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Courier View Pikes Peak 10-2-2013

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Teller County, Colorado • Volume 52, Issue 40

Where do you want to go in

?

CRIPPLE CREEK

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtellercountynews.com

Center plans October event By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

With Rentfrow’s input and photos, Applegate writes the text as well as the 100,000 lines of code for the app, which offers bonuses such as up-to-the-minute road and weather reports. “There are hundreds of thousands of apps out there, but these guys have put capabilities in a travel app that you aren’t Printed on recycled going to find in some other cities,” said newsprint. Please recycle this copy. Mike Perini, founder of Perini and Associates public-relations firm. “There are even things for kids to do.” Applegate started his program training

Elizabeth Connell is looking for sponsors, not for herself, of course, but for Woodland Park Panther Recycling. Connell, youth employment program specialist at Woodland Park RE-2 School District, is the Panther Recycling program developer. The program needs help from the Teller County community, she said. Woodland Park Panther Recycling, which started up at the Woodland Park Middle School in January, is a venue for recycling unwanted electronics. Besides helping the community keep electronic devices out of landfills, the recycling depot also teaches needed job skills to the school district’s special-education students. Panther Recycling has recently had an influx of televisions because of a new state law nonprofit organizations such as Discover Goodwill and ARC of Colorado are no longer taking used televisions for resale. Students enrolled in the program learn how to use power tools to take electronics apart for their recyclable parts, while at the same time, they learn about running a business. “According to the Colorado Association for Recycling, 296 jobs are created for each ton of computers recycled each year,” Connell said. “Our program not only helps the environment, but also teaches job skills to a population of students who will have a difficult time finding jobs. It’s perfect, they learn skills for jobs those skills are creating.” These students get the premise behind e-recycling. When Connell asked them why they are participating in the program, one of them answered that “recycling electronics isn’t about making money; it’s about helping the environment.” Another said “if you leave your electronics outside, chemicals may seep into the ground and contaminate our water and that can hurt our animals.” Senate Bill 12-133, which went into effect Aug. 1, was approved last year by the Colorado General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. John Hickenlooper on Earth Day 2012. The law bans electronics, everything from computers and monitors to DVD players and tablets, from landfills and enforcement includes fines of up to $10,000 per violation. The law requires all Colorado counties to make a “good-faith” effort to provide electronic waste recycling to their citizens. According to the law, a good-faith effort might include having two collection events in the county each year or opening a permanent collection facility. Those counties that can’t achieve that effort can ask for an exemption. Saving Teller County from opening a permanent facility or seeking an exemption, Panther Recycling is now offering two collection events per year, one in April to correspond with Earth Day and one on Oct. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Woodland Park Middle School. “America Recycles Day is in November, but recycling in October makes it less likely we’ll be recycling in the snow,” Connell said, adding that even October could be

APP continues on Page 17

Center continues on Page 17

By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

POSTAL ADDRESS

75 cents

State’s new e-recycling law explained

App thrusts town into 21st century What seems like magic is the result of brain power and shoe leather. With a tap of the finger tip, the Cripple Creek mobile app yields instant information in response to the user’s query. Casinos, restaurants, lodging, shopping, shuttles and parking, the app reveals all about each category. Instead of asking for directions, the app zeroes in on the exact location in Cripple Creek. The technology wizards who designed the app are John Applegate and Bill Rentfrow, shift manager and slot technician, respectively, at Century Casino. “Bill took all the photos and gathered the data and I created the back end,” Applegate said. “We list everything about the business; if there’s a web page, email or social media, we’ll include that at no extra charge.” The app is available only through the iPhone and most of the information is available offline. “Most people have some kind of connectivity these days, but if you don’t, the offline feature beats a lot of apps right there,” Rentfrow said. The Cripple Creek Mobile App is reliable. “Our app is bullet-proof, does not crash at all,” Applegate said. The app is user-friendly. “With the little buttons on the side you can email; you don’t leave the app except for phone calls,” Rentfrow said. Because of the human connection, the information is 99 percent accurate, Applegate said. “We go out and actually find the gold,” Rentfrow said. “If you data mine, you get a lot of inaccurate information, pulled in from the Internet, or some other source.” As the go-to guy, Rentfrow pounds the pavement to ensure the app’s information is correct, that a restaurant remains open or a casino is still in the chips. “I keep in

October 2, 2013

John Applegate, left, and Bill Rentfrow, have designed a mobile app for the Apple iPhone that, with a press of the finger, reveals everything you’d ever want to know about Cripple Creek, including where your car is parked, just in case you forgot. Photo by Pat Hill

‘There are hundreds of thousands of apps out there, but these guys have put capabilities in a travel app that you aren’t going to find in some other cities.’ Mike Perini, founder of Perini and Associates public-relations firm

constant contact; believe me, if there’s something wrong, somebody’s going to bust our chops,” he said.


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October 2, 2013

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas Lighter Side event to bring cartoon characters to Woodland Park

TO BECOME A SPONSOR

By Staff report The 2013 Lighter Side of Christmas parade committee is back at work to plan events and activities for the 25th anniversary of the Lighter Side of Christmas parade, scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 7 at 6 p.m. in downtown Woodland Park. This year’s parade theme will honor 25 years of the parade and the 90th anniversary of Warner Brothers with “That’s All Folks.” The LSOC committee is proud to observe 25 years of organizing the parade in Woodland Park. “People from all walks of life have celebrated and participated in this fun holiday event each year. We have business owners, horse riders, school kids and folks from all over that either come to actively participate

Interested parties may visit www.lightersideofchristmas.com to explore sponsorship and participation opportunities for the 2013 Lighter Side of Christmas activities and parade. Contact Janie Child, LSOC fundraising chairwoman, of the WP Community Cupboard to become a sponsor at 719-687-3663. Additional questions can be sent to tracie@dinosaurbrokers.com.

in the parade with an entry or enjoy all the festivities from the sidelines. My husband and I took over organizing the parade 13 years ago and have never looked back. It is by far one of the most fun events for area families every holiday season,” said Tracie Bennitt, LSOC committee chair. The anniversary coincides with another historic milestone – the 90th anniversary of Warner Brothers. One of the most respected, diversified and successful motion picture studios in the world, Warner Bros. began when the eponymous brothers - Harry,

Albert, Sam, and Jack - incorporated it on April 4, 1923. Four years later, the release of “The Jazz Singer,” the world’s first “talkie,” set a tone of innovation and influence that would forever become synonymous with the Warner Bros. brand. Ninety years old this year, Warner Bros. continues to entertain the world with films and cartoons for everyone to enjoy. “We anticipate a grand selection of float entries focused on Warner Bros. movies and TV characters,” Bennitt said. “This could end up being one of the best parades ever.” Each year, the committee chooses a recipient for the parade fundraising effort. Proceeds this year will be donated to the Woodland Park Community Cupboard. The cupboard is an emergency food pantry that has served the Ute Pass Region since 1978. Their mission, “Sharing our Love by Caring for our Community” is embodied with friends in neighborly service. The cupboard provides five to seven day emergency food and daily needs supply to residents of the Ute Pass region in Teller County and High-

way 24 West in El Paso County and is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Residents are welcome to call to arrange days and/or hours outside of the normal operating schedule to access services or make a donation. The “Fill the Van” campaign is going to take place again this year, with parade attendees being asked to bring nonperishable food items to fill the van following the parade at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. The committee also will offer a collectible LSOC pin to celebrate the 25th year of the event. “Friends of the Parade can actively help with fundraising and expenses by purchasing the pins for $50. This is a way anyone can join in and help,” Bennitt added. The committee is organizing a citywide “Yule Log Hunt” that will kick off at the Nov. 15 Friday Art Walk at Vintage Vines with the first clue. The person that finds the LSOC Yule Log will win a gift basket that is full of goodies from local businesses, valued in the past at more than $1,000.

Recycling Center snagged again County files motion seeking change in annexation By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com In the ongoing issue of the proposed recycling center, Jay Baker hit another snag last week. “We did file a motion to ask the city of Woodland Park to reconsider their annexation of the Southwest Valley,” said Sheryl Decker, Teller County administrator, speaking at the commissioners meeting on Sept. 26. At issue is the city’s annexation of the 1.84 acres on West Street, a vital piece of property for Baker’s proposed recycling center. In June, the city approved the an-

nexation, granting Baker permission to move ahead on the center. In filing the motion, the county lists 12 points. One of them was that the property annexed was the subject of ongoing litigation at the time of the annexation, which is contrary to the city charter and as a result, a violation of the provision of the city charter. The statutorily-required notification to the county was sent by certified mail, not registered mail, as required by Colorado Revised Statues. In addition, the motion states that the property annexed is not contiguous to the existing city limits and therefore does not satisfy the one-sixth contiguity required by Colorado Revised Statutes. The center would be accessed by a portion of County Road 231; the motion to reconsider states that drainage issues and

ENTS: S E R P S A TCR ” s l i a T d n a T op Ha

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Please join us for an evening of friendship, fabulous food and fund-raising to benefit our animals!

Friday, October 18th 2013

other improvements or changes have not been adequately addressed. After the meeting, Mike Perini, founder of Perini & Associates, a public-relations firm that represents Baker issued this statement: “We are aware of Teller County’s request to the city of Woodland Park for a Motion of Reconsideration. We cannot speak for the city, but we do know that the annexation was approved lawfully in an overwhelming vote by city councilmembers. We would expect the city of Woodland Park to move forward with the special-permit process, as both Teller County Waste (Baker’s company that proposed the center) and city officials have previously agreed to this prudent course of action to ensure the best interests of the community are met.”

David Buttery, Woodland Park’s city manager, declined comment on the issue.

Commissioner Norm Steen reports on transportation issues

“We are continuing to work, at the state level, on proposed legislation that would add a statewide sales-tax of .7 percent,” Steen said. “If passed, the tax would fund declining highway revenues.” With more efficient cars these days, tax revenues are declining for highway maintenance projects, he said. If approved by the legislature, the initiative would appear on the Colorado ballot in 2014 or 2015. “I testified at the hearing that we support local control for transportation funding,” Steen said. “There’s much more to come on that issue.”

Couple wins gold coin WOODLAND PARK – The drawing for a quarter-ounce gold coin was held Sept. 28. Southern Teller County Focus Group board members Jeff Campbell and Ruth Zalewski were on hand. Campbell drew the winning ticket from an old-fashioned miner’s lunch. The bucket held the 200 tickets that were sold by the STCFG between mid-July and mid-

September. Norm and Cheryl Steen of Woodland Park received the winning ticket. The coin was donated by CC&V Gold Mining Co. to the group raffle as a fundraiser. All 200 tickets were sold, which raised $2000 for trails efforts. For more information on the STCFG, visit VictorColorado.com.

SO MUCH INSIDE THE COURIER THIS WEEK

at the

d’oeuvres s r o h & r a b il a 6 PM cockt e pairing in w h it w e c n ie r ining expe ) 5 Course, fine d y not included it tu ra (g e t la $150 per p r by mail o S A R C T t a le ab Tickets are avail

GHOST OUTPOST SERIES: Check out tales of area spirits. Page 21

Seating is limited so purchase your tickets today!

A great blessing: Animals behave at chuch cerermony. Page 14

Teller County Regional Animal Shelter

308 Weaverville Road, in Divide

(719) 686-7707

www.tcrascolorado.com

Come and preview the big plans in store for the shelter!

A good cause: Public health programs raise awareness. Page 5


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If he had a golden hammer Man makes difference doing work for Habitat for Humanity By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com There’s a story behind the Golden Hammer pin on Bob Goheen’s lapel. He wears it as a reflection of his commitment to Habitat for Humanity. “I ran into Habitat in the 1970s in Evergreen,” he said. “And I have been doing something with them ever since.” From that first house to dozens more, Goheen’s volunteer hours creeped up on him and, before he knew it, he’d racked up 5,000 hours in Evergreen alone and won the privilege of wearing the Golden Hammer. “I didn’t keep track of the hours, had absolutely no clue,” he said. Since 2002, off and on, Goheen has been wielding a hammer, digging ditches and laying foundations for Teller County’s Habitat, beginning with several homes in Cripple Creek. Goheen, who owns RG Enterprises, an excavation and construction company, believes in the mission of the nonprofit organization. “People who could never afford to buy a house get to buy a house,” he said. The houses are not free to qualified applicants but rather the new homeowner that contributes at least 500 hours, some require 1,500 hours, of “sweat equity,” toward construction. The homeowner receives low-interest mortgage loans through the organization. In Woodland Park, the most recent project is Las Casas at Forest Edge, seven townhomes and the first of its kind for Habitat in Teller County. For Goheen, the project reflects the rewards associated with helping to provide safe housing for successful applicants. “The amazing thing that I never expected is that Habitat creates community,” he said. What happens is that the whole community gets involved in that Habitat home; they all get to know each other and it’s just marvelous.”

Bob Goheen has been volunteering with Habitat for Humanity for more than 40 years, beginning his service in Evergreen and continuing in Teller County. Photo by Pat Hill While Goheen is in the construction business, his skills are among those needed to complete a Habitat home. “You don’t have to know how to build a house to volunteer,” he said. Some volunteers are “gofers,” people who fetch everything from boards and saws to doing tasks like sweeping the floors. “We had a volunteer on this project who carried foam planks for the foundation and brought boxes of those plastic ties,” he said. “Stuff like that makes the work go so much faster. I don’t think people realize how much of a help that is.”

EXTREME MAKEOVER FOR HABITAT With a new leadership team and a stepped-up marketing campaign for Habitat for Humanity in Teller County, the organization is on a steady roll forward. Among the changes are: • Additions to the board of directors: Scott Davis, Cindy Davis, Dan Vinton and Joy Reis. • Paul Summeril, Home Pro Services, has been hired as the site supervisor; Summeril is accepting bid proposals for contractors, concrete flat work, electrical, plumbing, heating,

roofing and stucco • A new marketing campaign includes an updated website and Facebook page • A new funding campaign through the Glove and Hammer Fund to underwrite the building of new homes • A donation of $5,000 from Cripple Creek & Victor Mining Co., was matched by donors to the organization. For information about volunteering or contributing in other ways, call 687-4447.

West Nile Virus case confirmed in El Paso County

land coinResidents urged to take o. toprecautions during dawn, ticktrailsStaff report

CFG,

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dusk

An adult male is El Paso County’s first confirmed human case of West Nile virus this year, according to El Paso County Public Health. The West Nile virus has an incubation period of between two to 14 days. Most those who become infected with West Nile virus do not develop any symptoms. About

one in five people who are infected will develop a fever with flu-like symptoms. Less than 1 percent of those who are infected will develop a more serious illness – including meningitis and encephalitis. West Nile virus can affect any age group. People who experience severe headaches or confusion should seek medical attention immediately. Mosquito activity can vary depending on weather patterns, but typically peaks in the summer months and begins to decline in the fall. Mosquitoes typically change their feeding habits this time of year from a blood meal to nectar. Therefore, risk cur-

rent levels for West Nile virus transmission are low. El Paso County Public Health’s Medical Director Dr. Bill Letson said the best way to “fight the bite” is to remember the five D’s: • When involved in outdoor activities at dusk and dawn, greater precautions need to be taken because mosquitoes are most active during these times. • Wear insect repellent with DEET. • Dress in pants and long sleeves outdoors whenever possible. • Drain standing water outside in flower pots, birdbaths, rain gutters, tires, wheel-

barrows, and pools. This is especially important because of the recent heavy rains in the area. Treat standing water, such as small ponds and livestock tanks, with microbial larvicide doughnuts, which can be purchased at hardware and home improvement stores. West Nile virus was first detected in El Paso County in 2002; the first human cases were reported in 2003. El Paso County had two reported human cases in 2012. For more information, visit www.elpasocountyhealth.org.

thIngs to do In your communIty

Oct. 3

Oct. 3-5

music, dance and fun from 6-10 p.m. Oct. 5 at a disco/rock dance at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. Tickets are $15 per person and can be purchased at the door.  Dance instruction, door prizes and light refreshments will be provided. Please join us wearing your best disco outfit to win the prize for best costume.  Sponsored by the Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Foundation.

munchkin market. Ute Pass MOPS presents

Oct. 8

cOmmunity meeting. Affordable HealthCare informational community meeting is at 1 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Woodland Park Public Library, and at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Florissant Public Library. Call 719-687-9281 ext. 103. 

its annual Munchkin Market, a children’s consignment sale featuring gently used clothing, shoes, accessories, toys, media, play equipment, strollers, high chairs, sporting goods, baby gear, maternity bedding and more. The sale is open from 5-8 p.m. Oct. 3; from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Oct. 4; and from 9 a.m .to 1 p.m. Oct. 5 (everything is half price). Sale is at Woodland Park Community Church, 800 Valley View Drive. Free admission; cash, checks and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard) accepted for purchases. Proceeds benefit Ute Pass MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers). Call 719-208-7558 or visit www. utepassmops.org.

Oct. 4 Star WarS Reads Day is from 3:30-5 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Activities and crafts planned. Call 719-687-9281 ext.112. Oct. 5 DiScO/rOck Dance. Come for an evening of

Fall FeStival. The Ute Pass Social Club of Teller County will host a fall activity festival from 1-4 p.m. Oct. 8 to demonstrate many club activities such as hiking, luncheons, needle crafts, card games, and others. Festival is at Cathedral Ridge Conference Center on Highway 67, north of Woodland Park. Members, both current and new, as well as interested ladies in the area are welcome. Demonstrations, activities, conversation, door prizes and pie will be featured. The event is free to members and prospective members. Reservations for the event can be made to Mary Ann Schroeder at schroederedd@aol.com or 719-687 1773, or Danna Weber danna.weber@yahoo.com by Sept 30. Oct. 8 WeStern authOr, singer and songwriter Jim Jones will appear at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 8 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9281 ext. 103.

Oct. 8, Oct. 22

chriStmaS cOmmittee. The Cripple Creek/Victor Christmas Committee plans meetings Oct. 8 and Oct. 22. Call Kathi at 719-659-3599 or kathipilcher@ yahoo.com. Oct. 11 taSte OF Teller. The third annual Taste of Teller is planned from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Oct. 11 at Shining Mountain Golf Course in Woodland Park. This event features some of Teller County’s most distinguished eating establishments. All proceeds benefit Community Partnership Family Resource Center. Matt Meister will broadcast the weather report for KRDO News 13 LIVE from Taste of Teller. Teller County resident Clarke Becker is this year’s emcee. Tickets are $45 per person or $80 per couple. Visit TasteOfTeller.com or call 719686-0705 for more information. Oct. 12 QueSt FOr Mastery online classes are offered Oct. 12. Learn these tools that can help you to manifest your highest potential, and overcome issues in your life. This program is based on the Wisdom teachings of Archangel Michael. For more information email Jimena at Jimena.yantorno@gmail.com or call 719306-0772. Classes offered in English and Spanish.

Market Association presents its winter farmers’ markets from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of each month from October to May inside the Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Dates are Oct. 12, nOv. 9, Dec. 14, Jan. 11, Feb. 8, March 8, April 13, May 11. Autumn/winter harvest includes fruit and vegetables, eggs, cheese, jams, organic meats, breads, pastries, pasta, holiday wreaths, alpaca yarn/knits, soaps, hot foods and drinks. Contact the market managers at 719-689 3133 or 719-648 7286, email   tcfma@q.com, visit www.wpfarmersmarket.com or join us on Facebook: Woodland Park Farmers Market.

Oct. 19 earth Science. The Air Force Academy presents “Physics is Phun,” including more than 15 physics demonstrations, many of them hands on, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 19, at the Dinosaur Resource Center, 201 S. Fairview St., Woodland Park. The demonstrations will use everyday objects and scientific equipment. Two shows are planned at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Visit http://www.rmdrc.com for information. Oct. 26 hallOWeen celebratiOn. Join Cathy Kelsay

Oct. 12, nOv. 9, Dec. 14 FarmerS’ market. The Teller County Farmers

Things continues on Page 4

801 West Cucharras St., Co. Springs, CO

475-7003, Fax: 447-1761 Email: soscanyon1@aol.com

pikes peak courier view

(USPS 654-460)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 PhOnE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier View is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLInES: Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.


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THINGS TO DO: ART SHOW Continued from Page 3

at the Dinosaur Research Center for a playful

puppet workshop from 1-2 p.m. and a parade at 2:30 p.m. Learn how to be a puppeteer and make your own bag puppet. Be sure and wear your Halloween costume and join in our contest and parade right after the workshop. There will be stories, treat bags and lots of fun for all. The center is at 201 S. Fairview St., Woodland Park. Visit http://www.rmdrc.com for more details.

Nov. 1-30 art show. The Pikes Peak Plein Air Painters is preparing for its 10th anniversary art show, “A Pikes Peak Rocky Mountain Christmas,” running

from Nov. 1-30 at Colorado Expressions Gallery. Artwork created by the Pikes Peak Plein Air Painters. All paintings will be 11-by-14-inches and will be framed consistently in matching frames. All paintings will be sold for $700-$900. An opening reception is from 5-8 p.m. Nov. 1 at the gallery. Artists will present their creations and meet patrons. A portion of sales will go to support youth art education programs.

Nov. 2 ChristMas tea. “A Cup of Christmas Tea” will be presented Nov. 2 at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. Hosts/hostesses are needed. Tickets are $15, and seating is limited. Call Kathi at 719-659-3599 or kathipilcher@yahoo.com.

Have an event? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com or by fax to 303-566-4098.

Nov. 9-11 Free day. Celebrate National Public Lands Day with a fee free day Sept. 28 at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. During the fee-free day, Florissant Fossil Beds will offer special ranger-led programs throughout the day. In addition to National Public Lands Day, the park will offer a free weekend in November for Veterans Day Weekend (Nov. 9-11). To learn more about fee-free days in all 400 national park units around the country, go to http:// www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm. Call 719-748-3253. throuGh NoveMber veteraNs tribute. The Ute Pass Historical

business buzz

Society, in conjunction with the Woodland Park Public Library, presents “A Tribute to our Local World War II Veterans,” an exhibit featuring vintage artifacts, photographs, and vignettes of two soldiers from the Pikes Peak region who served our country during the war years. The exhibit is on display on the library’s second floor, near the Colorado Room, and runs through November. For more information, call 719-6867512 or via e mail uphs@peakinter.net.

editor’s Note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Courier View. No attachments please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

CitiZeNshiP day Chelsea Crandell, chef at Casey’s Dog House Grill, is expanding the menu to include specialty hamburgers and homemade soups as well as venison and sweet wild boar sandwiches, with fried chicken dinners on the schedule. Crandell is a recent graduate of Victor Matthews’ Paragon Culinary School in Colorado Springs. For fans of Casey’s sliders, the owners, Kristi and Don Hagan, say they’re still on the menu. Photo by Pat Hill

dates and times.

The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or 687-3006. Dana Collins, MA, LPC, has re-opened her massage-therapy business, Therapy for Life, at Gold Hill Square North, Suite No. 203. For an appointment, call 930-8732. Pikes Peak Regional Hospital & Surgery Center offers free classes on total joint replacement. The classes are held from 2 to 4 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of each month at the cafe meeting room. For information, call Wendy Westall at 6865769. The Cripple Creek Care Center will host the fundraiser, “Please ... Have a Seat,” at 6 p.m. on Oct. 5 at the Double Eagle Conference Center in Cripple Creek. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased by contacting Judith McPherson at 314-7705 or email bjmac@peakinet.net. Noma Nel Hayden announced her retirement his month from Jones-Healy Inc. Realtors. Hayden has been selling real estate in Teller County for more than 30 years. Woodland Park Arts Alliance hosts the Wine and Microbrew Tasting Fundraiser from 6 to 8 p.m. on Oct. 4 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Tickets are available at Seven Arrows Gallery, Studio West Aveda and Banana Belt Liquors. Coalition for the Upper South Platte received a $10,000 grant from the Joseph Henry Edmondson Foundation for mitigation supplies. FedEx donated $30,000 to CUSP for recovery efforts in the Waldo Canyon burn area. David Pearlman has remodeled and updated his Creekside Inn in Green Mountain Falls. For more information, call Pearlman at 684-7816.

CoMPuter Classes. The Woodland Park Public Library offers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register.

Master Gardener meetings scheduled

Teller County commissioner Marc Dettenrieder honors Gari Lu Schwab, fifth-grade teacher at Cresson Elementary School. Thanks to Schwab’s guidance, the class was able to answer questions posed by commissioners Marc Dettenrieder and Norm Steen about the U.S. Constitution last month.

