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Tribune Tri-Lakes 10-9-2013

October 9, 2013

Tri-Lakes

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtrilakesnews.com

Tri-Lakes Region, Monument, Gleneagle, Black Forest and Northern El Paso County • Volume 48, Issue 41

Thousands affected locally by shutdown Air Force Academy chapel, fossil beds among landmarks closed By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The Air Force Academy commissary was extra busy on Tuesday, one day after the partial U.S. government shutdown. That’s because an announcement was made earlier in the day that beginning Wednesday, the commissary would be closed until further notice. That scenario was just one of many involving government-run agencies in the Pikes Peak region. According to sources, most Defense Department offices employees showed up for work Tuesday morning, but the majorities of those workers received furlough notices and were sent home. The federal government shutdown also affected the area’s only national park, Florissant Fossil Beds in Florissant. Folks who visited the Fossil Beds’ web site on Tuesday were greeted with this message: “Because of the federal government shutdown, all national parks are closed and

National Park Service web pages are not operating. For more information, go to www. doi.gov.” The Colorado Springs Convention and Visitors Bureau released a statement Tuesday morning that stated that the Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel and Peterson Air & Space Museum were closed temporarily because of the current government status. The statement also read that even though Pikes Peak is federally owned, the mountain is operated via a permit from the National Forest Service with the city of Colorado Springs. “All attraction employees, including forest rangers, are employed by the city and thus not affected by the shutdown. Pikes Peak, the Summit House and the Pikes Peak Highway, are all open and operating normally,” the statement read. “At this time, travel for all intercollegiate athletics is canceled – this includes the Air Force-Navy game on Saturday, Oct. 5. The statement also said that Air Force will attempt to play all home intercollegiate athletic contests but those may be canceled, as well. By Tuesday afternoon there was talk that the football game - which is sold out and scheduled to be televised nationally by CBS – might be back on because of private funding. According to various Colorado Springs news outlets, a military source said that

The lights are still on, but local federal installations were affected by the government shutdown. Photo by Rob Carrigan there is a 50/50 chance that the game will be played with conference fees, conference television money and ticket revenue making up for a lack of government funding. A decision must be made by 10 a.m. Thursday or the game will be canceled or postponed. A likely makeup date is Dec. 7. In the meantime, Air Force is practicing as if it might travel to the East Coast to play the game. Even some Air Force Academy civilian employees were furloughed Tuesday, including public affairs officers John Van Winkle and Meade Warthen. “We will start our furloughs today and we will be on furlough until further notice,”

Van Winkle said in an email. “We are not allowed to work, or volunteer assistance. Likewise, all government cell phones that we use are off and turned in for the duration of the furlough/shutdown.” Congressmen Doug Lamborn, whose constituents area spread over a large part of El Paso and Teller counties, furloughed 43 percent of his staff in Washington, D.C., according to his spokesman Catherine Mortensen. The government shutdown wasn’t felt on Wall Street on Tuesday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average finished up 62.03 points at 15,191.70. The S&P 500 and NASDAQ were also up.

As the Sheriff ’s Office makes

WORLD

turns

arrest in burglaries 20 businesses were targeted in Black Forest By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com

Colors are just starting to turn in the Tri-Lakes area. These Aspen trees represent the vanguard at Fox Run Regional Park. Photo by Rob Carrigan

POSTAL ADDRESS

The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office arrested two men for a string of burglaries in the Black Forest area. According to a report from the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, two suspects were arrested on Oct. 3 for more than 20 business burglaries in the Black Forest area and three in the Cimmaron Hills area. The burglaries have involved multiple business suites in the 12600 and 11500 blocks of Black Forest Road, the 6800 block of Silver Pond Heights and one burglary in the 6900 block of Shoup Road. The investigation also identified similar burglaries in the 7300 block of McClain Point, 500 block of Hathaway Drive, and 700 block of Valley Street in the Cimarron Hills area. Hunter Cody Shackelford, 23, was arrested and booked into the El Paso County jail

on one count of second degree burglary concerning theft of prescription drugs a Class 3 Felony and multiple counts of second degree burglary a class 4 felony. Shackelford is held on a $10,000.00 bond. Kylie Jo Mardon, 22, was arrested and booked into the El Paso County jail on two counts of false information to a Pawn Broker a class 6 felony and posted a $1,000 bond. Since Sept. 22, the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office has been investigating reports of more than 20 business burglaries in the Black Forest area. In each case, the suspects forced entry into the businesses and a variety of property items were taken. The investigation resulted in the arrests of these two suspects and the recovery of a large amount of stolen property, reports said. As the investigation continues additional charges are anticipated and the business owners affected by these crimes will be contacted to identify the recovered property. Anyone who believes they are a victim of similar crimes is encouraged to contact the Sheriff’s Office at 390-5555.

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OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 MAILING ADDRESS: PO Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866 PHONE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in El Paso County, Colorado, The Tribune is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES: Display advertising: Thurs.11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

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October 9, 2013

Monument winery expected to open in early 2014 Woodworth receives medals for winemaking The new winery, which is both the inspiration and lifelong dream of longtime Monument merchants Woody And Catherine Woodworth, will open its doors in early 2014. The building, at 243 Washington St., will be, in only a few months, the home of Catriona Cellars. The Catriona Cellars complex will house a tasting room, a café that includes outdoor patio seating and a production facility. Clifford “Woody” Woodworth will serve as the winery’s chief winemaker. Woodworth was awarded silver and bronze medals earlier this year for his custom wine entries in the 2013 WineMaker International Amateur Wine Competition, the largest

wine competition of its kind in the world. Woodworth’s silver medals were awarded in the categories of Sauvignon Blanc and Other Red Vinifera Blends. His bronze medal was awarded in the category of Other Red Vinifera Varietals. Woodworth was notified only recently about the honors his wines had garnered, and in his words, was “surprised and quite delighted” with the news. This year’s competition included a record 4,564 entries and included 2,282 total judging hours using the well-established U.S. Davis 20-point wine scale evaluating appearance, aroma, taste, aftertaste and overall impression. Entrants represented all 50 states, eight Canadian provinces and nine countries in total. “I was delighted to be so honored by the judges as I know the competition was stiff,”

FAST-GROWING INDUSTRY Catriona Cellars will soon join the ranks of Coloradobased wineries, a fast-growing and robust industry that included more than 100 wineries in 2010, compared to only five in 1990, and attracts visitors and wine enthusiasts from all over the world. Catriona’s investors, who are often seen touring the rapid construction progress, are particularly excited. Diane Wisdom, co-proprietor of Wisdom Tea House in Monument, and one of Catriona Cellar’s investors observed, “Tom and I are honored to be a part of this important business, which will be a truly invigorating addition to Monument!” commented Woodworth, who has been making wine and custom blends for more than a decade. Catriona, which is the Gaelic version of the name Catherine, is aptly named for Catherine Woodworth, who will also be the

40 YEARS AGO

Hodgen Road detour planned on Oct. 7 Staff report Hodgen Road between Meridian Road and Northcliff Road will be closed to through traffic from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. which started on Oct. 7 and will continue through

Oct. 11. Through traffic will follow detour signs along Meridian Road and Northcliff Road. Motorists should expect delays. Detour dates are dependent upon weather and resource availability. For the safety of the traveling public and

construction personnel, El Paso County asks motorists to adhere to posted speed limits and follow road signs through the construction area. Funding for the Hodgen Road Safety Improvement project is provided by the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority.

Air Force, Navy football game played on Saturday Rivalry game played in Annapolis By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Air Force Academy’s football game with Navy is back on and was played as scheduled on Saturday, despite the partial government shutdown.

The decision was announced late Wednesday after Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel consulted with officials from both schools via telephone. Navy, especially, was thrilled that the sold-out game was back on. Navy expected to generate more than $4 million between ticket sales, concessions and television revenue. The game was broadcast by CBS. Navy won this year, 28-10. Navy won

last year’s game in overtime in Colorado Springs, coming back from a nine-point deficit in the fourth quarter. Air Force won in overtime two years ago in Annapolis. Air Force announced Friday that all of its other sporting events, both home and away, are postponed until further notice.

THINGS TO DO

OCT. 10, 17, 26 SCARY MOVIE nights. The Town of Monument plans showings of family-friendly retro scary movies at 7 p.m. Thursdays in October at the marketplace in Jackson Creek, near the clocktower. Movies are free and begin at 7 p.m. Free snacks available to everyone. Lineup includes: “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes” on Oct. 10; “Gremlins” on Oct. 17; and “Beetlejuice” on Oct. 26. Visit http://www.townofmonument. org/ or follow on Facebook: www.facebook. com/TownofMonument. OCT. 12 QUEST FOR Mastery online classes are

offered Oct. 12. Learn these tools that can help you to manifest your highest potential, and overcome issues in your life. This program is based on the Wisdom teachings of Archangel Michael. For more information email Jimena at Jimena.yantorno@gmail.com or call 719-3060772. Classes offered in English and Spanish.

OCT. 17 GHOST STORIES. The Palmer Lake Historical Society presents “Ghosts of Douglas and Surrounding Counties” at 7 p.m. Oct. 17 at Palmer Lake Town Hall, 28 Valley Crescent. Shaun Boyd will tell history-related ghost stories about several properties in Douglas County, with a little stretch into Denver and ending near

Palmer Lake. Stories include several buildings in Castle Rock, the Highlands Ranch Mansion, a Parker ghost story or two and a phantom telegrapher. Hear about some unusual activities that occurred in the neighborhood, while you learn about the unique history of the area. Shaun is a member of the Douglas County Library staff and enjoys researching the history of the area. In a 2011 presentation to Historical Society members, she provided an interesting and entertaining look at some of the fascinating women who contributed to the history and development of Douglas County. This event is free and refreshments will be served after the presentation. Visit us at www. palmerdividehistory.org.

OCT. 19 DISASTER CLASSES The American Red Cross presents disaster classes from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 19 at Tri-Lakes Cares, second floor, 235 N. Jefferson St., Monument. From 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., attend Shelter Fundamentals, a basic level course that introduces the guidelines and procedures for setting up, running and closing a shelter during a disaster (such as the one set up at Palmer Ridge High School during Black Forest Fire). Then from 1-5 p.m., attend Disaster Services: An Overview, a basic level, instructor-led course that provides an introduction to Disaster Services at the American Red Cross. The course introduces

disaster preparedness and response and provides local disaster program information. The course engages participants through integrated video and interactive activities. Register at EPG@tlumc.org or call/text Lisa at 719-339-7831 for more information. Classes are free. If you attend both sessions, bring a lunch; microwave available for use. Seating is limited so please register early. Hosted by Tri-Lakes United Methodist Church Emergency Preparedness Group. 

