ reunion at Lambeau Field in Green Bay. Horn was the first round draft pick of the Packers in 1967. Courtesy photo thin Loftin added a 30-yard touchdown run. The Titans (6-2, 3-0) host Pueblo County (4-4, 2-1) on Thursday. TCA has won 6 of 7 games. TROUPE LEADS TCA TO WIN ON GRIDIRON The Classical Academy football team eked out a 21-20 victory over Pueblo East on Oct, 11. Titans junior slot back Peter Troupe had another solid game, catching the game-winning 41-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter from Jantzen Ryals (161 yards passing). Troupe also scored on a 1-yard run. Titans senior tailback Andrew Register rushed for 74 yards and scored a touchdown. LEWIS-PALMER SHUT OUT BY CORONADO Lewis-Palmer lost to Coronado, 28-0, Oct. 11 at Garry Berry Stadium to drop to 0-2 in 3A South Central League, 2-6 overall. The last time Lewis-Palmer was shut out was Oct. 19, 2007 - a 56-0 loss to Arvada West. The Rangers finished 1-9 that season. Rangers sophomore Paul Tillotson completed 7 of 18 passes for 93 yards against Coronado. Freshman Charley Young led the Rangers in rushing with 32 yards on eight carries. “Offensively we’re struggling to move the ball,” said Lewis-Palmer coach Tony Ramunno. “We have to be able to come out and run the football and establish the run game. Stay on our blocks a little bit longer. “The kids told me `Where not done yet, coach.’ They work hard at practice and that’s all I can ask.” Lewis-Palmer was off last week. It hosts Mitchell Oct. 25 at Don Breese Stadium at 7 p.m. HAMER, HEREBIC, DEITSCH LEADING BEARS RUNNERS The Palmer Ridge boys and girls cross country teams appear to be at the top of their games as the state finals approach this weekend.0 Two weeks ago, Eric Hamer and Tommy Herebic finished 1-2 in the Class 4A Pikes Peak Athletic Conference meet at Fountain Creek Regional Park. As a team, Palmer Ridge placed four runners in the top seven to win the meet with 38 points. Cheyenne Mountain was second with 63 points. Hamer finished in 16 minutes, 24 seconds, while Herebic came in at 16:42. On the girls side, Palmer Ridge senior Aly Deitsch won in 18:42, beating Cheyenne Mountain’s Greta Sloan by 13 seconds. Cheyenne Mountain won the girls race with 35 points, while Palmer Ridge was second with 56 points. Discovery Canyon was third with 62 points.

Call me today for your welcome information package Tri-Lakes, Gleneagle & Black Forest Welcoming Barbara Oakley 719-488-2119

adindex The Tri-Lakes Tribune is made possible thanks to our local advertisers. When you spend your dollars near your home – especially with these advertisers – it keeps your community strong, prosperous and informed. AUTO Building Construction TECC PAINTING .............................................................11 AUTO Business Services MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC ASSOC ......................12 AUTO Community BLACK HILLS ENERGY ................................................... 3 WOODMOOR COUNTRY CLUB ................................... 9 AUTO House & Home FURNITURE ROW MARKETING.................................. 2 J & K ROOFING.................................................................. 9 AUTO Lawn & Garden BOB AMES EXCAVATING ............................................... 4 PATTON PROFESSIONAL LAWN SERVICES ........3, 14 AUTO Medical KAISER PERMANENTE .................................................11 AUTO Real Estate MORNINGSTAR SENIOR LIVING ..............................14 AUTO Services PATTON PROFESSIONAL LAWN SERVICES ............11

SportS quiz 1) How many consecutive full major-league seasons did Stan Musial hit at least .300? 2) Earl Weaver is third on the list of most wins by a major-league manager who never was a major-league player (1,480 wins). Who are the top two? 3) Which two teams, entering the 2013 NFL season, had recorded the most victories on “Monday Night Football”? 4) In the 2011-12 season, center Cody Zeller recorded the second-highest fieldgoal percentage (62.3 percent) in Indiana Hoosiers history. Who had the highest? 5) In the past 10 seasons (2003-04 through 2012-13), how many NHL teams won

their first Stanley Cup? Answers 1) Sixteen (1942-58). 2) Joe McCarthy (2,125 wins) and Jim Leyland (1,676 entering 2013). 3) Dallas and San Francisco, with 43 wins each. 4) Matt Nover made 62.8 percent of his shots in the 1992-93 season. 5) Four — Tampa Bay, Carolina, Anaheim and Los Angeles. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. 

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