Fifth-graders at Cresson Elementary School in Cripple Creek received a big congratulations Sept. 26 from Teller County commissioners Dave Paul, Norm Steen (far left) and Marc Dettenrieder , (far right) as well as the sheriff’s office, represented by Deputy Renee Bunting, third from left, back row. The students participated in Citizenship Day in a class taught by Dettenrieder and Steen last month. Photos by Pat Hill

AREA CLUBS editor’s Note: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Courier View. PolitiCal teller CouNty’s Democrats In 2013, Teller

County’s Democratic Party is hosting education programs and community activities. Members and interested citizens are invited to participate. For more information about the TellerDems’ 2013 schedule, contact Ellen Haase, 719-687.1813.

teller CouNty Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www. teller-gop.org. traNsPortatioN’s loCal Coordinating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend. ProFessioNal divide ChaMber of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting

Kards NetworKiNG Group meets from 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Help build your business by building community. Accepting new members. Call Kim Francis at 719-232-0142 for information. teller busiNess Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through cooperative marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to gail@woodlandparkprinter.com or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008 the teller Networking Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help Clubcs continues on Page 19

Those who are interested in learning more about gardening in the Pikes Peak Region can attend the Colorado State University Extension informational meeting to learn more about the 2014 Colorado Master Gardener Training Program. The Colorado Master Gardener program is a volunteer program that is focused on teaching sustainable gardening practices. By becoming a Colorado Master Gardener, one will increase knowledge and skills, educate others and improve the local community. Informational meetings will be held Thursday Oct. 3 from 10 a.m. to noon at the CSU Extension office at 305 S. Union Blvd. For more information, visit the website at elpasoco.colostate.edu. Contact Diana Rhodes at CSU Extension in El Paso County at 719-520-7688.


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October 2, 2013

Public health programs raise awareness October is breast-cancer awareness month By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

If Darlyn Miller has anything to say about it, women from the age of 40 and up will have breast exams. Miller, RN, BSN, with Teller County Public Health, opens up what can be a frightening subject to talk about. While Miller repeats the mantra of the importance of mammograms, she also takes the stigma out of the word “cancer.” Hooking on to the national Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, Miller highlights the positive, a lifestyle choice: ● Drink no more than one drink of alcohol a day ● Maintain a healthy body weight by eating a healthy diet, including fruits and vegetables ● Exercise ● Do not smoke. “The guidelines don’t ex- say specifically not to smoke, but smoking and causes all cancers, mostly lung, but can d boar cause any cancer because of the toxins,” dule. she said. ragon Public health in Teller County is dediey’s cated to making a difference in the occurre still rence of breast cancer while it offers support for those who are diagnosed with the disease. “There is a 98-percent survival rate for breast cancer if it’s detected early, if it’s boutin one spot and non-invasive,” she said. uisi- With two grants for low-income women, ill atpublic health removes all excuses for delay 006. or cancellation of preventative healthcare. ened “We have a Women’s Wellness Connecy fortion grant, which funds screenings and e No.clinical breast exams, mammograms and 2. diagnostics,” Miller said. The funding is Sur-available for women from 40 to 64 who are jointwithin 250 percent of federal poverty guideom 2lines. sday For an individual, the guidelines are oom.$28,725 a year. 686- From a public-health standpoint, in the past six and a half years, of all those diagwill eat,” Cons are cting il bj-

Darlyn Miller, RN,BSN, at Teller County Public Health, offers guidelines for raising awareness about breast cancer. October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Photo by Pat Hill nosed with breast cancer, 50 percent have been women younger than 50, Miller said. “But the older you get, the higher the risk,” she said. Women should be aware of changes in the size and shape of the breast as well as the nipples. “Pain is the trickiest one,” she said. “Pain isn’t necessarily typical of breast cancer but if it’s a new pain in one spot that isn’t caused by something else, get it checked out.” For women older than 50, public health offers screenings that are funded by the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For women who qualify under the poverty guidelines, if diagnosed with breast

Commissioner thankful for funds

r reInc. l esears. s theEl Paso County Parks honored aiserat commissioners meeting Pass anceBy Staff report ble at veda The Starburst Award from the Colorado

Lottery was given to recognize the El Paso latteCounty Parks Master Plan, a guiding docusephment for management of parks, trails and miti-open space. The plan had not been updat00 toed since 2005, and the project was needed Can-to address existing and future community

needs. and The county tapped a Great Outdoors oun-Colorado grant to offset more than half the earl-cost of creating the key plan, said Colorado Lottery Communications Specialist Matt Robbins. He praised the county for their ongoing dedication to parks and open space. He acknowledged the extensive public involvement that was part of the development of the plan. Commissioner Sallie Clark said she was thankful for the lottery-generated funds for parks. “Without that assistance, we wouldn’t be able to keep up with it,” she said. “Our parks budget is very small here in El Paso

FOR MORE INFORMATION For more information on El Paso County Parks, go to: http://adm.elpasoco.com/CommunityServices/ParkOperations/Pages/default.aspx To view the Parks Master Plan go to: http://adm.elpasoco.com/CommunityServices/planning/Pages/MasterPlan.aspx County.” Colorado Lottery funds go to parks, recreation and protection of open space. In the past 30 years, El Paso County has received about $163 million. About $2.5 billion has been used across Colorado. The Starburst Awards began in 1992. Nominations are reviewed and winning projects are chosen based on the creativity of the project, economic and social impact to the community, and whether the project has achieved its goal. This is not the first time the county has received the award for Excellence in the Use of Lottery Funds. The county received the award in 2011 for The Pineries Open Space Master Plan and in 2010 for development of Stratmoor Valley Community Park.

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cancer, Medicaid funds the treatment. “So that is the reason to be in the program,” Miller said. Next year, under the Affordable Care Act, mammograms and screenings will be covered. “Before the ACA, not every insurance company covered the services,” she said. A healthcare resource for all people in Teller County, public health offers a family planning program which incorporates breast exams with an array of other services. “If there’s something abnormal found during the exam, we can use Komen monies for an ultrasound, for instance,” Miller said. In January, public health offers a free

course for breast-cancer survivors, “Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction,” is an eight-week program that includes yoga by Nancy Stannard, and education by Mary Ann Osborne, DNP. For reservations for the class that begins Jan. 13, call Miller at 6876416. Miller and other representatives from public health will be on hand at the Community Health Fair from 8:30 to noon on Oct. 12 at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital. Among the services offered that day by public health nurses are flu shots, health education, clinical breast exams and screenings. For an appointment, call 6876416.

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6-Opinion

6 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Colorado resiliency: Grin and bear it There is great pride in Coloradoness — a resiliency that can weather the meanest of storms. Longtime residents in these parts know boom and bust, rise and fall, peaks and valleys. They respond with a legendary Rocky Mountain springiness. Take for example the story of the last grizzly bear in Colorado. I was senior in high school when word came out of the San Juans of bow hunter Ed Wiseman’s life-and-death struggle with the lastdocumented griz. On Sept. 23, 1979, Wiseman, a Crestone guide was blindsided, knocked down and seriously mauled by a huge bear while hunting in the San Juan National Forest near Blue Lake. According to reports that I remember reading in the Durango Herald, Wiseman yelled and

waived wildly, but the old sow continued the attack biting on the right shoulder and legs. At that point the man reportedly played dead, but the bear continued to maul him. Born from desperation, in a last-ditch effort, Wiseman grabbed an arrow from his nearby quiver and began

stabbing the griz in the throat and neck. The bear let him go and wandered away. The full-grown, 400-pound, goldenhaired female grizzly was found dead a short distance from the site of the mauling by Division of Wildlife investigators. Prior to Wiseman’s encounter, the last recorded grizzly bear, ursus arctos horribilis, was slain by government trapper Lloyd Anderson in 1952 near the headwaters of the Los Pinos River, south of Gunnison. Suggestions of reintroducing grizzlies to Colorado have been officially opposed by the Colorado Wildlife Commission (1977 and 1982) and Malcolm Forbes’ offer to reintroduce on his ranch near Alamosa was also rejected. Author David Petersen, in his book “Ghost Grizzlies,” says the question of “is

that truly the last one?” still hasn’t been answered. “... The question remains frustratingly unanswered: Are there, or are there not any grizzlies still left in Colorado? If you wish to believe that a few grizzlies still haunt hidden refuges deep and high in the sprawling San Juans, there’s plenty of evidence to support you, with more coming in every summer. But evidence is not proof, and should you choose to believe that the Wiseman grizzly was the dead-last of the breed in Colorado — the end of a multi-millenial occupation — there is no way that anyone could prove you absolutely wrong.” As witness to legendary Colorado survival instincts, I choose to believe. I think the big, brown buggers are up there still.

Chances of Sky Sox moving downtown slim and none The city of Colorado Springs and its “City For Champions” project is gaining a lot of support from neighboring towns in El Paso County. The effort is being spearheaded by Colorado Springs’ Mayor Steve Bach. The former real estate developer is a huge sports enthusiast. But I think he might be biting off a bit more than he can chew. One of the most ambitious parts of the City For Champions project would be the construction of $60 million downtown baseball stadium. The idea would involve the Colorado Springs Sky Sox relocating to the new digs. Once that happens, downtown would be even more revitalized, and fans from the surrounding downtown area would have easier access to watch the Triple-A affiliate of the Colorado Rockies. The problem with Bach’s plan is that the odds of that scenario ever happening are slim and none. In other words, the chances of the Rockies relocating to Colorado Springs are probably better than the Sky Sox moving from their home at Barnes Road and Tutt Blvd. The biggest obstacle in the plan is Sky Sox owner Dave Elmore. Elmore, 80, is one of the most successful owners in all of minor league baseball. He is a shrewd businessman who’s had plenty of success in the sports world. Just last week, three of Elmore’s other minor league baseball teams won championships in their respective leagues; San Antonio Missions (Double-A Texas), Inland Empire 66ers (Single-A California League) and Idaho Falls Chukars (Rookie

Pikes Peak Courier View

1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 (enter off of Paradise Circle) Mailing address: PO Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866

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level Pioneer League). Elmore knows how to make a dollar and he also seems to have a flare for being involved with winning teams. His Missions and 66ers have each won six league titles since 1995. Coincidentally, Elmore’s Sky Sox have not won a playoff game since 1995. As previously written in my column on Aug. 21, the last time the Sky Sox advanced to the postseason was 1997, when they were swept in three games. The last time they won a playoff game was 1995, when they defeated the Salt Lake for the Pacific Coast League championship. Elmore has owned the Sky Sox franchise since 1981 when the team was based in Hawaii. He moved the club to Colorado Springs prior to the 1988 season. That same year he had his own stadium ($4 million at the time) constructed in the Stetson Hills area of town. The Sky Sox were a success from the start. They made the playoffs four out of five seasons as a Cleveland Indians affiliate, winning the PCL title in 1992. The

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Rockies came on board in 1993 and two years later, a second flag was blowing in the wind. But all of the sudden the winning stopped and a lot of people have been searching for answers why. The Rockies first blamed the stadium for playing a key role in the hurting the club’s chances of winning. They said it was difficult for pitchers to have success at elevation with the ball flying out of the ballpark. The Rockies then blamed the older, less-spacious locker room. They said the players would play better if they had more plush surroundings. So Elmore, the good guy that he is, refurbished the stadium and built a brand new home clubhouse. That was 2005. The Rockies are one of the folks leading the charge of a new downtown stadium. They believe that if the players are playing in a state-of-the-art facility, they will play better. They believe that since it is less windy downtown, the pitchers might pitch better knowing that they won’t give up so many gopher balls. Even some of the heavy hitters in the Colorado Springs sports world have been on board with Bach and the Rockies. These folks suggest, basically, that Elmore needs to get with the times and do what is best for the Rockies and for the city. I say hogwash. This is Elmore’s team and he can do with it what he wants. It’s his stadium. If the Rockies don’t like it, then one of the 29 major league clubs will relocate their

Triple-A affiliate here. Plus, what guarantee is there that a new downtown stadium will make the Sky Sox instant contenders? The main reason the Sky Sox have been as mediocre for nearly two decades is the Rockies. They fleece the club of its best players year in and year out. By June, the Sky Sox are generally a shell of the team that broke spring training. This year’s list who began the season with the Sky Sox and were in Coors Field by mid-summer included Nolan Arenado, DJ LeMahieu, Charlie Blackmon, Corey Dickerson, Tyler Chatwood, Drew Pomeranz and Charlie Culberson. Another factor in relocating the team downtown is that Elmore owns the concessions at Sky Sox Stadium (Security Service Field). There is little chance the city would allow Elmore to own the concessions in a ballpark that it had built with taxpayer funds. The same goes for parking revenue. Elmore owns the land Sky Sox Stadium sits on and gets all the money from parking. I can’t imagine any scenario in which the city would allow him to make money on parking at a new downtown stadium. Basically, in order for the city to make this deal work, it would have to pay Elmore in the neighborhood of $30 to $50 million for his team. That, plus the cost of the new stadium, would cost taxpayers around $100 million. It would take the city years to recoup that money; if at all. I am not against the Sky Sox playing in better digs. But I just don’t see how this is going to come together. Tell me if I am wrong.

There’s more than one ‘balanced rock’ in area Here in Colorado, we have balanced rocks, and more than just the famous one in Garden of the Gods. I have done a few stories about them. I recently found a 1919 newspaper story about several of them, and set me out to look for the ones I have not seen. I know of several others that are further away. There must be a half dozen within a 100 miles of Colorado Springs. Close to us there are four, as much as I can find. We will skip the one everybody knows about. The one I have only seen from a distance is up on Cameron’s Cone. It is almost as big as the one near Manitou, but this one is granite. It is about the size of a motor home. There was a trail from Ruxton Park and Halfway House a 100 years ago. There was also a trail from Crystal Park, high above Manitou. It is sitting on one end in some other rocks, and the other is out in the air. There is another west of Woodland Park, on what was the Skelton Ranch. The ranch was mainly a dude ranch. I have two postcards that show it, and say it is near the Colorado Midland railway. I was treated to a ride to near it a year ago. It is not easy to get to, even though there is an old road through the ranch. It sticks up, but it sits solidly on another set of rocks. The one I find most interesting is near

Woodland Park, but eastward toward Palmer Lake. It looks like a huge nose, and is about 65 feet tall. There is a road above Palmer Lake called Balanced Rock Road, and it goes almost right past this rock. A 100 years ago you could take a tour of both of these rocks. It took all day. It used to be a favorite picnic spot from either town. I have seen several pictures of this one, but I have not found it. I was told the trees have grown up around it now. There is a popular book of region trails which has a picture of this one with the comment that the author would like a “modern” picture. Two others are one near the road to Canon City from Cripple Creek. I have McFarland continues on Page 7


7

Pikes Peak Courier View 7

October 2, 2013

Use your imagination – or lose it Can you recall the multitude of ways you used your imagination as a child to entertain and amuse yourself to fill the empty hours? A broom handle became a race horse, cardboard boxes could morph into a castle and a bath towel around your neck would enable you to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Scientists, philosophers and creative souls have long mused about imagination and where it comes from. What allows humans to separate themselves from the rest of the animal kingdom and invent tools, create art or go to the moon? Researchers at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire claim to have solved a piece of the puzzle. In a study called “Network Structure and Dynamics of the Mental Workshop,” published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, scientists hooked up 15 participants to an MRI and asked them to imagine abstract visual shapes and then to mentally combine them into new more complex figures.

The researchers then measured each participant’s brain activity finding a cortical and subcortical network in the brain that was responsible for the subjects’ imagery manipulations. According to the study’s authors this “mental workspace” is the nerve network that scholars have theorized might be responsible for much of human conscious experience and for the flexible cognitive abilities that have evolved in humans. “Our findings move us closer to understanding how the organization of our brains sets us apart from other species

WAP board seeks support for project Last winter, members of the Woodland Aquatic Project board of directors contacted many people and organizations in our city and county in an effort to develop broad public support for a community swimming pool complex to be located in Woodland Park. We now have a firm date for a council vote on a formal resolution to allow the voters of Woodland Park to decide in the April 2014 election if they want an aquatic center using existing tax revenues. That date is Oct. 3. To realize this goal, the WAP board has accomplished the following during the past 18 months: • Held a town hall meeting on May 31 to solicit public comments on the strategic plan • Raised $10,700 from the 2012 Holiday Home Tour and Cripple Creek Victor Mining Co. to pay for the business plan • Obtained 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. If you believe, as we do, that the time has come for this important community asset to finally come to fruition, we request that you attend that council meeting and voice your support. We believe that it is important for city council to realize that there is a widespread desire for a community pool, and that they, in conjunction with the city staff, need to re-prioritize the available general fund and road account projects to identify sufficient funds for the design, construction, operation and maintenance. This initiative is unlike any previous efforts regarding an aquatic project in several respects. First, we believe that suf-

ficient public funds exist to cover the costs of the project from within existing revenue sources at current sales tax rates. Second, the size and scope, and hence, cost, of the currently-envisioned project is much smaller than previous proposals. We and the two short-listed, design-build contractors believe the complex can be designed and constructed, including site works, for about $7 million at current construction costs. It is worth noting that the March 2011 statistically-valid poll of Woodland Park residents conducted by Mike Perini’s company demonstrated that, of five potential competing community recreational projects, a public pool garnered an impressive 74 percent of the vote. The city council listed the Woodland Aquatic Project as their No. 1 priority goal in 2012, subject to submission of a business plan. Mayor Dave Turley campaigned last year, in part, by citing the aquatic project as a potential worthwhile initiative. A community pool complex will improve the quality of life for all the residents of Teller County, but particularly the youth, who will be able to practice and compete in swim meets in their own town; the seniors and physically-disabled residents for who non-impact bearing exercise is critical; families with young children who will be attracted to this area; and anyone who seeks year-round recreational opportunities. Pursing this initiative now, when interest rates are still very low, tax revenues are significantly higher than projected, and the construction industry is slowly recovering, represents an ideal opportunity for us all.

Curriculum offers new approach to math We are excited about the implementation of an aligned curriculum with Saxon Math K-9 and New Common Core Standards books for Geometry and Algebra 2. Both of these additions to the math department will further increase our students’ achievement levels in math. Saxon Math is an intricate math program that continually recycles previously taught information, while simultaneously introducing new and higher levels of math to the students.

What’s with all this homework?

We know that you ask why your son or daughter has math homework every night. The term is spiraling. This means that their homework begins with one concept and then builds on that concept to develop the next idea. What this means to your child is that if they miss one crucial part of information, they may have a difficult time with the next idea presented in class. This is why they have daily homework and why it is so important that they do this work so that they fill any gaps they may have in their math background. This, in turn, will make future

homework easier for them to complete.

and provides such a rich internal playground for us to think freely and creatively,” says lead author Alex Schlegel, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. “Understanding these differences will give us insight into where human creativity comes from and possibly allow us to recreate those same creative processes in machines.” According to Wikipedia, the artificial simulation of human imagination in computers is call Synthetic imagination. Creativity, vision, digital art, humor and satire are among some of traits that researchers are hoping to instill in machines. While the geniuses of the world work on transposing human imagination to inanimate objects, the use of imagery already offers countless potential benefits to people. The problem is that a lot of us use our imagination to worry about pending trouble, problems and disasters. Psychcentral.com suggests that you

can break the habit of habitually worrying with what they call “positive worry.” They contend the shift to positive worry allows you to create calm, relaxation and a sense of security to replace the negative worrying that creates such stress in our lives. The website offers audio clips that they say can help you learn to use your imagination to relax, stimulate your immune system and cultivate courage, patience, tolerance, humor, self-confidence or any other quality you’d like to embody. I’m not endorsing the website – simply reporting. I am endorsing the exploration of your imagination to improve the quality of your life. You’d be in good company. “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere,” Albert Einstein said. Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and the owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437 or by email at cordprettyman@ msn.com.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Dear Editor: I was deeply disappointed by your Sept. 18 issue. The media have gained a reputation for sensationalizing bad news and burying good news. You have merely confirmed that reputation by placing only a few column inches to the safe return of Ali Ponte to her family. In a Colorado summer of fires and floods, in a country that has appeared to be on the brink of war yet again, in a world

McFarland Continued from Page 6

looked for it, but have not located it. The other is near Red Rock Canyon, west of highway 115 near Fort Carson. I was told

that struggles to find peace, we can all be grateful for a child to have returned home. Indeed, I was struck by how many people I encountered, that had eyes filled with tears of thankfulness upon hearing of Ponte’s homecoming. That sense of gratitude and joy was deeply misrepresented by your coverage. I believe the Courier missed an opportunity to participate in that joy and confirmed our suspicions; you are ambivalent when it comes to good news. David Shaw, Woodland Park that this one was like the one in Garden of the Gods, but was knocked down about 75 years ago. There is another along U.S. 24 as you come down toward Buena Vista. I even have a postcard of that one. I have heard of others in the mountains around the San Luis Valley. So when you say balanced rock, there sure is more than the “common” one.

OBITUARIES WELCH

William H. “Bud” Welch May 11, 1921 - Sept. 21, 2013

William H. “Bud” Welch, 92, of Aledo, died Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at Genesis Senior Living Center in Aledo, IL. Graveside and military services are 10:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 26, at New Boston Cemetery. Visitation is 9-10 a.m. prior to services at Fippinger Funeral Home, Aledo. Memorials may be made to Mercer County VFW Post 1571 of which he was a member. Online condolences can be made at fippingerfuneralhome.com. He was born May 11, 1921, in Mannon, IL, to John and Elosia Hampton Welch. Bud married Ruth A. Smith. She died June 1, 2008. He proudly served his country in the U.S. Navy for six years, was called back during the Korean War for 18 months. He survived two ships being torpedoed within 24 hours. He was injured, but his records were lost so he received his purple heart many years later.

Bud farmed briefly then managed the Standard Oil Station in Viola before managing the Standard Oil Training Station in Sandwich, IL. He moved to California in 1960, then to Colorado in 1971, to work for the National Park Service, retiring in 1982. He was maintenance manager for the 11 Mile Ranch Development in Lake George, Colo., until 2008. Bud was a dedicated NASCAR fan and enjoyed restoring classic cars, dancing with Ruth and sightseeing in Colorado. Survivors include one son, Rich (Chris) Smith, Aledo; one daughter, Marie (Steve) Rapp, Big Sky, Mont.; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; two sisters, Bernadine (Charles) Holten, Moline; Wilma Garrett, Paso Robles, CA; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife Ruth; one son, Larry; and one sister, Marjorie.

UPCOMING ACTIVITIES:

Oct. 3 - HS volleyball at Cotopaxi 6 p.m. Oct. 3 - JH dance 6 to 8:30 at CCV Oct. 5 - HS football against Manzanola 1 p.m. Oct. 10 - JH football at Simla 5 p.m. Oct. 11 - HS football at Hoehne 7 p.m. Oct. 11 - HSJH football South Pak, Custer at CCV 10 a.m. Oct. 11 - HS volleyball at Sargent 4 p.m. Oct. 11 - JH volleyball South Park, Custer, Coto at CCV 10 a.m. Oct. 12 - HS volleyball at CCV Center, Sierra Grande, 11 a.m.

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8

8 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

BierWerks a hot spot in town Brewery a popular place that offers more than beer By Jenette DaPolito

Contributing writer

Most everyone would jump at the chance to enjoy fresh air, good company and a cold brew. In the last few years, BierWerks, Woodland Park’s local brewery, has been the prime location to enjoy all three. BierWerks marked their third anniversary on Aug. 21. Though it may be a shock that those three years have passed so quickly, the staff of BierWerks might say that time has a tendency to fly when you’re having fun. “It has been very well received from the start ... I’ve heard from a lot of people that they have a hard time finding a good place to get together, they just weren’t comfortable going to what were obviously bars. Which, even though BierWerks looks like a bar, it doesn’t have the same feel, and because we do make sodas there too. So its not uncommon to see three generations sitting out by the fire,” said Arden Weatherford, owner of BierWerks. Much hard work goes into making the brewery such a popular place. “We brew a lot of beer there, which seems obvious, but some places do not brew their own beer,” Weatherford said. Even choosing a brewer is a big decision which comes with either good or bad results for the business. “We have a guy named James McGraw that is professional, he trained in Germany, and in Germany brewing

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BierWerks Brewery offers an array of different activities as well as refreshments. Photo by Jenette DaPolito beer is a vocation. So he went to a school there and got a degree in that,” he said. To add to the enjoyable aspects of BierWerks is the weekly BierWerks walk. The walk is organized by the local Runners Club. Each Monday, several enjoy a 5K walk, run or bike ride which is equivalent to 3.1 miles. BierWerks is the starting and end point of the walk. At the end of the event, a free meal is available at BierWerks, possibly accompanied a brew of one’s choice. “The BierWerks walk give you plenty of time to get to know people, since its 5K. You get exercise for the day, and a nice dinner with your friends,” said Denise Blair, a local resident who has participated in the walk. “The patio is very relaxing, especially when they get the fire pit going. By participating in the BierWerks walk, people see not only the tourism section or main part of town but the different roads that aren’t as traveled, where there aren’t any stores. You see people’s gardens, the trees and Pikes Peak, and that’s what we all love to see ... the real Woodland Park. I would definitely recommend BierWerks to anyone because it is such a nice environment, and its a great hangout place,” she said.