THROUGH OCT. 26 PAINTING EXHIBIT. Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts will exhibit 30 oil paintings by Monument artist John DeFrancesco from Oct. 1-26. The display, titled, “Glorious Days,” will be in the upper gallery of the center. Part of the exhibit will introduce a grouping of seven panoramic paintings inspired by scripture in an ongoing series being painted by DeFrancesco. A free opening reception is planned from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 4. The center is at 304 Highway 105, in Palmer Lake. OCT. 31 to Nov. 3 ART SHOW. The Black Forest Arts & Crafts

Guild plans its 49th annual fall show and sale Oct. 31 to Nov. 3 at the Black Forest Community Center, just north of Shoup Road on Black Forest Road. The center is wheelchair accessible. More than 90 artisan and culinary

members will sell their work. Included will be quilts and afghans, baby items, paintings, pottery, jewelry, woodworking, stained glass, dolls, stitchery, note cards, baked goods, jams & jellies and much more. New items arrive throughout the show. Admission is free. The show is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. A portion of sale proceeds will benefit the Black Forest Arts and Crafts Guild Scholarship Fund and the Black Forest community. No strollers allowed. Visa, Mastercard and Discover accepted.

OCT. 26 GIFT FAIR/BAKE sale. Broadmoor Community Church plans its alternative gift fair and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 26 at 315 Lake Ave., Colorado Springs. All proceeds from the sales are given back to nonprofit groups that serve communities struggling with challenges. Cash and checks are encouraged, and some credit cards are accepted. There is no charge to attend. A bake sale at the event raises funds to defray expenses of the fair. EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Tribune. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

EXTRA! EXTRA! Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions.

co-owner of the winery and the proprietor of The Café at Catriona. Her planned menu will include offerings selected to pair with or include wine as a key recipe ingredient and will also offer non-alcoholic offerings. “I’m looking forward to sharing our passion for wine and food pairing with the larger community,” added Catherine Woodworth. “It’s a dream very soon to come true for both of us.” Catriona’s tasting room will offer samples of Woodworth’s signature blends of red and white wines and will offer wines by the glass and by the bottle to enjoy in the Café at Catriona. Cases of wine will also be available for purchase on premise. His vision is to create wines that transcend standard varietals to become the “sum that is greater than its parts.” For more information, visit www.catrionacellars.com.

Palmer Lake Monument News, Oct. 3, 1973 Palmer Lake Elementary School received a new 16mm movie projector. Profits from the spring carnival were used to purchase the projector. Also, two television sets and playground equipment were purchased from the profits. The past year was the PTO’S first year of operation. New Palmer Lake post office employees as of Oct. 1 are Roberta Pierce (Bobbie) and Richard Jones (Dick). Postmaster, Elaine Kruegar asks for patience as the two new employees “learn the ropes.” The Yule Log meeting was held Tuesday, Oct. 2. Officers were elected and a committee was formed. New tennis courts will be one of the improvements at Lewis Palmer High School. Construction is slow and the courts should be ready in several weeks. $17,600 was a joint effort of El Paso County Parks and Recreation and Lewis Palmer School District 38. The Young at Hearts Club will meet Tuesday, Oct. 9 at 11:30 a.m. for a potluck at Monument Baptist Church. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, former residents of Monument, took a tour of Rome, Cairo and Jordan and will show slides of their trip. All senior citizens are invited to join. James Britt resigned from the board of education. He has served since Sept. 20, 1972. He has sold his home. The board of education is seeking someone to fill his position. Candidates should send a statement of intent and a resume of qualifications to Mr. Robert Mumm, secretary of the board. Blizzard conditions caused power outages in Black Forest and the Elbert area Oct. 5. Snow and 40 mph wind gusts created icing conditions. Allen Harness took his mother, Dorothy Harness, Stella Hoyt and Mable Wasson to Denver to visit Emma Hall in the hospital. Chas Orr will have surgery at Memorial Hospital. He is wished a speedy recovery. Mr. and Mrs. Duane Hanson bought the home of Criag and Elsie Burns. The Hansons recently married. Mrs. Hanson is the former Bonnie Berg. Paintings by Tillie McCarty are hanging in the Village Inn Pancake House in Monument. Tillie has been a resident of the Palmer Lake Art Group since 1963 when it started. LaRayne Graff of Palmer Lake graduated from North Dakota State School of Science as a practical nurse. – Compiled by Linda Case

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October 9, 2013

Winter could be right around the corner here in the Pikes Peak region. Photo by Rob Carrigan

Tips on how to prepare for winter Precautions need to be taken in the coming months for safety By Sherri Albertson Contributing writer

October is the time of year for winter readiness in the mountains. Here are some preparation tips to help get started. There is snow in the forecast again, but before getting dependent on running the heat at night – it’s important to do two things. One, have the furnace inspected and two, schedule a visit from a local chimney sweep. Maintaining the furnace will keep it running efficiently, reduce energy costs and keep everyone safe and warm. Remember to change the air filter and have a licensed service technician clean the flame and heat sensors, the burner and the oil pump and the stack control, as needed. Also, check the

outside vents for any blockages like leaves or nests. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, a branch of FEMA, more than onethird of Americans use fireplaces, wood stoves and other fuel-fired appliances as primary heat sources in their homes. Heating fires also account for 36 percent of residential home fires in rural areas every year. Often these fires are because of creosote buildup in chimneys and stovepipes. In addition to having the chimney inspected and cleaned annually by a certified chimney specialist, homeowners should keep the area around the hearth clear of flammable debris; leave glass doors open while burning a fire to ensure that the fire receives enough air to ensure complete combustion and keep creosote from building up in the chimney and close glass doors or metal mesh screening when the fire is out to keep air from blowing hot embers in the room. Remember to burn seasoned hardwoods whenever possible, never burn cardboard

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers The Colorado Public Utilities Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $15.40-$17.00 per month and business services are $30.60-$35.02 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone per household, which can be either a wireline or wireless telephone. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. Lifeline eligible subscribers may also qualify for reliable home High-Speed Internet service up to 1.5 Mbps for $9.95* per month for the first 12 months of service. Further details are available at centurylink.com/internetbasics. If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-888-833-9522 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program.

*CenturyLink® Internet Basics Program – Residential customers only who qualify based on meeting income level or program participation eligibility requirements, and requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period. First bill will include charges for the first full month of service billed in advance, prorated charges for service from the date of installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying customers may keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after service activation provided customer still qualifies during that time. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of $9.95/mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which the rate reverts to $14.95/mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-month term agreement. Customer must either lease a modem/router from CenturyLink for an additional monthly charge or independently purchase a modem/router, and a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee applies. A one-time professional installation charge (if selected by customer) and a one-time shipping and handling fee apply to customer’s modem/router. General – Services not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Offer, plans, and stated rates are subject to change and may vary by service area. Deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. ©2013 CenturyLink. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

or trash in the fireplace or woodstove and store stacked firewood at least 30 feet away from the home. Also check around the chimney for any low hanging branches that may catch fire from a spark. Daylight-saving time ends on Sunday, Nov. 3 – so this is also the time to change the batteries in smoke detectors and carbon monoxide monitors. By this point, the first frost has already happened, so it’s time to tuck in the garden and yard for a long winter’s nap. Those who haven’t already, need to fertilize the lawn and aerate, if needed, and blow out irrigation systems. Also carefully prune any dead branches from trees and shrubs, but keep up with watering new or young plantings until the ground freezes completely. It’s now time to dig up flower bulbs like dahlias and gladiolus and to plant tulips for next spring’s showing. Seeds can also be saved from many types of annuals. Gently clean off dirt and store bulbs and seeds in paper bags in a cool, dry location away from direct light. Also apply a thick layer of mulch (3 or more inches) to any bedding areas to help insulate them throughout the coldest months. Once finished with the outdoor gardening task, don’t forget to clean, sharpen and lubricate tools before storing them. While

checking off outdoor preparation chores, take a moment to clean the leaves out of gutters to prevent ice buildup and tune up tractors and snowplows so they’re ready to go. Winter activities are the reason that many have moved to this area, but there are precautions to keep in mind as well. The coming months are not only popular for skiing, snowmobiling and other outdoor sports, they are also well-liked by hunters. Those who have plans for hiking or backcountry skiing should be aware of their surroundings and remember to wear some type of blaze orange clothing or accessory. Stay on the trail, take extra supplies, never hike alone and make sure someone knows where one will be and when they plan to return. It’s also wise to keep an emergency kit in the car during this season. According to AAA Colorado, the kit should include, but not be limited to, a flashlight and spare batteries, a gallon of water, a water-repelling blanket, a container of non-clumping cat litter, a shovel, snow brush and flares. By preparing ahead of time, everyone can get the most enjoyment out the coming season. As Ben Franklin once said “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

‘Snow’ much to learn about winter Silver Lake holds record for 76 inches of white stuff By Metro Creative Connection Snow is much more than white, wet and cold. There are many different facts about snow that make it unique and one of the more complex types of precipitation. • Although snow appears white because of the countless tiny surfaces of each snowflake crystal reflecting most of the wavelengths of light, snowflakes are actually colorless. Snow may take on other colors thanks to particulates in the air or even from different strains of algae. • Many places around the world hold certain world records pertaining to snow. The most snow to fall in a 24-hour period occurred in 1921 in Silver Lake, where 76 inches of snow fell. However, the most snow to fall in one year took place on Mount Baker in the state of Washington. This area saw more than 1,000 inches of snowfall during the 1998-99 season. • The world’s largest snow sculpture was called “Romantic Feelings” and was 656 feet long and 115 feet tall. The sculpture was on display at the International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival in Heilongjiang Province in China. • Snowflakes come in many different

shapes, and their sizes are determined by how many ice crystals connect together. • It can be too cold for snow to form. Without enough water droplets in the air, snow will not fall during extremely cold weather. • The largest snowflakes ever recorded fell in the state of Montana. The snowflakes were 15 inches in diameter. • The average snowflake falls at a speed of 3.1 miles per hour. • Snow that has been compacted after multiple melting and refreezing cycles is known as snow pack. • A snow storm describes a heavy snowfall that results in several inches of snowfall. A blizzard classifies a snow storm combined with wind, obscuring visibility. • Snow will either melt or sublimate. Sublimation is when snow turns from a solid form into a gaseous form without an intermediary liquid phase. • Snow can be heavy or light depending on its water content. • An avalanche occurs when snow that has accumulated on a mountain is disturbed by a thermal or physical impact, which causes the snow to rush downhill in a large mass. Preceding an avalanche is a phenomenon known as an avalanche wind caused by the approaching avalanche itself, which adds to its destructive potential.

HAVE A NEWS TIP Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can't do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries ... Please share by contacting us at news@ ourcoloradonews.com and we will take it from there.


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October 9, 2013

Retro Scary Movie Nights in Monument sure to spook Four classic Halloween-type movies being shown this month tower. Popcorn and beverages are being provided free of charge by Wal-Mart. Hot chocolate will be donated by It’s a Grind. The event kicked off on Oct. 3 with the showing of the 1983 classic “Ghostbusters.” More than 100 people showed up and watched the film, which screened at 7 p.m. “We’re pleased and excited by the turnout,” Steinfeld said. “We expect a much larger turnout next week. “We’re not taking the whole event too seriously. We just want people to come out and enjoy themselves.” “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes” is scheduled for Oct. 10. The final two movies are “Gremlins” (Oct. 17) and “Beetlejuice” (Oct. 26).

By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews. com The first, the original and the soon to be legendary – at least according to the Town of Monument– Retro Scary Movie Night’s are taking this place this month during specific evenings. “The Halloween scene is rolling around so we figured this would be a great time to show some solid family movies,” said Josh Steinfeld who handles marketing for the town of Monument. “The movies are a good balance of fun, a little bit of scary, and great for the family.” The movies are being shown at the Monument Marketplace in Jackson Creek near the Clock-

“These wonderful community events represent the first of many new initiatives based on a recently launched marketing effort the town has begun to entice people from Denver, Pueblo, Colorado Springs and across the Front Range to visit our wonderful hamlet,” said Pamela Smith, Monument town manager. “We look forward to hosting movie enthusiasts or just people looking to come to Monument for dinner, shopping and an old fashioned fun night out underneath the stars.”

The Town of Monument is hosting an event called Retro Scary Movie Nights during the month of October. This week’s film is “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes.” Courtesy photo

Firefighters extinguish Burgess Road house fire Other agencies respond to evening blaze By Staff report Black Forest firefighters quickly responded to a house fire Sept. 30 on Burgess Road, just east of Vollmer. All damage was contained to the structure, with no spread to the surrounding forest. No people or animals were injured. Early in the evening, the homeowners noticed the smell of smoke in the house. When they investigated, they found smoke rising from the chimney and heavy smoke in the garden-level basement. A smoke alarm on the upper level had begun to sound. The family immediately left the house, not even stopping for their shoes. They called 911 from a cell

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phone and stayed safely outside. Only a few minutes after the owner’s call to 911, firefighters arrived from Black Forest Station One. The house is only two miles from the station. “When a fire is quickly discovered and quickly reported, that always helps firefighters,” noted Black Forest Fire Chief Bob Harvey. “We can do an even better job when smoke detectors are installed on every level of the home, to give homeowners an even earlier warning of a fire.” The first-arriving firefighters included both paid and volunteer firefighters who were on duty. When they arrived, they saw well-developed flames in one of the rooms of the garden-level basement. More Black Forest volunteers arrived within minutes, along with engines and firefighters from the Wescott, Tri Lakes – Monument, and

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Falcon fire departments. Deputies from the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office shut down a section of Burgess Road to allow fire trucks to safely operate. Fire damage was mostly contained to two rooms, but the rest of the house was heavily damaged by smoke. The family has been temporarily displaced, and was offered immediate support from the Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Red Cross. Firefighters removed drywall from several walls and ceilings to ensure that the fire was not smoldering unseen. A Black Forest team remained at the house for the rest of the night, watching to make sure that the fire did not re-ignite from hidden embers. The fire is under routine investigation by the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, which has not yet determined the cause.

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6pm evening Adult Bible Study

A church for all of God's people

2013 Winne

Crossroads Chapel, SBC

Monument Hill Church, SBC

18725 Monument Hill Rd. 481-2156 www.monumenthillchurch.org Sunday: Bible Classes 9:15am Worship Service 10:30am Pastor Tom Clemmons USAFA ‘86, SWBTS ‘94 Preaching for the Glory of God God-centered, Christ-exalting worship Wed: AWANA 6:30pm The “New” MHC - Where Grace and Truth Abound

Traditional Worship Service Sunday 10a.m.-Nursery available 18125 Furrow Road Monument 80132

488-3200

495-3200 Child care provided

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Monument Community Presbyterian Church We Welcome You! 9:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

Worship with Praise Team Adult Bible Class Children’s/Middle School Sunday School Fellowship Coffee Youth Sunday School Adult Bible Class Worship with Chancel Choir

238 Third Street Monument, CO 80132 719.481.3902 www.mcpcusa.org

Maranatha Bible Fellowship A Home Church Spirtual Growth Meaningful Relationships Solid Biblical Teaching A New Testament early church format that is changing lives 495-7527

Connecting People to God and Others SUNDAYS 10 AM

Family of Christ Lutheran Church 675 W. Baptist Road Colorado Springs, CO 719.481.2255

7:30 AM – Classic Worship 9:00 & 10:45 AM – Modern Worship 9:00 & 10:45 AM – Children and Student Programs 5:00 – 7:00 PM – Programs for all ages

Pastor David Dyer Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

Service TimeS Woodmoor Campus 8:15, 9:30 and 11:00 a.m 1750 Deer creek rd., monument, cO Northgate Campus 9:30 a.m. 975 Stout Dr., colo Spgs, cO Church Office 1750 Deer creek rd. monument, cO 80132 (719) 481‐3600 www.TheAscentChurch.com

Bear Creek Elem School 1330 Creekside Dr. 487-7700 www.forestridgechurch.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


6-Opinion

6 The Tribune

October 9, 2013

M Dropping names before Yankees were strong opinions / yours and ours

It is weird, but I think I ran into Rick “Goose” Gossage when walking the dogs today. He was jogging, but said “hello.” I thought about legacy, coincidence, high-powered names and old-time baseball. I didn’t have my Yankee hat on, and the dogs didn’t recognize him, or if they did, they didn’t realize he was in the Baseball Hall of Fame. So much for dropping names. Long before the Yankees were strong, Carrigan was a household name in Boston, Maine, and all over New England. Bill “Rough”Carrigan was “deadball-era” catcher and played 10 seasons for the Boston Red Sox. In the middle of the season in 1913, he replaced defending World Series manager Jake Stahl as a player manager. Later, he returned as Boston’s manager in 1927 and stayed until 1929. Carrigan was fairly small for major league baseball, only about 5 feet, 9 inches tall, and weighed about 175 pounds. “In the spring of 1906, Carrigan was signed to a Red Sox contract by Charles Taylor, the father of Red Sox owner John I. Taylor. Carrigan joined the struggling Red Sox directly in the middle of the season, immediately catching the likes of Bill Dinneen and Cy Young,” according to Mark Amour, for the SABR Baseball Biography Project. The next few seasons established him as a reliable contributor on the field and in the box. “In July 1913, the Red Sox were grap-

pling with a series of injuries, fighting among themselves, and limping along in fifth place. Team president Jimmy McAleer fired manager Jake Stahl just months after his World Series triumph, and replaced him with his 29-year-old catcher. Carrigan liked Stahl, as did most of the team, and was reluctant to take charge of a team filled with veterans, many of whom were just as qualified for the job as he. McAleer persuaded Carrigan to take it. The Red Sox were a team fractured along religious lines, as Protestants like Tris Speaker, Joe Wood, and Harry Hooper often crossed swords with the Catholics on the team, including Carrigan,” says Amour. “Smoking Joe” Wood began his baseball career on town teams in the Colorado San Juans, playing for Ouray teams in Telluride, Rico and Silverton, before his outstanding major-league run. “The well-mannered Carrigan earned the nickname ‘Rough’ for the way he played. He was a well-respected handler of pitchers, and had a fair throwing arm, but

it was his plate blocking that caused Chicago White Sox manager Nixey Callahan to say, “You might as well try to move a stone wall.” On May 17, 1909, he engaged in a famous brawl with the Tigers’ George Moriarty after a collision at home plate, while their teammates stood and watched. He had a fight with Sam Crawford a couple of years later, and maintained a reputation as someone who would not back down from a confrontation,” according to Amour. After he replaced Stahl as manager, he led Boston to a second-place finish in 1914 and then, two world championships in 1915 and 1916, stacking up an 8-2 record as a manager in World Series play. Until Terry Francona duplicated the feat in 2007, he was the only manager to have won two World Series titles with Boston. Babe Ruth called Carrigan the best manager he ever played for. “The most important event of the 1914 season was the purchase, at Carrigan’s urging, of pitchers Ernie Shore and Babe Ruth from Baltimore of the International League. Although Ruth gave his skipper a lot of credit for his development as a player, Carrigan was humble in his own assessment: “Nobody could have made Ruth the great pitcher and great hitter he was but himself. He made himself with the aid of his God-given talents.” Old Rough did allow that his protégé needed quite a bit of discipline, and Carrigan was there to provide it, even rooming with Ruth for a time. Carrigan caught Ruth in his pitching

“I debut, on July 11,” wrote Amour. enjoy “In early September 1916, Carrigan an- — th nounced that he would be leaving baseball have at the end of the season. He had actually dwel wanted to quit after the 1915 Series, and of reg had so told owner Joe Lannin, but his feel l owner talked him into the one additional rollin campaign. Carrigan later wrote, “I had us wi become fed up on being away from home it is c from February to October. I was in my 30’s, — was married and had an infant daughter. I wanted to spend more time with my family than baseball would allow.” W He retired to his hometown of Lewiston from and embarked on careers in real estate (as It’ co-owner of several movie theaters in New Ih England) and banking. A few years later had b he sold his theaters for a substantial profit hom and became a wealthy man.” jeans He returned home to his banking career,fort z eventually becoming president of People’s right Savings Bank in Maine. In 1946, he was a girl named to the Honor Roll in the Major “go-t League Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1968 was n was named to Holy Cross College’s Hall of when Fame, and in 2004 named to the Boston Id Red Sox Hall of Fame. “Rough Bill” CarriIt gan died in a Lewiston, Maine, hospital in me b 1969 at the age of 85. dream Today, it occurs to me, that legends and It names are relative. So much for dropping Worl names. Nebr Our name is written in the dirt along- some side the plate. M But the umpire can sweep it away – the had f next time there is a close call at home. that it see It got th stop N was n like i happ

Can a train be repossessed? Thanksgiving holiday

I ran across this story in an old Cripple Creek paper, and all I could think of was the various TV programs about repossessing cars! Sheriff Henry Robertson of Cripple Creek, on Oct. 5, 1903, repossessed the Pullman palace car “Chamita” standing at the Midland Terminal depot for the nonpayment of $663.21 in taxes. The Pullman Co. had never paid any county taxes, according to county assessor Lysight. In order to make sure the Pullman Co. could not pull the car out of the county, Robertson secured a large log chain and a heavy padlock. He placed the chain about the axle of the car and passed the chain under the steel rail and then locked it. Charley Hoskins was made custodian and occupied the car until the taxes were paid. In addition there were two Pullman employees in the car, who could not leave their posts. If the county went so far as trying to sell the car, it might be quite difficult to find a buyer. The car was worth about $5,000. The company and the Midland Terminal road reacted by abolishing their

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has a confusing history

Cripple Creek sleeping car service that night and no Pullman Palace cars came into the district. No attempt was made by any of the company’s employees to move the car. The sleeper stood on the Midland Terminal siding, chained to the tracks through the day and night. In the morning, word went out that Deputy Treasurer Gus Trolich had not received any word from any of the Pullman officials, whose principal office was in Chicago. Owing to the incident, there were no Pullman cars coming into the Cripple McFarland continues on Page 9