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Jodi Mijares has been named executive director of Community Partnership Family Resource Center. Photo by Pat Hill Rose Peters

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Woman described as having ‘sound management’ skills By Pat Hill

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Mijares named center director

Candy Kohler

phill@ourcoloradonews. com Jodi Mijares has been named executive director of Community Partnership Family Resource Center. Mijares has been part of the partnership’s team since 2007 when she was hired as the program coordinator for the Divide Playgroup. Mijares succeeds Karen Casey-Svetich, who has taken a position as coordinator of North Teller Build A Generation. According to

Steve Randolph, president of the board of directors, Casey-Svetich initiated new programs, increased community participation and expanded the office space. “Superior fiscal responsibility was evidenced in a recent independent review conducted by Taylor, Roth and Company, attesting to Mijares’ sound management and effective use of our financial resources, which are primarily from grants awarded by foundations and agencies,” Randolph said. As the new director, Mijares heads up the center’s team that will host the Taste of Teller fundraiser on Oct. 11.


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Pikes Peak Courier View 9

October 2, 2013

Rural road deaths show limits on help Sparse services tied to high fatality rates By Kevin Vaughan

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS A car swerves across the centerline and slams into you head-on in a sickening thud, a spray of glass, an exploding air bag. You’re alive, but you’re hurt and you need help — fast. Someone calls 911. Who comes to render aid, how much training and experience they have, and even how long it takes them to arrive will vary drastically, depending on where you are in Colorado. So will your chances of living or dying. That’s because in emergency medicine, minutes matter. And Colorado is a state with 82 percent of its 5.2 million people concentrated along the Front Range from Fort Collins to Pueblo. It’s also a state with vast sweeps of rural land, including three of the nation’s 15 least-populous counties. Those realities have spawned a patchwork emergency medical system where a wide disparity exists between the on-theground care you could expect along a rural highway and what you would see along the urban Front Range. It’s a state with dead zones, where no dedicated ambulance service exists. And it’s a state where many rural communities are fighting to maintain even a basic emergency medical service. “We struggle day in and day out,” said Sue Kern, the emergency medical system coordinator and coroner in Cheyenne County on Colorado’s eastern plains. She is also the director of nursing at Keefe Memorial Hospital in Cheyenne Wells, just 18 miles from the Kansas border.

Fewer people, higher risk

I-News examined 10 years of traffic fatality data, compiled by the Colorado Department of Transportation, and then compared it with the average population in each county over a decade — calculating a rate equal to the number of deaths per 10,000 residents in road crashes. The five counties with the highest rate of traffic fatalities — Mineral, Cheyenne, San Juan, Kiowa and Baca — are all small, remote counties, and four of them lost population in the first decade of the 21st century. Two of them are among the three Colorado counties with fewer than 1,000 residents. On the flip side, the five counties with the lowest rate of traffic deaths — Arapahoe, Boulder, Jefferson, Douglas and Denver — are in the highly populated Denver metro area.

A new report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that 55 percent of those who died in road crashes in 2011 lost their lives in rural areas, while only 19 percent of the population lived in rural areas. In Colorado, 51 percent of those who died in 2011 crashes perished on rural roads, according to the same report. Part of this disparity is the result of geography. Part is the result of philosophy — emergency care is concentrated where the most people live. And part is an outgrowth of Colorado’s long history of “local control” — where local officials figure out how best to care for those who suffer life-threatening traumatic injuries. Also, many rural areas are served by volunteers whose dedication is not in question but whose training and experience may pale compared to their urban counterparts.

Response time is crucial

“If you live in urban Colorado, the response is quick,” said Randy Kuykendall, interim director of the state’s emergency medical system. “If you live in rural Colorado, it’s longer, and it’s a day-to-day struggle.” Kuykendall acknowledged that no one from the state has tried to determine exactly which areas fall into an emergency ambulance no-man’s-land — places where there is no contracted ambulance service. As it stands now, neighboring agencies respond into those areas. But none of that matters when you’re injured. Minutes matter. “The `Golden Hour’ is a real thing,” said Dr. Gregory Jurkovich, chief of surgery at Denver Health Medical Center. “The concept is valid — you have a limited amount of time before you’ve lost your opportunity to save someone’s life.” Get hit head-on Denver’s Federal Boulevard, and you can expect that an ambulance operated by Denver Health will arrive in a matter of minutes, two highly trained paramedics on board. Get hit head-on in Poudre Canyon west of Fort Collins, and it’s likely to be a very different experience. First, you have to find a phone in an area with no cell service, said Bill Sears, president of the board of the Poudre Canyon Fire Protection District. “In the lower part of the canyon, a couple of our volunteers work close, in the western part of Fort Collins, and they’re close enough that they can respond into the lower canyon in about — worst case is about half an hour,” Sears said. “If you’re bleeding to death, of course, that’s no consolation. But that’s the reality of being out in the boondocks.”

The backbone of Colorado’s on-theground emergency medical system is a patchwork of ambulances operated by more than 225 individual organizations — cities, hospitals, ambulance districts, fire districts, private companies — and the emergency medical technicians and paramedics who staff them.

Training levels differ sharply

Colorado is one of two states — California is the other — that leave it to counties to license ambulance providers. And while the work of all those different organizations is coordinated by the state through 11 regional councils, there is no statewide oversight of such benchmarks as mandated response times. Those seriously or critically injured are treated at a system of designated trauma centers, from Level 1, where the most grievously hurt are taken, to Level 5. But in one part of the system after another, there are dramatic differences between the available care in urban and rural areas. All three of the state’s existing Level 1 trauma centers are in the Denver area — Denver Health Medical Center, Swedish Medical Center and St. Anthony Hospital. And in much of rural Colorado, the wounded are likely to be treated by volunteer emergency medical technicians, who have to leave homes or jobs, respond to the garage where the ambulance is parked, and then speed to an accident scene. Those EMTs — while highly dedicated — may initially have as little as 150 to 200 hours of training. Paramedics — such as those who staff all of the Denver Health emergency ambulances — have at least 1,500 hours of training. Privately operated medical helicopters exist, but they are largely clustered along the Front Range — and often they aren’t called until initial responders have gotten to a scene and assessed the injured. One area where the playing field has been leveled in recent years is equipment. Thanks to a $2 charge on each motor vehicle registration, the state has about $7.5 million a year to assist local jurisdictions as they need to update their equipment and train their members.

No requirement for service

At the same time, there is nothing in Colorado law that obligates anyone to provide emergency medical services. “We provide advanced life support ambulance service,” said Tim Rossette, deputy chief of the Kiowa Fire Protection District in Elbert County, “but if my board decides to stop providing that service, they can do that and there’s nobody that’s required to come

in and fill that void.” The dwindling population in many rural counties makes it more difficult for local organizations to raise money from a shrinking tax base or find volunteers willing to give up hours at a time for no pay. Dramatically changing Colorado’s system would probably require a major infusion of money — most likely through taxes or fees or a combination of the two. One state that has built such a system is Maryland. Motorists there pay $14.50 a year in vehicle registration fees that are dedicated to the state’s emergency medical system. The fee generates roughly $55 million a year, and it funds a fleet of seven medical helicopters based around the state and operated by the state police. All operating expenses are covered by the vehicle registration fees, which also support the state’s EMS certification system and pay for a statewide medical communications system. According to the same federal report, 35 percent of those who died in auto crashes in Maryland in 2011 were on rural roads. But even people in the Colorado system question whether there’s value in dramatically increasing funding in rural areas for a relatively small number of calls. In southwestern Colorado’s Hinsdale County — where the Continental Divide crosses twice — EMS director Jerry Gray said people simply have to accept that emergency response in rural Colorado is very different from that in urban Colorado. “The reality of the situation is that up on Stony Pass you’re never going to get a response like you will in downtown Denver,” Gray said. “It’s just the nature of the beast, and people need to realize when they’re headed out into the area. People come here for the solitude and the remoteness of it, and that brings with it delayed response times.” Kuykendall, the acting state EMS chief, said that while little can be done to change geography, one thing that can change is the way people think about ambulances. Historically, ambulance services are paid when they transport a patient. Kuykendall said he’d like to see EMS funded the way police and fire protection are, “because what you’re really paying for with an ambulance or a fire truck is you’re paying for it to be ready to go when the public needs it, as opposed to only paying for it when it actually is in use.” I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. For more information, go to inewsnetwork.org or call 303-4464932. Senior reporter Burt Hubbard contributed to this report.

Flu vaccine widens range of protection This year’s treatment covers four strains By Lauran Neergaard Associated Press

More children than ever got vaccinated against the flu last year, and health officials urged families to do even better this time around. Far too many young and middle-aged adults still forgo the yearly protection, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Sept. 26. And this year, Americans have an unprecedented number of vaccine options to choose from: The regular shot; the nasal spray; an egg-free shot for those allergic to eggs; a high-dose shot just for those 65 and older; and a tinyneedle shot for the squeamish. The bigger change: A small number of the regular flu shots, and all of the FluMist nasal vaccine, will protect against four strains of influenza rather than the traditional three. “There’s something for everyone this year,” said CDC’s Dr. Anne Schuchat. A severe flu strain swept the country last winter, sparking a scramble for last-minute vaccinations. There’s no way to predict if this year will be as bad. But it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to take effect, so health officials say early fall — before flu begins spreading widely — is the best time to start immunizations. “Now is the time to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Paul Biddinger of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “Don’t wait until it’s in your community.” Boston declared a public health emergency last January when hospitals were filled with flu patients, and Biddinger said he treated many who openly regretted not having been vaccinated. January and February typically are the peak flu months

in the U.S. But small numbers of flu cases circulate for much of the year, and Biddinger said a couple of people have been hospitalized already. “That first cough or fever is not the time to think about influenza vaccine,” Schuchat said. Flu vaccine is recommended for nearly everyone ages 6 months and older. Yet just 45 percent of the population

followed that advice last year. Flu is particularly risky for seniors, children, pregnant women and people of any age with asthma, heart disease and other chronic diseases. Two-thirds of adults 65 and older were vaccinated last Flu continues on Page 10

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October 2, 2013

State’s racial gaps narrow in education Economic disparities stay unchanged over two years By Burt Hubbard

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS Black and Latino adults in Colorado narrowed some of the wide education gaps with their white counterparts last year, according to an I-News analysis of new U.S. Census Bureau data. Colorado no longer has the largest gaps in the nation in college graduation rates between black and white residents, and both Latino and black adults saw high school graduation gaps narrow to their lowest levels in decades. “That’s good news all the way around,” said Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia, who also is executive director of the Colorado Higher Education Department. “It’s the result of more focus and more collaboration between K-12

and higher education.” However, income, poverty and homeownership disparities between whites and the state’s largest minority groups remained unchanged between 2010 and 2012, the analysis found. Garcia An I-News investigation published earlier this year of six decades of Census data found that minority gains made in key economic and education areas had eroded over time. In many cases, the disparities between Latinos, blacks and whites were wider in 2010 Bailey than they were in the 1960s and 1970s. The latest Census data from the 2012 American Community Survey of states and their largest cities and

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counties found across-the-board increases in minority high school and college graduation rates since 2010. The percent of black adults 25 years of age and older with college degrees rose from about 20 percent to 24 percent during the two years. That narrowed the gap with their white counterparts to less than 20 percentage points, compared to 23 percentage points in 2010. White college graduation rates inched up less than 1 percentage point to 43 percent in 2012. As a result, Colorado no longer has the largest gaps in the U.S. between white and black adults. It now ranks third behind Connecticut and Massachusetts, the I-News analysis found. Sharon Bailey, a former Denver Public Schools board member and a member of the Colorado Black Round Table, said the state’s attention to education disparities may be starting to pay off. “I do think there has been a bigger spotlight put on graduation rates and remediation,” Bailey said. The round table is holding a community forum at Manual High School in Denver Sept. 28 on minority education and economic gaps. The college graduation gap between Latino and white Colorado adults remained unchanged in the new report, exceeding 30 percentage points, and was still the largest in the U.S. Both Latino and black adults continued to narrow the gaps in high school graduation rates. Black rates rose from 86 percent to 89 percent and Latino rates rose from 65 percent to 68 percent between 2010 and 2012, while white rates stayed at about 96 percent.

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year. So were nearly 57 percent of children, an increase of 13 percentage points over the past two years. The number is even higher among babies and toddlers — 77 percent — and Schuchat said pediatricians get the credit for pushing flu vaccination in recent years. About half of pregnant women are vaccinated, a number also on the rise since the 2009 flu pandemic illustrated that population’s vulnerability. But only 42 percent of adults younger than 65 were vaccinated, Schuchat said, with rates even lower among 18- to 49-year-

Both gaps are the smallest since 1960. However, Garcia said most new jobs in the state in the coming years will require more than a high school degree. “A high school degree just isn’t going to cut it,” he said. “When we look at Colorado’s economy, we know that some 70 percent of the jobs that will be created in the next 10 years will require some post-secondary credentials.” Both Garcia and Bailey said the state needs to step up its efforts on educational attainment. Bailey said Colorado needs to look at factors behind minority successes and replicate them. Garcia said the state should work on eliminating barriers to minorities completing college, such as the high rate of remedial classwork, while expanding programs such as concurrent enrollment, which allows students to take college class while still in high school. “We have to do a better job if we want to have a strong economy long term.” The gaps in economic areas such as family income and homeownership either remained unchanged or widened slightly between 2010 and 2012, the analysis found. Family income and poverty gaps widened between white and black residents, while homeownership gaps widened between white and Latino households. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. To read the Losing Ground report go to http://www.inewsnetwork.org/losingground/. Contact Burt Hubbard at bhubbard@inewsnetwork.org or 303-446-4931.

olds. It’s not clear why. But “there are no good reasons to skip the influenza vaccine,” said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University and past president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. The flu shot cannot give anyone the flu, he stressed. But while it’s estimated to cut by about 60 percent the chances of getting the flu, Schaffner said it’s “a good vaccine, but it’s not a perfect vaccine.” How to choose among the vaccine options, including the new four-strain version? The CDC doesn’t recommend one type of flu vaccine over another. All flu vaccine protects against two strains of Type A flu, typically the most severe kind, and one strain of Type B. The new so-called quadrivalent versions protect against two Type B strains.

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Pikes Peak Courier View 11

October 2, 2013

Of 38 countries with maternal/neonatal tetanus, the Kiwanis Eliminate global campaign has eliminated the disease in 22 countries. The local Kiwanis club hosts a fundraiser Oct. 6 at the Country Lodge in Woodland Park. © UNICEF/BANA2006-00313/Akash

$1.80 can save a life Kiwanis hosts fundraiser for global effects By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com A devastating disease that kills one baby every nine minutes, maternal/ neonatal tetanus is gradually being eliminated because of the fundraising prowess of Kiwanis clubs around the globe. In Woodland Park, the Kiwanis campaign is headed by Dawn Ignatius and a team of volunteers, some from the nonprofit Help the Needy. “Our goal is to eliminate maternal/neonatal tetanus off the planet, a lofty goal but we will do it,” Ignatius said. “In 2015, we’ll be done.” With $37 million raised around the globe so far since 2011, Ignatius puts the amount in simpler terms. “All it takes is $1.80 to immunize a baby with three shots,” she said.

To add to the pot, the team hosts a benefit concert and party from 2 to 6 p.m. Oct. 6 at the Country Lodge Patio. Lodge owner Mark Rabout, got the ball rolling with a $25,000 donation. The fundraiser is designed to raise awareness about a problem that does not exist in United States. The stories are tragic. Born with the disease, babies experience seizures and are sensitive to touch as well as light. “A mother can’t even comfort the baby because the sensation of touching is so painful,” said Jenny Cowan, who helped Ignatius launch the campaign in 2012. “It’s horrific for everyone involved.” The disease is capricious, attacking pregnant mothers with no warning. “The spores are in the ground and begin to attack during the birth process; the mother can get it from the spores in the ground and so can the infant,” Cowan said. “We’re not talking about countries where births occur in a nice clean hospital.” Because the global immunization campaign includes some turbulent

countries, the shots are handled by UNICEF rather than Kiwanis volunteers. “There’s a lot of work to do before you go into a country,” Ignatius said, adding that Afghanistan is among the countries where the disease has been eliminated. “So you can imagine the politics involved.” However, of the 38 countries targeted by international Kiwanis clubs and UNICEF, 16 are off the list, with babies successfully immunized. “We’re on the final push,” Ignatius said. The final push includes fundraising by students in the RE-2 and RE-1 school districts. “Even though we’re already passionate about it, to hear a young person talk about it, you’re reinvigorated, ready to go again,” Cowan said. Ignatius added, “The students are not held back because it’s not happening in Woodland Park,” she said. “Their world is global.” At $10 a ticket, the benefit concert features music by Dallas Alley, a local band, and prizes are awarded on the hour. For tickets, call 237-7533 and 359-3714.

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers The Colorado Public Utilities Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $10.97-$14.74 per month and business services are $24.31-$36.79 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone per household, which can be either a wireline or wireless telephone. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. Lifeline eligible subscribers may also qualify for reliable home High-Speed Internet service up to 1.5 Mbps for $9.95* per month for the first 12 months of service. Further details are available at centurylink.com/internetbasics. If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-855-954-6546 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program.

The team in Woodland Park dedicated to help eliminate maternal/neonatal tetanus by 2015: Jenny Cowan, Linda Meier, Dawn Ignatius, Rose Carpenter and Taryn Ignatius Ketel. The team hosts a fundraiser to push the goal along from 2 to 6 p.m. Oct. 6 at Country Lodge. Photo by Pat Hill

*CenturyLink® Internet Basics Program – Residential customers only who qualify based on meeting income level or program participation eligibility requirements, and requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period. First bill will include charges for the first full month of service billed in advance, prorated charges for service from the date of installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying customers may keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after service activation provided customer still qualifies during that time. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of $9.95/mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which the rate reverts to $14.95/mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-month term agreement. Customer must either lease a modem/router from CenturyLink for an additional monthly charge or independently purchase a modem/router, and a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee applies. A one-time professional installation charge (if selected by customer) and a one-time shipping and handling fee applies to customer’s modem/router. General – Services not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Offer, plans, and stated rates are subject to change and may vary by service area. Deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. ©2013 CenturyLink. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.


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October 2, 2013

Hundreds of runners showed Saturday to outrun the undead in an event designed to call attention to preparing for disasters.

‘Don’t be a Zombie’ event brings out many undead heads Hundreds or runners, walkers and staggerers appeared Saturday morning, Sept. 28, for El Paso County’s “Be Prepared ... Don’t be a Zombie” event held at Fox Run Regional Park. This event was designed to showcase the need for all residents to develop their own family and workplace emergency preparedness plans. The 5K run began at 10 a.m. with some runners dressed as zombies. The 3K Zombie Run heats included zombies trying to grab “life flags” from the runners, very similar to flag football. There were several specific “zombie zones” in the 3K races where zombies tended to gather.

PHOTOS BY ROB CARRIGAN Undead heads dotted locations inside the Fox Run Park’s boundaries.

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Pikes Peak Courier View 13

October 2, 2013

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MDS Coordinator Cripple Creek Care Center, Teller County's only long-term care skilled nursing facility is looking for an MDS Coordinator. The successful candidate must be a Colorado-licensed RN. MDS 3.0 and long-term care experience preferred. This position is responsible for assuring the timely completion of accurate assessments and interdisciplinary care plans that meet Federal and State guidelines. Included is identifying resident acuity and needs, helping to determine specific care needs and communicating needs/expectations to families and responsible parties. All applicants must be licensed and able to pass a drug and TB screen, background check, and pre-employment physical. Please submit applications in person at 700 N "A" Street in Cripple Creek. Call HR with questions and/or driving directions. 719.689.2931. Cripple Creek Care Center is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Cripple Creek-Victor School District is accepting applications for a Technology Assistant. Qualifications, job descriptions and application are located at ccvschools.org. Please submit application/resume to Cripple Creek-Victor School District, P.O. Box 897, Cripple Creek, CO 80813; or e-mail to jolmsted@ccvschools.com. All applications are subject to acceptance or rejection at the sole discretion of the Board of Education. Applications will be accepted until positions are filled. Cripple Creek-Victor School District is accepting applications for a fulltime SPED Severe-needs para-educator position at the secondary school. Excellent wages & benefits. For more information, application and submission instructions visit ccvschools.org or the district office. Please submit application/resume to Cripple Creek-Victor School District, P.O. Box 897, Cripple Creek, CO 80813; or e-mail to jolmsted@ccvschools.com. All applications are subject to acceptance or rejection at the sole discretion of the Board of Education. Applications will be accepted until positions are filled. Dental Assistant with experience for small office 3 days a week Dorsey Dental Care 719-687-6366

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Couch for sale. Great condition $80 719-687-7676 Peak Vista Community Health Centers is hiring a Medical Assistant for the Divide Health Center. Graduate of an MA program or equivalent military training required. Apply online: www.peakvista.org/employment. Santa's Workshop is now scheduling interviews for F/T and Weekend help for the Holiday Season. These jobs are available now through Christmas Eve. We are in need of Ride Operators, Shop Sales and Food Service. These position are 6 1/2 hours per day. You must be able to pass a drug test and background check. Call 719-684-9432, 9 - 4; Thurs Mon to schedule an interview. WOODLAND PARK POLICE DEPARTMENT The City of Woodland Park, Colorado, is accepting applications to fill the position of Police Officer. Applications will be accepted until this position is filled. The applicant will be Colorado P.O.S.T. Cert/exp. Preferred. The salary range is $37,828 - $44,447 DOE. Application is available through the WPPD, 911 Tamarac Pkwy, Woodland Park, Colorado and from www.city-woodlandpark.org. Please forward application, letter of interest, copy of your Colorado P.O.S.T. Certificate, references and resume to Beverly Hodges, WPPD, POB 7255, Woodland Park, CO. 80863.

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14-Color

14 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

Animals (usually) behave during blessing ceremony

This dog does not know how lucky he is, to be blessed by Rev. Myrna Bevens at last year’s Blessing of the Animals ceremony at St. David of the Hills Episcopal Church. This year’s ceremony is at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 6. Courtesy photos

St. David’s honors St. Francis in style By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com The legacy of St. Francis of Assisi lives on at St. David of the Hills Episcopal Church, West U.S. 24 and Edlowe Road in Woodland Park. With the Blessing of Animals ceremony, the church will observe the feast of St. Francis in style Oct. 6. “We bring our companion animals and big grazing beasts to the ceremony,” said Carolynne Forster, the church’s senior warden. With four dogs and a cat, Forster is selective, and she believes in setting boundaries. “I bring pictures of my cranky old dog and kitty because they aren’t in to going to church,” she said. St. Francis is usually portrayed in sculptures and paintings with animals. And the animals appear to show him respect. “It’s so amazing,” Forster said. “The animals line up on the porch and I swear they know we’re in church. We’ve never had a skirmish, a snarly lip, everybody’s on their best behavior.” The church does not discriminate. “We have dogs sitting next to cats, dogs sitting next to dogs, fish, birds and everybody just gets along,” Forster said. The ceremony will take place at 11:30 a.m., after the regular Sunday service. “We gather on the porch and bring the big guys onto the field, the grassy area behind the church,” she said. “We’ve got plenty of room and have been blessed with good weather over the past several years.”

Let us ceLebrate with you Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews.com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

All animals are welcome at Blessing of the Animals ceremony Oct. 6 at St. David o the Hills Episcopal Church. Pictured, Michele Chatkoff showed up last year with her chinchilla, blessed by Rev. Myrna Bevens

Immigration stalemate hurts Coloradans Growers, ranchers suffer from inability to find workers By Associated Press

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hires nearly 200,000 employees. Raymond owns one of only six dairy farms on the Western Slope. It’s an industry he says is shrinking, while the area’s population continues to grow. “Our country was built on people who have come here from foreign countries,” said Carlyle Currier, vice president of Colorado Farm Bureau. “We need to continue that ability for people who are seeking freedom, who are seeking a better life for their families.” Supporters note that U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman of Colorado won election in 2008 in a conservative district by campaigning against an immigration overhaul. But an unfavorable redrawing of his district after the 2010 census left him in a Democratic-leaning territory that President Barack Obama won last year and where Hispanics make up nearly 20 percent of the population. He is now pushing for a “compassionate” approach to immigration.

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The president of the Colorado Farm Bureau said fruit growers and ranchers are having some crops go unpicked and animals untended because they can’t get a dependable supply of field workers due to a stalemate over immigration reform. At a Sept. 25 meeting in Pueblo, Don Shawcroft said the U.S. Senate needs to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill, a measure that House Republicans have rejected. The issue is also on the minds of several Western Slope farmers, who would like to see a guest worker program. Farmers and supportive commu-

nity groups on the Western Slope got together to talk about how a large part of their business is hiring workers that could benefit from the bill. They said while they might not agree with every part of the bill that passed through the U.S. Senate, they hope the House will support some type of reform, and soon. “We would like to be legal here,” said Antonio Gallegos, a member of the Hispanic Affairs Project. “We want to be out of the shadows” and have the freedoms everyone else has so they can compete. Bruce Talbott, farm manager for Talbott’s Mountain Gold, said his business is seasonal and he is always hiring new people to work in his fields. “We need a guest-workers program that will allow us to bring in people from out of Mexico, Honduras and El Salvador and Guatemala,” he said. Talbott said Colorado’s agriculture is a $40-billion-dollar industry that

Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions.