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I want to be the first to wish everyone in the Pikes Peak region a Happy Thanksgiving! And make sure you save room for a piece of pumpkin pie. If you’re like most Americans, you likely celebrate the truly American event the fourth Thursday in November. But, like many things American, that day has little to do with the actual first Thanksgiving. Of course, nobody actually knows when that first Thanksgiving was, or if it even involved Pilgrims. We grew up reading and learning about the Pilgrims and of the great feast they had with their American Indian friends in 1621. They started the tradition of beginning their Thanksgiving Day by playing a game of flag football in the local park and then watching the Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys on a little black and white television. That night they ate pumpkin pie and capped off the evening by taking in the latest Hollywood blockbuster. The actual truth is much different. Researchers at the University of Florida claim that the earliest Thanksgiving service in what is now the United States, was celebrated by the Spanish on Sept. 8, 1565, in what is now St. Augustine, Florida. Of course, that claim contradicts the folks in the little town of San Elizario, Texas, a community near El Paso, boasts it celebrated the first Thanksgiving on American soil in 1598. For several years, the town has staged a reenactment of the event that culminated in the Thanksgiving celebration; the arrival of Spanish explorer Juan de Onate on the banks of the Rio Grande. De Onate is said to have held a big Thanksgiving festival after leading hundreds of settlers on a grueling 350-mile long trek across the Mexican desert. Virginia also lays claims to the first Thanksgiving in 1619. The first Virginia Thanksgiving - which some say actual dates to 1607 - took place at the Berkeley Plantation on the James River on Dec. 4. Every year since 1958 the folks in that area have reenacted the event. This Virginia Thanksgiving was actually recognized by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 as the official first Thanksgiving. Another President, George Washington, made the first official Thanksgiving proclamation on Oct. 3, 1789. By doing so, he created the first Thanksgiving Day designated

by the national government of the United States. His proclamation read, in part: “Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor, and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. “Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious” Washington again proclaimed a Thanksgiving in 1795. President John Adams declared Thanksgivings in 1798 and 1799. No Thanksgiving proclamations were issued by President Thomas Jefferson, but President James Madison renewed the tradition in 1814, in response to resolutions of Congress, at the close of the War of 1812. Madison also declared the holiday twice in 1815. However, none of Madison’s Thanksgivings of 1815 were celebrated in autumn. For the next 40 years, governors of states everywhere were issuing Thanksgiving proclamations. By 1858, proclamations appointing a day of thanksgiving were issued by the governors of 25 states and two territories. Finally, on Oct. 3, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln announced that the nation will celebrate the official Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday of each November. But the madness didn’t end there. Summers continues on Page 9


7-Color

The Tribune 7

October 9, 2013

Moving on up to a higher altitude “I hear there are people who actually enjoy moving. Sounds like a disease to me — they must be unstable. Though it does have its poetry, I’ll allow that. When an old dwelling starts looking desolate, a mixture of regret and anxiety comes over us and we feel like we are leaving a safe harbor for the rolling sea. As for the new place, it looks on us with alien eyes, it has nothing to say to us, it is cold.” — Jan Neruda, “Prague Tales” ••• We moved to Colorado last November from Iowa. It’s been almost a year now. I had been out of Iowa before — but it had been many years. I was used to my home state. It was like a well-worn pair of jeans. It was a soft blanket. It was my comfort zone with a Walgreen’s and a Dillard’s right around the corner. It was everything a girl could want — all of my essential “go-to” places within reach. McDonald’s was nearby too, which was handy on nights when I needed to pick up a fast dinner. I didn’t want to move to Colorado. It wasn’t just the familiarity that held me back in Iowa — I had just secured my dream job that I had sought since I was 18. It was an editor position at The Omaha World-Herald just across the line in Nebraska. It was a stone’s throw and then some from where we lived. It was perfect. My kids’ schools were nearby and they had friends. I had friends. I had co-workers that I liked. I was in a good place in my life, it seemed. I thought, “we won’t move just when I got this job — something will happen to stop it.” Nothing happened to stop it. There was no 11th-hour “save the day” moment like in the movies. This was really going to happen.

Our reason for moving was a job change for my husband. His company wanted him to relocate to Denver. He found a lovely home to make an offer on in a place called Castle Rock. I had never heard of Castle Rock. I reluctantly agreed to make an offer. I was still holding out for something to sweep in and save us from this life-changing event. We got the house. So we began to pack up the home we had lived in for 12 years and raised two little boys in. We had too many things. As an occasional hoarder, I found many odd objects that I was holding on to for no apparent reason other than “I may use that one day!” One day never came — in the trash they went. Unlike those people on the “Hoarders” TV show, I didn’t have to see a therapist to get over my cast-off items. When we finally accomplished packing up, we started our journey to Castle Rock and our new life. In my tiny car we packed our three cats, my son Danny’s pet crab and various other household things. My father-in-law drove my car, while my husband drove the moving truck and my mother-in-law drove our larger vehicle — she had my kids with her, then 13-year-old Max and 11-year-old

Danny. It was just my father-in-law and me in a tiny Chevy Aveo with three very upset kitties and a usually silent crab making loud chirping sounds. It was surreal at 2 a.m. along a dark highway. It was like we were hauling a miniature zoo. We finally arrived and tried to settle in. There was a King Soopers and liquor store down the street, but precious little else. I longed for my McDonald’s and Walgreen’s. I had no idea where anything was in this strange little town. Would I ever learn? •••

Gradually, I began to get a feel for the area. I even took up shopping again. And I can get to the Walgreen’s in Castle Rock with ease, so now I can resume buying all the “As Seen on TV” stuff, much to my husband’s chagrin. My boys have settled into new schools and have each had a birthday since we’ve been here. My oldest, Max, is now in high school. I would have never thought that he would experience that milestone in a completely different state. •••

I kept a tight grip on my GPS for the first six months. I found that a lot people are impatient drivers out here, much different from the slow and steady drivers back home. And I was terrified of Colorado snow. I had heard that snowstorms were numerous out here. I wasn’t sure how I would be able to cope with a new place and new snow. But cope I did. I got a job at Colorado Community Media in Highlands Ranch, which was about 30 minutes from Castle Rock. My workplace was so easy to find, even I could get there. Me — the person that got lost trying to find the nearest pizza place. So terrified was I of getting lost that I actually gave up my favorite pastime for a spell — shopping. I didn’t think I would ever get new clothes again, even with Castle Rock’s outlet malls in close proximity. But they were difficult for me to find. Anxiety gripped me whenever I ventured out, so I just went to and from work. I felt my GPS urging me to give driving around a try. It’s robot-like voice was calling to me. Slowly, I began to try to find places in my adopted town.

My new home and its residents are growing on me now. It’s so nice to go to work and actually see some scenery. The mountains loom on the horizon, and they’re gorgeous. I have seen more rainbows out here than I have ever witnessed in my life. And I have plenty of grainy cellphone shots to prove it. There are still the occasional rough spots though. I have picked up some new allergies out here. I’m allergic to aspen trees, which grow aplenty. Sagebrush too. But I’m handling it. Baking, it turns out, is another struggle. My once special cakes now cave in the middle. So the high-altitude baking is something I need to get a handle on. It’s like a fine art. A small pinch here, a dash there. But the stuff still falls apart in the oven. Oh well, baking is overrated anyway ... I guess what I’m trying to say is that Colorado may not be to well-worn jeans stage, but it’s getting more comfortable by the day. I’m even looking forward to the winter — sort of.

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Tri-Lakeslife 8-Life-Color

8 The Tribune

October 9, 2013

Eighth-grade students at Lewis-Palmer Middle School visited Palmer Lake on a recent field trip to learn about the lack of no water in the lake. The students are getting involved in the Awake Palmer Lake committee as part of a service project to help raise awareness and funds to restore the lake. Courtesy photo Courtesy photo

Students want to see Palmer lake restored Lewis-Palmer Middle School children take the lake on as a service project By Lisa Collacott Seeing Palmer Lake filled with water doesn’t just mean something to the adults who live in the community. It means something to the countless children who up until two years ago went fishing in the lake or watched a fireworks display over the water. And because these children want to see the lake restored they will be working this school year to help raise funds and spread the word for the Awake Palmer Lake committee, a committee formed by Palmer Lake businesses and residents to restore the lake. The Lewis-Palmer Middle School eighthgrade blue team has chosen to get involved

in Awake Palmer Lake as their service project. They have learned a lot about the lake from their teachers Suzanne Magerko, Rick Bainer and Earl Hammond. Magerko said during a recent field trip, the students hiked up to the reservoirs above the town of Palmer Lake so the students could see where the town’s watershed is. “We talked about the fact that the reservoirs used to help keep Palmer Lake filled, but that due to water rights issues, that is no longer allowed,” Magerko said. She said afterward that the students were bussed to Palmer Lake so they could see how the lake has dried up. They discussed how it has negatively affected the area both ecologically and economically. Magerko said the students talked about the size of the lake and then walked around the lake counting their steps. Once back at school, the students converted their steps into measurements so they could estimate the area of the lake and the volume of water it could hold.

“Our teacher really cares about the lake,” eighth-grader Mario Facinelli said. Facinelli and fellow classmate, Kevin Eells, care about the lake just as much. They recall many fun times they have had at the lake growing up. “We would go out fishing and play on the playground and I played ice hockey on it,” Facinelli said. “We grew up around it and care about it. The lake has always been a part of our community. It’s been a part of our lives growing up and we want it back,” Eells said. Jeff Hulsmann, owner of O’Malley’s and member of the Awake Palmer Lake committee said he is thrilled that the students are getting involved. “I look at it as it’s their lake. I think it’s terrific that the kids are getting involved in environmental issues,” Hulsmann said. “The awareness is important.” Stacey Nolan, another member of the committee agrees. “I think the most important thing is awareness. If the students get involved their parents get involved and

other students get involved.” Nolan said she talks to people all the time that have no idea what is going on with the lake. By the students getting involved it helps create more awareness. One fun activity that the whole family will enjoy and will help raise money for the committee is the upcoming haunted hayride at the lake. The event will take place starting at 6 p.m. on Oct. 31. The hayride is geared towards older children, but there will be spooky stories, face painting and candy for the younger ones beginning at 4 p.m. by the gazebo. Nolan has enlisted the help of the LPMS students as well as high school students to dress up as zombies and help sell hot chocolate. The hay ride will be $8 but Nolan said the students will help distribute $2 off coupons. The LPMS students hosted an ice skating night at the Colorado Sports Center in September and hope to host another one soon. The plan to make posters and write content for the Awake Palmer Lake website.

Music scene heats up at TLCA Monument Academy still WildWood Station, John Adams Band coming to center By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews. com Temperatures may be dipping, but the Tri-Lakes music scene is heating up. Two special acts are coming to the area over the next few weeks. On Oct. 12, WireWood Station headlines Bluegrass, Beer and BBQ. The event starts at 6 p.m. and ends at 9 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts. Tickets range from $8 to $12. On Nov. 1, the John Adams Band will awe listeners with a John Denver Tribune Concert at the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the concert beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 to $20. Bluegrass, Beer and BBQ will feature $3 beer specials and $5 barbecue sandwiches and coleslaw while WireWood Station

entertains folks with its unique blend of bluegrass music with a twist. WireWood Station consists of Casey Cherry, Michelle Edwards, Herb Wetzel and Darin T. Whitson. WireWood Station’s members have performed all over the United States including stages in New York, Chicago, Branson and Nashville. In August, WireWood Station was part of the Tri-Lakes Music Festival, which was headlined by Charlie Daniels. WireWood Station plays its own unique version of Daniels’s signature song “The Devil Went Down to Georgia.” Edwards, the band’s violinist, has performed at the Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall, and has been a studio musician in Nashville. She has also performed with legendary Las Vegas entertainer Wayne Newton. The John Adams Band has been providing audiences with an authentic John Denver tribute concert for nearly two decades. They perform the music the way it was written, recorded and performed by the late Denver

himself. Their motto with the music is, “If it’s not broke, don’t fix it.” The group has vowed to never let the music of the Rocky Mountain legend be forgotten. The John Adams Band brings the music alive with classic hits like, “Annie’s Song,” “Sunshine on my Shoulders,” Leaving on a Jet Plane,” and “Thank God, I’m a Country Boy.” John Adams met with Denver over a dozen times to talk about their experiences in China, love for guitars and concern about the environment. Adams interweaves the stories he and John shared throughout the concert. The John Adams Band has performed all over the world, including the prestigious Red Rocks Amphitheater. Adams had the privilege to perform with Denver in 1988, during a television special in Europe. Together they performed a duet of “Whispering Jesse.” For more information or to get tickets for both events, call 719-481-0475, or go to www. trilakesarts.org.

looking for sponsors By Jim Cunningham

Public Relations and Community Outreach Monument Academy received a record number of sponsors for its third-annual Read-a-thon program, but is still seeking sponsors for the February Walk-a-thon. Monument Academy’s nonprofit Parent Teacher Organization manages three annual fundraisers; the Read-a-thon for elementary students, a Walk-a-thon for middle school students and Eat Your Art Out, a fine arts showcase featuring music, art, silent auction and local restaurant cuisine. All three are designed to augment school funding gaps. “We receive the lowest level of per-pupil funding of any school in the state,” said Julie Galusky, Monument Academy PTO president. “We have to find ways to ensure our children and teachers have the resources they need.” Last year’s Read-a-thon netted more than $25,000 and funded 12 grants to support students and teachers. This year’s money is ear-

marked for educational needs to include software, curricula support materials and other classroom items. More than 800 people attended Eat Your Art Out last April and raised $10,000 for the Fine Arts Department to purchase new sound equipment to support choir and band performances. “More than $30,000 in teacher grant requests have been submitted for critical items this year that our school’s budget just can’t cover,” Galusky said. “While we received tremendous sponsor support for this year’s Read-a-thon, we’re still 50 percent short of our overall goal.” State funding for Monument Academy has dropped by nearly $1,000 per student in the past three years, making fundraising even more important. “One hundred percent of the funds go directly to school programs,” said Galusky. “Sponsorship can be given at any amount, but a company’s logo will be placed on all event-related signs, banners and T-shirts for those who donate $100 or more.”


9-Color

The Tribune 9

October 9, 2013

McFarland Continued from Page 6

Creek district. There were several trains with Pullman cars that did pass through the county on the Colorado Midland with stops at Woodland Park, Divide and Florissant.

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PMS dents l hot Nolan 2 off

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Summers Continued from Page 6

In 1939, at the tail-end of the Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, hoping to boost the economy by providing shoppers and merchants a few extra days to conduct business between the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, moved Thanksgiving to November’s third Thurs-

The idea that the sheriff might do the same to other cars passing through the county gave considerable worry to the Pullman Co. and the railroad. Indeed the county treasurer let it be known that it was his intention to have the sheriff go to Divide and attach any Pullman cars that came through. This could probably bring endless suits brought by patrons who might be in the cars and would be detained

at Divide. The solution came two days later when the Pullman sleeping car “Chamita” still sitting about 80 feet north of the Cripple Creek depot was released. It was attached to a Midland passenger train and pulled to Divide. Deputy U.S. Marshal Thomas Clark had arrived from Denver and served an order of release upon Robertson and County Treasurer Duncan McNeill.

The Pullman Palace Car Co. had posted a bond and the car was released. The Pullman Co. paid plenty of taxes to Colorado and was not amused by this action. The company began an action against the county to recover damages on the grounds that the car was unlawfully detained. I understand that eventually an agreement was made and things quieted down on both sides.

day. In 1941, however, Roosevelt bowed to Congress’ insistence that the fourth Thursday of November be re-set permanently as the official Thanksgiving holiday. Now back to the Pilgrims. Nobody knows exactly when the Pilgrims celebrated that first Thanksgiving, but it likely occurred somewhere between September and December. That first event lasted three days. It was attended by about 50 Pilgrims and as many as 90 Native Americans, who,

by the way, were not invited. The Indians just kind of showed up with all sorts of food and gifts. Actually, that’s kind of how it works today with relatives. The term “Happy Thanksgiving” didn’t really take off until the 1880s. By the 1930s, the event really started to gain momentum. The Detroit Lions decided to host an annual football game on that day. Today Thanksgiving is one of the biggest annual events. Three NFL games are now played. Huge Hollywood blockbust-

ers are released that night. “Black Friday” begins for many at the bewitching hour. I don’t really mind Thanksgiving the way it is now - minus Black Friday. It has a special meaning to me. The three or four days leading up the Big Dance (Turkey Day) seem to mark the beginning to the festive holiday season. But lest we forget, this is only October. The Great Pumpkin has not even arrived yet. Oh, what the heck. Happy Thanksgiving!

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tT ork Bes to W asy y. • E iendl e Fr ous , h er y ific t ev spec ve n i se hie pa we . We u to ac e. g n s tin om ain ur ow ethod our h P o y C m TEC t were oven ce for t A if i , pr len as cting excel exa nting pai

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or from any Tri-Lakes Women’s Club member and at the door. Beverages have been arranged by:

THE WINE SELLER & SERRANOS COFFEE

Culinary Creations prepared by: MYABELLA CUPCAKES BELLA PANINI MY BIG FAT GREEK RESTAURANT BONEFISH GRILL OAKLEY’S AT SUNDANCE MOUNTAIN LODGE DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT TEXAS ROADHOUSE EL PADRINO THE ART OF CHOCOLATE JUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT MOZAIC RESTAURANT All proceeds benefit qualified non-profit service organizations and public schools in the Tri-Lakes Community

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18945 Pebble Beach Way • Monument, Colorado 80132 • www.monumenthillcc.com


10-Color

10 The Tribune

October 9, 2013

A Saturday, October 12th • 10AM U www.GormanAuctions.com C T I O N S GORMAN AUCTIONS • 719-687-2400 Registration 9AM - ON SITE Living Estate of Ron & Rosanne Brown 8150 Pine Cone Rd., Black Forest, CO Preview Friday 2PM-4:30PM

John Deere 2320 Tractor. John Deere Mower. Camper. Lots of Tools. Hunting. Fishing. Mounts. Trains. Coins. GUNS & AMMO. Furniture Glassware. Collectibles and So Much More!

Go To www.GormanAuctions.com To See Pictures!

Friday, October 18th • 10AM Several Estates, BOX LOTS to Furniture... Saturday, October 26th Antiques to Collectibles Featuring East Lake Furniture & Clock Collection... Gun Auction - Date Pending for Nov. 9th

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3945 N. Academy Blvd., Colorado Springs In the City-Wide Garage Sale Complex

VA finalizes land acquisition agreement Staff report The Department of Veterans Affairs has announced that it has executed a sales agreement to purchase land for a National Veterans Cemetery in Southern Colorado. It will next engage in the final steps to complete a formal property acquisition. “This welcome and long overdue news represents a significant step toward finally building a cemetery veterans in southern Colorado can call their own,” Sen. Michael Bennet said. “We’re grateful to our troops, our vet-

erans and our military families for everything they’ve done on behalf of our country. It’s time we delivered on this promise.” The Pikes Peak area has one of the highest concentrations of veterans in the country, estimated at more than 100,000. This new cemetery will help ease demand for space at existing facilities while significantly reducing the cost and distance of travel for families of fallen soldiers. The new cemetery will also enable veterans who reside in Southern Colorado to be buried near the communities they call home.

Bennet led efforts in Washington to bring the cemetery to Southern Colorado. In March 2009, he introduced a bill with Sen. Mark Udall to create a cemetery in El Paso County. The following year, he and then-Representative John Salazar met with Secretary for Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki to discuss the issue and shortly thereafter, the President’s FY2011 budget included language for establishing such a cemetery. In 2012, Bennet convened a meeting of the Southern Colorado Veterans Cemetery Committee to receive feedback on potential site locations.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY adindex

EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Tribune. PROFESSIONAL

The Tri-Lakes Tribune is made possible thanks to our local advertisers. When you spend your dollars near your home – especially with these advertisers – it keeps your community strong, prosperous and informed. AUTO Building Construction TECC PAINTING ............................................................... 9 AUTO Business Services GORMAN AUCTION ......................................................10 HOLT AND ASSOCIATES ..............................................14 MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC ASSOC ......................14 AUTO Community TRI-LAKES WOMENS CLUB .......................................... 9 AUTO Communication CENTURYLINK.................................................................. 4 AUTO Entertainment METRO NEWS AD SERVICES ........................................ 2 RESORTS AT WENDOVER ...........................................13 WOODMOOR COUNTRY CLUB ................................... 9 AUTO House & Home FURNITURE ROW MARKETING................................16 J & K ROOFING................................................................15 AUTO Lawn & Garden BOB AMES EXCAVATING .............................................13 PATTON PROFESSIONAL LAWN SERVICES .............. 7 AUTO Real Estate KELLER WILLIAMS - RUTH WORDELMAN............14 MORNINGSTAR SENIOR LIVING ................................ 7

FRONT RANGE Business Group meets

from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of every month at Bella Panini in Palmer Lake.

TRI-LAKES BUSINESS Networking International meets from 8-9:30 a.m. every Wednesday at the Mozaic Inn in Palmer Lake. Call Elizabeth Bryson at 719-481-0600 or e-mail ebryson@ farmersagent.com. TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business

After Hours meets at 5:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at various locations. Free to members; $10 for non-members. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www.trilakeschamber.com.

TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business Networking Group meets at 7:30 a.m. the first and third Thursday at Willow Tree Cafe, 140 2nd St., Monument. New members welcome. If District 38 is delayed or cancelled, their will be no meeting. Yearly membership dues are $20. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www. trilakeschamber.com. WISDOM AND Wealth Master Mind Group Lifting Spirits meets from 7-9

p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday from July to September at 755 Highway 105, Unit C, Palmer Lake. RSVP to Meredith at 630-618-9400. Visit www.MeredithBroomfield.com.