15-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 15

October 2, 2013

Barbara McMillan has purchased the historic Miner’s Union Hall in Victor. With a new façade, painted by Victor’s Dream Team, the place has an exterior sparkle; the inside however, is something else again. Photos by Pat Hill

Reluctant savior for a historic building McMillan acquires Miner’s Union Hall along with parking lot By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

VICTOR - In a twist on a clean sale of real estate, Barbara McMillan just wanted to buy the parking lot adjacent to the Miner’s Union Hall in Victor. Instead, for $50,000, she got the lot and one of the most historic and significant buildings in Colorado. “Joe Stevens owned both and said I couldn’t have the lot unless I bought the building,” said McMillan, referring to a longtime resident of the city. “He had a sucker right away.” Thus began the bizarre story of a woman who cherishes history, loves old buildings, but is crossed with an albatross, one that could take in the neighborhood of $1.5 million in restoration costs. “I could do it cheaper than that,” she said. “But I just needed the lot for parking for my building across the street.” To date, McMillan, the most recent owner, has stocked the three-level, 6,000-square dairyfoot building with a small portion of her n in-antique collection. Out of the rubble of the e thebuilding, she has created a cozy corner of ow. chairs, a rug and antiques. eople A tour of the union hall, once the meeting reignplace for members of the Western Federavicetion of Miners Local No. 32, tells tales of the reau.past in a kind of haunted ambience. y for “We varnished the original wallpaper so it whowill still be there when somebody rich buys ami-

ns

Mike on in camoverng of s left itory n last e up tion. sion-

the building,” she said. “We re-bricked the walls. Oh, I just love this building; I’m just hoping somebody will step up and fix it.” Yes, McMillan said the building is for sale; but in the meantime, she’s piecing out improvements with the help of local carpenter Mark Bruckelmyer. “I’ve put $125,000 worth of improvements in the building; we started in the basement,” she said. The improvements include a new paint job on the exterior done by the city’s Dream Team, a group of volunteers dedicated to preserving history. Support beams from the floor to the ceiling keep the building from falling in on itself. The recent rains, too, moved up the time when the building is no longer safe. McMillan gives it maybe 10 years. “If I hadn’t bought it, I don’t think this building would still be standing,” she said. Built in 1901-02, the hall harbors memories of a turbulent time for labor unions. In 1904, the Colorado National Guard broke up a fight between the miners and the owners of the gold mine, leaving nine bullets as their signature. While the miners’ ghosts remain, so, too, do those of teachers and students of the Victor School District, which was given the deed in the 1920s by the miners. “These are the girls’ locker rooms, the girls’ bathroom,” she said. “This was the stage in the gymnasium. Somebody begged me not to get rid of the stage.” A reluctant landlord, McMillan is making her mark on Victor. Along with the hall, she owns the adjacent former assay office, now her antique shop and several apartments. The building across the street is being remodeled to hold more apartments.

Barbara McMillan, who recently purchased the Miner’s Union Hall in Victor, has a collection of antiques housed in the building, which is gradually being renovated.

But the hall has really got her attention; she’s already thinking the upstairs would make “wonderful lofts” and present opportunities for investment. Conflicted over what to do with her purchase, McMillan is almost ready to let it go. “It has to be somebody who has the money, maybe needs a tax break, and likes to save

old buildings,” she said. “Because that’s what I like to do. I tell people in town that, ‘if it has a bad roof, I’m going to buy it.’” When she isn’t busy selling antiques or remodeling the hall, McMillan has plans to partner with the city of Victor to improve the triangle of land in front of the antique shop for a park.


16-Color

16 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

Storyteller helps others reach within He doesn’t remember quite what motivated him to offer a class to senior citizens on how to write your own life story. But then, for Garrett Ray, at 77 no youngster himself, life has been all about stories. The first page of his in-progress book starts this way: “Our stories begin as fragments in an attic trunk, nearly forgotten, then rediscovered, sometimes to our surprise. We pull out bits of fabric, examine the colors, move the scraps around, enjoy each one as a unique link to our past. Then we begin to place them side by side, discovering patterns we had not seen before, rearranging, looking again.” When you think about it, that’s who we are, isn’t it? A jumble of pieces steadily stitched into a narrative that somehow, one day, amazingly and unexpectedly, becomes a good story. You just have to see it. “Everybody … has stories to tell,” says Ray, in his soft and quick-paced voice, “if you can just get them to think that way.” The classes began in 2010 in the Highlands Ranch retirement complex he and his wife of 53 years moved to after a first career as a newspaper reporter and editor and a second one as a journalism professor. He calls this his third act. Offered once or twice a year for five hours over five weeks, the classes average 10 to 15 students. Even though he wrote weekly newspaper columns for more than 20 years, Ray uses Lois Daniel’s book, “How to Write Your Own Life Story,” to help teach his students. “A lot of them think if you’re going to write your life story, you’ve got to start with the first day,” Ray says. But you don’t. You look for the moments. “It might be a happy incident … or a

house you lived in,” Ray says. “And that’s where you ought to start, and guaranteed … you have enough stories to string together to make a pretty impressive package.” That’s what Dottie and John Talbott are doing. The couple, in their 80s, attended one of Ray’s classes last year. John, who can no longer type or write, is in a motorized wheelchair and speaks very softly. So he dictated his stories to Dottie, who typed them on the computer. “We figured out what things to talk about and what things to put in his memoir up to his sophomore year in college,” Dottie says. That’s when they met. “It was great fun,” she says, with a laugh. “I heard a lot of things I didn’t even know about him and we’ve been married for 63 years.” This winter, Dottie plans to write her part, which also will end at sophomore year in college. Then, she and John will compile the rest together. When the story is complete, one of their three daughters will add photographs and print the book. Their children, seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, Dottie says, “will know who we are.” Ray’s passion for writing started when he was 11 in Greeley, where he grew up. He, his younger brother and sister and a couple of friends published a weekly newspaper

called “The Neighborhood News” for three summers. They wrote about lost dogs and vacation trips and home improvements. He learned a bit about storytelling from his mother, a reporter and editor at The Greeley Tribune. His tenure as editor and publisher at The Littleton Independent from the 1960s to 1981 won him state and national acclaim — he was recently inducted into the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. And he continued sharing his love for storytelling with students as a professor at Colorado State University until retiring in 2001. When you get it just right, writing is a gift, Ray says: “The human being … the eccentricities of people, the joys of people, the sadness of lives. … Almost anything will shape itself into a story if you can figure out how to start.” He smiles, blue eyes earnest behind his glasses, as he answers a question about the writing of his life story. Working on it, he says. “I’ve got to give myself a deadline — I only respond to deadlines, I think.” But he has a good start. A white utility binder encompasses 70 or so pages, some copies of the “Scratch Pad” columns he wrote for the newspaper, others written more recently. Each carries a simple title. There’s “The house on the corner.” “When we turn the corner by the house, I always hope someone will be standing outside so I can stop and say, `I grew up here!’ Here is where my parents planted the iris garden, and here, my grandmother grew roses, feeding them coffee grounds each evening.” And “Playing back the old tapes.” “We carry old tape recordings in our unconscious minds. …” And “Farm boys” and “Understand-

ing Dad” and “Thanksgiving at Grandma Ray’s.” And “In 2007 I became old.” “I have begun to notice the darkening beauty of our mountain ridge against the last light in the western sky. I wait for the dusk, grateful for the purity, the clarity, the nightly gift. “I dance with Bailey, overflowing with 18 months of toothy grins and joyful rhythms, to `Sleeping Beauty’ and `Mary Had a Little Lamb.’ “I cry easily, in sadness, in joy, in gratitude, in celebration. “In 2007, I became 71. I forgave myself. I began to wonder what happens next.” Ray calls his in-progress book “Partial Recall” because he doesn’t remember every detail. Just bits and pieces stand out. His life story, he says, is not cohesive. “This is not going to have the nice, smooth flow that a memoir would have. I don’t know if it will work or not. But it doesn’t make any difference if it works or not if I’m happy with it.” In the end, he hopes his grandchildren and their children, whoever reads his words, will think “it was worth their time.” Remember the first page, where Ray describes stories as scraps of fabric that we constantly rearrange and lay side-by-side into stories that matter? Here is the last line to that paragraph: “Before our eyes, a larger scene emerges, full of memories and color. Finally, our patchwork quilts reveal the stories of our lives.” We all have one. We just have to see it. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. She can be reached at ahealey@ourcoloradonews. com or 303-566-4110.

Oxbow Bend is just one of many scenic overlooks in Grand Teton National Park that provide breathtaking views of the Teton Range and the autumn colors. Photos by Tony Lane

Yellowstone’s neighbor is magical place In anticipation of winter, this black bear gorges himself on the fall crop of berries along the Moose-Wilson Road in Grand Teton National Park. Moose sightings are also frequent along this stretch of roadway

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Mention Yellowstone National Park and just about everyone has either been there or knows of its many natural wonders, including the most famous of all geysers, “Old Faithful.” Wildlife is another major draw, and it is one of the few places in the country where visitors may actually see wild, free-roaming grizzly bears and wolves. But resting just a few miles south of Yellowstone’s south entrance in Wyoming, via the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway, lies another popular national park that is often overlooked by Yellowstone-bound visitors. It’s called Grand Teton National Park, and mid-September to early October is truly one of the best times of the year to experience this national treasure. Yellowstone and the Tetons share much in common, but are not the same. Each park has its own distinct features, and if you skip the Tetons you are missing some of the best Western outdoor grandeur in the National Park System. The jagged peaks of the Teton Range can be seen long before entering the park. Once inside the park there are a number of popular view-

ing areas — Oxbow Bend, Cottonwood Creek, the Snake River Overlook and Coulter Bay, to mention a few. As dawn approaches, photographers from all over will gather at these sites to capture the first rays of the sun as it slowly brings the majestic peaks of the Tetons to life. Elk, bison, pronghorn antelope and black and grizzly bears may be seen throughout the park. Moose, a park favorite, thrive in the valleys and are often seen feeding along the Snake River, and around the Oxbow Bend overlook area. Just one of a number of camping grounds in the park, and a good bet for moose watching, is the Gros Ventre Campground, just a dozen or so miles from the Town of Jackson. Nestled in the shadow of the Tetons and among the tall cottonwoods that line the Gros Ventre River, this spot

provides all the makings for a great outdoor experience. Bears, moose and other wildlife can usually be found along the Moose-Wilson Road near the south end of the park. In anticipation of the coming winter, bears will go on a feeding frenzy and gorge themselves in the numerous hawthorn and chokecherry berry bushes that line this stretch of roadway. Be prepared to face traffic jams and delays if a bear or moose is spotted. The road is narrow and will not accommodate many vehicles at a time, but who really cares? Jackson Lake, Jenny Lakes, the Snake River and numerous other waters in and around the park provide excellent fishing. These pristine waters also provide opportunities for canoeing, kayaking and other outdoor activities. Hiking trails and picnic areas abound. Mormon Row, near Antelope Flats, contains probably the most photographed barns in the country. With the Tetons rising in the background, these roughly 100-yearLane continues on Page 17


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17-Color

Area raises over $20K for ‘Purple Thunder’ More than 500 attend fundraiser for Roberson By Sonja Oliver

Contributing writer Within one month of hearing about the illness of 10-year-old Alexandra Roberson, an entire community has been able to raise over $20,000 towards the fight for a little girl’s survival. The outpouring of love and support was “overwhelming” according to co-coordinators Linda Karlin, Vicki Litz, Shera Fresno and Amber Lewis, all who put the fundraiser together in a matter of three weeks. Alexandra has a rare form of brain cancer known as “Medullaoblastoma.” Just a few months ago, she was an active, young girl. But in early September she became a medical patient facing a serious disease, undergoing surgery in order to remove a tumor on her brain stem. She is currently is receiving chemotherapy and radiation treatments at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver and will continue those for the next six to 12 months. Knowing that the Teller County-based family would need to meet medical and other expenses such as travel from their home in Florissant to the hospital in Denver, friends and co-workers immediately made plans for a fundraiser. Alexandra is the daughter of Lance Roberson and Heather Oswald. The “Purple Thunder” Benefit fundraiser was held on Sept. 21 at the Thunderbird Inn, a local tavern and restaurant in Florissant. Many of the people attending the event wore purple T-shirts and bracelets; Alexandra’s favorite color is purple. At 2 p.m., Alexandra arrived in a wheelchair; she had lost her hair but was smiling and amazed at the show of love and support shown by the hundreds of people attending the benefit. The community that surrounds Alexandra includes school children and staff at Summit Elementary School where Alexandra attends, and neighbors, friends and local businesses from throughout both Teller and Park Counties. Over 500 people attended the event throughout the day, with local musicians donating their time, along with numerous individuals and businesses who donated items and services for both a live and silent auction. Face painting, manicures and purple hair coloring donated by two out-of-work stylists who had set up shop during the afternoon event raised over $300. A song entitled “Purple Thunder” was

Center Continued from Page 1

iffy, but said that the April event is already booked. Woodland Park Panther Recycling takes in electronic waste from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday at its middle-school depot for a specific cost-per-pound, but the point of the planned events is to make electronic

Lane

d Continued from Page 16 ate reold-plus shelters are best seen and photographed with the morning sun. The Moulton Barn was featured in the

oine for door

t try. k-

Pikes Peak Courier View 17

October 2, 2013

Local businesses turned out to raise money for Alexandra with facepainting, manicures and a silent auction Photos by Sonja Oliver written and recorded by Quenton Good, a local musician who is donating proceeds from the CD sales to the fund. The generosity was overwhelming: for example at the bake sale, a mountain of home-baked goods could be seen on the table. Co-coordinator Vicki Litz said instead of pricing the goods, they just asked for a donation, raising over $1,800. So far, the total funds raised from the bake sales, sales of bracelets, CDs, etc., amounts to $20,172.34. The auction alone raised $10,172.00. Summit Elementary School students, teachers and PTSO members raised $1,489 from donations and the sale of “Purple Thunder” bracelets. A school staff member donated two tickets to a Jimmy Buffet concert which raised $550 because someone at the live auction won the bid for the tickets and then turned around and donated them to be auctioned again. Summit Principal Katie Rexford said the entire “school family” was behind Alexandra. “The kids miss her terribly. The entire

student body really rallied behind her. Kids cleaned out their piggy banks (to make donations),” Rexford said. The school held “Purple Thunder Day” on Sept. 20 to show their support with Alex’s fifth- grade teacher Mike Waddell getting his head shaved by some of her classmates. “We’re proud of Alex for fighting so hard and she’s working so hard (to heal),’ Rexford said. According to Litz, fundraising efforts will be ongoing and, for those who wish to contribute, an ENT Federal Credit Union account has been set up under the account name: Alexandra Roberson Fund. People can also donate on-line at www. GoFundMe.com under the same name or type in the zip code for Woodland Park (80863) to find her account on the site. “We are still getting money in every day (since the event) and that’s awesome,” Litz said.

recycling cheaper for community members. “We want to make it as easy as possible for people to do the right thing,” she said. The program itself is self-sustaining but we need sponsors to keep costs down during events.” As with the program’s kick-off event in January and the one in April - the Oct. 12 event is a partnership between Panther Recycling and Woodland Park High School’s Save Our Society (environmental) Club.

Panther Recycling is part of the Blue Star Recyclers nonprofit Vocational Electronics Recycling Network that promotes ethical electronic recycling as a way to create jobs for people with disabilities. A more detailed explanation of the new law, including a complete and frequently updated list of electronic devices that must be recycled or that are exempt, is available at www.cdphe. state.co.us, or at the Colorado Association for Recycling website, www.cafr. org.

Hollywood classic “Spencer’s Mountain,” starring Henry Fonda, and has graced the pages of many a magazine and Christmas card. There is just so much history here to see and enjoy. Timing is everything when it comes to catching the autumn colors, usually late September into early Oc-

tober. During the peak of the season, the countryside is ablaze with various shades of yellow, orange and red. It’s absolutely breathtaking and a good time to be there. Tony Lane, the former police chief of Castle Rock, is an avid outdoorsman and photographer.

Alexandra, wearing her favorite color - purple, family members were encouraged to dance for the child as she faces a long road to heal and recover from cancer.

App Continued from Page 1

early, on the Commodore 64 computer, when he was 14. “That was way back,” Rentfrow said. “All he wanted to know was how that thing worked.” Doing business as Osage Apps, Applegate and Rentfrow are on a roll. Last month, they launched mobile apps for Central City and Black Hawk. “We own the platform and can design an app for any town,

any business, organization or hospital, for instance,” Rentfrow said. “The hardest thing is the data – if you’ve got the data, we can put together an app pretty darn fast.” Despite its remote location, Cripple Creek has been thrust into the 21st century, as a result of ingenuity and foresight. “The world’s going mobile, faster than we even have any idea,” Rentfrow said. “You can’t stop it, can’t do anything about it except join it.” The mobile app costs $1.99 and is available online at the App Store.

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and cultural events are happening in your area and the areas around you? Visit our website at www. ourcoloradonews.com/calendar/.

WE WOULD LIKE TO ANNOUNCE

YOUR COLORADO NEWS Colorado Community Media connects readers to 23 local communities: Castle Rock, Castle Pines, Douglas County, Parker, Elbert County, Lone Tree, Highlands Ranch, Littleton, South Platte, Englewood, Centennial, Lakewood, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Golden, Foothills, Northglenn, Thornton, Westminster, North Jeffco, Teller County, Pikes Peak and Tri-Lakes. To find out more about our communities visit www.ourColoradonews.com the online home of Colorado Community Media.

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18-Color

18 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

Lawyers, officials tackle civil-court aid for poor Litigants face tough task in non-criminal cases By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com At one time, Maria Nunez was a single mom struggling alone to reach a settlement with her ex. Today, she’s a confident personal trainer with fair child support and visitation agreements. Nunez credits help she got from Metro Volunteer Lawyers. “I felt that I was in the middle of a big support group,” she says in a video shown to elected officials and others from throughout the 18th Judicial District during the Access to Justice Hearing, held Sept. 24 at the Arapahoe County Justice Center. “It was nice to see how that helped Maria grow,” attorney Steve Cook says in the video. When someone facing criminal charges shows up in court without an attorney, the judge can appoint a public defender at taxpayer expense. But there is no such provision in civil cases like divorce, probate and custody battles — situations that people who can’t afford an attorney commonly face. “I was drowning in debt, as everyone was at the time,” said Patricia Crowe, who saved her house from foreclosure with help

an attorney from Colorado Legal Services. “He was very good and very thorough, and he was with me through the whole deal.” Hobbs presented data indicating there are 85,000 people living in poverty in the 18th Judicial District, a number that is projected to grow by 45 percent before the year 2040. In 2012, more than 82,000 civil cases were filed in the district, mostly in county court. There are efforts throughout the district to provide help for people facing civil battles, whether they are defending themselves or filing a claim. For example, Douglas and Arapahoe counties both have “pro se clinics” to guide people representing themselves through the court system. “I compare it to changing an oil filter,” said David Rolfe of the Douglas Pro Se and Mediation Clinic. “If you’ve never changed an oil filter, you’re going to want to get with a buddy and watch it happen first.” There’s also a new self-help center at the Arapahoe County Justice Center that’s seen more than 1,000 people since it opened at the beginning of the year. Its director, Lindsey Adams, said domestic-relations cases make up 76 percent of those she sees. In divorce cases, for example, people can pick up a packet from the clerk’s office, fill it out and file everything themselves. But they often get stuck. “There’s a real emotional factor,” she said. “Even though it has instructions, it can

be overwhelming.” Families facing separation due to deportation can often be waylaid by emotion, as well. Mekela Goehring of the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network explained that undocumented immigrants have no right to an attorney, no matter their status, nationality or even age. “It simply is an injustice that 5-year-olds are forced to represent themselves,” she said. Organizations like MVL and CLS provide volunteer attorneys to the indigent, but they rely on state and local funding. Representatives from those organizations say the money is unpredictable, insufficient and dwindling. “Despite our best efforts, the American Bar Association estimates only 20 percent of the legal needs of the poor are met,” said Jonathan Asher of CLS. “We, in fact, turn away one person for every person we help.” Part of the money comes from fees tacked on to filing charges, which some consider controversial. “There is a real philosophical debate around funding our judicial system and access to it by charging the participants in the system,” said state Sen. Pat Steadman, D-Denver. “At some point, you can start to price it out of reach.” Such assistance doesn’t just help the poor, notes Colorado Supreme Court Justice Gregory J. Hobbs. He says it speeds up

the process for everyone by keeping incorrect paperwork and confusion from leaving cases languishing on the dockets. And the longer they languish, the more they cost in the way of attorney fees, staff time and other resources, he said. “It puts us as judges in a very difficult position, because we can’t go out of our way to offer them legal advice,” he said. “We can help them along, but we can’t offer them a whole lot of guidance.” Elbert County Commissioner Robert Rowland wondered about the other extreme, asking if a lot of pro se cases are frivolous and clogging up the courts unnecessarily. “I have no doubt that some pro se people have meritless cases,” said Asher. “There are some who no reasonable lawyer would take their case. Some get that message, and some go ahead and file pro se.” But, he adds, assistance services can help weed those out. Dianne Van Voorhees of MVL noted fundraising in this arena can be more challenging than in others, such as animal shelters or starving children. “People say, `I love puppies, and I love kittens.’ But it’s tougher for our people. We get our people at the toughest time in their lives. … We need to figure out how to broaden the knowledge about this critical service we provide to the community.”

School administrator sees school’s success in its kids By Sonja Oliver

contributing writer Lake George Charter School Administrator Bill Fredenburg is comfortable with wearing the numerous hats of principal, teacher, and any additional responsibilities that may be required of that position. Fredenburg is the school’s new principal who has taken the reins of leadership following the retirement of Pat Lewis. Prior to his becoming the school’s administrator on Aug. 1, Fredenburg was the the sixth- and seventh- grade teacher during the 2012-2013 school year. Fredenburg has 26 years of experience in public education. During 16 of those years he served as a principal at an elementary school in southeastern Missouri. He spent 10 years as a classroom teacher prior to his tenure as an administrator in Missouri.

Fredenburg holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from the University of Northern Colorado. He received his master’s with a focus on administrative specialist/elementary principalship from Southeastern Missouri State University. Fredenburg also has a degree in special education. In 2005, Fredenburg retired from the public school system, and in 2010 he moved with his wife to the Florissant area, where he planned to build furniture and cabinets as a carpenter. And although Fredenburg enjoys woodworking, a little over two years ago he entered the classroom again as a reading teacher at Lake George. Six months later he was hired on as a full-time fifth- and sixth- grade teacher when that position became open. “I’ve always liked being around kids,” Fredenburg said of returning to the classroom.

Following the announcement of Lewis’ retirement, the school board opened the position and advertised in-house, and Fredenburg said he was immediately interested in applying. The board voted unanimously to move Fredenburg from his teaching position to the administrative position at a special board meeting on April 23 with his 2013-2014 contract beginning one day after Lewis’ retirement on July 31. Fredenburg was well-known and well-liked by both parents and students during his tenure as a classroom teacher. School board president John Rakowski said that the board’s hopes are for the school¹s progress to continue on the path of accomplishments the school has made so far. Enrollment has increased, test scores have risen, and the school’s classification with the state has jumped up two posi-

tions in a four-classification system in the last two years. The new building, now in its second year, can house approximately 140 students. This year’s enrollment initially stood at 137 students (which includes a morning and afternoon pre-school program) with three new students added to the roles last week. Rakowski said the school board “has strong confidence in (Bill Fredenburg) as the new administrator.” “I think he¹s going to do a great job with the kids,” Rakowski said. Looking towards the future, Fredenburg said that he wants to “carry on with the success that we’ve started and make Lake George a school that everyone wants to attend.” “We want to continue to have a high standard of performance with regards to Colorado state standards,” Fredenburg said.

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Jessica Grady wrestles with Akita/lab mix pups outside Safeway in Elizabeth Sept. 25. Grady and Dave Barnell were selling three puppies for $150 each. “We’ve had the mom and dad for nine years,” says Barnell. “They’re awesome dogs.”