WOODMOOR BUSINESS Group Meet-

ing is the second Monday of every month from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Woodmoor Barn, 1691 Woodmoor Dr. We are Woodmoor residents offering products and services to the community. New members welcome. For more information, call Bobbi Doyle at 719-331-3003 or go to www. woodmoorbusinessgroup.com.

RECREATION AMATEUR RADIO Operators, W0TLM (Tri-Lakes Monument Fire Radio Association), meets the third Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Monutemnt Fire Protection District Station 1, 18650 Hwy 105. All Amateur Radio Operators are welcome. Call Joyce Witte at 488-0859 for more information. ADULT RECREATIONAL and interme-

diate pick up volleyball is at Lewis-Palmer Middle School every Monday from 7-9 p.m. Call Claudia at 719-313-6662 for details.

BINGO BY the Tri-Lakes American Legion Post 9-11 is conducted from 7 to 9 p.m. every Saturday at the Post home, Depot Restaurant in Palmer lake.

Help Wanted

Open House Directory

Helper Needed Doing Misc. Items around home. Must be able to lift 25-50 lbs. Call between 8am-5pm if interested (719)465-1496

Farm Products & Produce

OPEN HOUSE! Sat & Sun 1-4:00 15997 Ray Drive, Larkspur Custom Ranch backing to private land conservancy

Estate Sales

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GLENEAGLE GOLF Club has implemented a Community Advisory Committee. Their mission is to help establish a stronger relationship between the club and the community. They are looking for representatives from all home owners associations. The committee meets

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 303-566-4100

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FRIENDS OF Monument Preserve is a nonprofit organization that works to keep trails rideable and hikeable in the Monument Preserve Area. Meetings are at 7 p.m. every third Wednesday at the Monument Fire Center. Trail work is done at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday in the summer months. Contact info@fomp.org or Chris at 719-488-9850.

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BIG RED Saturday Market. Fresh vegetables and fruit, bakery items, local honey, crafts, jewelry, pet stuff and more are for sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday at the Big Red Saturday market at Second and Jefferson streets in Monument. The money benefits Lewis-Palmer community schools.

the fourth Wednesday of the month at 6:30PM at Gleneagle Golf Club. If you can join, give Rick Ebelo a call at the club at 488-0900.

THE PIKES Peak chapter of Pheasants Forever meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month (except June, August and September) at the Colorado Division of Wildlife Training Classroom in the back of the building at 4255 Sinton Road, Colorado Springs, CO 80970. THE VAILE Museum, 66 Lower Glenway, is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays year-round and from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays from June through August. Groups by appointment are accepted. Call 719-559-0837. VINI E Crostini, 6 flight wine tasting paired with moZaic tasty bites is at 5 p.m the first Saturday of the month at 443 S. Highway 105, Palmer Lake. Cost is $40 per person. SERVICES SHARE COLORADO, a nonprofit organization, is a monthly food distributor that offers grocery packages at half the retail price to everyone. Call 800-3754452 or visit www.sharecolorado.com. Clubs continues on Page 15

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Proceeds are dedicated to Scholarship and community support activities of the Post. At least 70 percent of the game sales are awarded in prizes, and free food drawings are conducted. Doors open at 6 p.m. and all are invited for the fun, food, and prizes. See www.americanlegiontrilakespost911.com/bingo.htm for more information.

Larkspur 3 Generation Estate Sale Antiques and Collectibles Over 200 Department 56 Buildings & Accessories Ski Country and Jim Beam Decanters, Annalee Dolls, China, Glassware, Steins, Dishes, Crocks, Pottery, Books, Christmas, Crafts and Much More Friday & Saturday October 11th & 12th 9am-4pm 1441 Tenderfoot Drive Larkspur 80118

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y

October 9, 2013

Case No.: 2013CV030590 Div: 9

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Warren Arthur Bostrom, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30018 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of El Pasco County, Colorado on or before February 9, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Lynn M. Vanatta-Perry Attorney at Law 315 East San Miguel Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 Legal Notice No: 932175 First Publication: October 9, 2013 Last Publication: October 23, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, EL PASO COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO Court Address: 270 South Tejon Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Court Phone: 719-448-7700

DEFENDANTS: DAVID R. BARTLING; COLORADO HOUSING AND FINANCE AUTHORITY; and THOMAS S. MOWLE AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO

sants ond Brianna L. Schaefer ne, Attorney: Firm: HindmanSanchez P.C. Address: 5610 Ward Road, Suite 300 orado Arvada, Colorado 80002-1310 oom in Phone Number: 303.432.8999 Fax Number: 303.432.0999 nton E-mail: bschaefer@hindmansanchez.com Atty. Reg. No.: 34078 Our File No.: 803.004

Case No.: 2013CV030590 Div: 9 SUMMONS

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint ng filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or t 5 p.m other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within 443 S. twenty-one (21) days after filing of $40 Plaintiff’s initial disclosure statement and service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day orga- of the last publication. A copy of the Commay be obtained from the Clerk of utor plaint the Court.

f the 75om.

PLAINTIFF: COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. v. DEFENDANTS: DAVID R. BARTLING; COLORADO HOUSING AND FINANCE AUTHORITY; and THOMAS S. MOWLE AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO Attorney: Brianna L. Schaefer Firm: HindmanSanchez P.C. Address: 5610 Ward Road, Suite 300 Arvada, Colorado 80002-1310 Phone Number: 303.432.8999 Fax Number: 303.432.0999 E-mail: bschaefer@hindmansanchez.com Atty. Reg. No.: 34078 Our File No.: 803.004

h at COUNTRYSIDE ou can PLAINTIFF: COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. ub at v.

p.m. 4 p.m. ugust. ed.

Court Address: 270 South Tejon Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Court Phone: 719-448-7700

If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the time required, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action affecting the real property described in the Complaint and is a proceeding in rem as well as a proceeding in personam.

Misc. Private Public NoticeLegals DISTRICT COURT, EL PASO COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO Court Address: 270 South Tejon Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Court Phone: 719-448-7700 PLAINTIFF: COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. v. DEFENDANTS: DAVID R. BARTLING; COLORADO HOUSING AND FINANCE AUTHORITY; and THOMAS S. MOWLE AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO Attorney: Brianna L. Schaefer Firm: HindmanSanchez P.C. Address: 5610 Ward Road, Suite 300 Arvada, Colorado 80002-1310 Phone Number: 303.432.8999 Fax Number: 303.432.0999 E-mail: bschaefer@hindmansanchez.com Atty. Reg. No.: 34078 Our File No.: 803.004 Case No.: 2013CV030590 Div: 9 SUMMONS THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within twenty-one (21) days after filing of Plaintiff’s initial disclosure statement and service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court. If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the time required, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action affecting the real property described in the Complaint and is a proceeding in rem as well as a proceeding in personam.

SUMMONS

Misc. Private Legals

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within twenty-one (21) days after filing of Plaintiff’s initial disclosure statement and service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court. If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the time required, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action affecting the real property described in the Complaint and is a proceeding in rem as well as a proceeding in personam. Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. Respectfully submitted, HINDMANSANCHEZ P.C. Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer is on file with the law offices of HindmanSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. 121, §1-26(7). /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 Marc A. Tahiry, No. 38991 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. Address of Plaintiff: Countryside Community Association, Inc. c/o Association Financial Services 4400 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 550 Miami, FL 33137

to appear and defend against the claims

11 of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint

filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within twenty-one (21) days after filing of Plaintiff’s initial disclosure statement and service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court.

The Tribune 11

If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the time required, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action affecting the real property described in the Complaint and is a proceeding in rem as well as a proceeding in personam.

Misc. Private Legals

Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. Respectfully submitted, HINDMANSANCHEZ P.C. Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer is on file with the law offices of HindmanSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. 121, §1-26(7). /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 Marc A. Tahiry, No. 38991 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. Address of Plaintiff: Countryside Community Association, Inc. c/o Association Financial Services 4400 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 550 Miami, FL 33137 Legal Notice No.: 932165 First Publication: September 11, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune Public Notice Notice of Sale of Abandoned Property Attention: Dana Clark 20153 Sedgemore Rd. PO Box 2844, Monument, Co. 80132 Property stored at S&S Storage LLC, 18' Reinell boat and trailer. You may claim the property by contacting S&S Storage on or before October 30th, 2013. After October 30th, 2013 the property will be disposed of. S&S Storage LLC 19275 Beacon Lite Rd. Monument, Co. 80132. (719) 481-2706 Legal Notice No.: 932176 First Publication: October 9, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Legal Notice No.: 932165 First Publication: September 11, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. Respectfully submitted, HINDMANSANCHEZ P.C. Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer is on file with the law offices of HindmanSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. 121, §1-26(7). /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 Marc A. Tahiry, No. 38991 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. Address of Plaintiff: Countryside Community Association, Inc. c/o Association Financial Services 4400 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 550 Miami, FL 33137 Legal Notice No.: 932165 First Publication: September 11, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. Respectfully submitted, HINDMANSANCHEZ P.C. Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer is on file with the law offices of HindmanSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. 121, §1-26(7). /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 Marc A. Tahiry, No. 38991 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF COUNTRYSIDE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. Address of Plaintiff: Countryside Community Association, Inc. c/o Association Financial Services 4400 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 550 Miami, FL 33137 Legal Notice No.: 932165 First Publication: September 11, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

The newspaper, yes the newspaper, is still America’s best portable information device. In these complex times, newspaper newsrooms continue to produce the most trusted journalism available anywhere, thanks to teams of dedicated, professional reporters and editors. That’s why more than 100 million Americans pick up a newspaper every day. So impress your family, friends and co-workers by enjoying the most portable, easy-to-use information device available anywhere. No charger required.

Public Notice NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT Public Notice Misc. Private Legals

Notice of Sale of Abandoned Property Attention: Dana Clark 20153 Sedgemore Rd. PO Box 2844, Monument, Co. 80132 Property stored at S&S Storage LLC, 18' Reinell boat and trailer. You may claim the property by contacting S&S Storage on or before October 30th, 2013. After October 30th, 2013 the property will be disposed of. S&S Storage LLC 19275 Beacon Lite Rd. Monument, Co. 80132. (719) 481-2706 Legal Notice No.: 932176 First Publication: October 9, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT Notice is hereby given that final payment will be made on or after the 19th day of October, 2013, on a contract dated June 5, 2013 between the Donala Water and Sanitation District (Owner) and Wildcat Construction Co., Inc. (Contractor) for work completed through August 8, 2013 on the Water Transmission and Distribution System Improvements-2013 Phase 1 project. All persons, companies or corporations that have furnished labor, materials or other supplies or services used by Contractor under and in connection with said contract and whose claims have not been paid by the Contractor shall file with the Owner a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such a claim on or before the date of final payment stated above. Failure on the part of the claimant to file such settlement will relieve the Owner from any or all liability for such claim. Owner: /s/ Donala Water and Sanitation District Legal Notice No.: 932173 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Notice is hereby given that final payment will be made on or after the 19th day of October, 2013, on a contract dated June 5, 2013 between the Donala Water and Sanitation District (Owner) and Wildcat Construction Co., Inc. (Contractor) for work completed through August 8, 2013 on the Water Transmission and Distribution System Improvements-2013 Phase 1 project.