Photo by GeorGe Lurie


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Pikes Peak Courier View 19

October 2, 2013

r AREA CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Continued from Page 4

ncoravingEACH OTHERS’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call d theVickie at 719-748-1274. cost andRECREATION CHRISTIAN YOGA is offered at 5 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sundays t po-at Corner Street, 500 E. Midland Ave. in Woodland Park. wayMindfullness-centered practice aimed at relaxation, focus, e cangentle movement. Contact Chrissy Bensen, with bStill Integraem ative Wellness LLC at 719-510-2743 (www.bStillyoga.com)  before attending for the first time to reserve a spot; after that, obertjust drop in. Cost is $7 per class. r exs areEXERCISE CLASSES offered for free through Community nnec-Partnership Family Resource Center’s Healthy Living Programs. Locations of classes are throughout Teller County.  Visit www. o secpteller.org under “Get Healthy Challenge” or email Kathy at sher.Kathy@cpteller.org for more information.

wyerEVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The mes-Old School House) is open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music o se.”and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday helpevenings. Sometimes we have more musicians than people and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, fun-but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous eng-food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and eltersif you are not a musician, come for the social evening out. Call 719-748-0358. love e. WeGET IN shape with a parks and recreation fitness membership. theirThe center offers Paramount and Nautilus equipment and free oad-weights. Schedule a personalized fitness orientation and have rvicean individual workout program designed for your fitness needs. Individuals ages 16 and older are welcome to become fitness members. Minors require signed parental permission. Corporate memberships are available. Call 719-689-3514.

FRONT RANGE Fencing Club. Learn to fence class for children and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http:// frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced competitive lessons available too. HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Chronic Disease Self-Management Classes Are you tired of being sick and tired? Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center offer six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with an ongoing health condition. Participants learn skills to cope with fatigue, frustration, pain and stress of chronic disease, as well as effective action plans and problem solving. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www. cpteller.org or www.tellercountypublichealth.org for information and a list of classes in your neighborhood. Suggested donation: $35. JAM NIGHT. The Grange Hall is open from 6-9 p.m. every

Thursday for the Jammers music and potluck. This is a great night and the place to be on Thursdays. The music is always different depending on who and how many musicians show up. We always have fun, good food and dancing. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session. If you are not a musician, come for a social evening out to meet other community members. Call 719-748-0358.

KARATE PLUS meets at 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonprofit and non-denominational. THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for Earth Science Education, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Community Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow field trips on weekends. Further information from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub.org. THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second

Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a field trip in conjunction with the regular meeting. There is always a program or field trip.

LEARN GUITAR from a guitar player, singer and entertainer, Cari Dell. Call 719-748-0358. MOTHER BEAR Self-Defense offers Krav Maga classes from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturdays and by appointment on Thursdays on the second floor of the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Mother Bear also offers women’s self-defense classes for groups of three or more. Contact Wendy at 719-323-7949 for information. THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at different locations on the first Tuesday of the month. Membership fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub. com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at 719-687-2489.

Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861.

TAI CHI is offered from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Senior Center. Call Rip Blaisdel, 719-686-1408. TAI CHI is offered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Wood-

land Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI is offered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122. TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is offered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633. THE TELLER County 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the first Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Rifle, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, please contact Crystal at 509-680-1231 or crystal. terry@email.wsu.edu. For 4-H enrollment contact Mark Platten at 719-686-7961. THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. Email gclark25@live.com for information. THE UTE Pass Historical Society offers free tours (donations

gratefully accepted) of History Park every second Saturday of the month from June through September. History Park is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come tour our old buildings, and learn some of the history of Ute Pass. We also offer a walking tour of Woodland Park which meets at the Museum Center at 10:30. The Museum Center at History Park is located at 231 E. Henrietta Avenue in Woodland Park, next to the library. For information, contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or check out our website: www.utepasshistoricalsociety.org. Also, like us on Facebook.

UTE PASS Historical Society Gift Shop is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Museum Center building at History Park, 231 E. Henrietta, next to the Woodland Park Library. Call 719-686-7512 for information or to schedule a group tour. WALKING TOURS. The Cripple Creek District Museum offers free walking tours at 2 p.m. each Sunday. Tours last approximately 45 minutes. Meet in front of the Colorado Trading & Transfer Company building at the museum, 500 E. Bennett Ave., for an extensive look at the history of downtown Cripple Creek. No reservations are required. Comfortable shoes, bottled water and jackets are advised. Tours may be postponed or canceled due to inclement weather. Call 719-689-2634, visit www. cripple-creek.org or email CCDMuseum@aol.com.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a difference serving their community. You are invited to our monthly meeting the first Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. Free parking is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@ coloradoranger.org. CRIPPLE CREEK Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and offers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends. DIVIDE PLAYGROUP meets from 9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays

and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome.

DOLL LOVERS of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the first Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of antiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age 12 is welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098. FLORISSANT GRANGE No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to offer the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358. 

THE FLORISSANT Library Book Club welcomes all book readers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of the month. Call 719-748-3939. GOLD CAMP Victorian Society is dedicated to the preservation of the history of Cripple Creek and the surrounding area. The Society plays a role in Cripple Creek’s historic events, celebrations, and festivals, including Donkey Derby Days, the Gold Camp Christmas, the Mt. Pisgah Speaks cemetery tour, the Salute To American Veterans, and many others. The Gold Camp Victorian Society also supports events in other communities in Teller County. The Society also sponsors a Victorian ball as well as a Victorian tea each year, both of which are open to members and non-members alike. Gold Camp Victorian Society members can be seen dressed in period attire welcoming visitors to Cripple Creek on Saturday afternoons during the summer months. The Society also includes the “Smokin’s Guns” club which presents historically-based skits and other entertainment during local events and festivals. The Gold Camp Victorian Society meets on the fourth Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. Persons interested in participating as members of the Gold Camp Victorian Society are encouraged to call 689-0907 for more information. HELP U Club meets the third Thursday of every month. Pot luck at noon and meeting at 1 p.m. We help people and other nonprofits in Teller County and the Lake George area of Park County. Meetings are at the Lake George Community Center. Information: Joan 719-689-2486 or Help U Club, 1054 High Chateau Road, Florissant, CO 80816. JOIN US to knit, crochet or craft every Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring your projects. Meet new and old friends. Instructions are provided for free. Meeting are at Cripple Creek Coffee at Aspen Mine Center. KIWANIS CLUB of Ute Pass/Woodland Park meets at 6:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Denny’s. Call 719-687-5534. Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time.

Going to Pieces Quilting

WOODLAND PARK Saddle Club, providing community camaraderie among humans and horses since 1947, sponsors gymkhanas, jackpots, dances, barbecues, parades, trail rides and more. Join us. For information, contact info@wpsaddleclub. com. Visit www.wpsaddleclub.com. YOGA CLASSES are offered at 5:30 p.m. Mondays and 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior yoga class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information.  YOGA CLASSES are offered in Woodland Park. All levels are

welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information.

YOGA FOR Every Body Thought about yoga but think you can’t? Think again and join us Thursdays, at 10 a.m. at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide (free); at noon at Dana’s Dance 210 W. Midland Ave. in Woodland Park (donation); at 4:15 p.m. at Summit Elementary, Room 212, Divide (free); and at 6:30 p.m. at Cripple Creek/Victor High School (free). Call Stacy for more information at 719-689-5745. XINGYI IS offered from 7-9 p.m. Wednesdays at the Woodland Park Recreation Center. Must be 18 or older. Contact Jeff at 816260-8595 for information. SOCIAL A COURSE in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail lynnzina@aol.com for information. ABOVE THE Clouds Cruisers meet the first Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058. AMERICAN LEGION Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org. AMERICAN LEGION Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek. APPLY SPIRITUAL laws as taught by the Ascended Masters for the achievement of personal and global freedom, love, peace and abundance. Free study group meets every Saturday in Woodland Park. For information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823 or miraclesofwellness@gmail.com. ART RECEPTION Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a different artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park. BILL HARPER, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4-7

TAI CHI is offered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant

p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere.

TAI CHI is offered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile Fire

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and as-

Public Library. Call Pam Powers, 719-748-3378 or Judy Ross, 719-686-9122.

sist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an auxiliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your community. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org.

Going to Pieces Quilting is owned and operated by Susan Clark and is located in Woodland Park, Colorado. Susan has been quilting for almost ten years and has dreamt of owning a longarm quilting machine since she began quilting. With the youngest of her four children starting Kindergarten this year, she decided to take the plunge, buy a machine, and share her love of quilting. Going to Pieces offers professional longarm quilting and computerized custom quilting services. With their state of the art 12- foot Gammill Optimum longarm quilting machine, equipped with the Statler Stitcher, they can finish quilting projects quickly, at a competitive price. They have thousands of patterns and work in a smoke-free environment. They combine the consistency of a stitch-regulated, computer guided system with personal, hands-on monitoring to ensure the highest quality finished product possible. Give them a call at (719) 687-1782; they offer a free consultation. You can also visit them at www. goingtopiecesquilting.com or find them on Facebook under ‘Going to Pieces Quilting’.

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Pikes Peaklife 20-Life-Color

20 Pikes Peak Courier View October 2, 2013

Eating for a cause Oct. 11 Samples help Community Partnership Family Resource Center

By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com A lip-smackin’ fundraiser that teases the gustatory palate, Taste of Teller is a sampler of goodies from 15 restaurants, a coffee shop, bakeries and a candy store. “Taste of Teller is designed to bring the community together, including the businesses, especially after the last couple of years,” said Carolyn Sparkman, who heads up the fundraising committee for Community Partnership Family Resource Center. “With the fires and the flooding, it’s been very difficult.” For residents, Taste of Teller is from 5:30 tourists and “stayto 8:30 p.m. Oct. 11 at Shining cationers,” the tastMountain Golf Club. Tickets ing party on Oct. are $45 or $80 per couple. 11 is an entertainFor more information, go to ment alternative. www.tasteofteller.com or call “We want people to 686-0705. know what Woodland Park, Cripple Creek and Divide have to offer, so that business will stay within our community,” Sparkman said. A nonprofit organization founded in 1992 in response to the initiation of limited-stakes gaming, Community Partnership is today a vital contributor to the county’s quality of life. With a range of programs, including parenting workshops, a children’s play group, health and emergency-energy services as well as education, the partnership removes barriers. The GED program is designed to help residents surmount educational and workforce challenges. Aligned this year with the Common Core standards, the program is directed by Mataya Harrold, adult-education coordinator. “The new standards require more critical thinking than in the past,” she said. “The academics are going to be much higher, including a higher level of vocabulary.” The new writing standards expect students

IF YOU GO

Things are happening at Community Partnership Family Resource Center where board members and staff are refining last-minute details for the annual fundraiser, Taste of Teller, Oct. 11 From left, Amy Payne, Debbie Upton, Jodi Mijares, Carolyn Sparkman and Yvette Engel. Photo by Pat Hill

to argue a position based on two sources. “We’re here to support them in whatever they need; some just need a ‘you-can-do-it’ reassurance,” Harrold said. By January, students will be tested exclusively on the computer. As a result, the organization’s critical needs include new computers. The fundraiser, however, is all fun and games, but it has a larger mission of promoting the partnership’s programs. With silent and live auctions adding zest to the event, the biddable items feature vacation packages in Durango, Salida and Woodland Park. Donors also can take a chance on winning one or two snowmobiles donated to the nonprofit by Big D Motorsports. Clarke Becker, former Woodland Park mayor

and Teller County commissioner, is the master of ceremonies, while vocalist Marci Nickelsburg will provide the entertainment. In a time when the weather isn’t just a subject to pass the time, Matt Meister, KRDO meteorologist, will offer live weather reports along with being the keynote speaker. “The fundraiser is an opportunity for the restaurants to promote themselves, to bring their signature dish and let people see them in a different arena,” said the partnership’s executive director, Jodi Mijares. Event sponsors are Vectra Bank, Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co., Park State Bank & Trust, Mountain Home Medical, Inc., Bronco Billy’s and Wildwood casinos, Pikes Peak Courier View and Shining Mountain Golf Club.


21

Pikes Peak Courier View 21

October 2, 2013

Exploring the Dark Side of Pikes Peak

W

ith Halloween approaching like the Dullahan riding out of October night, we decided to explore for a bit, the dark side of Pikes Peak and other areas in the following pages. The word itself, “Halloween,” actually has its origins in the Catholic Church. It comes from a contracted corruption of All Hallows Eve. November 1, “All Hollows Day” (or “All Saints Day”), is a Catholic day of observance in honor of saints. Prior to the 5th century BC, in Celtic Ireland, summer officially ended with the lunar cycles but when the Romans introduced their calendar to the Island, the celebration was shifted to always fall on October 31. The holiday was called Samhain (pronounced sow-in), which means “end of summer”, the Celtic New year. 2001 was the last year a full moon fell on modern Halloween and the next time won’t happen until 2020. The moon itself, especially a full harvest moon, like Friday’s , can create its own trouble. See all the eerie stories of the area on Pages 22-28

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22

22 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

Work, live and die hard and go to hell Highway with name change still has infamous reputation By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com I always found it interesting that the “highway to hell” ran through Cortez and on into Utah, with stops at Pleasant View and Cahone. After all, as Carl Sandburg wrote, “To work hard, to live hard, and to die hard, and then to go to hell after all, would be too damned hard.” But I guess the politicians and the signmakers fixed it for us. In 2003, on May 31, the Old 666, “the mark of the beast’ got its brand altered and became Highway 491. “Whereas, the living near the road already live under the cloud of opprobrium created by having a road that many believe is cursed running near their homes and through their homeland; and “Whereas, the number ‘666’ carries the stigma of being the mark of the beast, the mark of the devil, which was described in the book of Revelation in the Bible; and whereas, there are people who refuse to travel the road, not because of the issues of safety, but because of the fear that the devil controls events along United States Route 666; and whereas, the economy of the area is greatly depressed when compared with many parts of the United States, and the infamy brought by the inopportune naming of the road will only make development in the area more difficult,” read the Joint

U.S. Highway 666 name was changed in 2003 to avoid the “mark of the beast.” Roads signs, such as this, became hot commodities in internet auctions around the country. Photo by Courtesy photo Memorial Resolutions put forth first by the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department and later joined by Colorado and Utah transportation officials in the recommendation of the name change. But as Richard Weingroff, of the Office of Infrastructure, noted in a 2003 article about why it was number 666 in the first place, “despite the biblical reference and the image U.S. 666 has gained over years, the ge-

matria calculation had nothing to do with the numbering of the route. Boring though it may be to contemplate, the route was simply the sixth branch of U.S. 66 in early August 1926, and retained that number when U.S. 466 was dropped a few weeks later,” said Weingroff. That bit of truth and knowledge did little, however, to stop the tales of the strange and the twisted on the remote stretch of blacktop winding its way through multiple states. Mad truckers, packs of demon dogs and even a frail girl in a long nightgown that appears out of nowhere, are just some of the stories associated with “Triple 6” according to Linda Dunning, in a “Haunted Utah” piece that she wrote in 2003. Not to mention the occasional “skinwalker.” “There are Native American tales of unwanted passengers appearing in the backseat of the car along such stretches of highway,” writes Dunning. The evil shape shifter may take the form of a crow, a coyote or other animals. Then, of course, there is the movie. The 2001 straight-to-video release by Lions Gate Home Entertainment simply titled “Route 666,” has Lou Diamond Phillips complicating his job protecting a mob informant by heading down a mysterious highway with evil prison gang zombies in chase, as well as wicked mobsters. Basically, in the end, it is “the road’s” entire fault. But the Joshua Trees and the dialog makes you wonder if the writers and the directors (and maybe even the actors) fell in a Peyote patch out in there in the process

of filming. The name change brought a ton of attention nationally and internationally. A June 2003 article in the New York Times by Jodi Wilgoren, told the story of how the Anasazi Restaurant & Lounge had its address altered 15 years before the highway took the treatment. “June Merrett (it is really Merritt, even the ‘Gray Lady of Journalism’ can jack up the spelling of a name every so often) who owned the Anasazi then, decided that the address of her establishment was unacceptable. As though it wasn’t inauspicious enough to be stuck squarely on U.S. Route 666, the building’s number was also 666. So along with adopting the local name of the road as it crosses through town -Broadway she convinced officials at city hall to switch the address of the Anasazi to 640.” When the highway officially dropped the 666 designations at the end of May in 2003, the signs for “New 491 - Old 666” as well as anything with the “666” became quite the collector’s item fetching admirable pricing on eBay. Fanciers of the signage made it difficult to keep the route marked. People were running over them with their cars and taking the chain saw or the cutting torch to them. That reminds me of conversation related to the absence of signage that I overheard in Cortez shortly after the highway name changed. “Is that the Highway to Hell over there? “No, now it’s just the road to Dove Creek.” “What’s the difference?” “Good point.”

The pick, pick, pick of the knockers Cornish miners leave their marks on Colorado mining By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com Here in the hard rock camps of Colorado, where the mountains are full of riches, the stories of “the knockers” will be found below. The Cornish, miners for at least a thousand years, arrived in droves during the 19th century in the American West as the copper and tin played out in their native Cornwall. Often labeled “Cousin Jacks,” reportedly because mine owners valued their knowledge and experience so much, they were always asking “don’t you have cousin, back in Cornwall that would like to come here to United States and work for us?” The miners seemed to always have a cousin “Jack,” back on the Celtic Sea that wanted to relocate. With them, came their peculiar way of speaking, ancient stories and traditions. The language of the mines was heavily influenced. The Cornish word “shaft” described a vertical hole. Horizontal tunnels were “levels” and “winzes, raises and adits,” all derived from Cornish origins. As did the lunch pail, the miners candlestick, “Cornish pump” and the signal code for communicating to the hoist operators in the mines. In the dark, strange underworld of the hard rock mine, it is easy for your imagination to run away with you and the stories. “Knockers,” according to lore, were the departed spirits of miners who had passed this life and went on to the next. If you were miner trying to earn living beneath the earth, the knockers could be for you, or against you, dependent largely on how you treated them. Unlike the aliens of Ste-

phen King horror novels, most knockers of Cornish legends were generally thought of in favorable terms. Like the Irish Leprechauns, the knockers were were people and the creaks, drips, groans, knocks and other sounds of underground work were often attributed to them and given special meaning. “Miners hear eerie sounds working underground. Sounds made by the earth moving along fault lines, miners in distant tunnels setting off dynamite charges and whirring machinery echoing off tunnel walls – all could be attributed to Tommyknockers,” wrote Tim Willoughby in recent column in the Aspen Times. “Sounds of dripping water, braying mules and creaking mine cars were compounded by total darkness.” Some miners tried to be nice to the knockers by leaving offerings of left-over lunch, fashioning small clay figures of the spirits to please them, avoiding whistling while working – because it was said to bother them – and speaking only in positive terms on their behalf. Any deviation from said course could bring on a round of bad luck in the form of cave-ins, “dry holes,” missing tools and deadly accidents. Being nice to them could result in their help finding the “mother lode” or warning you away from a dangerous cave-in or other accidents. The dwarf-like, tapping creatures were often heard in the depths of the mines but seldom seen. In fact, it was considered an ominous warning if you were to catch a glimpse of the little fellows. Seeing them in the mines could bring on more misfortune than a red-headed woman’s presence in the mine – red-haired women were considered omens of death. Also called Bucca, or Bwca by the Welsh, the knockers origins are sometimes referenced as ghosts of Jewish slaves, brought to mines in Cornwall by Romans to work in the Iron age. But here in the West, the knockers took on legendary

status as illustrated by following poem penned in 1910 by Anthony Fitch. The Tommy Knockers ‘Av you ‘eard of the Tommy Knockers In the deep dark mines of the west Which the Cornish miners ‘ear? an ‘tis no laughin’ jest, for I’m a Cornish miner, An’ I’ll tell you of it today, Of the ‘knock-knock-knock” of a tiny pick, As we work in the rock an’ clay. We go down in the skips with our buckets, With ‘earts which nothing fazes, Each man with a candle to light the way, Through the tunnels winzes an’ raises, An’ the stale air smells of powder, An’ the mine is full of sound, But ‘tis only the noise of a Tommy Knocker Which makes our ‘earts rebound. “Pick ... pick ... pick” Someone be ‘ind us knocked, Pick ... pick ... pick ‘tis souls of dead miners For they’re locked in the earthen wall, Those that found death down there. An’ tis the “knock-knock-knock” of their pick W’ich makes on end stand our ‘air. So we leave the ‘aunted place, (For we won’t work where they be) An’ we ‘erever we’ear them knockin’ We sure will always flee. For it means w’oever ‘ears it Will be next in line, The pick, pick, pick, of the Knockers Is a last an’ awful sign.

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October 2, 2013

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LOT 44, WILSON LAKE ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 59 Wallace Drive Florissant, CO 80816

Public Trustees Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE even (CRS §38-38-103) k up Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0061 whoTo Whom It May Concern: This Notice is t thegiven with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: nacJuly 19, 2013, the undersigned Public ciousOn Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust deoute scribed below to be recorded in the 6. SoCounty of Teller records. f theOriginal Grantor: ERIN R FRANKLINway -MILLER Original Beneficiary: FIRST FRANKLIN A witchDIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN

Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE d theTRUSTEE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN 2003,TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FF10 ell asDate of Deed of Trust: 8/24/2005 Date of Deed of Trust: e theRecording 8/25/2005 pric-Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 584353 madeOriginal Principal Amount: $140,800.00 utstanding Principal Balance: eopleO $153,305.97

s andPursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you ch toare hereby notified that the covenants of

the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

latedFailure to pay principal and interest when earddue together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt senamecured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

ere? THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. eek.”THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN

IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 44, WILSON LAKE ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 59 Wallace Drive Florissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Public Given that I will, at NOTICE OF10:00 SALEa.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013,Foreclosure at the TellerSale County (CRS §38-38-103) No. Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett 2013-0062 Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicToauction the highest best bidder Whom to It May Concern:and This Notice for the said realtoproperty and all inis cash, given with regard the following terest of said Grantor(s), described Deed of Trust:Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the provided in said On July 19,indebtedness 2013, the undersigned Public Evidence of Debtthe secured Deed of Trustee caused Noticeby of the Election Trust, plus attorneys’ expenses and Demand relating fees, to the the Deed of Trust ofdescribed sale andbelow othertoitems allowedinby be recorded thelaw, and will issue to the purchaser a CertificCounty of Teller records. ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Original Grantor: GATT FAMILY ENTERFirst Publication: PRISES, LLC 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Original Beneficiary: FIRST COMMUNITY Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View BANK, A BRANCH OF FIRST STATE BANK N.M. Dated: 7/22/2013 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ROBERT W. CAMPBELL ACQUIRED CAPITAL II, L.P. Teller TRUSTEE Date COUNTY of Deed ofPUBLIC Trust: 2/24/2004 By: Pamela A. Cronce Recording Date of Deed of Trust: Deputy Public Trustee 2/27/2004 Recorded in Teller County: Reception Attorney: CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER No. 562589 Attorney Registration #34145 Original Principal THE CASTLE LAWAmount: GROUP,$300,000.00 LLC Outstanding Principal Balance: 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, $225,197.00 DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Pursuant to865-1410 C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you Fax: 1 (303) are hereby notified that the covenants of Attorney file #: 13-04117 the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a FailureAny to make payments on the may Debt be debt. information provided whenfor thethat same were due and owing. used purpose. THE Notice LIEN FORECLOSED Legal No.: 2013-0061MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. 9/25/2013 First Publication: Last Publication: 10/23/2013 THE PROPERTY Published in: Pikes DESCRIBED Peak Courier HEREIN View IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. which has the address of: N/A NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence

Public Trustees

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/22/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Attorney Registration #34145 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-04117 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0061 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0052 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 8, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: KIMBERLY C GARCIA AND GERALD A GARCIA Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, Notice INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE ofFOR DebtEVERBANK secured by the Deed of Trust Current herein, Holderhas of filed Evidence of Debt: described Notice of WELLSand FARGO Election DemandBANK, for saleNA as provided Date Deed of Trust: by lawof and in said Deed4/23/2007 of Trust. Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 5/12/2008 Notice Is Hereby Given THEREFORE, Recorded Tellera.m. County: No. that I will, atin10:00 in theReception forenoon of 617406 20, 2013, at the Teller County November Original Principal Amount: Public Trustee’s Office, 101 $115,710.00 W. Bennett O u t sCripple t a n d i Creek, n g P rColorado, i n c i p a l sell B aat lance: Ave., $ 1 0 6auction , 7 7 9 . 1to5the highest and best public bidder for cash, the said real property and Pursuant §38-38-101 (4) (i), you all interest to of C.R.S. said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ are hereby notified that the covenants heirs and assigns therein, for the purposeof the deed of trust have been violated of paying the indebtedness provided in as follows: said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the Failure toofpay principal and interest when expenses sale and other items allowed due will to allthe other payments by law,together and will issue purchaser a provided for in the Evidence of Debt Certificate of Purchase, all as provided secured by law. by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. First Publication: 9/25/2013 THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE Last Publication: 10/23/2013 A FIRST LIEN. Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Dated: I S A L7/22/2013 L OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE ROBERT W. CAMPBELL DEED OF TRUST. Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce 21, INCLUSIVE, IN LOTS 19 THROUGH Deputy Public Trustee BLOCK 21, CITY OF VICTOR, SOMETIMES KNOWN AS LOTS 19 THROUGH Attorney: 21, INCLUSIVE, IN BLOCK 21 IN DOMINIC H RIVERS PROVIDENCE ADDITION TO THE CITY Attorney Registration #40127OF TELLER, OF VICTOR, COUNTY FOX ROTHSCHILD LLP STATE OF COLORADO. 633 SEVENTEENTH STREET, SUITE DENVER, COLORADO which 2700, has the address of: 126 S 4th St Phone: (303) 292-1200 Victor, CO 80860 Fax: (303) 292-1300 Attorney N/A NOTICEfile OF#:SALE The above of is acting as a debt TheAttorney current holder the Evidence of Debt collector attempting collect a securedand by is the Deed of to Trust described debt. Anyhas information provided may be and herein, filed Notice of Election used for that Demand forpurpose. sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0062 THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given First Publication: 9/25/2013 that Publication: I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of Last 10/23/2013 November 6, 2013, at the Teller County Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/12/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9105.05711 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0052 First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

scribed Deed of Trust: On July 8, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

which has the address of: 126 S 4th St Victor, CO 80860

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

21, INCLUSIVE, IN BLOCK 21 IN

OF VICTOR, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

23 PROVIDENCE ADDITION TO THE CITY

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

NOTICE OF SALE

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0052 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 8, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