Government Legals

All persons, companies or corporations that have furnished labor, materials or other supplies or services used by Contractor under and in connection with said contract and whose claims have not been paid by the Contractor shall file with the Owner a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such a claim on or before the date of final payment stated above. Failure on the part of the claimant to file such settlement will relieve the Owner from any or all liability for such claim. Owner: /s/ Donala Water and Sanitation District Legal Notice No.: 932173 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune


Tri-LakesSportS 12-Sports

12 The Tribune October 9, 2013

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Palmer Ridge senior captain Luke Zarkovacki scored one of the Bears goals during the team’s 3-2 victory over Thompson Valley Oct. 5 at Don Breese Stadium Photos by Danny Summers

Palmer Ridge junior defender Ira Weyand battled for a ball against Thompson Valley.

Palmer Ridge knocks down Thompson Valley in boys soccer Bears win for only the second time this season By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The Palmer Ridge boys’ soccer team improved to 2-9-1 on Oct. 5 with a 3-2 nonleague victory over Thompson Valley (5-6) at Don Breese Stadium. The Bears got goals from Jimmy Kochanski, Chase Bellefiulle and Luke Zarkovacki. Kochanski leads the Bears in goals (5) and assists (5). This is a transition season for Palmer

Ridge, which lost nine starters off of last year’s Class 4A state runner-up team. The Bears have had double-digits in victories every season since the school opened in 2007. The Bears lost their first eight games to begin this season, and tied their ninth (3-3 against Lewis-Palmer on Sept. 26). They were outscored 26-6 in the process. Palmer Ridge is 1-3-1 in the Pikes Peak Athletic Conference. Their victory was against Falcon, 6-0, on Oct. 1. The Bears close out the season with PPAC games against Vista Ridge and Discovery Canyon, and non-league game against Liberty.

Palmer Ridge senior captain Chase Bellefiulle maneuvers his way down field against Thompson Valley in a game played Oct. 5 at Don Breese Stadium. Bellefiulle scored a goal. Palmer Ridge junior captain Jimmy Kochanski boots the ball downfield during the Bears’ 3-2 victory over Thompson Valley on Oct. 5. Kochanski scored a goal in the game and leads the team with five.


13

The Tribune 13

October 9, 2013

Tri-Lakes area represented well at state Nine local players vied for top honors By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Nine Tri-Lakes area golfers competed in last week’s state golf championships. The finals were help Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at various venues around the state. The Classical Academy sophomore Noah Shin and St. Mary’s junior Jakob Bucher (a resident of Flying Horse) had the best finishes of any area golfers. They both ended up tied for 40th at the Class 3A state meet at Pueblo Country Club. Shin, a two-time state qualifier, had a two-day total of 171 (85-86, 29 over par). He was 57th at state as a freshman. “Noah never really got it going,” said TCA coach Bob Gravelle about Shin. “He had really nice strokes. He had six pars on his last nine, but that was mixed in with two double bogeys.” Bucher fell out of contention for the title on Day 1 when he shot a 91. But he regrouped and came back with a solid 80 on Day 2. TCA senior Josh Gordon finished tied for 53rd. Gordon was originally an alternate, but he found out about before the tournament that he would be able to play at state. He shot a 92 on Day 1, but came back with a solid 83 on Day 2 of the tournament. “Josh had some nice shots the second day,” Gravelle

said. “It was a good comeback for him.” One other area golfer also played in the 3A tournament; Jimmy Velten, a St. Mary’s student who lives in Fox Run. Velten finished 67th with a two-day total of 182 (9191). Basalt’s Tristan Rohrbaugh won the 3A tournament at 1-under par. His two-day total included five birdies, 27 pars and four bogeys. The 4A tournament was held at Hiwan Golf Club in Evergreen. Lewis-Palmer junior Marcus Fenimore had the best finish of the five area 4A golfers. He finished 56th with a two-day total of 175 (92-83). Fenimore was sharp on Day 2, scoring three pars on the front nine and six on the back. His downfall came on Day 1 when he shot a 49 (14-over par) on the back nine. The course was par-70. Discovery Canyon’s Owen Pavogel, originally an alternate, finished in 61st place after firing a 177 (86-91). His Thunder teammate, Jacob Trujillo, was tied for 76th (190, 88-102). Palmer Ridge also had two golfers at state. Devin Bruecken was tied for 62nd (178, 92-86) and Pierce Delacretaz was 71st (185, 89-96). Bruecken scored two birdies on Day 2. Coronado sophomore Isaac Petersilie won the 4A title at 4-over par. He played very consistent golf, scoring five birdies and 22 pars over two days. He had nine bogeys and no double bogeys.

St. Mary’s golfers, Jakob Bucher, left, and Jimmy Velten, right, are all smiles after the Class 3A Boys’ state golf tournament last week at Pueblo Country Club. Bucher lives in Flying Horse, while Velten lives in Fox Run. Courtesy photo

State Tennis begins Thursday; State softball regionals are Saturday Power-packed week of sports ahead for local teams By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The Tri-Lakes area is going to be well represented at this week’s boys’ Class 4A state tennis finals as 12 players from LewisPalmer, Palmer Ridge and Discovery Canyon Campus advanced. Lewis-Palmer qualified five spots at last week’s regionals, including all three singles spots in No. 1 Jared Stuart, No. 2 Nolan Rademacher and No. 3 Thomas Gregory. Also advancing for the Rangers is the No. 1 doubles team of JK Balk and Brennan Stuart, and the No. 2 doubles team of David Meleski and Kyle Finn. Lewis-Palmer also took second in the team standings. Stuart, Rademacher and Gregory all reached the finals, but lost there before winning playbacks. Both doubles teams also reached the finals before losing. Palmer Ridge qualified two spots; the No. 3 doubles team of Zach Wilcox and Drake Wilson, and the No. 4 doubles team of Ricky Wilcox and Marc-Andre Lacrampe. By sending four players to the state tournament, Palmer Ridge ties the previous best mark for the program. Discovery Canyon’s lone representative is senior No. 1 singles Luke Lorenz. The four-time state qualifier won a playback 6-0, 6-0 to advance. Lorenz reached the championship match against Kent Denver’s David Mitchell, was defeated 6-3, 7-5. Kent Denver took first as a team at the

regional with 84 points. Discovery Canyon was third with 44. The state finals start Thursday and run through Saturday at Pueblo City Park.

tack was smothered as Cheyenne Mountain held the Bears to minus-51 yards on 22 attempts. Palmer Ridge plays at Pueblo West Friday at 7 p.m.

THUNDER, BEARS SOFTBALL TEAMS IN REGIONALS

THUNDER ROLLS ON

Discovery Canyon will host the 4A Region 3 tournament on Saturday, while Palmer Ridge travels to Wheat Ridge for the Region 1 tournament. Discovery Canyon (14-5) earned the No. 5 overall seed and will host No. 28 Green Mountain (9-9) in one game. The other Region 3 game will be played between No. 12 Thompson Valley (13-5) and Woodland Park (16-3). The top two teams from the each of the eight state regionals moves on to the state tournament. Palmer Ridge (13-6) is the No. 16 seed and will play No. 17 Montrose (14-7). Host Wheat Ridge (18-1), the No. 1 seed, will play No. 32 Mead (9-10) in the other regional game. Palmer Ridge and Discovery Canyon each advanced to the state tournament in 2012.

BEARS WIN STREAK AT TWO

The Palmer Ridge football team defeated Cheyenne Mountain, 17-14, on Oct. 4 to improve to 2-1 in the 4A Foothills League, 2-4 overall. The Bears overcame a 14-3 halftime deficit on an interception return for a touchdown by Thorin Wang and a touchdown pass from Blaine Wycoff (9 of 15 for 126 yards) to Caleb Ojennes. Palmer Ridge’s usual stealth running at-

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Senior quarterback Alec Wirtjes scored on touchdown runs of 1, 6 and 3 yards to lead Discovery Canyon to 35 unanswered points during a 42-14 3A South Central League victory over Lewis-Palmer on Oct. 4. The score was tied 7-7 after an 80-yard touchdown run by Lewis-Palmer running back Matt Brines (132 yards on 14 carries) midway through the first quarter. But Discovery Canyon took control after that on its way to improving to 6-1 overall, 1-0 in league. Also scoring touchdowns for the Thunder were Michael Beiswinger on a 27-yard fumble return, and Canin Ritz on a 3-yard run. Lewis-Palmer got a late touchdown by Nick Christenson. Discovery Canyon has a bye this week, while Lewis-Palmer (2-5, 0-1) plays Coronado on Friday at Garry Berry Stadium.

TITANS ROLL OVER HARRISON

The Classical Academy football team defeated Harrison, 42-14, on Oct. 4 in its 3A Southern League opener. Andrew Register rushed for 90 yards and three touchdowns to lead the Titans (4-2, 1-0). Peter Troupe had a game-high 113 yards and one touchdown, while backfield mate Nick DeRay had 61 yards and a touchdown.

BEARS AND THUNDER SET TO LOCK HORNS Palmer Ridge will host Discovery Canyon in a key 4A Pikes Peak Athletic Conference volleyball game on Thursday. Both teams are coming off big wins. Palmer Ridge (8-4, 2-1) defeated Sand Creek in straight sets on Oct. 3 (25-16, 2519 and 25-14), as Carley Wilcox paced the Bears with 10 kills and 12 digs. Discovery Canyon (6-7, 2-1) defeated Vista Ridge in straight sets on Oct. 3 (25-12, 25-24 and 25-22). Aly Fry had a game-high 12 kills for the Thunder, while teammate Carina Serratore added 23 assists and 18 digs.


14

14 The Tribune

October 9, 2013

Hundreds of runners showed Saturday to outrun the undead in an event designed to call attention to preparing for disasters. Photos by Rob Carrigan

First ‘Don’t be a Zombie’ event draws 240 Citizens educated on emergency preparedness tools, strategies Staff report The kickoff zombie avoidance event brought hundreds of runners to Fox Run Park recently, as well educated hundreds more about being preprared in case of a disaster. Thanks to the response of participants and the contributions of many volunteers and County staff, El Paso Coun-

ty’s inaugural “Be Prepared ... Don’t Be A Zombie” event was a success. Two-hundred forty runners tempted the “undead” in the zombie runs on Sept. 28 at Fox Run Regional Park. “Laughter mixed with screams and zombie groans were heard around Fox Run Regional Park,” said Todd Marts, recreation and cultural services division manager for El Paso County. “Feedback from the participants has been wonderful. People had a great time running in a beautiful park on a perfect fall day.” Seventy runners participated in the more traditional 5K, which was the first run of the day. This was followed by the “heat races,” where runners were challenged along the course by “zombies” in ominous makeup. In addition to the 310

runners, 40 volunteers served as zombies and helped with the event, surpassing the initial projection of 200 participants. The event was designed to showcase the need for all residents to develop their own family and workplace emergency preparedness plans. “The goal of providing a fun run to expose and educate citizens to emergency preparedness tools and strategies was not only met but exceeded the expectations of many,” said Commissioner Peggy Littleton. “Citizens embraced the concept of being personally prepared and learned how to build a 10-minute, one-hour and one-day evacuation plan as well as how to shelter in place for an extended period of time.”