Public Trustees

Original Grantor: KIMBERLY C GARCIA AND GERALD A GARCIA Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR EVERBANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust: 4/23/2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 5/12/2008 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 617406 Original Principal Amount: $115,710.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $106,779.15 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOTS 19 THROUGH 21, INCLUSIVE, IN BLOCK 21, CITY OF VICTOR, SOMETIMES KNOWN AS LOTS 19 THROUGH 21, INCLUSIVE, IN BLOCK 21 IN PROVIDENCE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF VICTOR, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 126 S 4th St Victor, CO 80860 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 6, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 6, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/12/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9105.05711 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0052 First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0055 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 8, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: HOLLIS R MERRIFIELD A/K/A HOLLIS ROSS MERRIFIELD Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR OCEANSIDE MORTGAGE COMPANY Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: FREEDOM MORTGAGE CORPORATION Date of Deed of Trust: 1/30/2013 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 2/4/2013 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 660092 Original Principal Amount: $230,034.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $230,034.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The failure to timely make payments as required under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE First Publication: 9/11/2013 A FIRST LIEN. Last Publication: 10/9/2013 THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Public Notice Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE NOTICE OF SALE Dated: 7/12/2013 DEED OFNOTICE TRUST. OF SALE ROBERT W. CAMPBELL LOT 102, TRANQUIL ACRES ADDITION (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO. 1, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE The current holder of the Evidence of OF 2013-0051 By: Pamela A. Cronce COLORADO Debt secured by the Deed of Trust deDeputy Public Trustee scribed herein, has filed Notice of ElecTo Whom It May Concern: This Notice which the address of:as provided by tion andhas Demand for sale is given with regard to the following Attorney: LISA CANCANON 223 Aspen Rd law and in said Deed of Trust. described Deed of Trust: Attorney Registration #42043 Woodland Park, CO 80863 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given On July 9, 2013,STREET, the undersigned Public 1199 BANNOCK NOTICE OF SALE that will, at 10:00 in the forenoon of Trustee caused the Notice of Election DENVER, COLORADO 80204 TheI current holdera.m. of the Evidence of Debt November 6, 2013, at the and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: secured by the Deed of Teller Trust County described Public Trustee’s Office, 101ofW.Election Bennett and described to be recorded in the Attorney file below #: 9105.05711 herein, has filed Notice Ave., Cripple County of Teller records. Demand for Creek, sale asColorado, providedsell by at law and public auction highest and best bidThe Attorney above is acting as a debt in said Deed to ofthe Trust. der for cash, the said real property and Original Grantor: RICHARD F. collector and is attempting to collect a all interest of saidNotice Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ HAMMOND debt. Any information provided may be THEREFORE, Is Hereby Given heirs therein, theforenoon purposeof Original Beneficiary: used for that purpose.BANK OF that Iand will,assigns at 10:00 a.m. inforthe ofNovember paying the6,indebtedness provided in AMERICA, N.A. 2013, at the Teller County said Evidence of Debt secured Current Holder Evidence of Debt: Legal Notice No.:of 2013-0052 Public Trustee’s Office, 101 by W.the Bennett Deed Trust, Creek, plus attorneys’ fees, CHAMPION MORTGAGE First Publication: 9/11/2013 COMPANY Ave.,of Cripple Colorado, sellthe at pubexpenses ofto sale other and items allowed Date of Deed of10/9/2013 Trust: 10/14/2009 Last Publication: lic auction theand highest best bidder by andthe willsaid issue to the purchaser a inRecording DeedCourier of Trust: Published in:Date PikesofPeak View forlaw, cash, real property and all 10/21/2009 Certificate of Purchase, all Grantor(s)’ as providedheirs terest of said Grantor(s), by law.assigns therein, for the purpose of Recorded in Teller County: Reception and No. 630726 paying the indebtedness provided in said First Publication: 9/11/2013 Original Principal Amount: $690,000.00 Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Outstanding Principal Balance: Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses Published in: other Pikes Peak $379,756.37 of sale and itemsCourier allowedView by law, and will issue to the purchaser a CertificDated: 7/12/2013 all as provided by law. Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) ate of Purchase, (i), you are hereby notified that the W. CAMPBELL covenants of the deed of trust have been ROBERT First Publication: 9/11/2013 violated as follows: Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes PeakTRUSTEE Courier View Teller COUNTY PUBLIC Pursuant to, but not limited to, Paragraph By: Pamela A. Cronce Dated: 7/15/2013 Deputy Public Trustee 9, Section (a) of the Deed of Trust, the ROBERT W. CAMPBELL debt has been accelerated because the Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE borrower is deceased and the property is Attorney: By: Pamela A. Cronce LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration not the primary residence of at least one Deputy Public Trustee surviving borrower. #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP Attorney: SHEILA J FINN , DENVER, 1199 BANNOCK STREET THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE Attorney Registration COLORADO 80204 #36637 A FIRST LIEN. JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C. Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: 19201 E.file MAIN Attorney #: STREET SUITE 205, THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN PARKER, COLORADO 80134-9092 8686.00037 IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMPhone: 1 (303) 706-9990 BERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED Fax:Attorney 1 (303) above 706-9994 The is acting as a debt OF TRUST. Attorneyand file is #: attempting 30539 collector to collect a debt. Any information provided may be ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ The for Attorney above is acting as a debt used that purpose. AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS collector and is attempting to collect a THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. debt.Notice Any information provided may be Legal No.: 2013-0051 used for that purpose. First Publication: 9/11/2013 which has the address of: Last Publication: 10/9/2013 804 Sioux Road Legal Notice Published in: No.: Pikes2013-0055 Peak Courier View Florissant, CO 80816 First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Original Grantor: HOLLIS R MERRIFIELD A/K/A HOLLIS ROSS MERRIFIELD Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR OCEANSIDE MORTGAGE COMPANY Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: FREEDOM MORTGAGE CORPORATION Date of Deed of Trust: 1/30/2013 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 2/4/2013 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 660092 Original Principal Amount: $230,034.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $230,034.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Public Trustees

The failure to timely make payments as required under the Deed of Trust. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 102, TRANQUIL ACRES ADDITION NO. 1, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 223 Aspen Rd Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 6, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/15/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: SHEILA J FINN Attorney Registration #36637 JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C. 19201 E. MAIN STREET SUITE 205, PARKER, COLORADO 80134-9092 Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990 Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994 Attorney file #: 30539 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0055 First Publication: 9/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/9/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0057 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 18, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JOHN PAUL MONAT AND COLETTE N MONAT Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS OF COLORADO, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: 2/17/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 2/26/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 624419 Original Principal Amount: $195,742.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $186,172.96 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay monthly installments due Note Holder. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 15, BLOCK 1, LA MONTANA MESA FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 900 Matterhorn Dr. Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/22/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: HOLLY L DECKER Attorney Registration #32647 MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC 355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228 Phone: (303) 274-0155 Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159 Attorney file #: 13-910-24930 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0057

terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Pikes Peak Courier View 23

First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/22/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: HOLLY L DECKER Attorney Registration #32647 MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC 355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228 Phone: (303) 274-0155 Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159 Attorney file #: 13-910-24930

Public Trustees

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0057 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0060 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 18, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: CHRISTOPHER BOEHNKE Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust: 10/20/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 11/5/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 631044 Original Principal Amount: $236,060.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $224,288.22 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 13, INDIAN CREEK 5, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 174 Pioneer Creek Drive Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/22/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: MONICA KADRMAS Attorney Registration #34904 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9105.05826 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0060 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0063 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 25, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: LEONARD JAMES DOSS AND JENNIFER A DOSS Original Beneficiary: AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: SPRINGLEAF FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., FORMERLY KNOWN AS AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES INC., D/B/A AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES (DE), INC., AND AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES Date of Deed of Trust: 12/18/2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 12/27/2006 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 601730 Original Principal Amount: $108,997.98 Outstanding Principal Balance: $104,277.71 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Default in payment required by the Deed of Trust. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 6, BLOCK1, LOG HAVEN ADDITION TO TOWN OF WOODLAND PARK, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO


24 Pikes Peak Courier View THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

Public Trustees

LOT 6, BLOCK1, LOG HAVEN ADDITION TO TOWN OF WOODLAND PARK, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 721 Walnut Street Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/26/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KAREN J RADAKOVICH Attorney Registration #11649 FRASCONA, JOINER, GOODMAN & GREENSTEIN, P.C. 4750 TABLE MESA DRIVE, BOULDER, COLORADO 80305 Phone: (303) 494-3000 Fax: Attorney file #: 7206-250 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0063 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0064 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 29, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: WENDY K. NEFF AND WAYNE A. NEFF Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATIONS SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Date of Deed of Trust: 8/22/2002 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 8/28/2002 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 538066 Original Principal Amount: $116,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $99,581.62 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. THE SURFACE ONLY OF: LOT 21A, (FKA LOTS 21 THRU 34), BLOCK 35, TOWN OF GOLDFIELD, ACCORDING TO THE ORIGINAL PLAT AND TO THAT VACATION RECORDED OCTOBER 8, 1992 IN BOOK 630 PAGE 169, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO. which has the address of: 1221 Victor Avenue Victor, CO 80860 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/30/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: JOAN OLSON Attorney Registration #28078 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9696.03287 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0064 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0065 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 30, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0065

Public Trustees

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 30, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: TODD W STILWELL AND LESLIE R STILWELL Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust: 9/10/2003 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 11/12/2004 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 573548 Original Principal Amount: $232,100.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $200,536.58 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 81, HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION FILING NO. 4, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 28 Beaver Lake Circle Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of November 20, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 7/30/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: ALISON L BERRY Attorney Registration #34531 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-05103 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0065 First Publication: 9/25/2013 Last Publication: 10/23/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Notice To Creditors Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Virginia K. Kraft, Deceased Case Number: 2012PR1118 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Teller County Probate Court, Colorado on or before January 27, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Randall Cable 521 Black Bear Trail Woodland Park, Colorado 80863 Legal Notice No.: 933874 First Publication: September 25, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice District Court, County of Teller, Colorado 101 W. Bennett Ave. Cripple Creek, CO 80813 719-689-2574 Plaintiff: LIBERTY SAVINGS BANK, F.S.B. Defendants: GREGG HOLDINGS, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company; GREGG HOLDINGS, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company d/b/a LAST DOLLAR INN; CHARLEY J. GREGG, an individual; KATHLEEN J. GREGG, an individual; JOHN F. WALSH IN HIS OFFICIAL CAPACITY AS U.S. ATTORNEY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLORADO; U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION; BOB CAMPBELL IN HIS OFFICIAL CAPACITY AS PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Attorneys For Plaintiff: Michael C. Bullock (#30988) Robert G. Graham (# 26809) Marcy Ongert (#38030) Foster, Graham Milstein & Calisher, LLP 360 S. Garfield Street, 6th Floor Denver, CO 80209 Phone: (303) 333-9810 Fax: (303) 333-9786 Email: mbullock@fostergraham.com bob@fostergraham.com mongert@fostergraham.com Case Number: 2012 CV 274 Division: 11 SHERIFF’S COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE, RIGHT TO CURE AND RIGHT TO REDEEM Under a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 12, 2013, in the above entitled action, I am ordered to sell certain real property as follows: Grantor (Borrower): Gregg Holdings, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company Original Beneficiary: Liberty Savings Bank, F.S.B. Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Liberty Savings Bank, F.S.B. Date of Deed of Trust: June 22, 2007 County of Recording: Teller Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 25, 2007

WHEREAS, fire danger ratings and re-

Under a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 12, 2013, in the above entitled action, I am ordered to sell certain real property as follows:

24 strictions need to be coordinated among

Grantor (Borrower): Gregg Holdings, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company Original Beneficiary: Liberty Savings Bank, F.S.B. Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Liberty Savings Bank, F.S.B. Date of Deed of Trust: June 22, 2007 County of Recording: Teller Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 25, 2007 Book and Page No. or Reception No. of Recorded Deed of Trust: 607890 Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $307,500.00 Outstanding Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt as of the date hereof: $267,017.87 Amount of Judgment entered March 12, 2013: $296,350.20 Description of property to be foreclosed: The surface only of Lots 28, 29 and 30, Block 10, Fremont (now Cripple Creek) County of Teller, State of Colorado a/k/a 315 E. Carr Ave. Cripple Creek, CO 80813

WHEREAS, objective criteria has been developed among cooperating counties, state and federal Forest Service and other wildland fire agencies; and

Misc. Private Legals

THE REAL PROPERTY TO BE SOLD WHICH IS THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS LITIGATION AND DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST DESCRIBED IN SAID JUDGMENT AND DECREE OF FORECLOSURE THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay monthly payments as required in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof and the legal holder of the indebtedness has accelerated the same and declared the same immediately due and payable. NOTICE OF SALE YOU ARE ADVISED that a public sale, pursuant to law, will be conducted by the undersigned at 10:00 A.M. o’clock on Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at Teller County Sheriff’s Office front steps, 11400 W. Hwy 24, Divide, CO 80814, whereat said real property and improvements thereon and all interest of said Grantor and the heirs and assigns of said Grantor therein will be sold to the highest bidder for cash for the purpose of paying the judgment amount entered herein, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 09/11/2013 Last Publication: 10/09/2013 Name of Publication: Pikes Peak Courier View NOTICE OF RIGHTS YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE ANY DEFAULT UNDER THE INSTRUMENT BEING FORECLOSED. A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE PURSUANT TO SECTION 38-38-104 C.R.S. MUST BE FILED AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED. IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED. A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM PURSUANT TO SECTION 38-38-302 C.R.S. MUST BE FILED NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE. The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the holder of the Deed of Trust being foreclosed is Foster, Graham, Milstein, & Calisher, LLP, 360 S. Garfield Street, 6th Floor, Denver, CO 80209 (303) 333-9810. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED at Divide, Teller County Colorado this 22nd day of August, 2013. Mike Ensminger Sheriff County of Teller By: Sheriff Legal Notice No.: 933841 First Publication: September 11, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Government Legals Public Notice CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF VICTOR, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 483 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE SALARY FOR THE CITY CLERK OF THE CITY OF VICTOR, COLORADO PASSED AND ORDERED PUBLISHED BY TITLE ONLY ON SECOND READING THIS 26th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2013 Byron L. Hakes, Mayor ATTEST: Sandy Honeycutt, City Clerk Legal Notice No.: 933885 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 2, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice ORDINANCE 02-2013 AN ORDINANCE RESTRICTING ALL OPEN FIRES AND OPEN BURNING WITHIN THE TOWN OF GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, COLORADO WHEREAS, open fires and open burning can be a prime cause of forest fires in The Town of Green Mountain Falls; and WHEREAS, the Green Mountain FallsChipita Park Fire Protection District Fire Chief (hereto referred to as Fire Chief), has advised the Board of Trustees that atmospheric conditions, including lack of moisture, and other local conditions create a high danger of forest fires in the Town of Green Mountain Falls, thereby making open fires and open burning within the Town of Green Mountain Falls hazardous; and WHEREAS, the Fire Chief, monitors fire weather conditions and fire danger ratings; and WHEREAS, fire danger ratings and restrictions need to be coordinated among the various wildland fire agencies within the County and surrounding Counties; and WHEREAS, objective criteria has been developed among cooperating counties, state and federal Forest Service and other wildland fire agencies; and WHEREAS, changing conditions require that fire restrictions need to be implemented and/or released in a timely manner;

the various wildland fire agencies within the County and surrounding Counties; and

Government Legals

WHEREAS, changing conditions require that fire restrictions need to be implemented and/or released in a timely manner; WHEREAS, the Colorado State Forest Service and the United States Forest Service have, at times, requested restrictions be placed on open burning in the Town of Green Mountain Falls; and WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees finds that competent evidence has been presented indicating that the danger of forest fires in the Town of Green Mountain Falls is periodically high, and therefore it is necessary to the preservation of the public health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the Town of Green Mountain Falls to impose a restriction on all open fires and open burning within the Town of Green Mountain Falls; and NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE TOWN OF GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS: THAT, the following sections will be added under Chapter 10, Article XV. SECTION I Sec. 10-325. Purpose. The purpose of this Ordinance is to preserve and protect the public health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the Town of Green Mountain Falls, Colorado, by restricting open fires and open burning in the Town of Green Mountain Falls in order to prevent forest fires given the high danger of such fires as a result of atmospheric conditions, including lack of moisture, and other local conditions. Sec. 10-326. Interpretation. This Ordinance shall be so interpreted and construed as to effectuate its general purpose to preserve and protect the public health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the Town of Green Mountain Falls, Colorado, by restricting open fires and open burning in order to prevent forest fires given the high danger of such fires in the area. Sec. 10-327. Definitions. (a) Open fire or open burning: For purposes of this Ordinance, open fires or open burning shall be defined as any outdoor fire, including, but not limited to, campfires, warming fires, cooking fires, charcoal grill fires, fires in outdoor wood burning appliances, the use of explosives, outdoor welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with open flame other than in an area cleared of all flammable materials, fireworks of all kinds or brands, and the prescribed burning of fence lines or rows, fields, farmlands, rangelands, wildlands, trash, and debris. (b) Fire Restriction Evaluation Guidelines: That set of evaluation criteria currently in use by local Federal, State and local fire suppression/management agencies for monitoring fuel moistures, fire danger class, current impacts on suppression resources, current fire cause types, fire weather forecasts, and other indicators of predicted fire danger. Sec. 10-328. Stage I Restrictions. Prohibits the following activities: 1. Open burning, excepting fires and campfires within permanently constructed fire grates in developed campgrounds and picnic grounds, charcoal grills and permanent outdoor fireplaces at private residences in areas cleared of all flammable materials. 2. The sale or use of fireworks; as defined in Sec. 10-291. 3. Outdoor smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials. 4. Launching of model rockets 5. Portable wood burning firepits or fire rings 6. Chimineas 7. Outdoor charcoal grills and permanent outdoor fireplace constructed with a spark arrestor on the chimney shall be allowed during Stage 1 Restrictions, provided they are at private residences and in an area cleared of all flammable materials including dry vegetation. Sec. 10-329. Stage II Restrictions. Prohibits the following activities: 1. All open burning as defined in Stage I. 2. Outdoor smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building. 3. Outdoor grilling with charcoal. Sec. 10-330. Unlawful Acts. During Stage I or Stage II Restrictions, it shall be unlawful for any person to build, maintain, attend or use an open fire, conduct an open burn, conduct sales of fireworks, or engage in outdoor smoking other than as explicitly allowed herein, in the Town of Green Mountain Falls including public, private, state, and applicable federal lands. Sec. 10-331. Requirements When and Where Outdoor Fires are Permitted. 1. the outdoor fires must be attended at all times. 2. attendees of an outdoor fire must have a suitable extinguisher nearby such as: a functioning garden hose, an extinguisher or dry chemical extinguisher. 3. an outdoor fire must be at least 20’ from structures, including all buildings. Sec. 10-332. Exceptions/Exemptions. (a) The following shall not be in violation: • Commercial or community fireworks displays properly permitted. • Fires contained within liquid-fueled or gas-fueled stoves. • Indoor fireplaces and wood-burning stoves installed and maintained in compliance with all applicable codes and ordinances. • Chainsaws with appropriate spark arrestors. • Outdoor charcoal grills and permanent outdoor fireplace constructed with a spark arrestor on the chimney shall be allowed during Stage 1 Restrictions, provided they are at private residences and in an area cleared of all flammable materials including dry vegetation. (b) The burning of irrigation ditches is prohibited by this Ordinance. (c) Any federal, state, or local officer, or member of a rescue or firefighting force organized, employed or contracted by a federal, state or local firefighting, military, or police protection service in the performance of an official duty. (d) Any further exemptions to either the meaning of terms or the enforcement of this Ordinance shall be granted only by the Fire Chief, and only if the proposed action is deemed to be safe and mitigable in the Fire Chief’s sole discretion based on best fire safety practices. Sec.10-333. Implementation of Stages. The Fire Chief or his or her designee may monitor fire danger conditions and coordinate with Federal, State and local fire agencies to determine the appropriate stage of restrictions. When the established Fire Restriction Evaluation Guidelines indicate that enforcement of this ordinance under Stage I Restrictions should be reinstated, or that restrictions should be upgraded to Stage II Restrictions, the Town of Green Mountain Falls’ Public Information

The Fire Chief or his or her designee may monitor fire danger conditions and coordinate with Federal, State and local fire agencies to determine the appropriate stage of restrictions. When the established Fire Restriction Evaluation Guidelines indicate that enforcement of this ordinance under Stage I Restrictions should be reinstated, or that restrictions should be upgraded to Stage II Restrictions, the Town of

Government Legals

Green Mountain Falls’ Public Information Officer or his or her designee shall coordinate with the Fire Chief and provide notification to the public through a general press release to local television, radios and print media, as well as posting at the Green Mountain Falls Town Hall. Likewise, when conditions indicate a reduction in restrictions from Stage II to Stage I, or the suspension of enforcement, the same notification to the public shall occur. Sec. 10-334. Enforcement Agencies/Prosecution. This Ordinance shall be enforced by the Green Mountain Falls Marshal, or his or her deputies, including thereby the administering agencies of the state and federal lands located therein, and they shall have authority to order any person to immediately cease any violation of this Ordinance. This authority shall include, but not be limited to, the right to issue a penalty assessment notice and the right to take such person or persons into temporary custody. Any further exception to the enforcement ability of this Ordinance by the administering agency shall be granted only by the administering agency, and only if the proposed action is deemed by the Fire Chief or the state or federal administering agency to be safe or mitigable. Sec. 10-335. Penalties. It is unlawful for any person to violate any of the provisions adopted in this Article. Violation of this Ordinance shall be a misdemeanor under Green Mountain Falls Municipal Code. The penalties for violation of this adopted code are as set forth in a resolution or subsequent modifications thereof. SECTION II: EFFECTIVE DATE THAT, this Ordinance placing a restriction on all open fires and open burning within the Town of Green Mountain Falls shall be effective immediately, and remain in effect until this Ordinance is amended by the Board, or enforcement is suspended at the direction of the Fire Chief or his designee. Likewise, the Fire Chief or his designee may also direct to reinstate enforcement of this Ordinance at any time after such enforcement has been suspended. Upon reinstating enforcement of this Ordinance, the Fire Chief or his designee shall specify the stage of restrictions in effect. SECTION III: SEVERABILITY THAT, if any section, subsection, clause, sentence or phrase of this Ordinance be declared illegal, void or unconstitutional, that the remainder of said ordinance shall be and remainder in full force and effect. SECTION IV: REPEAL OF CONFLICTING PROVISIONS THAT, any Town ordinances, resolutions, rules or regulations, or parts thereof, in conflict with this Ordinance are hereby repealed. BE IT FURTHER ORDAINED by the Board of Trustees of the Town of Green Mountain Falls, Colorado hereby finds, determines, and declares that this ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation and protection of the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the Town of Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. This ordinance shall therefore take effect upon adoption by the Board of Trustees and signature by the Mayor in accordance with State Statute. ADOPTED THIS 17TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2013 BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR THE TOWN OF GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, COLORADO. Lorrie Worthey, Mayor ATTEST: Chris Frandina, Town Clerk Legal Notice No.: 933886 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 2, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE City of Woodland Park The Woodland Park City Council will consider an amendment to the Woodland Park Municipal Code as described below on October 17, 2013. The meeting is held at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers located at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado: Ordinance No. 1195 on amending Chapters 20.02, 20.03, and 20.05 to the Flood Damage Prevention regulations of the Woodland Park Municipal Code. Please contact the Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5283 for more information. Legal Notice No.: 933888 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 9, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice WOODLAND PARK PLANNING COMMISSION WOODLAND PARK CITY HALL COUNCIL CHAMBERS 220 W. SOUTH AVENUE, WOODLAND PARK, CO REGULAR MEETING AGENDA OCTOBER 10, 2013 – 7:00 PM I. CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING Minutes of the regular meeting September 26, 2013 IV. REQUESTS AND/OR PUBLIC HEARINGS A. CASES CUP13-005, SUP13-001 and SPR13-003 Teller County Waste: Request for the City’s review and approval of a Conditional Use Permit, Special Use Permit and Site Plan Review for the purpose of operating a business to provide contractor services, vehicle repair and maintenance, and a recycling collection center located in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian, more specifically, 1000 and 1050 County Road 231 (West Street), Woodland Park, Colorado as requested by Jay Baker, owner of Teller County Waste. (QJ) V. REPORTS A. Chairman’s Report B. Planning Director’s Report VI. DISCUSSION AND COMMENT VII. ADJOURNMENT (A) Administrative Action QJ) Quasi-Judicial Action (L) Legislative Legal Notice No.: 933889 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 2, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice City of Woodland Park CITY COUNCIL AGENDA October 3, 2013 * 7:00 PM 1.

October 2, 2013 Public Notice Government Legals City of Woodland Park CITY COUNCIL AGENDA October 3, 2013 * 7:00 PM

1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 4. CEREMONIES, PRESENTATIONS & APPOINTMENTS: Miller A. Presentation by Debbie Miller, President of The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce. 5. ADDITIONS, DELETIONS OR CORRECTIONS TO AGENDA: (Public comment not necessary) 6. CONSENT CALENDAR: Public comment may be heard) Morse A. Approve minutes of September 19, 2013 Regular Meeting.(A) Morse B. Approve contract with Andersen Construction Company for the repair and replacement of the foundation at the UPHS Museum located at History Park. (A) 7. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: A. None. 8. ORDINANCES ON INITIAL POSTING: A. None 9. PUBLIC HEARINGS: (Public comment is appropriate) Morse A. Consider application from Gold Hill Theatres, LLC, located at 615 West Midland Avenue, Woodland Park, to grant a new Beer and Wine Liquor License. (QJ) Morse B. Consider application from LDL Limited, dba Wild Wings N Things located at 1079 US Highway 24, Woodland Park, for a transfer of a Hotel and Restaurant Liquor License effective October 17, 2013. (QJ) 10. NEW BUSINESS: Grina A. Request from Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Association to renew and extend the Utility Reimbursement Agreement between the Association and the City of Woodland Park, dated December 9, 2003 and direct staff to prepare a resolution to be presented at the October 17, 2013 City Council Meeting. (L) WAP Board B. Consider Resolution No. 761 as submitted by the Board of Directors of The Woodland Park Aquatic Project (WAP), concerning their proposed Aquatic Center Project. (A) Leclercq C. Consider proposal to streamline the process for City Liquor License renewals and for Special Event Liquor Licenses. (A) 11. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA. 12. REPORTS: Public comment not necessary) A. Mayor's Report. B. Council Reports. C. City Attorney's Report. D. City Manager's and Department Manager's Report. Fleer 1. DDA/Economic Development update. 13. COMMENTS ON WRITTEN CORRESPONDENCE: (Public comment not necessary) 14. ADJOURNMENT * * Per Resolution No. 90, Series 1982. (A) Administrative (QJ) Quasi-Judicial Action (L) Legislative Action Legal Notice No.: 933887 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 2, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REGULAR MEETING AGENDA Thursday, October 10, 2013 TELLER COUNTY CENTENNIAL BUILDING 112 North A Street, Cripple Creek, CO Commissioners' Meeting Room 1. 9:15 a.m. Convene in regular session - Invocation - Pledge of Allegiance - Minutes of Previous Meetings - Accounts Payable - Board Reports - Elected Official's Report - Administrator's Report 2. 9:25 a.m. Time reserved for Department Heads and Public without an appointment. 3. 9:35 a.m. Employee Service Awards 4. 9:40 a.m. Clerk & Recorder: Consider approval of a Hotel & Restaurant liquor license at 20918 Hwy 24, Woodland Park, CO dba Crystola Roadhouse. 5. 9:45 a.m. Pikes Peak Workforce Center: Consider approval of FY14 Master Agreement with Colorado Dept of Labor & Employment & El Paso & Teller Counties. 6. 9:50 a.m. Finance: Presentation of 2014 Proposed Budget. RECESS AS TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CONVENE AS TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 7. 10:00 a.m. Assessor: Consider authorization to approve valuation to settle BAA case number 62083, American Gaming Group, LLC for Lot 2 American Gaming Subdivision (R0054225), Tax Year 2013. RECESS AS TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION RECONVENE AS TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. Commissioners Business Items: Sheryl Decker, County Administrator Legal Matters: Chris Brandt, County Attorney Adjournment The implementation, modification, rescission, or amendment of a restriction on open burning in Teller County may be added to the Agenda of, and considered at, this meeting. If possible, an Amended Agenda adding that item will be posted, and placed on the Teller County website, at least 24 hours before the meeting. Appointments may vary by 15 minutes earlier or later than scheduled depending upon cancellations and time required for review and/or consideration of an agenda item. Legal Notice No.: 933890 First Publication: October 2, 2013 Last Publication: October 2, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

“Trust Us!” Without public notices, the government wouldn’t have to say anything else.

Public notices are a community’s window into the government. From zoning regulations to local budgets, governments have used local newspapers to inform citizens of its actions as an essential part of your right to know. You know where to look, when to look and what to look for to be involved as a citizen. Local newspapers provide you with the information you need to get involved.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!


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Pikes Peak Courier View 25

October 2, 2013

Lon Chaney lived in three homes in Colorado Springs as a youngster. This one was is located at 802 North Walnut St.

Lon Chaney was born in Colorado Springs. He lived in three homes in the city. This one at 509 West Bijou St., is the final home he lived with his family before heading off to join the vaudeville circuit.

‘Man of a thousand faces’ became legend The silent film icon was born and raised in Colorado Springs By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Of all the ghoulish Hollywood actors since the dawn of the movies, the greatest is still Colorado Springs’ own Lon Chaney. “The Man of a Thousand Faces’’ – as he was known – appeared in more than 160 silent films in a career that spanned nearly two decades to his death in 1930 at the age of 47. Chaney’s unique ability to transform into any one of the 1,000 fiendish characters has been well documented by Hollywood historians. But what are often overlooked are Chaney’s deep ties to Colorado Springs and the profound effect his family had in the Pikes Peak region. Chaney was born the second of four children. The Chaney family lived in three locations in Colorado Springs while he was growing up; 509 W. Bijou St., 738 N. Spruce St. and 802 N. Walnut St. All three houses are still standing and have been maintained. The silent film star was born Leonidas Frank Chaney on April 1, 1883. His parents, Frank and Emma, were deaf and mute. Chaney’s father was a barber whose clients included Gen. William Jackson Palmer and Winfield Scott Stratton. His mother was a teacher. Her father, Jonathan Ralston Kennedy, founded the Colorado School for the Education of Mutes in 1874. Today the school is known as the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind, 33 N. Institute St. in Colorado Springs, is located near the famous laboratory of Nikola Tesla. Chaney could hear and speak, but he learned to communicate with his parents and other children at the school through pantomime. When he was just 16 years old, he appeared in the play “The Last Tycoon” with his brother, John, at the Colorado Springs Opera House. Three years later, he was traveling the country on Vaudeville stages and before long, made his way to Hollywood to settle for good in 1910.

The Lon Chaney Theatre is located inside the Colorado Springs City Auditorium. Photos by Danny Summers

Chaney attended Lincoln Elementary School in Colorado Springs, but had to drop out in the fourth grade to become a caretaker when his mother became ill. He later worked a variety of jobs, including leading a mule train up Pikes Peak where worked on his mimicry skills on tourists, who encouraged the young Chaney to go into show business. At the age of 13, Chaney got a job working props at the Opera House. He later studied home repair at Brown’s Wall Paper and Paint Co. In 1899, after the Antlers Hotel burned down, Chaney took a job on the renovation crew as a carpet layer and wallpaper hanger. Chaney’s most famous Hollywood acting parts include that of Quasimodo in “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” and the title character in “Phantom of the Opera.” Those Metro Goldwyn Mayer films can be seen on Turner Classic Movies about once a year.

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Public Notice

from 50.0 feet to approximately 15.0 feet in the Agricultural (A-1) zone on the Bertie Lode Mineral Survey No. 14694 located within Sections 1/2, Township 16 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian, Teller County, CO (404 School House Hill View). IV. Consider an appeal of an Administrative Official’s determination that a Boundary Survey prepared by a State of Colorado Licensed Professional Land Surveyor is required as a submittal item for a proposed Variance application pursuant to Section 2.12.B.1. of the Teller County Land Use Regulations. V. Consider an appeal of a Planning Commission’s decision made on September 10, 2013 to deny the Conditional Use Permit application by the Colorado

District of the Church of the Nazarene for “Church” and “Group Meeting Facility” uses in the Agricultural (A-1) zone located on Parcel A within the East Half of the East Half of Section 34, Township 12 South, Range 70 West of the 6th Principal Meridian, Teller County, CO as described on the deed recorded at Reception No. 544934 (393 County Road 512). VII. Reports VIII. Other Items IX. Adjourn

TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT REGULAR MEETING AGENDA 7:00 p.m., Wednesday October 16, 2013 Council Chambers – City of Woodland Park Administration Building 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado I. Call to Order and Roll Call II. Review and Approve Minutes – May 7, 2013 III. Consider a request by Richard A. and Renee N. Ward (Property Owner) to vary the side setback for a proposed dwelling

Legal Notice No.: 933891 First Publication: October 3, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Chaney’s 17 films at MGM earned a combined box office gross of $16.2 million at a time when the average price of a movie ticket ranged from 25 to 75 cents. From film to film, Chaney appeared to transform himself with ease. He could not only morph his face, but his entire body would seem to change shape as he played characters with lost limbs or crippled spines. Chaney did all of his own makeup. By all accounts, Chaney kept his personal life private. He intentionally avoided the Hollywood social scene. He gave few interviews during his career, yet still managed to be a legend in his lifetime. When he died of lung cancer (he was a heavy smoker) in Los Angeles on Aug. 26, 1930, he made sure his three siblings – John, George and Carolin – were well taken care of financially. Chaney was revered as one of Holly-

wood’s greatest actors. Former actor-friend Wallace Berry said of Chaney; “Lon Chaney was the one man I knew who could walk with kings and not lose the common touch.” Chaney is buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, Calif. At the time of the Chaney’s death, he was in contract negotiations with MGM to play the lead role of “The Count” in 1931’s “Dracula.” That part, of course, went to Bela Lugosi who went on to become a Hollywood horror film icon in his own right. Chaney had one son, Creighton Tull Chaney, who was 24 at the time of his father’s death. After the senior Chaney died, Creighton gave up his job as a plumber and took up acting. In 1935, MGM persuaded him to change his name to Lon Chaney Jr. The younger Chaney lived up to the name, starring in a number of iconic horror films. His most famous role was that of a werewolf in 1941’s “The Wolf Man.” He also played “The Mummy,” “Frankenstein’s Monster” and “Count Alucard.” Lon Chaney Jr., died in 1973 at the age of 67. Both Chaneys were honored with a U.S. postage stamp in 1997, with senior as the phantom in “Phantom of the Opera” and junior as the Wolf Man. Lon Chaney Sr., was also honored with a U.S postage stamp in 1994. In 1986, the Colorado Springs Little Theatre was renamed The Lon Chaney Theatre. April is Lon Chaney Month in the city. Chaney was honored with a star on the famous Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1929, Chaney built an impressive stone cabin as a retreat in the remote wilderness of the eastern Sierra Nevada near Big Pine, Calif. The cabin is preserved by the Inyo National Forest Service. In the late 1950s, there was a resurgence of interest in Chaney. The legendary James Cagney starred in the biopic “Man of a Thousand Faces” in 1957. Since Chaney kept his private life private, there are no records of him returning to Colorado Springs after he left the city in the early 1900s.

BE Informed! Read the Legal Notices!


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26 Pikes Peak Courier View

October 2, 2013

The Briarhurst Manor Estate is home to many ghostly hauntings over the years. The castle was completed in 1889. Photo by Danny Summers

Briarhurst Manor scene of eerie sightings Manitou Springs castle is among area’s most haunted of houses By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com It seems only fitting that the world’s most popular coffin race – the upcoming Emma Crawford Coffin Race – takes place in Manitou Springs. It also seems appropriate that one of the state’s most storied haunted houses is also located in the quaint little town. The elegant Briarhurst Manor Estate, situated along Manitou Avenue, apparently is home to a number of ghostly spirits. These spirits, by all accounts, are as friendly as Casper. But before going into tales of ghoulish haunts and laughing children who go “boo” in the night, it is important to get a little background on Briarhurst Manor. The history of the Briarhurst is quite amazing. The current Briarhurst was built by Dr. William A. Bell in 1889 upon the ruins of his former residence, which burned three years earlier. Bell is known by many as the “Father of Manitou Springs,” which he founded in 1872. His luxurious Briarhurst Manor Estate is an elegant reminder of the Victorian Era. But what most people don’t know is that Bell was a key player in the early development of Woodland Park. Bell was already making waves in what would be Teller County several years before. Daniel Steffa platted his ranch in what would eventually be called Woodland Park. Dr. Bell’s Manitou Park was an area about 14 by four miles, located about eight miles north of Woodland Park. In 1870, Bell and Colorado Springs founder Gen. William

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Jackson Palmer purchased 26,000 acres from the government and developed the first area resort with a hotel built in 1873. Manitou Lake featured a nine-hole golf course, swimming pool, bowling alley and a horse race track. Today’s Manitou Lake still exists along Colorado 67, and remains a popular tourist destination. But it was in Manitou Springs where Bell left a lasting legacy in Colorado. Known as the “Saratoga of the West,” Manitou Springs combined summer social ritual with health renewal. Well-to-do travelers arrived by rail for the season, staying the whole summer in one of the turreted and many-gabled inns. Construction on the original Briarhurst Manor began in 1872. Bell left for England to marry a woman named Cara Scovell, who agreed to live with Bell in Colorado as long as her children were born in England. Under Mrs. Bell’s direction, Briarhurst Manor became the social center of the community – hosting the internationally famous people of the day. One winter night in 1886, while Bell was away on business, Mrs. Bell awoke to a bedroom filled with smoke. Burning embers escaped from a fireplace in Briarhurst. She woke the children and servants. The family escaped safely, but lost all of their belongings. They then went to England. They returned to Colorado in early 1887 to begin reconstruction of a second, more elaborate Briarhurst Manor, complete with schoolroom, conservatory, cloister and a library with a special alcove to display the “Mount of the Holy Cross painting,” which Mrs. Bell had saved during the fire. Today, five acres of the original Briarhurst Estate is a restaurant and event venue. The restaurant seats more than 400 guests and features fine dining. The Briarhurst has an almost magical quality from the moment one arrives in the parlor and catches a glimpse of its grand staircase. That is where, some say, children from days gone by have been seen running down the staircase chasing a ball, only to suddenly disappear. The Briarhurst’s ghostly guests have made an impression on visitors for decades. The master bedroom, for example, is one of the most active areas in the mansion for paranormal activity. Briarhurst guests have reported seeing small footprints leading out the door and down to the bedrooms where the Dr. and Mrs. Bell’s children slept. Other eyewitness accounts include hearing chimes in the upper floors or in the basement. Some visitors claim they have been bumped, touched or tugged at. Others have said they’ve heard strange noises and voices, experienced drops in temperature and music playing.

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The downstairs dining room is used as the restaurant today. Over the years, many patrons have reported seeing children – apparently those of the Bells – playing outside. Many diners claim to have seen a little redheaded girl in a bonnet amusing them while they eat. Others have said they’ve seen the ghost of Mrs. Bell and an unknown skeleton woman in white roaming the estate. Ken Healey, Briarhurst president, claims to have experienced many strange encounters, including disappearing wine bottles and glasses that seem to multiply when no one is around. Whether any of these accounts are real is probably up for the reader decide. The best way to find out is to head down the Ute Pass and have a look. But if a little redheaded girl in a bonnet tugs at your coat, you may not want to ask too many questions.

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Dr. William A. Bell is considered the founder of Manitou Springs. He built his second Briarhurst Manor Castle in 1889. It is considered one of the best haunted houses in Colorado. Courtesy photo

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Jesus’ “Sermon on the Mount” concludes with “everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rains came, the streams rose, and the wind blew and beat upon that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock” (Mt 7:24-25). We know all too well what flood waters can do, but do we know the One whose words provide a rock solid foundation in the storms of life? Why not seek Him through a study of His Word? Woodland Park Church of Christ 816 Browning Ave • 719-687-2323


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Pikes Peak Courier View 27

October 2, 2013

Busy funeral parlor hid terrifying secret Badly mangled miner’s spirit may haunt Dunn building By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com It is easy to dismiss the idea of a ghost or spirit in the light of day. Alone, under the stars or in the dim lighting of an ancient building, amid the night sounds of creaky floors, unknown varmints, sagging ceilings and the frightening history of a once violent 100-year-old mining camp, it can be an entirely different deal. Maybe it is that sudden unexplained draft in the room, or the feeling of not being alone, or the dog’s low growl and raised hair on her back. Or perhaps the fleeting image (at least you think you saw it) of young girl, dressed in the old-fashioned garb and saddest of looks, at the foot of the stairs - that convinces you to reconsider. The Dunn Building, at 213 Victor Ave., in Victor, has all the pre-described elements that might make such a statement. The building was once the prosperous business address of one Thomas F. Dunn, undertaker, who also lived with his wife in the upstairs apartments above the busy funeral parlor. By some accounts, Dunn was

an artist at patching up bodies that had been shot, stabbed, dynamited, buried in rubble, fallen from great heights, entangled in machinery, or otherwise twisted and torn in rigors of the gold camp mines, saloons and brothels. But death eventually catches up to us all, and Dunn passed from this world before the turn of the century. Mrs. Dunn, surviving her husband by many years, was left to cope. To do so, she converted the upstairs apartments into a boarding house and took on tenants. In the 1983 book “Ghost Tales of Cripple Creek,” by Chas Clifton, then owner of the Dunn building Skip Phillips is quoted, “I love my ghosts,” and said he has felt Mrs. Dunn’s presence and referred to her as his caretaker. “Not only does Mrs. Dunn manifest as the usual footsteps, Phillips said, but an earlier tenant is said to have seen a women dressed in black leaning over his bed upstairs in what had been one of Mrs. Dunn’s eleven rental rooms. The man also told Phillips of a ‘crying’ sound in the building all the time,” according to Clifton’s book. “Phillips tells how he and other persons have felt ‘watched’ in particular parts of the building, especially around the rear door,

and where the stairway comes up from the basement, a point he jocularly refers to as the ‘haunted stairwell.’ Several psychics have told him that ‘something really sad’ happened in an upstairs bedroom, others said that they could feel the concentrated essence of sorrow distilled from all the mourners who visited the undertaker decades ago.” But perhaps it had something to do with Thomas F. Dunn’s actions before his own death. That has become a legendary tale in the district. “For the longest time, people just assumed the spirits of those bitterly departed that once went in and out of the funeral parlor were responsible for the goings-on in the Dunn building. Until 1899, that is, when a man who had been one of Mr. Dunn’s assistants spoke up about a disturbing incident that took place in the funeral home in 1893,” wrote Dan Asfar in his 2006 book “Ghost Stories of Colorado.” “According to this man’s story, it happened while Dunn was working on the corpse of a miner who had been badly mutilated in a cave in. He had just begun preparing the miner for burial when the supposed cadaver suddenly twitched on the embalming table. A moment later, the badly bleeding body

came to tortured life; one of its hands darted out to grab the startled mortician while the other reached up to feel the remnants of its mangled face. It was an undertaker’s nightmare come true: the dead man at the table wasn’t quite dead yet,” writes Asfar. “The realization hit the mortician, his assistant and supposed-to-be dead miner with equal force. As Dunn took a few horrified steps backward, the man on the table let out a blood-curdling wail and tried to sit up. Although the miner did manage to get up, it quickly became obvious he didn’t know which way to go; he couldn’t see a thing through his one remaining eye.” According to legend, Dunn and his assistant administered morphine to quiet the man, and upon evaluation and consideration of what a doctor might be able to do for the man, more morphine was used to put him to his final rest. “Dunn himself administered the lethal injection and hardly waited at all before resuming his work on the miner. The young assistant couldn’t help noticing that the miner was still producing a faint pulse while he was being prepared for burial,” according to Asfar’s account. It is said that the badly mangled miner’s spirit haunts the Dunn Building to this day.

Ghosts that inhabitat the building Maggie, others haunt 300 E. Bennett By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com For years, Oscar Lampman took care of the dead in Cripple Creek. And it is a wonder more ghosts don’t hover around 300 E. Bennett, the one-time base of operation of the basement undertaker. Legend says it was here, in his funeral parlor, where Pearl DeVere’s sister – coming to collect Pearl’s body – noted the dyed auburn hair and discovered that her sister was no dressmaker but was employed as madam at the Old Homestead brothel. The high-minded sister turned tail and caught

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the first train back East. “Cripple Creek can bury its own dead,” editorialized The Cripple Creek Times then. Indeed, and let he – or she – who is without sin, cast the first stone. It was here that gold mining magnate Sam Strong’s body lay, with much of his hard head blown away from a shotgun blast. Countless other bodies, whose owners suffered the violent deaths of violent times, underwent embalming in the lower level of the building. Also for years, the Manhattan Barber Shop, with eight porcelain tubs for baths, occupied the first floor, and one would think some of the hanger-on, hang-around crowd would hang at such a popular place – even in an afterlife. But oddly enough, a comforting ghost

apparently haunts the premises of the old Fairley Bros. and Lampman Building. A lilted voice, singing high in the scales and steeped in the accent of the Emerald Isle, a faint wisp of rose-scented perfume, the clackety-clack of old manual typewriter, are offered as evidence of the presence of “Maggie.” Stories of Maggie have swirled at least since the 1960s. Noted Western artist Charles Frizzell, who ran an art gallery in the building then, and Katherine Hartz, who had the Sarsaparilla Saloon in the building beginning in 1968, and eventually purchased it, both related stories for Chas S. Clifton’s 1983 book, “Ghost Tales of Cripple Creek.” “That was during the good old hippie days and a lot of people coming through

town would be looking for a place to ‘crash’ for the night,” Frizzell is quoted in Clifton’s book. But when the Frizzell’s allowed visitors to stay in unused portions of the upper two floors, a ghostly commotion centered in what used to be a ballroom on the third floor, usually quickly drove away “crashers” before a second night. “At times, Frizzell says, mysterious blue lights danced down to the second floor, the living quarters. He and his wife tried to stop them by shutting the twin doors on the staircase, but someone else seemed to want that door open,” wrote Clifton. He quotes Frizzell: “We would tie them

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Morning { Sunday Bible Class 10 am { Service { Worship { 11am Wednesday Bible { Class 7pm { 816 Browning Ave. & Burdette Call: 687-2323 or 687-6311

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Maggie continues on Page 28

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A place of worship and prayer where people can come to escape their daily routine and enter into the presence of God. Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Free Wi-Fi 107 West Henrietta Ave. Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-7626 www.prayermountainco.com Experience His Presence Encounter His Power Expand His Kingdom

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Sunday Worship - 9:30 a.m 36 Edlowe Road • Woodland Park 719-687-9195

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Mountain View United Methodist Church 1101 Rampart Range Road Woodland Park (719) 687-3868

Sunday Worship 10:30 am www.mt-viewumc.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