El Paso County parks is sponsoring a 5K and 3K “Zombie Run” Sept. 28 at Fox Run Regional Park. Courtesy photo

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15-Color

The Tribune 15

October 9, 2013

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Continued from Page 10

8101 for information.

SOCIAL

PALMER DIVIDE Quiltmakers meets at 7 p.m. the first Thursday of

THE BLACK Forest AARP Chapter meets for a luncheon the second Wednesday of each month at the Black Forest Lutheran Church. Call 719-596-6787 or 719-495-2443. THE CENTURIAN Daylight Lodge No 195 A.F and A.M meets at 7 p.m.

the fourth Tuesday of each month. Eastern Star meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays. Both groups meet at 18275 Furrow Road. Call 719-488-9329.

COALITION OF Tri-Lakes Communities. Call John Heiser at 719-4889031 or go to www.CoalitionTLC.org. COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for volunteers.

The troop meets at 7 p.m. the first Friday of the month at the Colorado Springs Police Department, Gold Hill Division, 955 W. Moreno Ave, Colorado Springs. Visit  https://coloradoranger.org/index.php/troops/ troop-i or email info@coloradoranger.org

GIRL SCOUTING offers opportunities for girls ages 5-17 to make

friends, learn new skills and challenge themselves in a safe and nurturing environment. Call 719-597-8603.

GLENEAGLE SERTOMA Club luncheon meeting is every Wednesday

each month at The Church at Woodmoor. Contact Carolyn at 719-4889791 or hockcf@aol.com.

THE PIKES Peak Branch of the National League of American Pen Women offers information by calling 719-532-0021. PIKES PEAK Women’s Connection meets the second Thursday of the

month for a luncheon at the Clarion Hotel Downtown, 314 W. Bijou St., Colorado Springs. Social time begins at 11:30 a.m., with luncheon and program from noon to 1:30 p.m. Free preschool childcare is available with a reservation; $16 inclusive. Call 719-495-8304 for reservations or information. All women are welcome.

ROTARY CLUB of Colorado Springs InterQuest meets at 4:45 p.m. Thursdays at Liberty Heights Retirement Center, 12105 Ambassador Drive in Colorado Springs. Call Scott Allen at 719-590-7460. SILENT SPRINGS Social Group is a social group for hard of hearing and deaf adults. Sign language users are welcome. Dining out at local restaurants, potlucks and community activities are available on an ongoing basis. Call 719-487-9009 or e-mail silentspringscos@hotmail. com.

at 11:45 a.m., at Liberty Heights, 12105 Ambassador Drive, Colorado Springs, 80921. Call Garrett Barton at 719-433-5396 or Bob Duckworth at 719-481-4608, or visit www.sertoma.org.

TOASTMASTERS FACC Masters Club meets at noon Thursdays at Lockheed Martin, 9975 Federal Drive. Visit http://faccmasters.freetoasthost.us or call Kirby at 719-481-3738.

HISTORY BUFFS meets at Monument Library from 1-3 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month.

TRI-LAKES AMERICAN Legion Post 9-11 meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at the Depot Restaurant on Colo. 105 in Palmer Lake. Contact Ed at 719-481-2750.

KIWANIS CLUB of Monument Hill, a service club dedicated to

providing assistance to those less fortunate in the Tri-Lakes community, meets 8 a.m. Saturdays at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 Colo. 105. Join us for breakfast, great fellowship and informative programs, and come be a part of the opportunity to give back to your community. Visit http://monumenthillkiwanis.org; call 719-4871098; e-mail info@ monumenthillkiwanis.org

TRI-LAKES BARBERSHOP Chapter meets Mondays. Call Phil Zara at

719-481-3197.

TRI-LAKES CROP Club meets on the third Saturday of the month.

Call Angela at 719-481-9735.

LEGACY SERTOMA dinner meetings are at 6:30 p.m. the second and

TRI-LAKES CRUISERS Car Club meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Tri-Lakes-Monument Fire Station on South Colo. 105. Open to all vehicle makes and models. Call Dale at 488-2852.

MOMS IN Touch prayer groups meet, by school, throughout the school

TRI-LAKES FRIENDS of the Libraries meets from 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday of each month from September through June at Monument Library.

fourth Thursdays monthly at Monument Country Club. New members and visitors welcome. Call Ed Kinney, 481-2750.

district for one hour each week to support the children, their teachers, the schools and administration through prayer. Call Judy Ehrlich at 719-481-1668.

THE MONUMENT Homemakers Club meets the first Thursday of every month at the Tri-Lakes Fire Department Administrative Building, 166 Second Street, Monument. Arrive at 11:30 a.m. to prepare for a noon potluck, program, and business meeting, which ends around 1:30 p.m. Newcomers are welcome. Call Irene Walters, Co-President, at 719-481-1188 for Jean Sanger, Co-President, at 719-592-9311 for reservations. MOUNT HERMAN 4-H Club meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at Grace Best Elementary. There are no meetings in June, July and August. Anyone interested in pursuing animal projects, archery, cooking, sewing, model rocketry, woodworking or just about any hobby is welcome. A new member meeting is the third Thursday in October.

THE TRI-LAKES Lions Club meets the first Thursday of every month

at Monument Hill Country Club. The social is at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting is at 7 p.m. The International Association of Lions Clubs is the largest service club in the world with over 1.35 million members. The Lions are known as the “Knights of the Blind.” By conducting vision screenings, equipping hospitals and clinics, distributing medicine and raising awareness of eye disease, Lions work toward their mission of providing vision for all. Lions clubs are groups of community minded men and women who are interested in helping serve their communities. For information about the new Tri-Lakes Lions Club, contact the club’s president, Dave Prejean, at 719-492-8274. More information is available at lionsclubs.org.

TRI-LAKES NONDENOMINATIONAL Men’s Gathering meets at

6:30 a.m. Wednesdays at the Pinecrest Lodge in Palmer Lake. Continental breakfast is included. Call Basil Marotta at 719-487-9500.

TRI-LAKES PARENTS of Multiples Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the

ORDER SONS of Italy in America meets on the first Tuesday at 702 S. Tejon St. in Colorado Springs. Call Tony Rodasta for details or information, 719-260-8773.

third Monday of each month at the Little Log Church in Palmer Lake. Child care is provided for a minimal fee. New members and visitors are welcome. E-mail tlpoms@yahoo.com or call 719-488-6785.

THE PALMER Lake Art Group meets on the second Saturday of the month at the group’s Vaile Hill Gallery, 118 Hillside Road. Call 719-488-

TRI-LAKES VFW Post No. 7829 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday

of the month at The Sundance Lodge/Oakleys. New members are welcome. Call Darby Kelly at 719-481-4377.

U.S. AIR Force Academy Toastmasters meets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays at DeVry University, 1175 Kelly Johnson Blvd., Colorado Springs. Visit www.d26toastmasters.org/airforceacademy or call Angela at 719-494-2777. Guests are welcome. MSGT WILLIAM Crawford Ladies Auxiliary to Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7829 will meet on the third Tuesday of each month starting April 19, from 6 -7:30 p.m. at the Sundance Mountain Lodge in Monument. For information, contact Martine Arndt at 719-231-5323 or Martine.Arndt@yahoo.com. WISDOM AND Wealth Master Mind Group meets from noon to 1 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month at the Monument Library. “Change yourself, change your success.” Let’s talk money: how to save it (tips and ideas on how to cut costs), how to invest it (where, when and how), how to make it (build your business or start a new business). For information, or to register, contact Meredith@MeredithBromfield.com or 630-618-9400. SUPPORT ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays at Tri-Lakes Chapel, Woodmoor Drive and Deer Creek. Call Greg at 719-648-9495. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Sunlight of the Spirit Women’s Closed Step Study. Mondays, 6pm. Family of Christ Lutheran Church, 675 E. Baptist Rd. 487-7781.

I-25 EXPANSION North Gate Boulevard scheduled to open Oct. 10

Interstate 25-North Gate Boulevard interchange under Interstate 25 is scheduled to reopen Oct. 10. The construction added two roundabouts and other roadway enhancements to improve traffic flow on the heavily traveled roadway. While major construction has been completed on the interchange, additional work will continue with minimal traffic impacts expected. The construction eliminated two loop ramps to eastbound and westbound North Gate Boulevard from I-25. Also removed is a third loop ramp from eastbound North Gate Boulevard to northbound I-25. All work is subject to weather and road conditions.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Beacon Lite Group meets at 8 p.m. Monday and Thursday at Tri Lakes Chapel, 1750 Deer Creek Road, at Woodmoor Drive and Deer Creek Road. Call Kathleen at 649-1046.

The editor welcomes signed letters on most any subject. Please limit letters to 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for legality, clarity, civility and the paper’s capacity. Only submissions with name, address and telephone number will run.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Recovery in Action Group Open Big

Book Study. Thursdays, 7pm. Family of Christ Lutheran Church, 675 Baptist Road. 487-7781.

AL-ANON FAMILY Group meets at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Family of Christ Church, 675 Baptist Road. Call Jean at 719-487-8781 or Kay at 719-481-9258. AL-ATEEN GROUP meets at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Family of Christ Church, 675 Baptist Road. Call Jean at 719-487-8781. ALS, LOU Gehrig’s disease support group meets at 6 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Weber St. Center on Weber Street between Kiowa and Bijou streets. in Colorado Springs. Patients, family and caregivers are welcome. Contact Julie Bloom at 719-481-1906.

MAIL, E-MAIL OR FAX TO:

Colorado Community Newspapers, P.O. Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866 rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com, Fax: 719687-3009

BLACK FOREST Al-Anon meets at 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at the

Black Forest Community Church in the East Educational Building to help families and friends of alcoholics. Call 719-632-0063.

BLACK FOREST Homemakers meets the second Thursday of the month at the Black Forest Lutheran Church. Social time begins at 9 a.m. and is followed with a meeting/program. Newcomers are welcome. Call Cindy at 719-495-3402. COLORADO SPRINGS Shrine Club accepts new members who apply and register for children’s admittance to a Shriner’s Hospital from 10 a.m. to noon on the second Saturday of each month. Call 719-6323881.

STOP BY FOR A VISIT Have a newstip? Letter to the editor? Stop by Colorado Community Media’s Monument location at 325 2nd Street, Suite R.

FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT Group meets the second Monday of each month at 3505 Austin Bluffs Parkway at College Pharmacy. A DVD is shown at 5 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7 p.m. Visitors and new participants always are welcome. There is no charge; no products sold. Contact Lorna Searle at 719-481-2230.

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16 The Tribune

October 9, 2013

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