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October 2, 2013

Photo by Rob Carrigan

A reAl ghost story

Swinging lanterns headless baggage, and other wrecks By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com The Maco Light is a relatively famous story about an 1867 Wilmington-Manchester train wreck in North Carolina and of one Charles “Joe” Baldwin, whose ghost, it is said, haunted that stretch of track until it was pulled up in 1977. According to the story, Joe, on shift as conductor for the railroad in the caboose, noticed a slowing of his car, only to discover that the caboose had become uncoupled with the rest of the train. Realizing that the slow-moving car posed a grave danger to the fast-moving train following directly behind, Joe grabbed his signal light, headed to the back rail of the platform and frantically tried to warn the engineer in the following locomotive. Witnesses to the accident reported that Joe stayed where he was, waving the lantern, to the bitter end. According to some versions of the story, just before the engine collided with the car, Joe’s lantern was hurled away and rolled over and over again, finally coming to rest in a perfectly upright position. Some versions of the tale say that the coach was completely demolished and Joe was killed, his head severed from his body, however, newspaper accounts have him dying days later in the hospital. Shortly after this horrible accident, the Maco light began to appear along the train tracks and continued to appear to hundreds of viewers over the years until the

tracks were pulled up in 1977 – although accounts say the light can still be seen on the abandoned rail bed with the most recently recorded sightings in 2009. Here in Colorado, on the Rio Grande Southern between Rico and Dolores, I have encountered several similar yarns. Mary Joy Martin, in her book “Something in the Wind: Spirits, Spooks & Sprites of the San Juan,” offers the following account. “The freighter, hauling a heavy load of timber and ore was flying down the track below Rico, heading to Durango. A brief stop was scheduled for Rio Lado, where a few section men were to disembark for their bunks at the section house. The train had just passed Milepost 70 and the Montelores passing track. Staring into the engulfing gloom of night, made all the blacker by the deep narrow valleys and canyons of the Dolores River, engineer Tom Quine concentrated on the track where the headlight beam reached. The sky was moonless and the black-robed seemed to close in tighter, their summits higher.” It was then, according to Martin’s account, that Quine first saw the light. “Far ahead a signal light appeared, like a pinpoint hovering from side to side above the track. Quine strained to see it. It was gone. He shrugged, gave it over to ‘tricks of the night.’ The sound of the train throbbed against the silent forests, the only sound beneath the moonless sky, a rhythmic, soothing tune to the engineer. He took a long draw on his pipe and relaxed, although keeping a vigilant eye on the track ahead. The light appeared again and Quine, to assure himself that he wasn’t seeing things, asked fireman Ed Slick to take a look. The

fireman saw nothing, Martin wrote. The signal light appeared and Quine whistled to get the brakeman to slow the train. “ … And suddenly the swinging lantern seemed to be only a short distance away. Yelling for Slick to come and see for himself, Quine and the crew brought the train to a steaming, squealing stop within yards of the signaler. The crew jumped out, running ahead of the engine to see who was signaling and why.” Nobody, with signal or otherwise, was discovered anywhere near, but a dangerous mound of rock, gravel and earth that had washed down from the steep canyons, covered the tracks just in front of them. The phantom signaler, it is said, probably saved the crew’s lives. “At the original, higher speed of the train, Tom Quine would have been unable see the muck in time, causing a wreck,” says Martin. Another RGS railroad story bearing some of the marks of the Maco Light incident was related by Dan Asfar in “Ghost Stories of Colorado.” Asfar describes a mysterious, heavily tattooed man who put his neck on the tracks in the Telluride Depot. “Nothing is known about the man’s motivation, but he had long been considered one of the town’s more idiosyncratic citizens. After the incident, his apparition was encountered several times by clerks watching over baggage cars out of Telluride. Low miserable moans coming from one of the baggage compartments alerted these clerks that something was amiss. It was just a matter of swinging open a single door and a baggage clerk would be traumatized for

Maggie Continued from Page 27

shut with a twisted coat hanger because we could not lock them. We could go downstairs in the gallery and know there was no one upstairs, but we’d come back and find the hangers untied and the doors open.” Hartz had an even more finite visit from Maggie. Also from Clifton’s book quoting Katherine Hartz: “I was walking down the hall on the second floor. As I walked, I heard sounds like someone was upstairs with high heels on, walking above me. I realized that in order to do so, whoever it was had to be walking through the walls upstairs.” According to the account, when she investigated, she encountered a woman in her late 20’s or early 30’s, tall, good-looking brunette, with her hair in a “Gibson Girl” roll, wearing a white shirtwaist, ankle-length dark brown

life. For there, standing on the other side of the door, was the headless man, his arms and torso bedecked in tattoos of women and religious icons from myriad faiths, holding his own bleeding head aloft with an outstretched arm.” And one fairly recent account of a documented accident sounds eerily similar to the Maco Light yarn, without the disastrous effects and resultant hauntings. In the Dolores Star dated Sept. 29, 1950, Hartley Lee writes about it in his Hart’s Stuff from Rico column. “Friday sure was a bad day for old Puffin’ Jennie when 445 and caboose was rocking along a half mile this side of the high bridge, when the tender jumped the track and went over the hill, was a darn good thing that the coupling unhooked from the outfit or the caboose would have gone with it. Talk about a mess, they really had one, but the most disastrous part of the whole event was when conductor Phillips who was cooking his supper lost his spuds, says they were scattered all over the floor and under the bunks, while the coffee pot went rolling out the door. Due to the fact that the tender was so far over the hill, it was decided to push it on over and let it land on the highway below. Then they had Roy with the county cat to pull it back to the crossing where it was put on the rails again. Now if that wasn’t honey of a deal seeing that tender down on the road behind a cat. You know if a guy was smart, he could write a book about the old RGS and it would be the best seller in the country.” Maybe so. And it might be as famous, well known and imitated as the Maco Light yarn.

print skirt and high-heeled boots. Later, in the 1970s, having trouble with small unexpected electric bills and reports form police and nearby shop owners of late night lighting of the upstairs rooms, the Hartz expected to find evidence of squatters, but found instead, the building locked and undisturbed with electricity turned off at the fuse box. But even after the advent of gaming and the building’s conversion to Colorado Grande Casino, the sightings have continued. “Some have reported that singing and dancing is sometimes heard emanating from the old ballroom, as well as the sounds of Maggie’s lilting soprano voice heard singing an Irish accented concertina,” reports “Legends of America Newsletter” owner and editor Kathy Weiser. “At the casino, security guards have often reported seeing Maggie along with a gentleman friend playing the slot machines after hours. She has also been caught on tape by the security cameras. However, after being viewed

and stowed away, the tapes mysteri-The Pa ously vanished,” reports Weiser. Today, a café named in honor of Maggie resides in the building along with the casino. Over the many years, tenants in the building in addition to those previously mentioned – included The Central Drug Store on the northwest corner of the first floor. The upstairs on the second floor was occupied mostly by professionals with five attorneys and four doctors leasing space in 1902 and 1903. “On the third floor, B.P.O.E. 316 – a very influential organization in the city – had their meeting hall (the location of the ballroom.) The Elks were pleased to lease this space, but they were looking for a permanent home. They found this in 1911 when the Elks purchased The Gold Mining Exchange Building,” according to “Cripple Creek: City of Influence,” a 1994 book by Brian Levine. Perhaps Maggie, and other ghostly friends never noticed the party had relocated.


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October 2, 2013

Woodland Park’s softball team will be playing in the Class 4A regionals. Photos by Danny Summers

WOODLAND PARK SPORTS SPECIAL ATHLETICS SCHEDULE WOODLAND PARK ATHLETICS SCHEDULE 9/25 THROUGH 10/1 9/25 Golf: Varsity - 1:00pm @ Kissing Camels CC Softball-JV - 4:00pm @ Coronado 9/26 Softball-Varsity 4:00pm vs. Widefield @ HOME (Last Home Game) Soccer - Varsity 4:00pm @ Widefield

Volleyball - C/JV/Varsity - 4:00 pm @ Widefield Softball - C Team 4:15pm @ Palmer High School Football - Varsity - 7pm vs. Pueblo Central @ Dutch Clark Stadium 9/27 Softball JV - 4:00pm @ Mesa Ridge High School 9/28

Cross Country - 9:30am @ Castle View High School Football - C Team - 10:00 am @ Pueblo Central High School Softball C Team - 10 am @ Fountain Fort Carson High School (Double Header) 9/30 Softball: JV Game 4:00 pm 10/1 Golf - State Championships

Volleyball C/JV/Varsity - 4:00 pm vs.Mesa Ridge @ HOME Soccer Varsity - 6:00 pm vs. Mesa Ridge @ HOME Softball Varsity - 4:00 pm @ Mesa Ridge 10/2 Softball C Team 3:00pm @ Widefield (Double Header)

The Pioneers’ volleyball team will take its high-octane game to the court this week.

CRIPPLE CREEK SPORTS SPECIAL ATHLETICS SCHEDULE

The Panthers’ cross country team is having a banner season.

Cadets help out with Waldo Canyon Burn Scar project On Sept. 22, more than 160 Air Force Academy cadets, faculty and staff spent several hours moving 700 bales of wood straw in a human bucket brigade as part of the Waldo Canyon Burn Scar project around the Rampart Reservoir. This was done on three separate sites. On Sept. 26, another team of volunteers spread the wood straw and seed to mulch three test areas to slow erosion of sediment and ash, into drainage areas that lead to Colorado

Springs Utilities’ water treatment plant. At right, Cadet 4th Class Ryan Douglas (front to camera) helps out with the Waldo Canyon burn scar effort on Sept. 22. The team of 163 Air Force Academy cadets, faculty and staff spent several hours moving 700 bales of wood straw in a human bucket brigade, to three separate sites around the Rampart Reservoir. Photo by John Van Winkle

CRIPPLE CREEK-VICTOR ATHLETICS SCHEDULE 9/25 THROUGH 10/1 9/26 Volleyball - Varsity - 6:00 pm vs. Custer

County @ HOME 9/28 Football - Varsity - 1:00 pm vs. Fowler @ HOME


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30 Pikes Peak Courier View October 2, 2013

P th Woodland Park senior shortstop Kelee Suggs applies a tag during the Panthers’ 11-5 victory over Widefield on Sept. 26. Suggs leads the state in home runs with 10. Photos by Danny Summers

Comer’s two homers, five RBIs, lead WP to championship Panthers pound Widefield, 11-5, to win Metro League softball title By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Lexie Comer’s had the biggest game of her career in Woodland Park’s most important softball game in more than a decade. The junior had four hits, including a pair of towering home runs, and drove in five runs to lead the Panthers to an 11-5 victory over long-time rival Widefield on Sept. 26. The victory at Woodland Park Middle School clinched the Class 4A Metro League championship for the Panthers; their first since 1999. “I was just feeling it today,” said Comer, who hammered a solo homer in the bottom of the fifth inning and three-run blast in the sixth. “It feels good.” The victory improved Woodland Park to 8-0 in league, 14-3 overall, as it prepares for the upcoming regionals Oct. 12. Woodland Park coach Dale Huntington was almost at a loss for words after the game. “If we look at where we were at in April, I would say `Oh my gosh, we have a lot of work to do,’” Huntington said. “But these girls are the ones who put all the work into it. I am just so proud of them. “I am just so proud of the whole Woodland Park organization. They are doing it from top to bottom; the varsity to the junior varsity squad and the C squad. They’re all winning. That’s what we need as a program.” Comer improved her home run total to seven, which ranks second in the state among all classifications. She credited her father (Timm Comer) and Chris Burr - both Woodland Park assistant coaches - with helping her to develop her lethal swing.

Woodland Park players and coaches gather before the top of the seventh inning during the Panthers’ Sept. 26 game against Widefield. Woodland Park won the game 11-5 to claim the Class 4A Metro League championship. “I really wanted to go home to my family in South Dakota for a week one year,” she said. “That whole week my dad took me out for hours of hitting. Hitting here. Hitting at home. Obviously, it paid off. “For about three years coach Burr has been helping me with my batting and my mental game. He was so helpful because if I got into a slump he always had faith in me and helped me work it out.” As impressive as Comer’s performance was, it took the entire Woodland Park team to clinch the victory. Senior right-hander Mallorie Trichell battled a sinus infection and fatigue - including a visit to the doctor the morning of the game – to pitch a complete-game ninehitter. She struck out one and walked two. “The adrenalin got me going,” said Trichell, who was 1 for 4 at the plate. “I have just so much emotion right now.” Trichell said she gained confidence af-

ter her teammates staked her to a tree-run lead in the bottom of the first. “It’s so much easier pitching with a lead,” she said. “When we’re down I almost try too hard, but I know they have my back every time.” Senior Kelee Suggs played a splendid shortstop and used her rifle arm to keep Widefield hitters and base runners in check. Suggs, the state’s home run leader with 10, was 1 for 4 with a pair of runs. After the game she hinted that she may have to go back to swinging for the fence to put some distance between herself and Comer. “It puts me on my toes,” Comer said with a smile. “She’s coming after me.” Other offensive stars included Brenna Peters (2 for 4 with three RBIs), Cheyenne Wilcox (3 for 4) and Morgan Suggs (2 for 4). Center fielder Chrissy Cunningham showed time and again why base runners

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Woodland Park junior Lexie Comer connects for a threerun home run Sept. 26 against Widefield. It was Comer’s second blast of the game. She led Woodland Park to an 11-5 victory over Widefield as the Panthers claimed the Class 4A Metro League championship. should think twice before trying to take an extra base on her. She threw one girl out at second base and nearly ended the game on a bullet throw to catcher Natalie Diviney. The game was a community event. Earlier in the week Woodland Park mayor Dave Turley declared Sept. 26 “Woodland Park Softball Day.” He sat behind home plate in his folding chair and watched the action from beginning to end. Also present was Woodland Park School District Re-2 superintendent Jed Bowman and Woodland Park baseball coach Cliff Richardson. Not only was it the final regular season home game of the season for the Panthers, it was “Senior Day” for Suggs, Trichell, Diviney, Wilcox and Rebecca Roulette.


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October 2, 2013

Woodland Park middle blocker Kelsey Black goes up for a block against Sierra in a match played on Sept. 24. Woodland Park won 3-0. Photos by Paul Magnuson

Panthers spiking, digging their way to solid season Woodland Park volleyball team has won five straight matches By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com If you haven’t noticed lately, the Woodland Park High School volleyball team is enjoying a pretty good season. Especially in the Class 4A Metro League. The Panthers have pounced on league opponents, winning nine consecutive sets on their way to 3-0 league mark. Woodland Park has won five consecutive matches overall after starting the season 1-5. “We’re starting to come together more as a team and we’re finding our skills that we have deep down,” said Woodland Park senior outside hitter Carli Vahsholtz. “In preseason we weren’t sure of each other, but now we’re all playing together.” Vahsholtz leads the club in several categories, including kills (114) and kills percentage (41 percent). Senior Alexa Garrick, the team’s other outside hitter, has 44 kills, while junior right

side hitter Maureen Cummings has 48 kills. Woodland Park is getting strong efforts from lots of other players including senior setter Paloma Juarros (212 assists, 50 digs, 23 service aces), senior libero Linnea Sauer (127 digs, 32 service aces), junior middle blocker Kelsey Black (19 kills), junior defensive specialist Katie Stunkard (42 digs) and junior defensive specialist Kaitlyn Smith (39 digs). “We have a really strong team when we all play together,” Vahsholtz said. “If we stay focused we can continue to have success.” Woodland Park’s win streak started with a three-set victory over Vista PEAK Prep on Sept. 11 in Aurora. But the Panthers were unable to return home that night due to flooding in the Ute Pass. They were turned away and were forced to spend the night in a Manitou Springs motel. The Panthers upped their winning streak to two on Sept. 16 with a grueling five-set victory over Discovery Canyon (25-11, 16-25, 21-25, 25-19 and 15-13). “We knew we had to fight for it (against Discovery Canyon),” Vahsholtz said.

Woodland Park has had relatively no trouble in league with straight-set victories over Harrison, Sierra and Widefield. The Panthers played Mesa Ridge on Oct. 1, but results of that game were not available at press time. Woodland Park is at Mitchell on Thursday, and then it closes out league play next Tuesday (Oct. 8) at home against Coronado. “Our goal is to win league and put a banner up on the wall,” Vahsholtz said. “It’s been a while.” Woodland Park has not won a league title since 1992. State-powerhouses Lewis-Palmer and Cheyenne Mountain were in the league up until last season; making life difficult for the Panthers. “We just need to play well,’ said Woodland Park coach Stacy Roshek. “We have the potential to win league if we all play well at the same time.” The top 32 teams in state advance to the regionals. Woodland Park is currently ranked 31st. “We still have a lot of volleyball to play,” Roshek said. “Anything can happen.” The Panthers will play a total of 23 matches this season.

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Woodland Park setter Paloma Juaros sets up a play for the Panthers during their Sept. 24 match against Sierra. Woodland Park is 3-0 in the Class 4A Metro League.

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October 2, 2013

Panthers lose at Pueblo Central, 52-20 Woodland Park football team is 3-2 heading heading into homecoming game By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The Woodland Park High School football team had its modest two-game winning streak snapped Sept. 26 with a 52-20 loss to previously winless Pueblo Central, 52-20, at Dutch Clark Stadium. “It wasn’t pretty,” said Panthers coach Joe Roskam. “It was ugly. We didn’t play well at all. I don’t know why. We didn’t play our style of football.” The Panthers hung close early, trailing 13-12 early in the second quarter after sophomore wide receiver Joey Ereon got wide open and scored on a 71-yard touch-

down pass from Cecil (formerly Matt) Cox. It was Ereon’s second long touchdown of the game. He had an 80-yarder in the first quarter off of a bubble screen. Pueblo Central took a 20-13 lead into halftime and scored two quick touchdowns in the third quarter to go up 34-12 and break the game wide open. “We couldn’t stop `em,” Roskam said. “They threw like 11 screen passes and completed `em all. “It was more of a situation of us not executing. We couldn’t defend `em for anything.” Outside of his two long completions to Ereon. Cox was kept in check. He finished 4 of 12 for 169 yards and an interception. Woodland Park’s lethal running attack was nearly non-existent. The Panthers gained just 92 yards on 27 attempts. They entered the contest having averaged more

than 330 yards per game on the ground. Woodland Park (3-2) hopes to get back in the winning column this Friday against The Academy (2-3). It is the Panthers’ homecoming game. “We need to get back to playing our style of football,” Roskam said. “If we play our game we should be good.” When Woodland Park has been most effective this season it has run the ball often and for big yardage. He Academy is coming off a 32-29 victory over Pinnacle in which it allowed Pinnacle 130 yards on the ground. The Academy is led by senior quarterback Joey Ray, who has thrown for 145 yards and two touchdowns and rushed for a team-high 297 yards and two scores. Ray had 148 yards rushing against Pinnacle. “Every game is important for us,” Roskam said. “Losing that game against Pueblo Central means that we have to win `em all

to get into the playoffs.” The playoffs, however, are not the main focus for Roskam and his crew. “We just need to play one game at a time and see where they fall at the end of the year,” he said. “The playoffs are the farthest thing from my mind. “Last week a lot of people were talking playoffs, playoffs, playoffs. Then we went out there and laid a goose egg.” The Panthers open Class 3 South Central Conference play Oct. 12 at Mitchell. The league is down to just five teams with the closing of Wasson last spring. That means that each of the four league games is even more critical than in years past. Discovery Canyon and Coronado are a combined 11-1, while Lewis-Palmer and Mitchell are a combined 3-9.

Recreation Report for Woodland Park Woodland Park Parks & Recreation offers the following programs and sports. Sign up at least a week prior to session starting. Classes may be canceled because of lack of participants. Call 719-687-5225, stop by the office at 204 W. South Ave. or visit www.citywoodlandpark.org.

Guide now available

Look for the October 2013-March 2014 parks and recreation guide, which is out now. The guide offers many youth/adult sports programs and classes for all ages. Don’t miss the opportunity to sign up for a favorite program or sport.

Oct. 4, Oct. 21

Preschool basketball The Start Smart Development Program is a proven instructional program that prepares young children ages 3 to 6 years old for the world of organized sports without the threat of competition or the fear of getting hurt. Parents work together with their children in a supportive environment to learn all of the basic skills. Program takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and from 9 to 10 a.m. Saturdays, Oct. 22, 26, 29, Nov. 2, 5, 9. Register by Friday, Oct. 4; mandatory parent meeting (no children) is at 7 p.m. on Oct. 21.

Ongoing

Dynamic Training & Fitness Patrick Muir is the Total Health Coordinator and Head Trainer at Dynamic Training & Fitness in Woodland Park. Patrick received a Bachelor’s degree in Sports and Health Science with a concentration in Sports Medicine. He has been a certified trainer since 1980 (NASM). He has trained many professional athletes from NFL to NHL in Arizona and New York. He has over 20 years of experience and knowledge in the field of youth coaching and training, as well as being an athlete himself. Patrick returned to Woodland Park with the desire to give the community a new experience in fitness training. Opening their doors in May 2013, Patrick, his business partners and fitness team at Dynamic Training & Fitness offer you a high energy atmosphere that is community oriented and affordable for everyone. His training style is a combination of training techniques that he’s taught over the years - from fad workouts to professional athletic style strength training. He incorporates several of these methods to help the individual client meet his/ her goals as quickly and safely as possible. People of all ages and fitness levels are welcome at the gym and the training is tailored to their personal goals. For some, it’s a matter of wanting to do everyday activities with less pain and with a much easier application - from taking groceries out of the car to reaching for that 5lb bag of flour off the top shelf in the kitchen cabinet. Patrick’s philosophy is to make sure that every person who enters the facility is successful in attaining their individual goals. Patrick Muir, Trainer works with a client in Dynamic’s outdoor fitness area.

Come see Patrick and the whole health fitness family at Dynamic Training and Fitness to meet your unique individual goals. 1 free week Receive

· Natural juice bar and supplement center ONE FREE WEEK’S · 5,000 sq ft training/fitness · The only club in Woodland Park with ropes MEMBERSHIP Must bring in coupon · Astroturf training area · Outdoor training area · Adult & children’s fitness camps · Sport performance training for all ages · Over 100 years of combined industry experience Tamarac Business Center 800 Research Drive, Ste. 250 Woodland Park, CO 80863

719-687-1414

Adult drop-in volleyball is from 4 to 6 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 1 in the main gym at Woodland Park Middle School. The cost is $5 per person, per night. Adult drop-in basketball is from 8 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays through Feb. 11 in the north gym at Woodland Park High School. The cost is $5 per person, per night. Swim lessons American Red Cross offers its Learn to Swim program for children ages 6 months to 18 years. Descriptions of the classes are listed on the city website. Bring a swimsuit and towel. Lessons will take place at Golden Bell Camp. Youth tennis The beginner-level class is for new tennis players with little to no experience, and the intermediate class is for students who have some tennis experience and would like to improve their skills. Descriptions of the classes are listed in the Parks and Recreation Guide, as well as on the website. Classes take place Mondays and Wednesdays at the Gateway Elementary gym and are open for ages 6 years and older. Beginners play from 5 to 6 p.m. and intermediates play from 6 to 7 p.m. Mat Pilates works to improve core strength and flexibility. Learn to move efficiently reducing risk of injuries, while participating in other sports and activities. Learn the pilates principles and how to apply them to your daily routines. All levels are welcome. Classes are from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Parks and Recreation classroom. Cost is $64 per session or $10 for drop-in. Class dates are Oct. 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22 and 24. Anusara Yoga is a style of Hatha yoga blending together physical and strengthening through various poses while focusing on breath. The poses build core strength and

toned muscles with emphasis on proper body alignment. The attention to breath will reduce stress and promote relaxation. All students will be welcomed and encouraged to practice at the level appropriate for their experience and energy level that day. Classes are from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays in the Parks and Recreation classroom. Class dates are Oct. 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30. Body sculpt Jane Enger leads the body sculpt class from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in the Parks and Recreation classroom. All fitness levels welcome. Cost is $60 per session, $8 for drop-in, or a fitness punch card. Namaste yoga Jody Ajimura-Kessler leads namaste yoga from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Mondays in the Parks and Recreation classroom. The cost is $21 per session (three classes) or $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card. Yoga for stress relief Nancy Stannard leads yoga for stress relief from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the Parks and Recreation classroom. The cost is $28 per session (four classes), $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card. Lunch-time Zumba Alison Grimm leads lunch-time Zumba class from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Parks and Recreation classroom. The cost is $8 drop in, or fitness punch card. Zumba Sharron Johnson leads Zumba class from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Mondays. This class is at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in the main room, 210 E. Midland Ave. The cost is $8 per class, or fitness punch card. Zumba Gold Zumba Gold is specifically designed to take the exciting Latin and international dance rhythms of the original Zumba program and bring them to older or less-active adults. Sharron Johnson leads Zumba Gold Fitness from 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesdays. Next session starts April 2. This class is held at the Parks and Recreation classroom. Cost is $8 per class, or fitness punch card. Tae kwon do, children and adults Leeann Loss leads tae kwon do classes for ages 5 years and older on Tuesdays and Thursday in the Parks and Recreation classroom. Times are 4:15 to 5 p.m. for Little Lions (5 to 6 yrs); 5 to 6 p.m. for intermediate; 6 to 7 p.m. for beginners; and 7 to 8 p.m. for adults. The cost is $70 per session and $40 for additional family members per session. A uniform fee of $30 is paid to the instructor.

Recreation Report for Cripple Creek For hours for Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation, call 719-689-3514.

Ongoing

Kido 4 Kids is every Monday and Wednesday from 5 to 6 p.m. Kido is a selfdefense focused martial arts system for children ages 7 to 13. The cost is $25 a month for unlimited classes.

Aikido is every Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Aikido is a Japanese Martial Art. Adults are taught technically pure martial arts. The cost is $30 a month for unlimited classes. Open ZUMBA meets Monday through Thursday from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Lose those extra pounds with an energetic dance. Free to all fitness member types.


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